Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Jesus Movement and Liberation

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

January 24, 2020

YES MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday!

MISA this Sunday will be
January 26 at 9 am
at the Newman Chapel
on the corner of South 10th and San Carlos

SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo!

MISA este domingo
26 de enero a las 9 am
estaré en la capilla de SJSU
la esquina de Calle Sur 10 y S. Carlos

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

A fern frond from Fr. Jon’s garden represents the gradual unfolding of our spiritual life. In this week’s gospel, Jesus calls the first of his disciples together. Living in the present moment rather than perseverating about what that might mean, obsessing about things they need to let go of before following Jesus or fearing what the future might hold, Simon Peter, Andrew, James and John said, “Yes!” to the invitation immediately because they lived in the moment. They did not live in the past, nor were they living for the future. What might our lives become if we were to live our lives as a fern frond: a life that is constantly opening up to the presence of the sun.

Gospel Reflection: The Jesus Movement and Liberation
This week’s reflection on the beginning of the Galilean ministry (Mt. 4:12-22) will provide a socio-historical context for Jesus’ ethics and teachings. Sakari Häkkinen, a South African scholar’s article, “Poverty in the first-century Galilee,” (www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php? script=sci_arttext&pid=S0259-94222016000400046) wrote that most of the population of the Empire lived in extreme poverty in sparsely populated rural areas. 

Sakari Häkkinen, says that most of the population of the empire lived in subsistence conditions in rural areas and small towns. Cities were socially and economically parasitic: they imported all agricultural goods from surrounding villages and imposed taxes and extracted high rents on the people. In return, the poor received religious services and administration.

Wealth in rural areas was based on land ownership in which 1%-3% of the population controlled the land and possessed the wealth. Gentiles directed generosity to the community (buildings and art), not to individuals who needed support. In short, history shows that the trickle-down theory that lauds the good intentions and generosity of the upper class, is nothing but a fairy tale and ruse intended to paint the elite in favorable terms and veil their greed and selfishness.

Rather than helping the poor, the elite urban dwellers who controlled the land, increased the value of land and imposed higher taxes driving many rural inhabitants into debt. Debtors became tenants, were sent into debtors’ prison, and in some cases sold their families into slavery as a way to pay off debts. As rural poor families grew larger, they fell into greater debt because their ancestral land normally reserved for their children, had already been confiscated by the Empire.

The conditions of poverty in the ancient Mediterranean applied also to Galilee. Archeological digs have not surfaced stores or storage buildings for grain, suggest- ing that all products were immediately consumed and not sold. The lack of cash on hand because of rent, taxes, loan remissions with interest left the people with nothing to trade. While poverty was wide spread, poverty was not as important as the public reputation of the family. Worse than losing their money, people lost their honor, and under the Empire’s economic system, it would be impossible to regain what was lost: honor.

People were conditioned to believe that the only way one could get more wealth was to deprive others of their wealth. To become wealthy, then, was seen as sin and greed. The Empire conditioned people to believe that one’s status in life was fixed from birth and that there was no way out of their condition. Given what seems to be a no-win situation it would not be hard to imagine that the socio-historical conditioning of the people had created a collective anxiety. The Jesus movement was born in this context of economic and social oppression.

Galilee, already a hot bed of Jewish Resistance, was ripe for change. The invitation to be “Come after men, and I will make you fishers of men and women,” (see Mt 4:19) is more than merely asking Simon, Andrew, James and John to follow him, he is asking them to renounce the old system run by the elite few at the expense of the rest of humanity and to build a movement of Resistance. The “Jesus Movement” was one of several liberation movements in Galilee. The Jesus Movement was grounded in a Jewish understanding of liberation which was radically different from a Gentile understanding. In Rhetoric 1367:a32 Aristotle said that the “condition of the free man (sic) is that he not live under the constraint of another.”

Drawing from Gentile philosophy, freedom is being free from being indebted to another person whereas liberation and freedom in the Jewish tradition is far more extensive. Rooted in the Exodus narrative, liberation is far more than being freed from their Egyptian oppressors. Liberation is also the interior freedom expressed in joy, serenity and social harmony. As we go forward in our study of Matthew’s gospel we will see that the Jesus Movement is at once grounded in resistance to political and economic oppression as well as social and spiritual oppression.

As we begin to organize our selves and our community politically, we cannot ignore the underlying human emotions of those whom we organize. Like the Jesus Movement, we must pay attention to the spiritual and psychological pains of those who believe that they are in a fixed, no-win situation. We have to make space to hear the narratives of those directly affected by displacement and economic loss. Like Jesus, we are facing the Empire and we must call people forth to be fishers of humanity. Our organizing must integrate creating capacity within the community for their self-determination.

We, therefore, cannot be short sighted about our work. While it is paramount that what happens between now and November 3 is important, we must also prepare our communities to be strong, re- silient, and utterly compassionate for the long run. Our work will not be over in November. Our will indeed continue far into the future.

Weekly Intercessions

“Be Lost in the Call,” Rumi

Lord, said David, since you do not need us, why did you create these two worlds?

Reality replied: O prisoner of time,
I was a secret treasure of kindness and generosity,
and I wished this treasure to be known,
so I created a mirror: its shining face, the heart;
its darkened back, the world;
The back would please you if you’ve never seen the face.

Has anyone ever produced a mirror out of mud and straw?
Yet clean away the mud and straw,
and a mirror might be revealed.

Until the juice ferments a while in the cask,
it isn’t wine. If you wish your heart to be bright, you must do a little work.

My King addressed the soul of my flesh: You return just as you left.
Where are the traces of my gifts?

We know that alchemy transforms copper into gold. This Sun doesn’t want a crown or robe from God’s grace. He is a hat to a hundred bald men,
a covering for ten who were naked.

Jesus sat humbly on the back of an ass, my child! How could a zephyr ride an ass?
Spirit, find your way, in seeking lowness like a stream. Reason, tread the path of selflessness into eternity.

Remember God so much that you are forgotten. Let the caller and the called disappear;
be lost in the Call.

Let us pray for all who dare to take the steps to walk the spiritual path of service, building community, joy, harmony with others, and self sacrifice.

Reflexión del Evangelio: El movimiento de Jesús y la liberación 

La reflexión de esta semana sobre el comienzo del ministerio de Galilea (Mt. 4: 12-22) proporcionará un contexto socio-histórico para la ética y las enseñanzas de Jesús. Sakari Häkkinen, un artículo de un erudi- to sudafricano, “Pobreza en la Galilea del primer siglo” (www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_art- text&pid=S0259-94222016000400046) escribió que la mayoría de la población del Imperio vivía en extrema pobreza en áreas rurales escasamente pobladas.

Sakari Häkkinen dice: La mayoría de la población del imperio vivía en condiciones de subsistencia en áreas rurales y pueblos pequeños. Las ciudades eran social y económicamente parásitas: importaban todos los productos agrícolas de las aldeas vecinas e imponían impuestos y obtenían altas rentas a la gente. A cambio, los pobres recibieron servicios religiosos y administración.

La riqueza en las zonas rurales se basaba en la propiedad de la tierra en la que 1% -3% de la población con- trolaba la tierra y poseía la riqueza. Los gentiles dirigieron la generosidad a la comunidad (edificios y arte), no a las personas que necesitaban apoyo. En resumen, la historia muestra que la teoría de “trickle down” que alaba las buenas intenciones y la generosidad de la clase alta, no es más que un cuento de hadas y un truco destinado a pintar a la élite en términos favorables y velar su codicia y egoísmo.

En lugar de ayudar a los pobres, los habitantes urbanos de élite que controlaban la tierra, aumentaron el valor de la tierra e impusieron impuestos más altos que endeudaron a muchos habitantes rurales. Los deudores se convirtieron en inquilinos, fueron enviados a la prisión de deudores y, en algunos casos, vendieron a sus familias a la esclavitud como una forma de pagar las deudas. A medida que las familias pobres rurales crecieron, se endeudaron más porque sus tierras ancestrales normalmente reservadas para sus hijos, ya habían sido confiscadas por el Imperio.

Las condiciones de pobreza en el antiguo Mediterráneo se aplicaron también a Galilea. Las excavaciones arqueológicas no han aparecido en tiendas o edificios de almacenamiento de granos, lo que sugiere que todos los productos se consumieron inmediatamente y no se vendieron. La falta de efectivo disponible debido a rentas, impuestos, remisiones de préstamos con intereses dejó a las personas sin nada para comerciar. Si bien la pobreza estaba muy extendida, la pobreza no era tan importante como la reputación pública de la familia. Peor que perder su dinero, la gente perdió su honor, y bajo el sistema económico del Imperio, sería imposible recuperar lo que se perdió: el honor.

La gente estaba condicionada a creer que la única forma de obtener más riqueza era privar a otros de su riqueza. Llegar a ser rico, entonces, fue visto como pecado y avaricia. El Imperio condicionó a la gente a creer que el estado de uno en la vida estaba fijado desde el nacimiento y que no había forma de salir de su condición. Dado lo que parece ser una situación de no ganar, no sería difícil imaginar que el condicionamiento socio-histórico de las personas hubiera creado una ansiedad colectiva. El movimiento de Jesús nació en el contexto de esta opresión económica y social.

Galilea, que ya era una cama caliente de resistencia judía, estaba lista para el cambio. La invitación a ser “Vengan tras los hombres, y los haré pescadores de hombres y mujeres” (ver Mt 4:19) es más que simplemente pedirle a Simón, Andrés, Santiago y Juan que lo sigan, les está pidiendo que renuncien. El antiguo sistema dirigido por la élite pocos a expensas del resto de la humanidad y para construir un movimiento de resistencia. El Movimiento de Jesús fue uno de varios movimientos de liberación en Galilea. El Movimiento de Jesús se basó en una comprensión judía de la liberación que era radicalmente diferente de una comprensión gentil. En Retórica 1367: a32 Aristóteles dijo que la “condición del hombre libre es que no viva bajo la restricción de otro”. A partir de la filosofía gentil, la libertad es liberarse de estar en deuda con otra persona, mientras que la libertad en la tradición judía es mucho más extensa.

Arraigado en la narrativa del Éxodo, la liberación es mucho más que liberarse de sus opresores egipcios. La liberación es también la libertad interior expresada en alegría, serenidad y armonía social. A medida que avancemos en nuestro estudio del evangelio de Mateo, veremos que el Movimiento de Jesús se basa a la vez en la resistencia a la opresión política y económica, así como a la opresión social y espiritual.

A medida que comenzamos a organizarnos a nosotros mismos y a nuestra comunidad políticamente, no podemos ignorar las emociones humanas subyacentes de aquellos a quienes organizamos. Al igual que el Movimiento de Jesús, debemos prestar atención a los dolores espirituales y psicológicos de aquellos que creen que están en una situación fija, sin ganar. Tenemos que hacer espacio para escuchar las narraciones de las personas directamente afectadas por el desplazamiento y la pérdida económica. Al igual que Jesús, estamos frente al Imperio y debemos convocar a las personas para que sean pescadores de la humanidad. Nuestra organización debe integrar la creación de capacidad dentro de la comunidad para su autodeterminación. Por lo tanto, no podemos ser miopes sobre nuestro trabajo. Si bien es esencial que lo que ocurra entre ahora y el 3 de noviembre sea importante, también debemos preparar a nuestras comunidades para que sean fuertes, resistentes y completamente compasivas por el plazo largo. Nuestro trabajo no terminará en noviembre. Nuestra voluntad continuará lejos en el futuro.

Intercesiónes semanales
LA PALOMA LIBRE PATROCINIO NAVARRO

Violeta y dorada, en el alba Danza la paloma blanca. Remando va cielo arriba Buscando en su navegar
La fuente de la mañana. Libre, la paloma olvida
Que la tierra es verde y parda En la orilla del juncal
Donde dos ojos aguardan. De plomo son sus entrañas

Sin el alma en el mirar…
Y la sombra verdiparda
Escupe fuego fatal.
La paloma blanca al aire
Tiñó de rojo en su volar,
Y entregó su cuerpo a la sombra De la muerte en el juncal
Con ojos de gris y plomo Y entrañas de mineral.

Y volvió a remar cielo arriba
Sin equipaje mortal.
(Por el aire de otro cielo La palo-
maVivaVa)

Oremos por todos los que se animen a dar los pasos para caminar por el sendero espiritual del servicio, construir comunidad, alegría, armonía con los demás y sacrificio personal.

 

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, January 25, 10am-12pm Casa de Clara 318 N. 6th St. San Jose 95112

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

LATINOS IN ACTION 2020
COMMUNITY ACTION
ACCION COMUNITARIA

HOLD THE DATE! — Guarda esta fecha
February 8 – 8 de febrero
9 am – 12 pm

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2020 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

January 17, 2020

YES MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday!

MISA this Sunday will be
January 19 at 9 am
at the Newman Chapel
on the corner of South 10th and San Carlos

SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo!

MISA este domingo
19 de enero a las 9 am
estaré en la capilla de SJSU
la esquina de Calle Sur 10 y S. Carlos

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

From last week’s misa de Solidaridad. Members were asked to share with one another what they saw in the person with whom they were speaking. People saw, “A courageous person,” “A beautiful little one.” “An intelligent young man,” “An amazing, generous human being.” What we see in one another will tell us how we will treat one another. The first step in justice is to learn to open our eyes to the Divine in one another. Only until we see the Divine in the Other will we be able to do the work required by justice and faith.

Gospel Reflection: “I saw the Spirit come down like a dove from the sky and remain upon him.”

Today’s gospel selection is taken from the Gospel of John, rather than Matthew. Our study of Matthew’s gospel will begin next week.

Recall that Spirit, Ruach Ha Kodesh, (רוח הקודש) refers to the divine force and influence of God over all God’s creatures. Ruach is the breath, wind, the moving force that brings life to all things and Kodesh means, holy — that which is set apart for a specific and clearly special purpose of God. As John’s gospel uses the then most contemporary Jewish theological references than the synoptic gospels, we must pay attention to the reference. At the time of John the Baptist, Jewish thought about the indwelling of Spirit was becoming more widely accepted among the Jewish population around the time of the Destruction of the Second Temple (c. 70 CE).

The indwelling of the Spirit was specifically, Shekhinah (שכינה) -which literally meant, ”dwelling” or “settling” indicating that the divine presence of God has taken up residency in a specific place or a “dwelling.” Note that the prolog of John’s gospel (Jn 1:14), “And the Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us and we saw his glory, the glory as of the Father’s only Son, full of grace and truth.” The “dwelling” reference harkens the attentive reader to consider the Covenant being held in a tent among the people. This literary parallel might suggest to the early Christian disciples that Jesus-as-the Christ, like Torah, (“The Instruction” or “The Law”) dwells among us.

Divine Presence is transformative of those in the vicinity of the Dwelling, especially when Shekinah abides in a person and those whom that person touches. Jewish rabbinical references report that Spirit/Shekhinah is present when people read and study Torah together, when an assembly of ten are gathered for prayer (a minyan), when there are three people sitting as judges, in times of great and dire need, and in married life in which Spirit/Shekhinah is present. Today’s gospel selection, read in the context of the liturgical cycle of readings, prepares Christians to pay attention to Jesus-as-the Christ not because Spirit/Shekhinah is in the person of Jesus-as-the Christ, but that Jesus-as-the Christ is inseparable from Spirit/Shekhihah and therefore inseparable from God.

The gospel of John makes a claim that goes further than normative Judaism. For Christians Spirit/Shekinah does not merely abide in Jesus as Spirt/Shekinah might abide in a prophet or in a minyan or among 3 judges. Christians believe that Jesus-as-the Christ is the living word made flesh (Jn 1:14) and that Jesus-as-the Christ is Spirit/Shekinah. “In the beginning was the Word, and Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God All things came to be through him and without him nothing came to be. What came to be through him was life, and this life was the light of the human race; the light shines in the darkness, and the darkness has not overcome it.” (Jn 1:1-5).

Although Christians and Jews could agree about the one-ness of God, they could not (and still do not) have a common understanding of Jesus. Christians see Jesus-as-the Christ/LORD. Jews see Jesus as a teacher or a type of rabbi independent from the traditional rabbinical schools of Galilee. Let us take a moment to understand this difference by looking at the origin of the difference. The cornerstone prayer of Judaism is the Shema Yisrael (ְשׁ ַמע יִ ְשׂ ָר ֵאל ) translated says, “Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God, the LORD is one.” God cannot be divided in any way. Ruach Ha Kodesh and Shekinah are merely titles of God, not separate realities. Therefore one can be touched by Ruach Ha Kodesh or Shekinah, but one cannot be Shekinah. Thus, the notion that Spirit/ Shekinah is identified as an indivisible part of who Jesus-as-the Christ is and that Jesus-as-the Christ is identified as present in the beginning of all things, is antithetical to the non-dual understanding of God. As we continue in this reflection we will next touch on the break between Christians and Jews and how this break became twisted into to hateful aggression and eventually anti-Semitism and genocide.

The history of violence against Jews rose not from theological difference, but from a social separation sustained by an unjust distribution of power. For the first two centuries of the Common Era, Jews and Christians lived in the same neighborhoods, but as the Empire eased up on the persecution of Christians and as Christianity took greater hold among the poor of Gentile population, Christians began to distance itself from their former Jewish neighbors. The separation from their neighbors was justified by an emerging theology of triumph and supersessionism born from Jewish social exclusion and the might of the Empire. Christian triumphal supersession believes that Christianity replaced Judaism. They also believed that favorable social and political recognition of Christianity was an indication that God blessed Christians over others, especially the Jewish people. The triumphal elements of Christianity linger on to this day: ecclesial personalities appear in photo ops with dictators and tyrants and offer prayers at fascist gatherings and blessings at American presidential events. Triumphant supersession theology permeated the collective conscience of Christians for centuries. Christians, inured to the suffering of Jews and non-Christians, thought nothing was wrong with policies that excluded non-Christians from public life. Christians accepted colonialism and slavery based on race in the Americas and pogroms and genocide in Europe and North American and segregationist Jim Crow laws in America and apartheid in South Africa.

Not all Christian leaders; however, were comfortable with supersessionism and the Empire. In various times and places a small feisty minority of dedicated Christians dared to question the prevailing theology. A few stood up against the majority of 16th Century Christians to state that the Africans, Polynesians and the indigenous population of the Americas were in fact fully human and were made in the image and likeness of God and in our modern era people like Dr. King dared to step out of their relative privilege and challenge the system that measured the freedom and movement of non-White persons.

This Monday we celebrate the life and contribution of Dr. King precisely because he chose to lead and not follow. The body of his writing and preaching is imbued with the credo that all of us are children of God and that we are therefore sister and brother to each other. The theology that was the foundation of his preaching was a theology of the Spirit/Shekinah that spoke of the a vision of the Beloved Community: that is, a community bound together in mutual acknowledgment that the Divine has crafted the person that stands before us. The person who stands before us is the “Thou” regardless of that person’s race, ethnicity, status of residency, religious and political affiliation, economic level, age, physical or cognitive abilities, gender and sexual identity. The One standing before us is a child of the God, made in the image and likeness of the Divine. Behold: the Lamb of God!

Let us transcend artificial categories of values that grant superior status of one, while disvaluing the status of another. Let us embrace the Beloved Community: a community of radical equality and mutual embrace. May the memory of Dr. King remind us that our race is devalued because we believe in racial equality. That our religion is less true because we admire and work alongside those of other religions. That our patriotism is in question because we choose to respect the national identity of others. Dr. King said, “If we are to have peace on earth, our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Our loyalties must transcend our race, our tribe, our class, and our nation; and this means we must develop a world perspective.” In the context of Church, let us celebrate that the Spirit of God has indeed come down on Dr. King and all those who fight for justice. May this weekend’s liturgies and prayers not only echo Dr. King’s words, but may our actions subsequent to liturgy produce a harvest of racial, economic, political, social, and gender justice.

Weekly Intercessions

A reflection, “I remember” by Sheryl L. Jones, a colleague from Catholic Charities

I remember seeing the dogs released on the people and the fire hoses turned on people because they wanted equal rights.

I remember watching the marches and listening to the speeches of Dr. King.

I remember the boycott, bust strikes and garbage strikes.

I remember the church bombing that killed the girls in the Baptist church in Birmingham

I remember George Wallace and his outright hatred. Oh I remember the hatred I saw, I remember the young civil rights workers who disappeared and were later found murdered.

But I can remember Dr. Martin Luther King, who kept preaching non-violence amid this division in our country. A man who faced so many obstacles and roadblocks, but he would not give up or be intimidated. A man faced mobs of people time and time again that wanted to silence him, but he would not be silenced.
He organized and knew how to treat people and that was with love, the love that could only be given by God.

A man who brought blacks, whites, Jews, Protestants, other clergy, the young and old together to cry out against the injustice in the South. Dr. King was a man that lived what the Bible said.

From Matthew 5:44, “But I say unto you, Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, do good to them that hate you, and pray for them which despitefully use you and persecute you.

Reflexión del Evangelio: “Vi al Espíritu descender del cielo en forma de paloma y posarse sobre él.”
La selección del evangelio de hoy está tomada del Evangelio de Juan, en lugar de Mateo. Nuestro estudio del evangelio de Mateo comenzará la próxima semana.

Recordemos que el Espíritu, Ruach Ha Kodesh, (רוח הקודש) se refiere a la fuerza divina y la influencia de Dios sobre todas las criaturas de Dios. Ruach es el aliento, el viento, la fuerza motriz que da vida a todas las cosas y Kodesh significa, santo, lo que se aparta para un propósito específico y claramente especial de Dios. Como el evangelio de S Juan usa las referencias teológicas judías más contemporáneas que los evan- gelios sinópticos, debemos prestar atención a la referencia. En la época de Juan el Bautista, el pensamiento judío acerca de la morada del Espíritu era cada vez más aceptado entre la población judía en la época de la Destrucción del Segundo Templo (c. 70 EC).

La morada del Espíritu fue específicamente, Shekhinah (שכינה) que literalmente significa “carpa” o “asentamiento” que indica que la presencia divina de Dios ha establecido su residencia en un lugar específico o una “carpa”. Tenga en cuenta que el prólogo de S Juan (Jn 1:14), “Y el Verbo se hizo carne e hizo su morada entre nosotros y vimos su gloria, la gloria del Hijo único del Padre, llena de gracia y verdad“. La referencia de la “morada” atenta al atento el lector debe considerar el Pacto celebrado en una tienda de campaña entre la gente. Este paralelo literario podría sugerir a los primeros discípulos cristianos que Jesús como el Cristo, como la Torá, (“La Instrucción” o “La Ley”) habita entre nosotros.

La Presencia Divina es transformadora de los que se encuentran en la vecindad de la Vivienda, especialmente cuando Shekinah permanece en una persona y aquellos a quienes esa persona toca. Las referencias rabínicas judías informan que el Espíritu / Shekhinah está presente cuando las personas leen y estudian la Torá juntas, cuando una asamblea de diez se reúne para orar (un minyan), cuando hay tres personas sentadas como jueces, en momentos de gran y extrema necesidad, y en la vida matrimonial en la que el Espíritu / Shekhinah está presente. La selección del evangelio de hoy, leída en el contexto del ciclo litúrgico de lecturas, prepara a los cristianos a prestar atención a Jesús como el Cristo, no porque el Espíritu / Shekhinah esté en la persona de Jesús como el Cristo, sino que Jesús como … el Cristo es inseparable del Espíritu / Shekhihah y, por lo tanto, inseparable de Dios.

El evangelio de S Juan hace una afirmación que va más allá del judaísmo normativo. Para los cristianos, el Espíritu / Shekinah no solo permanece en Jesús como el Espíritu / Shekinah podría permanecer en un pro- feta o en un minyan o entre 3 jueces. Los cristianos creen que Jesús como el Cristo es la palabra viva hecha carne (Jn 1:14) y que Jesús-como-el Cristo es Espíritu / Shekinah. “En el principio era la Palabra, y la Palabra estaba con Dios, y la Palabra era Dios. Estaba en el principio con Dios. Todas las cosas se hicieron realidad a través de él y sin él nada se hizo realidad. Lo que llegó a ser a través de él fue la vida, y esta vida fue la luz de la raza humana; la luz brilla en la oscuridad, y la oscuridad no la ha vencido.”(Jn 1: 1-5).

Aunque los cristianos y los judíos podían ponerse de acuerdo sobre la unidad de Dios, no podían (y aún no lo hacen) tener una comprensión común de Jesús. Los cristianos ven a Jesús-como-el Cristo / Señor. Los judíos ven a Jesús como un maestro o un tipo de rabino independiente de las escuelas rabínicas tradiciona- les de Galilea. Tomemos un momento para comprender esta diferencia al observar el origen de la diferen- cia. La oración fundamental del judaísmo es el Shema Yisrael (ְמַע יִשְׂרָאֵלשׁ) traducido dice: “Escucha, Israel: Dios, nuestro Dios, Dios es uno“. Dios no puede dividirse de ninguna manera. Ruach Ha Kodesh y Shekinah son meramente títulos de Dios, no realidades separadas. Por lo tanto, uno puede ser tocado por Ruach Ha Kodesh o Shekinah, pero uno no puede ser Shekinah. Por lo tanto, la noción de que el Espíritu / Shekinah se identifica como una parte indivisible de quién es Jesús-como-el Cristo y que Jesús-como-el Cristo se identifica como presente en el principio de todas las cosas, es antitético a la comprensión no-dual de Dios. A medida que continuamos en esta reflexión, tocaremos a continuación la ruptura entre cristianos y judíos y cómo esta ruptura se torció en agresión odiosa y eventualmente antisemitismo y genocidio.

La historia de la violencia contra los judíos no surgió de la diferencia teológica, sino de una separación social sostenida por una distribución injusta del poder. Durante los primeros dos siglos de la Era Común, judíos y cristianos vivieron en los mismos barrios, pero a medida que el Imperio disminuyó la persecución de los cristianos y el cristianismo se apoderó de los pobres de la población gentil, los cristianos comenzaron a distanciarse de sus ex vecinos judíos. La separación de sus vecinos se justificó por una teología emergente del triunfo y el supersesionismo nacidos de la exclusión social judía y el poder del Imperio. La superación cristiana triunfal cree que el cristianismo re- emplazó al judaísmo. También creían que el reconocimiento social y político favorable del cristianismo era una indicación de que Dios bendijo a los cristianos sobre los demás, especialmente el pueblo judío. Los elementos triunfales del cristianismo perduran hasta el día de hoy: las personalidades eclesiales aparecen en sesiones fotográficas con dictadores y tiranos y ofrecen oraciones en reuniones fascistas y bendiciones en eventos presidenciales estadounidenses. La teología de la superación triunfante impregna la conciencia colectiva de los cristianos por siglos. Los cristianos, acostumbrados al sufrimiento de judíos y no cristianos, pensaban que no había nada de malo en las políticas que excluían a los no cristianos de la vida pública. Los cristianos aceptaron el colonialismo y la esclavitud basada en la raza en las Américas y los pogromos y el genocidio en Europa y Norteamérica y las leyes segregacionistas de Jim Crow en América y el apartheid en Sudáfrica.

No todos los líderes cristianos; Sin embargo, se sentían cómodos con el supersesionismo y el Imperio. En varios tiempos y lugares, una pequeña minoría luchadora de cristianos dedicados se atrevió a cuestionar la teología prevaleciente. Algunos se opusieron a la mayoría de los cristianos del siglo XVI para afirmar que los africanos, los polinesios y la población indígena de las Américas eran de hecho completamente humanos y fueron creados a imagen y semejanza de Dios y en nuestra era moderna, personas como el Dr. King se atrevieron a salir de su relativo privilegio y desafiar el sistema que medía la libertad y el movimiento de personas no blancas.

Este lunes celebramos la vida y la contribución del Dr. King precisamente porque eligió liderar y no seguir. El cuerpo de su escritura y predicación está imbuido del credo de que todos somos hijos de Dios y que, por lo tanto, somos hermanos y hermanas el uno para el otro. La teología que fue el fundamento de su predicación fue una teología del Espíritu / Shekinah que hablaba de la visión de la Comunidad Amada: es decir, una comunidad unida en reconocimiento mutuo de que lo Divino ha creado a la persona que está delante de nosotros. La persona que se presenta ante nosotros es el “Usted”, independientemente de su raza, origen étnico, estado de residencia, afiliación religiosa y política, nivel económico, edad, habilidades físicas o cognitivas, género e identidad sexual. El que está delante de nosotros es un hijo de Dios, hecho a imagen y semejanza de lo Divino. ¡He aquí el Cordero de Dios!

Trascendamos las categorías artificiales de valores que otorgan un estatus superior a uno, mientras desvalorizamos el estado de otro. Abracemos a la Comunidad Amada: una comunidad de igualdad radical y abrazo mutuo. Que el recuerdo del Dr. King nos recuerde que nuestra raza está devaluada porque creemos en la igualdad racial. Que nuestra religión es menos cierta porque admiramos y trabajamos junto a los de otras religiones. Que nuestro patriotismo está en duda porque elegimos respetar la identidad nacional de los demás. El Dr. King dijo: “Si queremos tener paz en la tierra, nuestras lealtades deben volverse ecumé- nicas en lugar de seccionales. Nuestras lealtades deben trascender nuestra raza, nuestra tribu, nuestra clase y nuestra nación; y esto significa que debemos desarrollar una perspectiva mundial ”. En el contexto de la Iglesia, celebremos que el Espíritu de Dios realmente estuve sobre el Dr. King y todos aquellos que luchan por la justicia. Que las liturgias y oraciones de este fin de semana no solo hagan eco de las palabras del Dr. King, sino que nuestras acciones posteriores a la liturgia produzcan una cosecha de justicia racial, económica, política, social y de género.

Intercesiónes semanales
Una reflexión, “Recuerdo”, de Sheryl L. Jones, una colega de Caridades Católicas

Recuerdo haber visto a los perros liberados sobre las personas y las mangueras de bomberos encendidas contra las personas porque querían los mismos derechos.

Recuerdo haber visto las marchas y escuchar los discursos del Dr. King.

Recuerdo el boicot, las huelgas de busto y las huelgas de basura.

Recuerdo el bombardeo de la iglesia que mató a las niñas en la iglesia bautista en Birmingham.

Recuerdo a George Wallace y su odio absoluto. Oh, recuerdo el odio que vi, recuerdo a los jóvenes trabajadores de derechos civiles que desaparecieron y luego fueron encontrados asesinados.

Pero puedo recordar al Dr. Martin Luther King, quien siguió predicando la no violencia en medio de esta división en nuestro país. Un hombre que se enfrentó a tantos obstáculos y obstáculos, pero que no se rendiría ni se dejaría intimidar. Un hombre se enfrentaba a multitudes de personas una y otra vez que querían silenciarlo, pero no sería silenciado.

Se organizó y sabía cómo tratar a las personas y eso fue con amor, el amor que solo Dios podía dar.

Un hombre que reunió a negros, blancos, judíos, protestantes, otros clérigos, jóvenes y viejos para gritar contra la injusticia en el sur. El Dr. King fue un hombre que vivió lo que la Biblia dice.

De Mateo 5:44, “Pero yo te digo, ama a tus enemigos, bendi- ce a los que te maldicen, haz el bien a los que te odian, y reza por ellos que a pesar de ti te usan y te persiguen.”

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

TUESDAY, January 21, 5:30-7:30 Santa Clara University (sign up for exact location)

SATURDAY, January 25, 10am-12pm Casa de Clara 318 N. 6th St. San Jose 95112

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

LATINOS IN ACTION 2020
COMMUNITY ACTION
ACCION COMUNITARIA

HOLD THE DATE! — Guarda esta fecha
February 8 – 8 de febrero
9 am – 12 pm

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2020 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

December 19, 2019

YES MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday!

MISA this Sunday will be
December 22 at 9 am
at the Newman Chapel
on the corner of South 10th and San Carlos

Join Fr. Jon at Our Lady of Refuge
on January 5
at the 10 am Spanish or 12 noon English mass

SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo!

MISA este domingo
22 de diciembre a las 9 am
estaré en la capilla de SJSU
la esquina de Calle Sur 10 y S. Carlos

Ven con P. Jon el 5 de enero en Nuestra Sra de Refugio
por la misa 10 (español) or 12 pm (inglés)
Nos esperamos!

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Parishioners at Our Lady of Refuge, staff of Catholic Charities Parish Engagement, volunteer leaders from the Tuesday Community Market and members of Grupo Solidaridad celebrated the Posada at the Parish. Drawing parallels from today’s events of exclusion (refugees at the border, people displaced by gentrification and deportation), participants were able to live their own Posada within the Posada of Joseph and Mary.

Advent-Christmas- Epiphany Reflection

This reflection will cover the last Sunday of Advent through the Epiphany. The next issue of the Communique will be for the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord.

The Fourth Sunday of Advent focuses on the circumstances just prior to the birth of Jesus-Messiah-Lord. The account from Matthew (Mt 1:18-24) differs from the more familiar gospel of Luke in that Matthew’s gospel focuses on Joseph and his decision to welcome Mary into his home. In Luke’s account Mary was visited by the Angel Gabriel and Mary had the power and self-agency. In Matthew’s gospel, Joseph holds the power of decision. He has to decide whether he follow the Torah to the literal letter of what is demanded of a man whose wife is pregnant by someone beside the husband or if he would ignore the Torah and send Mary away without publicly shaming her. At that point the angel spoke to Joseph in a dream to take Mary into his home.  In a dream state the angel told Jospeh that Holy Spirit conceived the child and that the child would “save people from their sins.” 

The Hebrew term, “Holy Spirit” (רוח הקודש Ruach Ha-Kodesh) refers to the divine force and influence of God over all God’s creatures. Ruach is the breath, wind, the moving force that brings life to all things. Kodesh means, holy — that which is set apart for a specific and clearly special purpose of God. In the passage today, Holy Spirit does not mean the “third person of the Trinity” but rather that God directly intervened with a single, clear, intentional purpose in the life of this young woman, Mary, to bring forth a child. The purpose of this child is to save the people. The reference to Isaiah’s prophecy (Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall name him Emmanuel,” Mt 1:23/Is 7:14) is that through God’s accompaniment (Emmanuel means, God is with the people), the people will be saved. This year will we explore the gospel of Matthew on the theme of God accompanying people by way of showing that Jesus-as-Messiah-Lord leads the people through a “new exodus” from the tyranny of the Empire through radical solidarity with the people of Israel, particularly those who are poor and marginalized.  Matthew’s gospel will also pick up on the tension brought on by resistance to solidarity.

The Christmas gospels most of us are familiar with are the birth of Jesus from Luke’s gospel. The less frequently used gospels are the Christmas day passage from the Prologue of John and the very challenging genealogy of Jesus from Matthew’s account. No matter which lectionary selection one takes, the preaching must point to the Incarnation (literally, the enfleshment of God). The infancy narratives from Luke are like an overture to a Broadway musical: they have multiple snippets of themes that will be developed in the rest of Luke’s narrative. Incarnation in Luke’s gospel is framed as both the birth of Jesus as a human person and the birth of Jesus in the repressive social and political circumstances of his birth. The genealogy of Matthew is an utterly fascinating passage; however, it is laden with many details that are lost to most “meat and potato” Christians.  Luke and Matthew have genealogies of Jesus in their respective gospels and these genealogies differ. Luke follows the lineage of Mary and Matthew follows the lineage of Joseph. Contemporary scholars associated with the “Jesus Seminar” believe that the genealogies were created to “prove” the legitimacy of Jesus-as-Messiah-Lord as belonging to the line of David (Matthew) and Jesus-as-the Christ (Luke. Note that the theme of the legitimacy of Jesus in the Davidic line of kings is underscored in the reason for Joseph and Mary to register in Bethlehem). The problem with the Jesus Seminary position is that it does not adequately unpack the social and historical circumstance of certain ancestors. Rather than dismissing the genealogies all together as mere inventions with one single intent to prove the legitimacy of Jesus as the Messiah, when looking at the social location of the ancestors of Jesus, the genealogies provide some insight to the thematic themes of liberation, healing and forgiveness. Given that the orthodox view that Jesus-as-the Christ/Messiah/Lord was conceived by the Spirit and born of a Virgin, genealogy in terms of bloodline, in not nearly as important as the familial and thematic connections with those who proceeded Jesus.

The Prologue of the Gospel of John is itself a fascinating document. The Prologue echos mystical Jewish beliefs about the Torah existing beyond the constraints of time and space. Jewish mystics prior to the literary composition of John’s gospel were already exploring the mystical pre-existence of the Torah and passed these teachings down by way of Torah commentaries.  It was not until the Middle Ages that Jewish scholars began systematizing the more mystical elements around the belief in the pre-existence of the Torah into formal literature for a wider audience. (Note the Zohar and other Kabbalistic literature became popular in the 10-12th Centuries CE) Contemporary Jewish mystics still believe that the Torah exists not only in this present realm, but also in spiritual realms because the Torah contains not only God’s knowledge and wisdom, but also God’s inner desire and will. Many Christian Scripture scholars have pointed out the Greek dimensions of John’s gospel (pre-existence of the Logos), but only a few scholars explore the possibility of a mystical Jewish influence on John’s Prologue. However we approach the Prologue, as Christians we would approach it from the dogmatic framework of the Incarnation: that God has embraced creation and humanity with all its flaws, not as an after thought or as a reaction to our need, but rather as an expression of God’s inner will that was present and unchanged from before the worlds came to be. (This is said most poetically in Jn 3:16-17, “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through him.” The Incarnation, then, is an act of love that was already a part of God’s plan, not an act of rescue for a condemned world.

In between Christmas and the Epiphany the Feast of the Holy Innocents (December 28) is celebrated. The feast day commemorates the biblical narrative from Mt 2:13-18 in which the Lord warned Joseph (in a dream) to flee to Egypt to escape the political masacre of the first born children of the Jews. Herod ordered the mass killing as a way for him to retain his power as the titular king of the Jews.  The passage parallels events in Exodus in which Pharaoh orders the slaughter of the first born Jews in an effort to curb their population growth (Ex 1:15-22) and Moses hiding in the bulrushes in order to escape Pharaoh’s murderers (Ex 1:2:10) and years later, Moses’ flight to Midian to escape prosecution for murder (Ex 2:11-22).  On one hand mainline Christian scholars believe that Matthew’s account draws upon elements from Exodus and Moses’ life story as a way to thematically tie Jesus-Messiah-Lord to Moses, as the giver of the Torah.  By having identified as a Moses-figure, Jesus-as-Messiah-Lord, becomes the new giver of the Law.  On the other hand, if we believe the literary parallels between Jesus and Moses are not just an obvious mechanism Matthew used to show Jesus-Messiah-Lord as a giver of Law, but that these parallels are also a way to provide commentary on the resistance elements in the Torah narrative of the slave revolt. Might it be possible that Matthew’s narrative of the circumstances of Jesus’ parallel with Moses’ own story is a way to connect the legitimacy of the struggle for liberation under the Roman Empire? Whereas Moses and the Israelites suffered repression under the Egyptian Empire, so too the Jews of Jesus’ time suffered repression under the Roman Empire.

The Feast Epiphany, celebrated on Sunday January 5, is based on Mt 2:1-12. Here again we see the political dimensions in which King Herod, fearful of his tenuous claim to legitimacy tries to ascertain where the Messiah-true king would be born. Christians tend to focus on the Magi and the gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh rather than consider the political tension and evil motives of Herod. Pause for a moment the question of political tension and move to the Magi and their gifts. We will return to the political tension in a moment.

Matthew’s use of the Magi provides the narrative with the theme of Messianic anticipation outside the Jewish world.  The Magi represent the non-Jewish world’s hope for a new way forward. Let us look briefly at the gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh. For Jews gold was the symbol of divine or celestial light. Incense was burned on the Day of Atonement in the temple and was used solely by the priest in prayers for forgiveness. Myrrh, a perfume, is mentioned more times than other perfumes in the Scriptures. Kings’ garments would be anointed with myrrh. In the Song of Songs myrrh is mentioned as a way to charm and attract the lover.  It is clear that these gifts express a sentiment of expectation and hope: that this child will be the Divine Light that will end the period of darkness that covers the world. The gift of frankincense expressed the hope that the child might be a reconciler and healer of nations and that the child’s life would reflect an attitude of mercy and unconditional love and that the scent of myrrh express a desire for true authority and one not based in violent coercion, but in love.

King Herod, in the narrative, represents the fragile ego of a doomed despot. The narrative showed that the arrival of the Magi shook not only Herod, but his “enablers” and all those who propped up his illegitimate kingship. The Magi simultaneously expose who the true king was (both Matthew and Luke’s narratives make the point that Jesus is in the line of King David) and the illegitimacy of Herod’s claim to the throne. Herod’s subsequent actions (2:13-18) expose his desperation to hold onto power.

The parallels to our own timeline are not lost. The Advent-Christmas-Epiphany cycle highlights a growing political consciousness among the people that the established political order is not longer serving their needs.  In summary, Advent builds up our hope for change and Christmas responds with a fragile child born in humble circumstance. The Feast of the Holy Innocents shows the Empire’s pushback, but Epiphany shows that the struggle is universal and that change is inevitable. May Advent renew your hope in the power of God to change our lives. May Christmas bring you joy in small, but miraculous victories and may Epiphany energize you for the work of Resistance ahead!

Weekly Intercessions

Christmas Poem by Howard Thurman

When the song of the angels is stilled,
When the star in the sky is gone,
When the kings and princes are home,
When the shepherds are back with their flock,
The work of Christmas begins:
    To find the lost,
    To heal the broken,
    To feed the hungry,
    To release the prisoner,
    To rebuild the nations,
    To bring peace among others,
    To make music in the heart.

From Wikipedia:
Howard Washington Thurman (November 18, 1899 – April 10, 1981) was an African-American author, philosopher, theologian, educator, and civil rights leader. As a prominent religious figure, he played a leading role in many social justice movements and organizations of the twentieth century. Thurman’s theology of radical nonviolence influenced and shaped a generation of civil rights activists, and he was a key mentor to leaders within the movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thurman served as dean of Rankin Chapel at Howard University from 1932 to 1944 and as dean of Marsh Chapel at Boston University from 1953 to 1965. In 1944, he co-founded, along with Alfred Fisk, the first major interracial, interdenominational church in the United States.

Howard Thurman died on April 10, 1981 in San Francisco, California.

Let us pray that our first humble and noble work of Christmas be the Eucharist.  As we come to the altar for worship, may the Body and Blood of Christ send us forth to share the LIGHT of HOPE with our world.

Reflexión de Adviento-Navidad-Epifanía  

Esta reflexión cubrirá el último domingo de Adviento a través de la Epifanía. El próximo número del Comunicado será para la Fiesta del Bautismo del Señor.

El Cuarto Domingo de Adviento se enfoca en las circunstancias justo antes del nacimiento de Jesús-Mesías-Señor. El relato de Mateo (Mt 1: 18-24) difiere del evangelio más familiar de Lucas en que el evangelio de Mateo se enfoca en José y su decisión de recibir a María en su hogar. En el relato de Lucas María fue visitada por el Ángel Gabriel y María tenía el poder y la habilidad a decidir por si misma. En el evangelio de Mateo, José tiene el poder de la decisión. Tiene que decidir si sigue la Torá al pie de la letra literal de lo que se le exige a un hombre cuya esposa está embarazada de alguien al lado del marido o si ignoraría la Torá y enviaría a María sin avergonzarla públicamente. En ese momento, el ángel le habló a José en un sueño para llevar a María a su casa. En un estado de sueño, el ángel le dijo a Jospeh que el Espíritu Santo concibió al niño y que el niño “salvaría a la gente de sus pecados”.

El término hebreo, “Espíritu Santo” (רוח הקודש Ruach Ha-Kodesh) se refiere a la fuerza divina y la influencia de Dios sobre todas las criaturas de Dios. Ruach es la respiración, el viento, la fuerza móvil que da vida a todas las cosas. Kodesh significa, santo, lo que se aparta para un propósito específico y claramente especial de Dios. En el pasaje de hoy, el Espíritu Santo no significa la “tercera persona de la Trinidad”, sino que Dios intervino directamente con un propósito único, claro e intencional en la vida de esta joven, María, para dar a luz un hijo. El propósito de este niño es salvar a la gente. La referencia a la profecía de Isaías (“He aquí, la virgen concebirá y dará a luz un hijo, y lo llamarán Emmanuel”, Mt 1: 23 / Is 7:14) es que a través del acompañamiento de Dios (Emmanuel significa que Dios está con el pueblo ), la gente se salvará. Este año exploraremos el evangelio de Mateo sobre el tema de Dios que acompaña a las personas al mostrar que Jesús-como-Mesías-Señor conduce a las personas a través de un “nuevo éxodo” de la tiranía del Imperio a través de una solidaridad radical con las personas de Israel, particularmente aquellos que son pobres y marginados. El evangelio de Mateo también recogerá la tensión provocada por la resistencia a la solidaridad.

Los evangelios de Navidad con los que la mayoría de nosotros estamos familiarizados son el nacimiento de Jesús del evangelio de Lucas. Los evangelios de uso menos frecuente son el pasaje del día de Navidad del Prólogo de Juan y la muy desafiante genealogía de Jesús del relato de Mateo. No importa qué selección leccionario se tome, la predicación debe apuntar a la Encarnación. Las narraciones de la infancia de Lucas son como una obertura para un musical de Broadway: tienen múltiples fragmentos de temas que se desarrollarán en el resto de la narrativa de Lucas. La Encarnación en el evangelio de Lucas se enmarca como el nacimiento de Jesús como persona humana y el nacimiento de Jesús en las represivas circunstancias sociales y políticas de su nacimiento. La genealogía de Mateo es un pasaje completamente fascinante; sin embargo, está cargado de muchos detalles que se pierden para la mayoría de los cristianos. Lucas y Mateo tienen genealogías de Jesús en sus respectivos evangelios y estas genealogías difieren. Lucas sigue el linaje de María y Mateo sigue el linaje de José. Los estudiosos contemporáneos asociados con el “Seminario de Jesús” creen que las genealogías fueron creadas para “probar” la legitimidad de Jesús-como-el Mesías-Señor como perteneciente a la línea de David (Mateo) y Jesús como el Cristo (re: Lucas. Nota que el tema de la legitimidad de Jesús en la línea de Davíd se subraya en la razón por la cual José y María se registran en Belén). El problema con la posición del Seminario de Jesús es que no revela adecuadamente las circunstancias sociales e históricas de ciertos antepasados. En lugar de descartar todas las genealogías como inventos con una sola intención de probar la legitimidad de Jesús como el Mesías, al observar la ubicación social de los antepasados ​​de Jesús, las genealogías proporcionan una idea de los temas temáticos de liberación, curación y perdón. Dado que la visión ortodoxa de que Jesús-como-el Cristo/Mesías/Señor fue concebido por el Espíritu y nació de una Virgen, la genealogía en términos de línea de sangre, no es tan importante como las conexiones familiares y temáticas con quienes procedieron de Jesús.

El Prólogo del Evangelio de Juan es en sí mismo un documento fascinante. El Prólogo refleja las creencias místicas judías sobre la Torá que existe más allá de las limitaciones del tiempo y el espacio. Los místicos judíos antes de la composición literaria del evangelio de Juan ya estaban explorando la preexistencia mística de la Torá y transmitieron estas enseñanzas a través de comentarios de la Torá. No fue hasta la Edad Media que los eruditos judíos comenzaron a sistematizar los elementos más místicos en torno a la creencia en la preexistencia de la Torá en la literatura formal para un público más amplio. (Tenga en cuenta que el Zohar y otra literatura cabalística se hicieron populares en los siglos 10-12). Los místicos judíos contemporáneos todavía creen que la Torá existe no solo en este reino actual, sino también en los reinos espirituales porque la Torá no solo contiene el conocimiento y la sabiduría de Dios. pero también el deseo y la voluntad internos de Dios. Muchos eruditos de las Escrituras cristianas han señalado las dimensiones griegas del evangelio de Juan (preexistencia del Logos), pero solo unos pocos expertos exploran la posibilidad de una influencia judía mística en el Prólogo de Juan. Sin embargo, nos acercamos al Prólogo, como cristianos lo abordaríamos desde el marco dogmático de la Encarnación: que Dios ha abrazado la creación y la humanidad con todos sus defectos, no como un pensamiento posterior o como una reacción a nuestra necesidad, sino como una expresión de la voluntad interna de Dios que estaba presente y sin cambios desde antes de que los mundos nacieran. (Esto se dice más poéticamente en Jn 3: 16-17: “Porque Dios amó tanto al mundo que dio a su Hijo unigénito, para que todos los que creen en él no perezcan sino que tengan vida eterna. Porque Dios no envió a su Hijo al mundo para condenar al mundo, pero para que el mundo pueda salvarse a través de él ”. La Encarnación, entonces, es un acto de amor que ya era parte del plan de Dios, no un acto de rescate para un mundo condenado.

Entre Navidad y la Epifanía se celebra la Fiesta de los Santos Inocentes (28 de diciembre). El día de la fiesta conmemora la narración bíblica de Mt 2: 13-18 en la que el Señor advirtió a José (en un sueño) que huyera a Egipto para escapar de la masacre política de los primogénitos de los judíos. Herodes ordenó el asesinato en masa como una forma de retener su poder como el rey titular de los judíos. El pasaje es paralelo a los eventos en Éxodo en los que Faraón ordena la matanza de los judíos primogénitos en un esfuerzo por frenar el crecimiento de su población (Ex 1: 15-22) y Moisés se esconde en los juncos para escapar de los asesinos de Faraón (Ex 1: 2 : 10) y años después, la huida de Moisés a Medián para escapar de la persecución por asesinato (Ex 2: 11-22). Por un lado, los eruditos cristianos principales creen que el relato de Mateo se basa en elementos de la historia de la vida de Éxodo y Moisés como una forma temática de unir temáticamente a Jesús,-el Mesías-y-el Señor con Moisés, como el dador de la Torá. Al identificarse como una figura de Moisés, Jesús-como-el-Mesías-Señor, se convierte en el nuevo dador de la Ley. Por otro lado, si creemos que los paralelos literarios entre Jesús y Moisés no son solo un mecanismo obvio que Mateo usó para mostrar a Jesús-Mesías-Señor como un dador de la Ley, sino que estos paralelos también son una forma de proporcionar comentarios sobre la resistencia elementos en la narrativa de la Torá sobre la revuelta de los esclavos. ¿Podría ser posible que la narración de Mateo de las circunstancias del paralelismo de Jesús con la propia historia de Moisés sea una manera de conectar la legitimidad de la lucha por la liberación bajo el Imperio Romano? Mientras que Moisés y los israelitas sufrieron represión bajo el imperio egipcio, también los judíos de la época de Jesús sufrieron represión bajo el imperio romano.

La Epifanía de la Fiesta, celebrada el domingo 5 de enero, se basa en Mt 2: 1-12. Aquí nuevamente vemos las dimensiones políticas en las que el rey Herodes, temeroso de su débil pretensión de legitimidad, trata de determinar dónde nacería el verdadero rey del Mesías. Los cristianos tienden a centrarse en los Magos y los regalos de oro, incienso y mirra en lugar de considerar la tensión política y los motivos malvados de Herodes. Pausa por un momento la cuestión de la tensión política y muévete a los Magos y sus dones. Volveremos a la tensión política en un momento.

El uso de Mateo de los Reyes Magos proporciona a la narrativa el tema de la anticipación mesiánica fuera del mundo judío. Los Magos representan la esperanza del mundo no judío de un nuevo camino a seguir. Veamos brevemente los regalos de oro, incienso y mirra. Para los judíos, el oro era el símbolo de la luz divina o celestial. El incienso fue quemado el día de la expiación en el templo y fue utilizado únicamente por el sacerdote en las oraciones de perdón. La mirra, un perfume, se menciona más veces que otros perfumes en las Escrituras. Las vestimentas de los reyes serían ungidas con mirra. En el Cantar de los Cantares, la mirra se menciona como una forma de encantar y atraer al amante. Está claro que estos dones expresan un sentimiento de expectativa y esperanza: que este niño será la Luz Divina que terminará el período de oscuridad que cubre el mundo. El don del incienso expresó la esperanza de que el niño sea un reconciliador y sanador de las naciones y que la vida del niño refleje una actitud de misericordia y amor incondicional y que el aroma de la mirra exprese un deseo de verdadera autoridad y que no se base en actos violentos. coerción, pero en el amor.

El rey Herodes, en la narrativa, representa el ego frágil de un déspota condenado. La narración mostró que la llegada de los Magos sacudió no solo a Herodes, sino también a sus “facilitadores” y a todos los que apuntalaron su reinado ilegítimo. Los Magos al mismo tiempo exponen quién era el verdadero rey (tanto las narraciones de Mateo como las de Lucas señalan que Jesús está en la línea del Rey David) y la ilegitimidad del reclamo de Herodes al trono. Las acciones posteriores de Herodes (2: 13-18) exponen su desesperación por aferrarse al poder.

Los paralelos a nuestra propia línea de tiempo no se pierden. El ciclo de Adviento-Navidad-Epifanía destaca una creciente conciencia política entre la gente de que el orden político establecido ya no satisface sus necesidades. En resumen, Advent construye nuestra esperanza de cambio y la Navidad responde con un niño frágil nacido en circunstancias humildes. La Fiesta de los Santos Inocentes muestra el retroceso del Imperio, pero la Epifanía muestra que la lucha es universal y que el cambio es inevitable. Que Adviento renueve su esperanza en el poder de Dios para cambiar nuestras vidas. ¡Que la Navidad te traiga alegría en victorias pequeñas pero milagrosas y que la Epifanía te dé energía para el trabajo de Resistencia que tienes por delante!

Intercesiónes semanales

Un poema navideña de Howard Thurman

Cuando la canción de los ángeles termine en la quietud,
Cuando la estrella en el cielo desaparece en el amanecer
Cuando los reyes y los príncipes regresan a sus castillos,
Cuando los pastores están de regreso con su rebaño en los campos,
comienza la obra de Navidad:
     Para encontrar a los perdidos,
     abrazar a los inconsolables
     Dar comida a los hambrientos,
     Liberar al prisionero,
     Reconstruir las naciones,
     Llevar la paz entre otros,
     Para hacer la música en el corazón.

De Wikipedia:
Howard Washington Thurman (18 de noviembre de 1899 – 10 de abril de 1981) fue un autor afroamericano, filósofo, teólogo, educador y líder de los derechos civiles. Como una figura religiosa prominente, desempeñó un papel destacado en muchos movimientos y organizaciones de justicia social del siglo XX. La teología de Thurman sobre la no violencia radical influyó y dio forma a una generación de activistas de los derechos civiles, y fue un mentor clave para los líderes dentro del movimiento, incluido Martin Luther King, Jr.

Thurman se desempeñó como decano de Rankin Chapel en la Universidad de Howard de 1932 a 1944 y como decano de Marsh Chapel en la Universidad de Boston de 1953 a 1965. En 1944, co-fundó, junto con Alfred Fisk, la primera gran iglesia interracial e interdenominacional en los Estados Unidos.

Howard Thurman murió el 10 de abril de 1981 en San Francisco, California.

Oremos para que nuestra primera humilde y noble obra de Navidad sea la Eucaristía. Al acercarnos al altar para la adoración, que el Cuerpo y la Sangre de Cristo nos envíen a compartir la LUZ de ESPERANZA con nuestro mundo.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, January 11, 10am-12pm Sacred Heart Community Service 1381 South First St, Sa Jose 95110

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. ¡Gracias por un patron queen donó una televisión la semana pasada! El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. We need a television/screen with a DVR. Thanks to the generous donor who gave us a microwave! The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: What Do You Look For?

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

December 12, 2019

NO MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday

MISA this Sunday will be a MISA DEL BARRIO. 620 So. White Rd at 12 pm

NO HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo

MISA este domingo SERA UNA MISA DEL BARRIO. 620 So. White Rd a las 12 pm

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Rev. Dr. William Barber invited unhoused persons to come forward to join him when he spoke at Glide Memorial Church on December 11 as a part of the Poor Peoples Campaign, a National Call for Moral Revival. The movement reflects the story and reality of those directly affected by poverty. The evening started with a march from San Francisco City Hall through the Tenderloin and into Glide Memorial where stirring music and preaching lifted the spirits of over 1,000 people. Can you see Miguel and Patti?

Gospel Reflection: What Do You Look For?
Today’s gospel text begins with a question about their Messianic expectations directed to the disciples of John the Baptist. “What did you go out to the desert to see? A reed swayed by the wind? Then what did you go out to see? Someone dressed in fine clothing? Those who wear fine clothing are in royal palaces?” (Mt. 11:7-8) In the First Century CE, the Jewish people had multiple expectations of the Messiah: some expected a political Messiah that would come down and cast out the Roman Empire and re-establish Jewish sovereignty, some expected a Messiah who would come down and usher in an era of religious renewal, and some expected a Messianic era in which the people themselves (as opposed to a specific figure) would rise up and claim their religious and political space.

Let us look at the expectations of a swaying reed and a finely dressed person. In Hebrew the phonetic sound of a “pious” reed is “qaneh” and the sound of the word for a militant zealot is “qanah.” Given what appears to be a deliberate alliteration, Jesus’ question of what one is looking for in a “swaying reed” is a binary choice: Is one looking for a pious Messiah or militaristic Messiah?

Prior to the composition of Matthew’s gospel and just prior to the destruction of the Second Temple, Jewish society was plagued by violence with various factions vying for power or influence. In Galilee the proto-Hasidim promoted social change through the establishment of a religious political order, Scicarii, a murderous faction of the Zealots who sought regime change through targeted assassinations (Scicarii, literally “dagger men” went through the market stabbing collaborators. Judas “Iscariot” may have been associated with the Scicarii), Essenes and other small influential factions of pious-minded Jews who resisted the Empire by retreating from society, the Sadducees, Scribes, and Levitical priests who made a calculated decisions of political compromises in order to survive the Empire, the decentralized Pharisees who had close contact with the people, itinerate Charismatic rabbis, and those who fully collaborated the Roman Empire. Political violence was used by both Jewish resisters and the Empire. The tension of violence and non-violent change is expressed in Mt 10:34, Jesus said, “I have not come to bring peace, but a sword.” That verse tells us that the nascent Christian religion was under no illusion that they would not be spared political violence. The insight is echoed in Mt 11:12 “From the days of John the Baptist until now, the kingdom of heaven suffers violence, and the violent are taking it by force.”

These verses on violence are like ancient artifacts that reflect the tension between polarized methods of resistance: establish resistance based on non-violence (qaneh) or a violent resistance (qanah). Jesus’ dialog with the crowd makes it clear that the Messiah is not a figure or a movement that would perpetuate a system of mutual destruction. Matthew’s gospel portrays Jesus as the Messiah-Law Giver brought sight to the blind, mobility to the lame, hearing to the deaf, and hope to the poor. Jesus-as Messiah- Law Giver will heal and restore society not through violence, but by Spirit and fire, that is, a force compelling the hearts and minds of the people to connect to the marginalized people and refashion a community where the hands of the feeble and the knees of the weak are strengthened and the hearts of the fearful become confident. It is through the power of human connection that society is healed and rebuilt.

Weekly Intercessions

Seven Deadly Sins
Seven deadly sins:
Wealth without work, Pleasure without conscience, Science without humanity, Knowledge without character, Politics without principle, Commerce without morality, Worship without sacrifice.

– Mahatma Gandhi

Gandhi’s reflection on sin helps us understand that not only is sin something that we do to other persons, but that sin is any action that is self-serving. Empires are built on the sin of amassing wealth and not dis- tributing it to those who labor. Those who benefit from Imperial greed do not reinvest what they have taken from the harvest, rather, they spend their wealth on pleasures. Science and knowledge serve the bottom line and do not lift the bottom. Politics and commerce only serve the interest of the elite few and do not build up the common good. The Empire is held together by a system of coercion and violence and by divisions fomented by those at the very top of society.

May our worship be authentic and filled with hymns prayers, sacred texts and rituals that open our eyes to the brokenness around us and stir us from our slumber into committing to do the work of healing and liberation.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Mantenerse ¿Qué buscas?
El texto del evangelio de hoy comienza con una pregunta sobre sus expectativas mesiánicas dirigida a los discípulos de Juan el Bautista. “¿Qué saliste al desierto a ver? ¿Una caña mecida por el viento? Entonces, ¿qué saliste a ver? Alguien vestido con ropa fina? ¿Los que visten ropa elegante están en palacios reales?” (Mt. 11: 7-8) En el siglo I D.C., el pueblo judío tenía múltiples expectativas sobre el Mesías: algunos esperaban un Mesías político que bajara y expulsara al Imperio y restablecer la soberanía judía, algunos esperaban un Mesías que descendería y marcaría el comienzo de una era de renovación religiosa, y algunos esperaban una era mesiánica en la que la gente misma (en oposición a una figura específica) se levantara y reclamara su espacio religioso y político.

Echemos un vistazo a las expectativas de una caña balanceándose y una persona finamente vestida. En hebreo, el sonido fonético de una caña “piadosa” es “qaneh” y el sonido de la palabra para un fanático militante es “qanah”. Dada lo que parece ser una aliteración deliberada, la pregunta de Jesús de lo que uno está buscando en un “Caña que se balancea” es una elección binaria: ¿se busca un Mesías piadoso o un Mesías militarista?

Antes de la composición del evangelio de Mateo y justo antes de la destrucción del Segundo Templo, la sociedad judía estaba plagada de violencia con varias facciones compitiendo por poder o influencia. En Galilea, los proto-jasidim promovieron el cambio social a través del establecimiento de un orden político religioso, Scicarii, una facción asesina de los zelotes que buscaban el cambio del régimen a través de asesinatos selectivos (Scicarii, literalmente, “hombres daga” atravesó el mercado apuñalando a colaboradores. