Newsletter

Weekly Communique: What Kind of Peace Do We Bring to the World?

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

August 16, 2019

MISA at Newman Center THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon will celebrate Sunday mass at the Newman Center August 18 at 9 am, corner of 10th and San Carlos.
NO MISA on August 25 and September 1.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman este domingo!
Habra la misa de Grupo el 18 de agosto a las 9 am
en la capilla de la Universidad SJSU
en la esquina de Calle 10 y S Carlos.
NO MISA 25 de agosto y 1 de septiembre.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

At the County Building with the Jewish community celebrating Tisha B’Av, a Jewish religious holiday commemorating the destruction of the First and Second Temples and the sufferings inflicted upon God’s people by injustice and social sin. Rabbis and inter-faith clergy shared in the prayer calling attention to the concentration camps, racism and El Paso shootings.

Gospel Reflection:
What Kind of Peace Do We Bring to the World?

Last week we read Lk 12:32-48, in which Jesus-as-the Christ broke through the Gentile mindset fixated on a caste system of levels of privilege. Jesus’ social critique was rooted in Jewish social ethics in which all people are charged with the responsibility to care for one another without regard to one’s socio-economic status. We explored the social difficulty Gentile had in letting go of privilege in order to embrace all persons regardless of race, social status, and gender.

Today’s gospel passage underscores the difficult choices that discipleship demands: you have to make a choice.  Do we baptize the Empire and its culture of privilege or do we renounce the Empire? Luke’s gospel does not provide a mix and match or buffet option of take what you like and leave what you do not like. The foundational condition of being a disciple of Jesus-as-the Christ is to make the hard decision whether your raison d’être is to maintain your status quo with a few minor adjustments in your life or to give your whole self to God.

In Judaism conversion to become a Jew was not a casual thing. One had to discuss the intent to convert with a rabbi. With the rabbi the potential convert would have to undergo rigorous instruction on Jewish life, beliefs, history, liturgy, learn Hebrew (for the prayers) become involved in the community and accept the divinity of the Torah. The convert would have to agree to observe all 613 mitzvot (commandments), life fully a Jewish life, undergo circumcision (if male) be immersed in a mikveh (baptism) and appear before at Bet Din (a religious court) for approval of the conversion. The conversion process was not a matter of taking classes, but of becoming a disciple of a particular rabbi in a particular community.

As we know, members of Luke’s community were not Jews and thus they may not have been made aware of the strenuous process needed to become a Jew.  The controversy of whether Gentiles should become Jews before becoming Christians was resolved in the Christian Council of Jerusalem about 15 years prior to Luke’s narrative, thus Gentiles could convert directly to become disciples in the lineage of Jesus. But this did not mean that conversion to Christianity was easier than converting to Judaism. The literary evidence in Luke’s gospel suggests that the process of becoming a disciple of Jesus-as-the Christ post Resurrection, was similar in rigor as one would undergo in becoming a Jew. Like potential Jewish converts, Christian converts had to be clear about their intent on being baptized and they had to participate in community life as a part of their conversion process. Note that Lk 12:50 references baptism and thus, baptism was not merely signaling a theological conversion or denominational change, but that baptism signaled a commitment to help usher in the kingdom of God. “There is a baptism with which I must be baptized, and how great is my anguish until it is accomplished!”

The Christian testament includes letters to the Christian communities that were directed mostly to Gentile converts to Christianity who were mostly from the slave and servant classes, (but also included freed persons and smaller number of people of means). These letters served as reminders that once baptized, all the baptized were obligated to care for one another, especially the most vulnerable among them.  Since most of those letters predated Luke’s gospel and that the letters began to be circulated throughout the region, it would not be unreasonable to believe that Luke’s community had a minimum understanding of the importance of equality and mutual care that transcended mere blood ties, but was extended to anyone in need.  The Empire did not specifically discourage caring for the poor and vulnerable, but it was clear that caring for the poor was a laudable thing, but not an ethical demand as it was in Judaism and the emerging Christian religion.

The kingdom of God: economic equality, radical inclusion of all people, and special care for the most vulnerable who are not related by blood, does more than disrupt the Empire, it sets it on fire! (c.f., “I have come to set the earth on fire, and how I wish it were already blazing!” Lk 12: 49) In short, today’s passage is a statement of the consequence of choosing God over the Empire: Division! More than merely disrupting the Empire, Jesus-as-the Christ annihilates the Empire by dismantling the Empire’s social system, beginning with paterfamilias, the social pecking order of the Roman family, (c.f., “From now on a household of five will be divided, three against two and two against three…” Lk 12:52, ff).

The reflection is based on the socio-historical location of Luke’s narrative, but given that we are living in the midst of an Empire, might we take this time to consider the level of commitment demanded of us in the same way that disciples had to consider in the time of Luke? What was our level of commitment to the well-being of others, particularly the poor, when we were baptized? If that commitment was made for us by parents and godparents, was there any time in our life when we made an adult decision to choose the kingdom of God over the Empire?

Weekly Intercessions
A recent article published in USA Today (USA Today republished the original article, “For Latinos, Fear in America becomes real, powerful,” by Thomas Hawthorne, The Republic, AzCentral.Com)  said that the “fear among Latino people is palpable…” after the El Paso shooting. The article said that the shooting was a turning point that “…peeled back the hate behind words they’ve tried to ignore. It has sliced open the racism many grew up learning to navigate.” A newly issued report on racism from Grupo Solidaridad shows that the weaponization of racism, when left unopposed, will merely increase in intensity and cause greater harm to the Latinx community. History has shown that racism has been used in many different cultures as a way to lift up one group above others or to place a social pecking order which valued the lives of those who found themselves categorized at the top of the order over those who found themselves at the bottom of the list. Preferences based on race physical characteristics were discussed in ancient Greece and Rome. In the late 19th and early 20th century the Eugenics Movement had great sway over England and the US. Supporter included Alexander Graham Bell, Stanford President David Starr Jordan and Luther Burbank!  An English scholar, Sir Francis Galton systematized the ideas of racial and physical preference and, after reading Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species, he proposed that societies should refrain from protecting the vulnerable and the weak so societies can improve. He believed that the less intelligent were more fertile and had more children. He encouraged a change in social mores that would encourage more “acceptable” people to procreate. Eugenics rationalized restrictive immigration policies barring non-white immigration in the 1800’s until the 1960’s and when the Nazis were placed on trial after WWII, many war criminals justified the Nazi racial and purification laws were inspired by policies of the United States! Sadly racism is embedded in science, public policy and politics and when unchecked, racism has and will escalate to genocide. Let us pray for the courageous civil rights activists who work to dismantle the infamous legacy of racism in the US and abroad. Let us also pray for our sisters and brothers who feel the sting of racial animus every day.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 
¿Qué tipo de paz traemos al mundo?

La semana pasada leímos Lc 12, 32-48, en el cual Jesús como el Cristo rompió la mentalidad gentil fijada en un sistema de castas de niveles de privilegio. La crítica social de Jesús se basó en la ética social judía en la que todas las personas tienen la responsabilidad de cuidarse unos a otros sin tener en cuenta el estado socioeconómico de uno. Exploramos la dificultad social que Gentile tuvo al dejar ir el privilegio para abrazar a todas las personas independientemente de su raza, estatus social y género.

El pasaje del Evangelio de hoy subraya las decisiones difíciles que exige el discipulado: tienes que tomar una decisión. ¿Bautizamos el Imperio y su cultura de privilegio o renunciamos al Imperio? El evangelio de Lucas no ofrece una opción de comer como en un buffet de tomar lo que te gusta y dejar lo que no te gusta. La condición fundamental de ser un discípulo de Jesús-como-el Cristo es tomar la difícil decisión de si su razón de ser es mantener su estatus quo con algunos ajustes menores en su vida o entregarse completamente a Dios.

En el judaísmo, la conversión para convertirse en judío no era algo casual. Uno tenía que dialogar la intención de convertirse con un rabino. Con el rabino, el converso potencial tendría que someterse a una instrucción rigurosa sobre la vida judía, las creencias, la historia, la liturgia, aprender hebreo (para las oraciones) involucrarse en la comunidad y aceptar la divinidad de la Torá. El converso tendría que aceptar observar todas las 613 mitzvot (mandamientos), vivir plenamente una vida judía, someterse a la circuncisión (si es hombre), sumergirse en una mikveh (bautismo) y presentarse ante Bet Din (un tribunal religioso) para su aprobación. conversión. El proceso de conversión no se trataba de tomar clases, sino de convertirse en discípulo de un rabino en particular en una comunidad en particular.

Como sabemos, los miembros de la comunidad de Luke no eran judíos y, por lo tanto, es posible que no hayan sido conscientes del arduo proceso necesario para convertirse en judío. La controversia de si los gentiles deberían convertirse en judíos antes de convertirse en cristianos se resolvió en el Concilio Cristiano de Jerusalén unos 15 años antes del evangelio de Lucas, por lo que los gentiles podrían convertirse directamente para convertirse en discípulos en el linaje de Jesús. Pero esto no significaba que la conversión al cristianismo fuera más fácil que la conversión al judaísmo. La evidencia literaria en el evangelio de Lucas sugiere que el proceso de convertirse en discípulo de Jesús-como-el Cristo después de la Resurrección fue similar en rigor al que uno se convertiría en judío. Al igual que los conversos judíos potenciales, los conversos cristianos tenían que ser claros acerca de su intención de ser bautizados y tenían que participar en la vida comunitaria como parte de su proceso de conversión. Tenga en cuenta que Lucas 12:50 hace referencia al bautismo y, por lo tanto, el bautismo no solo indicaba una conversión teológica o un cambio de denominación, sino que el bautismo señalaba un compromiso para ayudar a introducir el reino de Dios. “Hay un bautismo con el que debo ser bautizado, ¡y cuán grande es mi angustia hasta que se cumpla!”

El testamento cristiano incluye cartas a las comunidades cristianas que se dirigieron principalmente a los conversos gentiles al cristianismo que provenían principalmente de las clases de esclavos y sirvientes (pero también incluyeron personas liberadas y un número menor de personas de medios). Estas cartas sirvieron como recordatorios de que una vez bautizados, todos los bautizados estaban obligados a cuidarse unos a otros, especialmente los más vulnerables. Dado que la mayoría de esas cartas fueron anteriores al evangelio de Lucas y que las cartas comenzaron a circular por toda la región, no sería irrazonable creer que la comunidad de Lucas tenía una comprensión mínima de la importancia de la igualdad y el cuidado mutuo que trascendía los lazos de sangre, pero era extendido a cualquiera que lo necesite. El Imperio no desalentó específicamente el cuidado de los pobres y vulnerables, pero estaba claro que cuidar a los pobres era algo loable, pero no una exigencia ética como lo era en el judaísmo y la religión cristiana emergente.

El reino de Dios: la igualdad económica, la inclusión radical de todas las personas y el cuidado especial para los más vulnerables que no están relacionados por la sangre, ¡hace más que perturbar al Imperio, lo incendia! (c.f., “¡He venido a prender fuego a la tierra, y cómo desearía que ya estuviera ardiendo! Lc 12: 49) En resumen, el pasaje de hoy es una declaración de la consecuencia de elegir a Dios sobre el Imperio: ¡División! Más que simplemente interrumpir el Imperio, Jesús como el Cristo aniquila al Imperio desmantelando el sistema social del Imperio, comenzando con paterfamilias, el orden social jerárquico de la familia romana (cf. “De ahora en adelante, una familia de cinco se dividirá , tres contra dos y dos contra tres … “ Lc 12:52, ss.).

La reflexión se basa en la ubicación sociohistórica de la narrativa de Lucas, pero dado que estamos viviendo en medio de un Imperio, ¿podríamos aprovechar este tiempo para considerar el nivel de compromiso que se nos exige de la misma manera que los discípulos tuvieron que considerarlo? en el tiempo de Lucas? ¿Cuál fue nuestro nivel de compromiso con el bienestar de los demás, particularmente de los pobres, cuando fuimos bautizados? Si ese compromiso fue hecho por padres y padrinos, ¿hubo algún momento en nuestra vida cuando tomamos la decisión adulta de elegir el reino de Dios sobre el Imperio?

Intercesiónes semanales
Un artículo reciente publicado en USA Today (USA Today volvió a publicar el artículo original, “Para los latinos, el miedo en Estados Unidos se vuelve real, poderoso”, por Thomas Hawthorne, The Republic, AzCentral.Com) dijo que “el miedo entre los latinos es palpable … ” después del tiroteo en El Paso. El artículo decía que el tiroteo fue un punto de inflexión que “… retiró el odio detrás de las palabras que intentaron ignorar. Se ha abierto el racismo que muchos crecieron aprendiendo a soprtar”. Un reporte recientemente publicado sobre el racismo del Grupo Solidaridad muestra que la armamentización del racismo, cuando se deja sin oposición, simplemente aumentará en intensidad y causará un mayor daño a la comunidad Latinx. La historia ha demostrado que el racismo se ha utilizado en muchas culturas diferentes como una forma de elevar a un grupo por encima de otros o para colocar un orden social jerárquico que valora las vidas de aquellos que se encuentran en la parte superior del orden sobre aquellos que se encuentran al final de la lista. Las preferencias basadas en las características físicas de la raza se discutieron en la antigua Grecia y Roma. A fines del siglo XIX y principios del XX, el Movimiento Eugenésico tuvo un gran dominio sobre Inglaterra y los Estados Unidos. ¡El partidario incluyó a Alexander Graham Bell, el presidente de Stanford, David Starr Jordan y Luther Burbank! Un doctor inglés, Sir Francis Galton sistematizó las ideas de preferencia racial y física y, después de leer El origen de las especies de Charles Darwin, propuso que las sociedades deberían abstenerse de proteger a los vulnerables y los débiles para que las sociedades puedan mejorar. Creía que los menos inteligentes eran más fértiles y tenían más hijos. Alentó un cambio en las costumbres sociales que alentaría a más personas “aceptables” a procrear. La eugenesia racionalizó las políticas restrictivas de inmigración que prohibieron la inmigración no blanca en la década de 1800 hasta la década de 1960 y cuando los nazis fueron enjuiciados después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, ¡muchos criminales de guerra justificaron las leyes raciales y de purificación nazis inspiradas en las políticas de los Estados Unidos! Lamentablemente, el racismo está integrado en la ciencia, las políticas públicas y la política, y cuando no se controla, el racismo se ha intensificado y se convertirá en genocidio. Oremos por los valientes activistas de derechos civiles que trabajan para desmantelar el infame legado del racismo en los Estados Unidos y en el extranjero. Oremos también por nuestras hermanas y hermanos que sienten el aguijón del animus racial todos los días.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

NO MISA 25 de agosto y 1 de septiembre.

NO MISA on August 25 and September 1.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

Read the paper from our last Grupo discussion by clicking the link below:

CONFRONTING RACISM THROUGH CREATIVE CONSTRUCTION ORGANIZING IN GRUPO SOLIDARIDAD

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Social Climbers

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

August 9, 2019

MISA at Newman Center THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon will celebrate Sunday mass at the Newman Center August 11 at 9 am, corner of 10th and San Carlos.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman este domingo!
Habra la misa de Grupo a las 9 am en la capilla de la Universidad SJSU, en la esquina de Calle 10 y S Carlos.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

At the National Night Out celebration at Our Lady of Refuge. Organizations and agencies offered information and support to the community.  In the foreground we see the table for the Rapid Response Network and in the back ground we see Gerardo from Catholic Charities Immigration Legal Services. Both agencies serve the needs of the immigrant community.

Gospel Reflection: Social Climbers

Last week we read the Parable of the Rich Fool (Lk 12:16-21) which addressed the question of “ownership.”  The parable, taken from classical Jewish teaching, underscores that God truly owns everything and thus we merely stewards of what is owned by God. The parable makes the point that it is foolish, therefore to pursue wealth and control the future. The only option for us is to live in the moment.  Today’s selection Lk 12:32-48, amplifies the teaching on depending on God rather than depending on ourselves. The discourse on the dependence on God begins in verse 22: “…do not worry about your life and what you will eat, or about your body and what you will wear. For life is more than food and the body more than clothing.”  Speaking to the Gentile converts, Luke needed to break through the Gentile mindset that was fixated on a caste system of levels of privilege in order for Gentile converts to understand the concept of the egalitarian social structure that was rooted in Jewish social thought. In the role of rabbi and identity as Lord, Jesus’ social teaching in Luke’s gospel was that all people belong to one another and that they are charged with the responsibility to care for one another without regard to one’s socio-economic status or religious identity. Luke had to systematically delineate the teachings of the kingdom of God to an audience that had been conditioned in a complex social system that granted civil rights, protection of public speech, political participation, redress for labor conditions, and social privileges (e.g., how one is greeted, seated at public events, and treated in social circles) according to one’s status within the Roman social system.

Pliny the Younger, a Roman administrator once wrote, “In Rome — and across the empire — status mattered.”  Pliny noted that dinner guests were not fed the same food and drink. Guests of higher social rank ate much better food and drank better wine than those of lower rank. All subjects of the Empire were either slaves or in servitude. (See Communique 25vii2019 for commentary on the role of that debt played in defining relationships within the Empire).  Just prior to the birth of Jesus, the political and military power of the Empire was concentrated in the hands of a tiny percentage of the population. The social, political and economic system of the Empire did not serve the subjects of the Empire — even the “free citizens,” but only a percentage of the freed citizens, the senatorial and provincial elite.

The caste system began as a “birthright” system of privilege but by the end of the First Century Common Era, the immediate distinction between one’s ranking in the social order became a somewhat tricky proposition. There were two factors that made distinguishing social classes difficult: an increasingly diverse and populous from the provinces of the Empire due to expansion more slaves were granted freedom. Historical accounts showed that many subjects of the Empire had the illusion that economic upward mobility would result in upward social mobility.  These same accounts also showed that the “old guard” (the patricians and senatorial class) did not acknowledge the “nouveau riche” as equals, rather they saw them as pretenders and social climbers.  Freed slaves who became wealthy and soldiers who rose in rank were seen as grotesque brutes with bad taste. Status and legacy mattered more than wealth could not buy entrance into society.  

Because the emerging Christian religion completely rejected notions of privilege and social ranking, converts were obligated to embrace everyone as an equal: male, female, slave and free were all siblings at one table.  Gentile converts who came from the upper classes had to make a hard break from the Empire because wealth and birthright, political and business connections meant nothing in the kingdom of God. Luke’s community was in the provinces, thus it would have been unlikely that the patrician class would have been among the membership; however, because the content of Luke’s gospel places such a strong emphasis on social relationships and wealth, many scholars surmise that Luke’s community was made up of people who may have at one time aspired to gain acceptance into the high ranks of the Empire, but soon realized that such an effort was futile.  Luke’s parables and narrative underscore that God and the ethics of equity and social inclusion are the primary values that one must embrace as part of one’s conversion. The parable in today’s gospel selection serves as a catechesis of social ethics and a warning that conversion to Christianity cannot be entered into lightly:  “Much will be required of the person entrusted with much, and still more will be demanded of the person entrusted with more.”  (Lk 12:48)  One wonders what kind of Church would we have now if we were to incorporate Luke’s catechism on social ethics in our baptismal classes for parents and religious education curriculum.  What if entrance to Catholic schools, universities and seminaries was contingent on a full understanding of social equity and radical inclusion?

Weekly Intercessions
One of the most troubling weeks in American history occurred last week. On the heels of mourning over the deaths of Stephen, Keyla and Trevor, the victims from the Gilroy shooting, two other mass shootings occurred and at least one of them, like the Gilroy shooting, was motivated by racial hatred.  The El Paso shooter left mounting evidence of white supremacy leanings and a marked hatred for Latino immigrants, migrants and refugees. In the aftermath of El Paso, Latino organizations, immigrant activists, and public figures who support immigrants and Latinos demanded action.  Progressive faith leaders denounced the shooting with one national faith leader saying, “Stop praying! Act!” Many people pointed to Trump’s rhetoric as having set the stage for the El Paso shooter.  People who knew Trump from the time he was a New York developer pointed out his unethical and racist behavior as a private business man and journalists reminded their audiences that Trump’s presidential run began with a litany of negative racial stereotypes of Latino immigrants. Several people interviewed by the media — including victims from the Paso shooting said that they blame Trump for what happened. As the El Paso massacre unfolded, another mass shooting took place in Dayton (not Toledo).  The motive of this shooter is not entirely clear. But what is clear is that within 30 seconds, 9 people were shot dead and dozens were injured. The nation is still reeling from these incidents. A car backfired in Times Square and people ran in panic thinking that it was a gun. A sign fell over in a crowded mall in Utah and shoppers ran for cover thinking it was gun fire. People are indeed on edge and tragically Latino and Hispanic immigrants and non-immigrants alike, are most directly affected. Many say that they are hesitant about being in public spaces. The recent mass immigration raid in Mississippi (the largest raid in history) triggered deep fear that they fear not only a white supremacist shooter, but also the government. Let us pray for the victims of the shootings and for our Latino and Hispanic sisters and brothers who feel the burden of racial animus.  May all of us work together to build a better tomorrow.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Escaladores sociales

La semana pasada leímos la Parábola del “Tonto” Rico (Lucas 12: 16-21) que abordó la cuestión de la “propiedad”. La parábola, tomada de la enseñanza judía clásica, subraya que Dios realmente posee todo y, por lo tanto, simplemente somos administradores de lo que es propiedad de Dios. La parábola señala que es una tontería por lo tanto buscar riqueza y controlar el futuro. La única opción para nosotros es vivir y aceptar el momento. La selección de hoy Lc 12: 32-48 amplifica la enseñanza sobre depender de Dios en lugar de depender de nosotros mismos. El discurso sobre la dependencia de Dios comienza en el versículo 22: “… no te preocupes por tu vida y lo que comerás, o sobre tu cuerpo y lo que llevarás puesto. Porque la vida es más que comida y el cuerpo más que ropa ”. Hablando con los conversos gentiles, Luke necesitaba romper la mentalidad gentil que estaba fijada en un sistema de castas de niveles de privilegio para que los conversos gentiles entiendan el concepto del estructura social igualitaria que tuvo sus raíces en el pensamiento social judío. En el papel del rabino y la identidad como Señor, la enseñanza social de Jesús en el evangelio de Lucas fue que todas las personas se pertenecen unas a otras y que tienen la responsabilidad de cuidarse las unas a las otras sin tener en cuenta su estatus socioeconómico o identidad religiosa. Lucas tuvo que delinear sistemáticamente las enseñanzas del reino de Dios a una audiencia que había sido condicionada en un complejo sistema social que otorgaba derechos civiles, protección del discurso público, participación política, reparación por condiciones laborales y privilegios sociales (por ejemplo, cómo uno es recibido, sentado en eventos públicos y tratado en círculos sociales) de acuerdo con el estado de uno dentro del sistema social romano.

Plinio el Joven, un administrador romano escribió una vez: “En Roma, y ​​en todo el imperio, el estatus importaba”. Plinio notó que a los invitados a la cena no se les daba la misma comida y bebida. Los invitados de rango social más alto comieron mucha mejor comida y bebieron vino superior que los de rango inferior. Todos los súbditos del Imperio eran esclavos o serviles. (Ver el Comunicado 25vii2019 para comentarios sobre el papel de esa deuda en la definición de las relaciones dentro del Imperio). Justo antes del nacimiento de Jesús, el poder político y militar del Imperio se concentró en manos de un pequeño porcentaje de la población. El sistema social, político y económico del Imperio no sirvió a los súbditos del Imperio, ni siquiera a los “ciudadanos libres”, sino solo a un porcentaje de los ciudadanos liberados, la élite senatorial y provincial.Los versículos 10-12 proporcionan el consuelo de que el Espíritu Santo hablará a través de aquellos que se someten a una prueba. Cuando te llevan ante sinagogas y ante gobernantes y autoridades, no te preocupes por cómo o cuál será tu defensa o por lo que debes decir. Porque el Espíritu Santo te enseñará en ese momento lo que debes decir ”. A primera vista, los siguientes versículos 12: 13-15 no parecen desarrollar el tema del Espíritu, sino que se vuelven hacia una enseñanza sobre el materialismo. Leer los versos en el contexto de alguien que tiene mucho que perder, tal vez uno que se enfrenta a la pérdida de riqueza y estatus debido a la alineación con Jesús-como-el Cristo, podría tener más sentido de lo que pensamos y el verso nos permite pivote al tema de la reflexión de hoy: vivir en el presente.

El sistema de castas comenzó como un sistema de privilegios de “derecho de nacimiento”, pero al final de la Era Común del Primer Siglo, la distinción inmediata entre la clasificación de uno en el orden social se convirtió en una propuesta algo complicada. Hubo dos factores que dificultaron la distinción de las clases sociales: una población cada vez más diversa y poblada de las provincias del Imperio debido a la expansión, a más esclavos se les concedió libertad. Los relatos históricos mostraron que muchos súbditos del Imperio tenían la ilusión de que la movilidad económica ascendente resultaría en movilidad social ascendente. Estas mismas cuentas también mostraron que la “vieja guardia” (los patricios y la clase senatorial) no reconocía a los “nuevos ricos” como iguales, sino que los veían como pretendientes y escaladores sociales. Los esclavos liberados que se hicieron ricos y los soldados que subieron de rango fueron vistos como brutos grotescos con gusto corriente. El estatus y el legado importaban más que la riqueza no podía comprar la entrada a la sociedad.

Debido a que la religión cristiana emergente rechazó por completo las nociones de privilegio y clasificación social, los conversos estaban obligados a abrazar a todos como iguales: hombres, mujeres, esclavos y libres eran hermanos en una mesa. Los conversos gentiles que provenían de las clases altas tuvieron que hacer un duro descanso del Imperio porque la riqueza y los derechos de nacimiento, las conexiones políticas y comerciales no significaban nada en el reino de Dios. La comunidad de Lucas estaba en las provincias, por lo que hubiera sido poco probable que la clase patricia hubiera estado entre los miembros; Sin embargo, debido a que el contenido del evangelio de Lucas pone un énfasis tan fuerte en las relaciones sociales y la riqueza, muchos profesores de teología suponen que la comunidad de Lucas estaba compuesta por personas que alguna vez aspiraron a ganar aceptación en los altos rangos del Imperio, pero pronto se dio cuenta de que tal esfuerzo era inútil. Las parábolas y la narrativa de Lucas subrayan que Dios y la ética de la equidad y la inclusión social son los valores principales que uno debe adoptar como parte de su conversión. La parábola en la selección del evangelio de hoy sirve como una catequesis de la ética social y una advertencia de que la conversión al cristianismo no se puede hacer a la ligera: “Se requerirá mucho de la persona a quien se le ha confiado mucho, y se exigirá aún más a la persona a la que se le ha confiado más. (Lc 12:48) Uno se pregunta qué clase de Iglesia tendríamos ahora si tuviéramos que integrar el catecismo de Lucas sobre ética social en nuestras clases de bautismo para padres y el plan de estudios de educación religiosa. ¿Qué pasaría si el ingreso a las escuelas, universidades y seminarios católicos dependiera de una comprensión total de la equidad social y la inclusión radical?

Intercesiónes semanales
Una de las semanas más problemáticas en la historia de Estados Unidos ocurrió la semana pasada. Inmediatamente después del duelo por la muerte de Stephen, Keyla y Trevor, las víctimas del tiroteo de Gilroy, ocurrieron otros dos tiroteos masivos y al menos uno de ellos, como el tiroteo de Gilroy, fue motivado por el odio racial. El tirador de El Paso dejó una creciente evidencia de inclinaciones de supremacía racial y un marcado odio hacia los latinos. Después de El Paso, organizaciones latinas, activistas inmigrantes y figuras públicas que apoyan a inmigrantes y latinos exigieron acciones. Los líderes de fe progresistas denunciaron el tiroteo con un líder de fe nacional que dijo: “¡Dejen de orar! ¡Actúa!” Muchas personas señalaron que la retórica de Trump había preparado el escenario para el tirador de El Paso. Las personas que conocieron a Trump desde que era negociante de Nueva York señalaron su comportamiento poco ético y racista como hombre de negocios privado y los periodistas recordaron a su público que la campaña presidencial de Trump comenzó con una letanía de estereotipos raciales negativos de inmigrantes latinos. Varias personas entrevistadas por los medios, incluidas las víctimas del tiroteo en El Paso, dijeron que culpan a Trump por lo sucedido. A medida que se desarrollaba la masacre de El Paso, se produjo otro tiroteo masivo en Dayton (no en Toledo). El motivo de este tirador no está del todo claro. Pero lo que está claro es que en 30 segundos, 9 personas fueron asesinadas a tiros y decenas resultaron heridas. La nación todavía se está recuperando de estos incidentes. Un moto salió disparado en Times Square y la gente entró en pánico pensando que era un arma. Un letrero cayó en un centro comercial lleno de gente en Utah y la gente corriero a refugiarse pensando que era un tiroteo. De hecho, las personas están al límite y, trágicamente, latinos se ven más directamente afectados. Muchos dicen que dudan de estar en espacios públicos. La reciente red masiva de inmigración en Mississippi (la red más grande de la historia) provocó un profundo temor de que no solo temen a un tirador supremacista blanco, sino también al gobierno. Oremos por las víctimas de los disparos y por nuestras hermanas y hermanos latinos que sienten la carga del odio racial. Que todos trabajemos juntos para construir un mejor mañana.

News – Noticias

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Living in the Now

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

August 2, 2019

MISA at Newman Center THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon will celebrate Sunday mass at the Newman Center August 4 at 9 am, corner of 10th and San Carlos.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman este domingo!
Habra la misa de Grupo a las 9 am en la capilla de la Universidad SJSU, en la esquina de Calle 10 y S Carlos.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The Oaxacan Catholic community has a rich Catholic heritage which is shared from generation to generation. Feast days and family rituals maintain a strong communal identity which helps community members maintain their resilience in these difficult days.

Reflection: Living in the Now
Last week we explored the background and context of the Our Father. The prayer was rooted both in the Talmud and in emerging Christian experience. Potential converts needed to be taught not only how to pray, but how to see the world around them. When read in its original context, the Our Father addresses social inequities caused by the Empire’s socio-economic system. The prayer would compel the disciple to work to dismantle the socio-economic system of exploitation sustained by debt.  Last week’s passage concluded with two sayings that served as a reminder that the work of discipleship must be rooted in faith that the Empire will eventually to the arc of the kingdom of God, therefore, disciples must forge ahead trusting that their labor will eventually bear fruit. Today’s reflection begins in the following chapter. In Lk 12:1, Jesus said, “Beware of the leaven—that is, the hypocrisy—of the Pharisees….”  This line, taken out of its context, was used by later generations of Christians to justify animus toward the Jewish people. If; however, we were to consider that the verse was a literary artifact left by Luke as a way to contrast Jesus-as-Rabbi with other rabbi’s, we would see that Jesus was not advocating anti-semitism. Luke’s casting Jesus as rabbi was, on the surface, a way to provide historicity to his Gentile audience, but a closer read of the passage might suggest that Luke’s task was not merely situating Jesus within a historical context, but rather teaching his own audience how to endure the pressure to submit to the Empire.

The aggression implied in Luke’s text between Jesus and the Pharisees did not happen within the lifespan of Jesus himself, but rather took place over generations after the Resurrection and escalated to a definitive point of separation of the Jesus movement from standard Jewish belief happened at the Destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE. By the time of the composition of Luke’s gospel, (between 85 -95 CE), the Jesus Messianic movement was expanding in the Gentile community, Gentiles were facing expulsion from their own Gentile families. Verses 2-9 provide a way to interpret the challenges of Christians living around the time of the first Christian persecutions by Romans and the persecution of Jesus’ disciples. Gentile converts to Christianity had to persevere. Because Christianity was rooted in Judaism, those who suffered persecution had to find inner resolve within themselves rather than in recitation of prayers and incantations, practices familiar to those in the Greco-Roman religious world.  

Verses 10-12 provide consolation that the Holy Spirit will  speak through those who undergo a trial. “When they take you before synagogues and before rulers and authorities, do not worry about how or what your defense will be or about what you are to say. For the holy Spirit will teach you at that moment what you should say.”  At first glance, the following verses 12:13-15 do not seem to develop the theme of the Spirit, but rather turn toward a teaching on materialism. Reading the verses in the context of someone who has a lot to lose — perhaps one who is facing the loss of wealth and status because of aligning with Jesus-as-the Christ — might make more sense than we think and the verse allows us to pivot to the theme of today’s reflection: living in the present.

Around the time of the composition of Luke’s gospel, Gentile Christians were being arrested and tortured. Nero’s persecution of 64CE opened the way for authorities throughout the Empire to arrest, torture and publicly execute members of the new religion. Lk 12:15, “…Take care to guard against all greed, for though one may be rich, one’s life does not consist of possessions…” illustrates the hold of the Empire: security and control (ego). The Empire, representing “ego” has the potential of holding anyone back from doing a courageous act of selflessness. Recall that as rabbi, Jesus taught the principle of selflessness: to renounce one’s past and present possessions and to embrace the ever-unfolding present (the kingdom of God). Recall also that the Empire was built on a system of material debt, ownership and thus, material control. Discipleship and eventual total alignment with Jesus-as-the Christ demands that one surrender personal ambition (ego), the renunciation of the need to protect what one has (ego), and letting go of social expectations that demand conformity in exchange for acceptance (ego).  Following Jesus-as-the Christ demands a radical embrace of the unknown (what may happen to us in the future) and the unmeasurable (Eternity).  The need to hold onto material possessions is important for those who choose to live in the Empire, but completely irrelevant for those who chose to follow Jesus-as-the Christ. 

The parable of the rich fool (today’s gospel selection, Lk 12:16-21), like all parables, is rooted in classical Jewish thought: God has everything, we merely steward what is owned by God. It is foolish, therefore to pursue wealth and control the future. The only option is to live in the moment.  Even in the face of persecution, the only option is bravery: to stand up tyranny and hatred and trust that Spirit will provide the words of Resistance. The line from the Our Father, “Give us this day our daily bread,” is not a demand that we have bread for the week, but that each day we might have the patience and courage to embrace whatever the day may bring…or not bring.  Christians facing persecution could not embrace martyrdom if their hearts were torn between what they could have had in their lives had they not chosen the Way. 

Today so-called Christians tolerate tyranny, the persecution of vulnerable migrants and refugees, racism, and misogyny because they feel that they will be rewarded with a judicial system packed with like-minded zealots.  Are they different from the foolish rich person in the parable? Too busy to notice the cries of those locked in concentration camps and the victims of racially inspired mass shootings, too occupied with chanting, “Send her back!” “Lock her up!” that they cannot see the fiscal and political corruption, and wicked treatment of young girls and women. Too ambitious to pack the courts with those who align themselves to their ideology, they cannot feel the blood of Abel from under their feet.  They are not living in the present. They are living in a collective religious ego that can never be satisfied until they themselves become gods.  True people of faith live in the present and selflessly work to dismantle the Empire without calculating the cost to ourselves.  Embrace the now is to embrace God.

Weekly Intercessions

Last week after mass we heard the horrific account of the shootings in Gilroy. A young man, raised in the community, took it upon himself to open fire at a family friendly festival and kill three young people. Stephen Romero, a 6 year old boy from San José, is remembered by his neighbors as playing with his dog and swinging on a tire swing outside his house. Keyla Salazar, 13 of San José was killed at the scene. She was a student at ACE Empower Academy in San José and loved playing video games and had a pet guinea pig and chihuahua. Trevor Irby, 25 of Romulus, NY was a 2017 biology grad from Keuka College in New York. He was at the festival with his girlfriend. Trevor was well loved by alumni, family and friends. 12 people were injured in the shooting. Funerals for victims will be held this coming week. The background of the shooter did not seem to reveal any motive of why he would attack; however, a closer look at his reading material and online activity reveal a mind sympathetic to white supremacism. According to Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino, said that the shooter, “murders three young people of color, and right before he does it, he posts about mestizos, and then encouraged people to read a book republished by a Nazi publishing house. What more do you need?” The FBI was not willing to like the racist materials to a motive in the shooting. The reluctance of the FBI to name racism as a driving motive of the killer is curious in light of the recent incidents of racist comments from Trump and the newly revealed recordings of a racist conversation between Nixon and Reagan. Speculating on the motive of the shooter is indeed a difficult task but the investigative process should not be influenced by efforts to protect the reputation of Trump. We will lay the victims to rest and comfort their families. We will help heal the victims and we will also address the easy access of assault rifles and the all-too pervasive influence of racist ideology on impressionable minds. Let us pray for Stephen, Keyla and Trevor. May their souls be at rest, may their families find comfort in faith and in the promise of Eternal Life. 

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Viviendo en el presente 

La semana pasada exploramos los antecedentes y el contexto histórico del Padre Nuestro. La oración se basó tanto en el Talmud como en la experiencia cristiana emergente. Los conversos potenciales necesitaban que se les enseñara no solo cómo orar, sino también cómo ver el mundo a su alrededor. Cuando se lee en su contexto original, el Padre Nuestro aborda las desigualdades sociales causadas por el sistema socioeconómico del Imperio. La oración obligaría al discípulo a trabajar para desmantelar el sistema socioeconómico de explotación sostenido por la deuda. El pasaje de la semana pasada concluyó con dos dichos que sirvieron como recordatorio de que la obra del discipulado debe estar enraizada en la fe de que el Imperio finalmente llegará al arco del reino de Dios, por lo tanto, los discípulos deben seguir adelante confiando en que su labor finalmente dará sus frutos.  La reflexión de hoy comienza en el siguiente capítulo. 

En Lucas 12: 1, Jesús dijo: “Cuidado con la levadura, es decir, la hipocresía, de los fariseos …”. Esta línea, sacada de su contexto, fue utilizada por generaciones posteriores de cristianos para justificar el ánimo hacia el pueblo judío, sin embargo, debíamos considerar que el verso era un artefacto literario dejado por Lucas como una forma de contrastar a Jesús como rabino con el de los otros rabinos, veríamos que Jesús no estaba abogando por el antisemitismo. El hecho de que Lucas presentara a Jesús como rabino era, en la superficie, una forma de proporcionar historicidad a su audiencia gentil, pero una lectura más cercana del pasaje podría sugerir que la tarea de Lucas no era simplemente situar a Jesús dentro de un contexto histórico, sino enseñarle a su propia audiencia cómo soportar la presión de someterse al Imperio.

La agresión implicada en el texto de Lucas entre Jesús y los fariseos no sucedió durante la vida del mismo Jesús, sino que tuvo lugar durante generaciones después de la Resurrección y se intensificó hasta un punto definitivo de separación del movimiento de Jesús de la creencia judía estándar que sucedió en la Destrucción del Segundo Templo en 70 EC. En el momento de la composición del evangelio de Lucas (entre 85 y 95 EC), el movimiento mesiánico de Jesús se estaba expandiendo en la comunidad gentil, los gentiles enfrentaban la expulsión de sus propias familias gentiles. Los versículos 2-9 proporcionan una manera de interpretar los desafíos de los cristianos que viven en la época de las primeras persecuciones cristianas por parte de los romanos y la persecución de los discípulos de Jesús. Los conversos gentiles al cristianismo tuvieron que perseverar. Debido a que el cristianismo estaba enraizado en el judaísmo, aquellos que sufrieron persecución tuvieron que encontrar una resolución interna dentro de sí mismos en lugar de recitar oraciones y encantamientos, ritos familiares para aquellos en el mundo religioso grecorromano.

Los versículos 10-12 proporcionan el consuelo de que el Espíritu Santo hablará a través de aquellos que se someten a una prueba. “Cuando te llevan ante sinagogas y ante gobernantes y autoridades, no te preocupes por cómo o cuál será tu defensa o por lo que debes decir. Porque el Espíritu Santo te enseñará en ese momento lo que debes decir ”. A primera vista, los siguientes versículos 12: 13-15 no parecen desarrollar el tema del Espíritu, sino que se vuelven hacia una enseñanza sobre el materialismo. Leer los versos en el contexto de alguien que tiene mucho que perder, tal vez uno que se enfrenta a la pérdida de riqueza y estatus debido a la alineación con Jesús como el Cristo, podría tener más sentido de lo que pensamos y el verso nos permite pivote al tema de la reflexión de hoy: vivir en el presente.

En la época de la composición del evangelio de Lucas, los cristianos gentiles estaban siendo arrestados y torturados. La persecución de Nero al 64CE abrió el camino para que las autoridades de todo el Imperio arrestaran, torturaran y ejecutaran públicamente a miembros de la nueva religión. Lc 12:15, “… Tenga cuidado de protegerse contra toda avaricia, porque aunque uno sea rico, la vida no consiste en posesiones …” ilustra el dominio del Imperio: seguridad y control (ego). El Imperio, que representa el “ego”, tiene el potencial de impedir que alguien haga un acto valiente de desinterés. Recordemos que, como rabino, Jesús enseñó el principio del desinterés: renunciar a las posesiones pasadas y presentes y abrazar el presente siempre en proceso (el reino de Dios). Recordemos también que el Imperio se construyó sobre un sistema de deuda material, propiedad y, por lo tanto, control material. El discipulado y la alineación total eventual con Jesús-como-el Cristo exige que uno entregue la ambición personal (ego), la renuncia a la necesidad de proteger lo que tiene (ego) y dejar ir las expectativas sociales que exigen conformidad a cambio de aceptación ( ego). Seguir a Jesús-como-el Cristo exige un abrazo radical de lo desconocido (lo que nos puede suceder en el futuro) y lo inconmensurable (Eternidad). La necesidad de aferrarse a las posesiones materiales es importante para quienes eligen vivir en el Imperio, pero es completamente irrelevante para quienes eligen seguir a Jesús-como-el Cristo.

La parábola del tonto rico (la selección del evangelio de hoy, Lucas 12: 16-21), como todas las parábolas, tiene sus raíces en el pensamiento judío clásico: Dios tiene todo, simplemente administramos lo que pertenece a Dios. Es una tontería, por lo tanto, perseguir la riqueza y controlar el futuro. La única opción es vivir el momento. Incluso frente a la persecución, la única opción es la valentía: resistir la tiranía y el odio y confiar en que el Espíritu proporcionará las palabras de Resistencia. La frase del Padre Nuestro, “Danos hoy nuestro pan de cada día”, no es una exigencia de que tengamos pan para la semana, sino que cada día tengamos la paciencia y las ganas para abrazar lo que sea que el día traiga … o no traer. Los cristianos que enfrentan la persecución no podrían abrazar el martirio si sus corazones estuvieran divididos entre lo que podrían haber tenido en sus vidas si no hubieran elegido el Camino.

Hoy los llamados cristianos toleran la tiranía, la persecución de los migrantes y refugiados vulnerables, el racismo y la misoginia porque sienten que serán recompensados ​​con un sistema judicial lleno de fanáticos afines. ¿Son diferentes de la persona rica tonta en la parábola? Demasiado ocupados para notar los gritos de aquellos encerrados en campos de concentración y las víctimas de tiroteos masivos inspirados con racismo demasiado ocupados cantando: “¡Envíenla de vuelta!” “¡Enciérrenla!” ellos son ignorantes del tratamiento de niñas y mujeres. Son ocupados con la ambición de empacar los cortes superior y federal con aquellos que se alinean con su ideología, no pueden sentir la sangre de Abel bajo sus pies. No están viviendo en el presente. Están viviendo en un ego religioso colectivo que nunca puede ser satisfecho hasta que ellos mismos se conviertan en dioses. Las verdaderas personas de fe viven en el presente y trabajan desinteresadamente para desmantelar el Imperio sin calcular el costo para nosotros. Abrazar el presente es abrazar a Dios.

Intercesiónes semanales
La semana pasada, después de la misa, escuchamos el horrible relato de los tiroteos en Gilroy. Un joven de la comunidad de Gilroy mató 3 personas: Stephen Romero, un niño de 6 años de San José. Sus vecinos lo dicen jugando con su perro y columpiándose en un columpio afuera de su casa. Keyla Salazar, 13 de San José fue asesinada en el lugar. Ella era una estudiante de ACE Empower Academy en San José y le encantaba jugar videojuegos y tenía una mascota conejillo de indias y chihuahua. Trevor Irby, de 25 años de Romulus, Nueva York, se graduó en biología en 2017 del Keuka College de Nueva York. Él estaba en el festival con su novia. 12 personas resultaron heridas en el tiroteo. Los funerales para las víctimas se llevarán a cabo la próxima semana. Los antecedentes del tirador no parecían revelar ningún motivo de por qué atacaría; Sin embargo, una mirada más cercana a su material de lectura y actividad de web revela una mente que simpatiza con el supremacismo blanco. Según Brian Levin, director del Centro para el Estudio del Odio y el Extremismo de la Universidad Estatal de California, San Bernardino, dijo que el tirador “…asesina a tres jóvenes de color, y justo antes de que lo haga, publica sobre mestizos, y luego alentó a la gente a leer un libro republicado por una editorial nazi. ¿Qué más necesitas?” El FBI no estaba dispuesto a querer los materiales racistas por un motivo en el tiroteo. La reticencia del FBI a nombrar el racismo como un motivo principal del asesino es curiosa a la luz de los recientes incidentes de comentarios racistas de Trump y las grabaciones recientemente reveladas de una conversación racista entre Nixon y Reagan. Especular sobre el motivo del tirador es una tarea difícil, pero el proceso de investigación no debe verse influenciado por los es- fuerzos para proteger la reputación de Trump. Acostaremos a las víctimas para que descansen y consuelen a sus familias. Ayudaremos a sanar a las víctimas y también abordaremos el fácil acceso de los rifles de asalto y la influencia demasiado dominante de la ideología racista en las mentes impresionables. Oremos por Stephen, Keyla y Trevor. Que sus almas descansen, que sus familias encuentren consuelo en la fe y en la promesa de la Vida Eterna. 

News – Noticias

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Our Father

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

July 25, 2019

MISA at Newman Center THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon will celebrate Sunday mass at the Newman Center July 28 at 9 am, corner of 10th and San Carlos.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman este domingo!
Habra la misa de Grupo a las 9 am en la capilla de la Universidad SJSU, en la esquina de Calle 10 y S Carlos.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

At the annual Obon Festival in Japantown, San José. History teaches us a lesson that the US government created concentration camps for Native Americans and Japanese Americans. Both actions were driven by unbridled racial animus and populist politics. New immigrants and refugees are living through what other oppressed communities have experienced for generations. Like the Native Americans and Japanese Americans who have culturally persisted in the face of hatred, so too will the new immigrants and refugees persist.  May their story told through song, dance and spiritual practice flourish and develop.
 

Reflection: The Our Father
Last week’s reflection opened up a conversation about the roles and expectations of women as portrayed in the Gospel of Luke and explored possible implications for Christians (and all people of good will) today. The passage of Martha and Mary presented an opportunity for us to look at how we might promote co-equality among all genders and lift up the ideal of creating a radically egalitarian society.  Luke’s gospel, unique among the other gospels, raises the question of how his community might contribute to social transformation by scaling up the egalitarian nature of their own community into a social movement that extends beyond their religious and geographical parameters.

The evangelist Luke portrays discipleship as an expansion of the Jesus-as-the Christ’s teachings in a wider context than its Jewish origin. At the time of the gospel’s composition Christianity was not so much recognized as a religion, but rather a small, fanatical movement connected to, (but in process of separation from) Judaism. Disciples of the Jesus movement, therefore, were in need of a spiritual “home” that was grounded in Judaism, but not identified as specifically Jewish and on that would be comfortable for Greek/Roman (Gentile) potential converts, but a home that was definitely not in alignment with the cult of the Empire. In short, Christian communities were in need of identifying their own selves and what they believed. 

To begin the process of self-identity as a bona fide religion, the disciples had to learn how to pray from within their own emerging collective spiritual experience. New converts were accustomed to the prayers and sacrifices of Gentile religious traditions, but it appears that they were largely unfamiliar with the religious tradition of Jesus. Luke’s gospel has numerous references to provide ample information for Gentile converts to understand the proper Jewish context.

Today’s passage begins with Jesus teaching the Our Father. Luke’s version of the Our Father predates Matthew. The Our Father was not unfamiliar to Jews because the Talmud in the First Century Common Era contained parallels to the Our Father (see Tosef., Ber. iii. 7; Ber. 16b-17a, 29b; Yer. Ber. iv. 7d). The Lucan version of the Our Father differs from Jewish prayers of its time because the prayer does not express a messianic urgency (that the Messiah come right away and set things aright).  Why? Because Luke’s audience believed that Jesus was the Christ (the Messiah) and that he was in their midst when they gathered at prayer.  Despite this latter difference, these citations from the Talmud show the intractability of Jewish elements from the emerging Christian religion and how important it was for the disciples to pray from their newly emerging spiritual experience.

As we look more critically at the prayer we should first recall Luke’s emphasis on Christian expansion was not solely about increasing members, but rather about expanding the movement outwards and scaling up the capacity of disciples to effect social change beyond their own Christian community.  Luke’s gospel has numerous references to social change throughout its chapters and Luke’s Our Father the social context by way of the use of “debts” in the prayer.

“Debts” were one of the great millstones for ordinary people.  Because the social and economic structure of the Empire favored economic advantage to those who already had economic advantage, the disparity between the wealthily and the poor was, like today, scandalously wide. Many of the poor were unable to pay their debts and unforgiven debts landed people in “debtors’ prison” (which were private prisons run by those who held the debt). The imprisoned were more like “hostages” than prisoners because they were detained until their families paid off their debt. Speaking as a rabbi, Jesus underscored the teaching of Talmudic sources that rejected imprisonment for debt. Luke’s audience of Gentile origin was familiar with arguments justifying the Empire’s use of debtor’s prisons and was also most likely unfamiliar with Talmudic sources. Imagine the challenge in learning to pray Lk 11:4, “forgive us our sins for we ourselves forgive everyone in debt to us…”  The connection of sin to debt was not about personal sin or the sin of individual having made poor financial decisions, but rather an indictment against the infrastructure of privatized debtors’ prisons in the Empire.  The reference of debt and the personalization of obligation to deal with debt illustrates that Luke’s Christian social theory begins with an individual accepting responsibility for one’s own actions and then addressing inequity on a relational level: reconciling with (that is, forgiving debt) one person at a time.

Because privatized prisons were one of the most effective ways to extract money from the population (apart from taxation), the institution of these prisons needed to be dismantled.  Breaking the bond between debt and debtor by eliminating debtors’ prisons was not the way Christian communities chose to address the problem. They saw the problem on an atomized level: person to person.  Most of the population was somehow in some kind of indebtedness to the wealthier class and therefore relationships needed to be transformed from being transactional and conditional to being mutual and supportive. 

The Empire ruled by keeping people in a perpetual state of give and take. Luke’s version tore a hole in the fabric of the Empire by teaching that discipleship required a persistent and faithful effort to disrupt the hold of debt on people. The Christian community described in Acts 2:44-47 by the presumed author (or school of scholars of Luke) Luke described  the Christian community as holding all things in common and believers would have sold “…their property and possessions and divide them among all according to each one’s need.” This seems more of an ideal rather than a historical account, but it nonetheless provides us a literary artifact of which Christian communities aspired. A community free from debt stands in stark contrast to Empire’s the oppressive social and economic structure that perpetuate economic advantage for a few and economic catastrophe for the many.

Luke 11:5-8 and Lk 11:9-13 serve as exempla of the inner-disposition needed to dismantle this system of oppression.  Verses 5-8 stress the persistence required when praying as a disciple: the enormity of the injustice perpetuated by the Empire cannot limit our vision and dampen our resolve to disrupt and eventually dismantle the structures of oppression. Verses 9-13 stress the inner-faith and confidence necessary to undertake the task of discipleship. May we who are activists, labor and community organizers, and advocates find the spiritual resolve necessary to remain persistent and confident in the Resistance.

Weekly Intercessions

This week we offer A Lord’s Prayer for Justice by Fr. Ron Rolheiser, OMI

Our Father … who always stands with the weak, the powerless, the poor, the abandoned, the sick, the aged, the very young, the unborn, and those who, by victim of circumstance, bear the heat of the day.

Who art in heaven … where everything will be reversed, where the first will be last and the last will be first, but where all will be well and every manner of being will be well.

Hallowed by thy name … may we always acknowledge your holiness, respecting that your ways are not our ways, your standards are not our standards. May the reverence we give your name pull us out of the narcissism, selfishness, and paranoia that prevents us from seeing the pain of our neighbour.

Your kingdom come … help us to create a world where, beyond our own needs and hurts, we will do justice, love tenderly, and walk humbly with you and each other.

Your will be done … open our freedom to let you in so that the complete mutuality that characterizes your life might flow through our veins and thus the life that we help generate may radiate your equal love for all and your special love for the poor.

On earth as in heaven … may the work of our hands, the temples and structures we build in this world, reflect the temple and the structure of your glory so that the joy, graciousness, tenderness, and justice of heaven will show forth within all of our structures on earth.

Give … life and love to us and help us to see always everything as gift. Help us to know that nothing comes to us by right and that we must give because we have been given to. Help us realize that we must give to the poor, not because they need it, but because our own health depends upon our giving to them.

Us … the truly plural us. Give not just to our own but to everyone, including those who are very different than the narrow us. Give your gifts to all of us equally.

This day  … not tomorrow. Do not let us push things off into some indefinite future so that we can continue to live justified lives in the face of injustice because we can use present philosophical, political, economic, logistic, and practical difficulties as an excuse for inactivity.

Our daily bread … so that each person in the world my have enough food, enough clean water, enough clean air, adequate health care, and sufficient access to education so as to have the sustenance for a healthy life. Teach us to give from our sustenance and not just from our surplus.

And forgive us our trespasses … forgive us our blindness towards our neighbour, our obsessive self-preoccupation, our racism, our sexism, and our incurable propensity to worry only about ourselves and our own. Forgive us our capacity to watch the evening news and do nothing about it.

As we forgive those who trespass against us … help us to forgive those who victimize us. Help us to mellow out in spirit, to not grow bitter with age, to forgive the imperfect parents and systems that wounded, cursed, and ignored us.

And do not put us to the test … do not judge us only by whether we have fed the hungry, given clothing to the naked, visited the sick, or tried to mend the systems that victimized the poor. Spare us this test for none of us can stand before this gospel scrutiny. Give us, instead, more days to mend our ways, our selfishness, and our systems.

But deliver us from evil … that is, from the blindness that lets us continue to participate in anonymous systems within which we need not see who gets less as we get more.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: El Padre Nuestro

La reflexión de la semana pasada abrió una conversación sobre los roles y expectativas de las mujeres como se muestra en el Evangelio de Lucas y exploró las posibles implicaciones para los cristianos (y todas las personas de buena voluntad) hoy. El pasaje de Marta y María nos brindó la oportunidad de ver cómo podemos promover la igualdad entre todos los géneros y elevar el ideal de crear una sociedad radicalmente igualitaria. El evangelio de S Lucas, único entre los otros evangelios, plantea la cuestión de cómo su comunidad podría contribuir a la transformación social al ampliar la naturaleza igualitaria de su propia comunidad a un movimiento social que se extiende más allá de sus parámetros religiosos y geográficos.

El evangelista Lucas retrata el discipulado como una expansión de las enseñanzas de Jesús-como-Cristo en un contexto más amplio que su origen judío. En el momento de la composición del evangelio, el cristianismo no era tan reconocido como una religión, sino más bien como un movimiento pequeño y fanático conectado al judaísmo, pero en proceso de separación. Los discípulos del movimiento de Jesús, por lo tanto, necesitaban un “hogar” espiritual basado en el judaísmo, pero no identificado como específicamente judío y que sería cómodo para los conversos potenciales griegos / romanos (gentiles), sino un hogar que era definitivamente no en alineación con el culto del Imperio. En resumen, las comunidades cristianas necesitaban identificarse a sí mismas y a lo que creían.

Para comenzar el proceso de auto-identidad como una religión fidedigna, los discípulos tuvieron que aprender a orar desde su propia experiencia espiritual colectiva emergente. Los nuevos conversos estaban acostumbrados a las oraciones y sacrificios de las tradiciones religiosas gentiles, pero parece que no estaban familiarizados con la tradición religiosa de Jesús. El evangelio de Lucas tiene numerosas referencias para brindar amplia información a los conversos gentiles para entender el contexto judío apropiado.

El pasaje de hoy comienza con Jesús enseñando al Padre Nuestro. La versión de Lucas del Padre Nuestro es anterior a Mateo. El Padre Nuestro no era desconocido para los judíos porque el Talmud en la Era Común del Primer Siglo contenía paralelos al Padre Nuestro (ver Tosef., Ber. Iii. 7; Ber. 16b-17a, 29b; Yer. Ber. Iv. 7d) . La versión del Padre Nuestro de S Lucas difiere de las oraciones judías de su tiempo porque la oración no expresa una urgencia mesiánica (que el Mesías venga enseguida y reparar el mundo). ¿Por qué? Porque la audiencia de Lucas creyó que Jesús era el Cristo (el Mesías) y que él estaba en medio de ellos cuando se reunieron para orar. A pesar de esta última diferencia, estas citas del Talmud muestran el vinculo fuerte de los elementos judíos de la religión cristiana emergente y lo importante que era para los discípulos orar desde su nueva experiencia espiritual emergente.

Al observar más críticamente la oración, primero debemos recordar que el énfasis de S Lucas en la expansión cristiana no fue solo sobre el aumento de miembros, sino más bien sobre la expansión del movimiento hacia afuera y el aumento de la capacidad de los discípulos para lograr un cambio social más allá de su propia comunidad cristiana. El evangelio de S Lucas tiene numerosas referencias al cambio social y precisamente el Padre Nuestro de S Lucas, proviene un ejemplo del contexto social mediante el uso de “deudas” en la oración.

Las “deudas” fueron una de las grandes piedras u obstáculos para la gente. Debido a que la estructura social y económica del Imperio favorecía la ventaja económica de aquellos que ya tenían ventaja económica, la disparidad entre los ricos y los pobres era, como hoy, escandalosamente amplia. Muchos de los pobres no pudieron pagar sus deudas y las deudas no perdonadas llevaron a las personas a la “prisión de deudores” (que eran prisiones privadas administradas por quienes tenían la deuda). Los encarcelados eran más como “rehenes” que prisioneros porque fueron detenidos hasta que sus familias pagaron su deuda. Hablando como un rabino, Jesús subrayó la enseñanza de las fuentes talmúdicas que rechazaron el encarcelamiento por deudas. La audiencia de S Lucas de origen gentil estaba familiarizada con los argumentos que justificaban el uso del Imperio de las cárceles de deudores y probablemente no estaba familiarizada con las detalles fuentes talmúdicas. Imagine el desafío de aprender a orar en Lucas 11: 4, “perdónanos nuestros pecados porque nosotros mismos perdonamos a todos endeudados con nosotros ...” La conexión del pecado con la deuda no se relaciona con el pecado personal o el pecado de un individuo que ha tomado malas decisiones financieras, sino más bien una acusación contra la infraestructura de las prisiones de deudores privatizadas en el Imperio. La referencia de la deuda y la personalización de la obligación de lidiar con la deuda ilustra que la teoría social cristiana de S Lucas comienza con un individuo que asume la responsabilidad de sus propias acciones y luego aborda la iniquidad en un nivel inter-personal: reconciliarse con (es decir, perdonar la deuda) una persona en un momento.

Debido a que las prisiones privatizadas eran una de las formas más efectivas de extraer dinero de la población (aparte de los impuestos), la institución de estas prisiones tenía que ser desmantelada. Romper el vínculo entre la deuda y el deudor mediante la eliminación de las prisiones de los deudores no fue la forma en que las comunidades cristianas eligieron abordar el problema. Vieron el problema en un nivel atomizado: persona a persona. La mayoría de la población estaba de alguna manera en algún tipo de endeudamiento con la clase más rica y, por lo tanto, las relaciones debían transformarse de ser transaccionales y condicionales a ser mutuas y de apoyo.

El Imperio gobernó manteniendo a las personas en un estado perpetuo de dar y recibir. La versión de Luke hizo un agujero en la estructura del Imperio al enseñar que el discipulado requiere un esfuerzo persistente y fiel para interrumpir el control de la deuda de las personas. La comunidad cristiana descrita en Hechos 2: 44-47 por el presunto autor (o escuela de eruditos de S Lucas) S Lucas describió a la comunidad cristiana como teniendo todas las cosas en común y los creyentes habrían vendido “… sus propiedades y posesiones y las dividirían entre todas de acuerdo con las necesidades de cada uno ”. Esto parece más un relato ideal que histórico, pero aún así nos proporciona un artefacto literario del que aspiraban las comunidades cristianas. Una comunidad libre de deudas contrasta con la opresiva estructura social y económica de Imperio que perpetúa la ventaja económica para unos pocos y la catástrofe económica para muchos.

Lucas 11: 5-8 y Lucas 11: 9-13 sirven como ejemplos de la disposición interna necesaria para desmantelar este sistema de opresión. Los versículos 5-8 enfatizan la persistencia requerida cuando se ora como discípulo: la enormidad de la injusticia perpetuada por el Imperio no puede limitar nuestra visión y frenar nuestra resolución de interrumpir y, eventualmente, desmantelar las estructuras de opresión. Los versículos 9-13 enfatizan la fe interna y la confianza necesarias para emprender la tarea del discipulado. Que nosotros, que somos activistas, organizadores laborales y comunitarios, y defensores, encontremos la determinación espiritual necesaria para mantenernos persistentes y confiados en la Resistencia.

Intercesiónes semanales
El Padre Nuestro de la Paz  

Padre que miras por igual a todos tu hijos. 
Nuestro: de todos, todos los millones de personas que poblamos la tierra, sea cual sea su edad, color, religión, lugar de nacimiento.
Que estás en los cielos y en la tierra y en cada hombre, en los humildes y en los que sufren.
Santificado sea tu nombre, en los corazones pacíficos de todos, hombres y mujeres, niños y ancianos, de aquí y de allí. 
Venga a nosotros tu reino, el de la paz, el del amor, el de la justicia, el de la verdad, el de la libertad.
Hágase tu voluntad siempre y en todas las naciones y pueblos. En el cielo, en la tierra. Que tus planes de paz no sean destrozados por los hombres violentos, por los tiranos. 
Danos el pan de cada día que está amasado con paz, con amor y aleja de nosotros el pan de la cizaña y del odio que alimenta envidias, divisiones y violencia.
Dánoslo hoy porque mañana puede ser tarde. Los misiles están apuntando y quizá algún loco quiera disparar. 
Perdónanos no como nosotros solemos perdonar, sino como Tu perdonas sin resquemores, sin rencores ocultos. 
No nos dejes caer en la tentación de mirar con recelo al de enfrente, de olvidarnos de nuestros hermanos necesitados, de acumular lo que otros necesitan, de vivir bien a costa de los demás. 
Líbranos del mal que nos amenaza, de los egoísmos de los poderosos, de la muerte que producen la guerra las armas, el odio. Porque somos muchos, Padre, los que queremos vivir en paz y construir la paz para todos.
 
Amén.

News – Noticias

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Sign up to be a Rapid Responder to defend your immigrant neighbor!  
 
A special training for Morgan Hill residents only: SATURDAY, July 27, 1:00pm
 
 
¡Regístrate para ser un Servicio de Respuesta Rápida para defender a tu vecino inmigrante! 
 
Una capacitación especial solo para residentes de Morgan Hill: SÁBADO, 27 de julio, 1:00 pm
 
Register/Registrarse:
http://sacredheartcs.org/rapidresponsenetwork/ or https://www.pactsj.org/rapid-response-network-in-santa-clara-county/
 

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Choosing the Better Part

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

July 19, 2019

NO MISA at Newman Center THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon will celebrate all the Sunday masses at Santa Teresa Parish at 794 Calero Ave, San José. 
Masses are at 8:30, 10:00 and 11:30 am.

¡NO HAY MISA en Centro Newman este domingo!
Unate con el P. Jon en la Parroquia de Sta Teresa ubicada en 794 Calero Ave.
Las misas son a las 8.30 10.00 y 11.30 (Misas será en inglés).

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

At the Morgan Hill Lights for Liberty Protest last week, one of hundreds of simultaneous protests throughout the country. Miguel and Bill from Grupo Solidaridad spoke at the San José gathering and several members of Grupo were present and spoke at the Morgan Hill protest. Many non-immigrant, non-Latinx allies were present, including several people who had never participated in public protests or pro-immigrant rallies prior to this action. The Movement is growing!

Reflection: Choosing the Better Part 

Last week’s reflection dove into the Torah study of how Jesus in the capacity as rabbi connected the love God, to love of neighbor to love of mercy. The familiar Good Samaritan parable was a premier example of Jesus magnifying the Torah in such a way that the love of God is most highly manifested to acts of compassion.  Today’s reading serves as both an exclamation point to Jesus’ preaching and as an invitation to marginalized persons that they too are welcome to full inclusion in the new spiritual movement. Before we continue, we must introduce a simple caveat to the reflection: unlike our present day with our understanding of multiple gender identities and shared and co-equal roles among the genders, Scripture texts tend to reflect on a “binary” view of gender with each gender occupying specific social roles. The reflection today critiques the rigidity of pairing gender identities with social roles and suggests that this critique (grounded in an overall reading of Luke’s gospel account) provides future generations with the theological foundation to push the envelope of radical inclusion. 

This Sunday’s passage begins in Lk 10:38 in which a woman welcomed Jesus. Within a strict Gentile context, a woman would not welcome a man because that might imply social equality. Typically a man would welcome a male visitor; however, it would appear that in this narrative, Martha came forward and implying that she has assumed the role of the head of the household.

In the non-Jewish Gentile world women had the duty of looking after the home and nurturing a family (pietas familiae). The father (or oldest male of the household) of a Gentile family occupied the principle role (paterfamilias). Women also had a very limited role in public. They were not allowed to participate in politics…with only a few exceptions. In ancient literature there are some examples of women yielding power, but their power was tied to spite and jealousy.  In the lower classes of Roman society women left the house to work in the fields, markets, as midwives, wet-nurses and the equivalent of modern-day nannies. Women were also allowed to be wait-persons, concubines to powerful men. Women who occupied those occupations were not protected against rape because they were considered “property” of a man.

Jewish attitudes (at that period in history) toward women was by comparison better.  According to historians in ancient Judaism women played strong roles but their social role was reduced when Jews settled into permanent settlements and established a monarchy.  The Tanakh (the books of the First Testament other than the Torah — the first five books) includes strong women characters: the prophet Deborah and the powerful figures of Hannah, Ruth, Esther — all of whom play pivotal roles in Jewish history. Centuries later, rabbis taught that women, though not equal to men, should be respected by men more than a man would respect himself. In the First Century Common Era, Jewish society, somewhat more egalitarian regarding the genders than Gentile society, did not consider women as “property” or slaves. To do so would be inconsistent with Jewish theology and identity! It would appear that non-Jewish-convert Christian communities at the time of the composition of Luke’s account (and corroborated by the letters of Paul), were in a period of flux regarding the co-equality of women and men. 

The Jewish influence of co-equality of the genders and the egalitarian nature of Christian assemblies regardless of class and social ranking, was not something that many potential Gentile converts to Christianity were accustomed. Luke’s gospel could be considered a literary artifact of the struggle between a social perspective of ranking people according to social status and gender.  Luke’s gospel, unique among the others, pairs the binary genders of male and female as a way to highlight the co-equal strand of Jesus’ vision of the kingdom.  Luke 1: Elizabeth and Zechariah and Mary and Joseph. (In those narratives women function independently of men as agents of God).  In Luke 2: Simeon and Anna. Luke 8: The Twelve and “certain women” (also referenced in Acts 1:14) indicating that women were also included among the disciples indicating that women were considered intellectually, spiritual and physically capable to assume positions in the enterprise of evangelization and leadership.  Luke 23:5-56: Joseph of Arimathea and “the women who follow Jesus from Galilee” were present at the burial of Jesus. (Underscoring the courageous and integrated role that women assumed in the formation of disciples).  Luke 24:1-12: both male and female disciples were “witnesses” of the Resurrection. 

Other specific elements in the literary structure of Luke include: Gender inclusion in miracles, gender symmetry of the parables, and gender inclusion in public teaching and discourse.  Some Christian scholars see that Luke presents a new paradigm of humankind relating to God in that women in Luke relate to God directly, are agents of salvation history, are fully participating in disciple formation and the post-Resurrection life of the company of disciples. (For the full article on this argument, see: https://juniaproject.com/male-female-equality-gospel-of-luke/

Now let us return to the text and consider the weight of verses 42-43, “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and worried about many things. There is need of only one thing. Mary has chosen the better part and it will not be taken from her.” Mary, Martha’s sister, did not want to straddle the border of traditional social expectations and leadership as her sister Martha. By assuming the traditional posture of “sitting at the feet” (See Lk 10:39) of the rabbi, Mary had chosen the “better part,” meaning, she had chosen to study Torah — which was very unusual for a woman to take part in Torah studies (see last week’s reflection on Lk 10:25-37 in which the passage was essentially a Torah study on “neighbor.”) rather than try to fit discipleship into an already-existing social system of exclusion by privilege of gender. The kingdom of God demands that all things be new!  That means that the kingdom must dictate who we are and what we do — not the system dictated by the Empire!  Our life and study of Torah must be done in the context of co-equality in a radically egalitarian community.  Potential Gentile converts had to make a decision whether they were able to embrace that invitation or not.  We too in this age of the “Trumpian Empire” in which unabashed misogyny, racial animus, and privilege have risen as the new virtues associated with power, must make a decision whether we will, like Mary, choose the “better part” and Resist!

Weekly Intercessions
Early this week Trump held what could only be described as a race-baiting nationalist rally in North Carolina.  Following his incendiary racist comments about against Congresswomen Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib of Michigan and Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts on Sunday demanding that they “go back” to the places from which they came, the North Carolina rallies seemed more like German national socialist rallies of the 1930’s, that traditional campaign rallies in a modern democracy.  At the rally Trump underscored his vile and hateful rhetoric against the women and incited the crowd to begin chanting, “Send her back! Send her back!” The stunning visuals and audios from the rally alarmed many, but not all Americans. Democrats, who had rallied their unequivocal support around the four Congresswomen, have spoken out and many political commentators have denounced the rally and ordinary residents have decried the rally as a sign of a fundamental departure from our American democratic traditions…but Republican politicians from dog-catcher to Congressmen and Congresswomen, with only few exceptions, have remained conspicuously silent. It does not take a doctorate in political science to see how silence of the ruling party empowers dangerous that nationalism. One need not be a professional pundit to note just how dangerous political intolerance endangers Democracy. A graduate degree in modern Europe history is not needed to see the disturbing parallels between what happened this week and the political rallies during the rise of fascism (also known as “corporatism”) in the 1930’s in Spain, Italy and Germany.  The chant, “Send her back!” is not simply a call to send someone back to the country or the neighborhood from which one comes. The chant is a call to “reclaim what is ours,” to set society back on its “natural course” to a world in which diversity is relegated to the back of the bus, to the kitchen, the yard, and the fields. “Send her back!” is a call to silence those who challenge the status quo of straight, white, cis-male, heterosexual privilege.  This week let us pray for Democracy and the courage to stand up and say something before it is too late.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Escojiendo la mejor parte

La reflexión de la semana pasada se sumergió en el estudio de la Torá de cómo Jesús, en su rol de rabino, conectó al Dios con amor, al amor al prójimo y el amor al prójimo al misericordia sin condiciones sociales. La familiar parábola del buen samaritano fue un ejemplo principal de Jesús que magnifica la Torá de tal manera que el amor de Dios se manifiesta más a los actos de compasión. La lectura de hoy sirve como un signo de exclamación a la predicación de Jesús y como una invitación a las personas marginadas para que ellos también sean bienvenidos a una inclusión total en el nuevo movimiento espiritual que era Cristiandad. Antes de continuar, debemos presentar una simple advertencia a la reflexión: a diferencia de nuestro presente con nuestra comprensión de las múltiples identidades de género y los roles compartidos e iguales entre los géneros, los textos de las Escrituras tienden a reflexionar sobre una visión “binaria” del género con cada género ocupa roles sociales específicos. La reflexión de hoy critica la rigidez de unir las identidades de género con los roles sociales y sugiere que esta crítica (basada en una lectura general del relato del evangelio de Lucas) proporciona a las generaciones futuras el fundamento teológico para impulsar el sobre de la inclusión radical.

El pasaje de este domingo comienza en Lc 10:38 en el cual una mujer dio la bienvenida a Jesús. Dentro de un estricto contexto gentil, una mujer no aceptaría a un hombre porque eso podría implicar la igualdad social. Típicamente, un hombre agradecería a un malvado; sin embargo, parece que en esta narrativa, Martha se adelantó e insinuó que ella asumió el papel de cabeza de familia.

En el mundo gentil no judío, las mujeres tenían el deber de cuidar el hogar y cuidar de una familia (pietas familiae). El padre (o el varón más viejo de la familia) de una familia gentil ocupó el papel principal (paterfamilias). Las mujeres también tenían un papel muy limitado en público. No se les permitió participar en la política…con pocas excepciones. En la literatura antigua hay algunos ejemplos de mujeres que rindieron poder, pero su poder estaba ligado al rencor y los celos. En las clases más bajas de la sociedad romana, las mujeres salieron la casa para trabajar en los campos, en los mercados, como parteras, enfermeras húmedas y el equivalente a las niñeras modernas. Las mujeres también podían ser esperas, concubinas por los hombres poderosos. Las mujeres que ocupaban esas ocupaciones no estaban protegidas contra la violación porque se las consideraba “propiedad” de un hombre.

Las actitudes judías (en ese período de la historia) hacia las mujeres fueron, en comparación, mejores. Según los historiadores del antiguo judaísmo, las mujeres desempeñaban roles importantes, pero su rol social se redujo cuando los judíos se establecieron en asentamientos permanentes y establecieron una monarquía. Los Tanakh (los libros del Primer Testamento que no son la Torá que es los primeros cinco libros) incluyen personajes femeninos fuertes: el profeta Deborah y las poderosas figuras de Hannah, Ruth, Ester, quienes desempeñan roles fundamentales en la historia judía. Siglos más tarde, los rabinos enseñaron que las mujeres, aunque no son iguales a los hombres, deberían ser respetadas por los hombres más de lo que un hombre se respetaría a sí mismo. En la era común del primer siglo, la sociedad judía, algo más igualitaria con respecto a los géneros que la sociedad gentil, no consideraba a las mujeres como “propiedad” o esclavas. (¡Hacerlo sería inconsistente con la teología y la identidad judías!) Parecería que las comunidades cristianas-no judías-convertidas en el momento de la composición del evangelio de S Lucas (corroborada por las cartas de Pablo) se encontraban en un período de cambio con respecto a la igualdad entre mujeres y hombres.

La influencia judía de la igualdad entre los géneros y la naturaleza igualitaria de las asambleas cristianas, independientemente de la clase y la clasificación social, no era algo que muchos conversos gentiles potenciales al cristianismo estuvieran acostumbrados. El evangelio de S Lucas podría considerarse un artefacto literario de la lucha entre una perspectiva social de clasificar a las personas según el estatus social y el género. El evangelio de S Lucas, único entre los demás evangelios, combina a los géneros binarios de hombres y mujeres como una manera de resaltar la línea de la visión de Jesús del reino de Dios. Lucas 1: Isabel y Zacarías y María y José. (En esas narrativas las mujeres funcionan independientemente de los hombres como agentes de Dios). En Lucas 2: Simeon y Anna. (Dos profetas y representaron dos perspectivos la las expectativas mesiánicas) Lucas 8: Las Doce y “ciertas mujeres” (también referidas en Hechos 1:14) que indican que las mujeres también fueron incluidas entre los discípulos, lo que indica que las mujeres eran consideradas intelectualmente, espirituales y físicamente capaces de asumir posiciones en la evangelización y el liderazgo. Lucas 23: 5-56: José de Arimatea y “las mujeres que siguieron a Jesús de Galilea” estuvieron presentes en el entierro de Jesús. (Subrayando el rol valeroso e integrado que las mujeres asumieron en la formación de discípulos). Lucas 24: 1-12: los discípulos, tanto hombres como mujeres, fueron “testigos” de la Resurrección.

Otros elementos específicos en la estructura literaria de Lucas incluyen: inclusión de género en los milagros, simetría de género de las parábolas e inclusión de género en la enseñanza pública y el discurso. Algunos profesores de la Escritura ven que Lucas presenta un nuevo paradigma de la humanidad relacionado con Dios en el sentido de que las mujeres en Lucas se relacionan directamente con Dios, son agentes de la historia de la salvación, participan plenamente en la formación de discípulos y en la vida posterior a la resurrección de la compañía de discípulos. (Para ver el artículo completo sobre este argumento, consulte: https://evangelizadorasdelosapostoles.wordpress.com/2017/01/14/macho-hembra-la-igualdad-en-el-evangelio-de-lucas/)

Ahora volvamos al texto y consideremos la tema de los versículos 42-43, “Martha, Martha, estás ansiosa y preocupada por muchas cosas. Hay necesidad de una sola cosa. Maria ha elegido la mejor parte y no se la quitarán ”. Maria, la hermana de Martha, no quería cruzar el límite de las expectativas sociales tradicionales y el liderazgo como su hermana Martha. Al asumir la postura tradicional de “sentarse a los pies” del rabino, Maria había elegido la “mejor parte“, es decir, había elegido estudiar Torá (ver la reflexión de la semana pasada sobre Lc 10: 25-37) en lugar de intentarlo para encajar el discipulado en un sistema social ya existente. ¡El reino de Dios exige que todas las cosas sean nuevas! Eso significa que el reino debe dictar quiénes somos y qué hacemos, ¡no el sistema dictado por el Imperio! Nuestra vida y estudio de la Torá debe hacerse en el contexto de la co-igualdad en una comunidad igualitaria radical. Los conversos gentiles potenciales tenían que tomar una decisión si podían aceptar esa invitación o no. Nosotros también en esta era del Imperio Trumpiano en el que se han alzado la misoginia, el animo racial y el privilegio a medida que las nuevas virtudes asociadas con el poder deben decidir si, como María, elegiremos la “mejor parte” y ¡resistiremos!

Intercesiónes semanales
A principios de esta semana, Trump celebró lo que solo podría describirse como una manifestación nacionalista  de racismo en Carolina del Norte. Después de sus comentarios de Twitter incendiarios sobre las congresistas Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez de Nueva York, Ilhan Omar de Minnesota, Rashida Tlaib de Michigan y Ayanna S. Pressley de Massachusetts el domingo exigieron que “regresen” a los lugares de donde vinieron, la asamblea de Carolina del Norte parecían más bien manifestaciones nacionalsocialistas alemanes de la década de 1930, que los asambleas de la campaña tradicional en una democracia moderna. En la asamblea, Trump subrayó su vil y odiosa retórica contra las mujeres e incitó a la multitud a comenzar a gritar: “¡Envíenla de vuelta! ¡Envíenla de vuelta!” Las impresionantes imágenes y audios de la manifestación alarmaron a muchos, pero no a todos los estadounidenses. Los demócratas, que habían reunido su apoyo inequívoco en torno a las cuatro congresistas, se han manifestado y muchos comentaristas políticos han denunciado la asamblea y los residentes comunes han denunciado la asamblea como un signo de una salida fundamental de nuestras tradiciones democráticas estadounidenses…pero políticos republicanos desde el cazador de los perros hasta las congresistas, con pocas excepciones, se han mantenido silencio. Fueron callados. No se necesita un doctorado en ciencias políticas para ver cómo el silencio del partido gobernante otorga poder al nacionalismo. Uno no necesita ser un experto en la media para notar cuán peligrosa es la intolerancia política que pone en peligro a la democracia. No es necesario un título de posgrado en historia de la Europa moderna para ver los inquietantes paralelos entre lo que sucedió esta semana y las manifestaciones políticos durante la amanecer del fascismo (también conocido como “corporativismo”) en la década de 1930 en España, Italia y Alemania. El canto, “¡Envíenla de vuelta!” No es simplemente una llamada para deportar a alguien al país o despertar al vecindario del que proviene. El grito es un llamado a “recuperar lo que es nuestro”, para devolver a la sociedad su “camino natural” a un mundo en el que la diversidad está relegada a la parte trasera del autobús, a la cocina, al jardín, y a los campos. “¡Envíenla de vuelta!” Es una llamada a callar la voz a quienes desafían el status quo de los privilegios heterosexuales, blancos, hombres-cis. Esta semana oremos por la democracia y el coraje de levantarnos y decir algo antes de que sea demasiado tarde.

News – Noticias

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Join Fr. Jon on July 21 at Santa Teresa Parish. He will speak about the need for affordable housing.  There will NOT be a Misa de Solidaridad July 21. Masses are at 8:30, 10 and 11:30 am. 
 
Únete al p. Jon el 21 de julio en la parroquia de santa teresa. Hablará sobre la necesidad de viviendas asequibles. NO habrá una Misa de Solidaridad el 21 de julio. Misas son a las 8.30, 10 y 11.30 en inglés.

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Sign up to be a Rapid Responder to defend your immigrant neighbor!  
 
WEDNESDAY, July 24, 11am-1pm, Evergreen Valley College Library, 3095 Yerba Buena Rd, San Jose, CA 95135
 
A special training for Morgan Hill residents only: SATURDAY, July 27, 1:00pm
 
 
¡Regístrate para ser un Servicio de Respuesta Rápida para defender a tu vecino inmigrante! MIÉRCOLES, 24 de julio de 11 am a 1 pm, biblioteca de Evergreen Valley College, 3095 Yerba Buena Rd, San Jose, CA 95135
 
Una capacitación especial solo para residentes de Morgan Hill: SÁBADO, 27 de julio, 1:00 pm
 
Register/Registrarse:
http://sacredheartcs.org/rapidresponsenetwork/ or https://www.pactsj.org/rapid-response-network-in-santa-clara-county/
 

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp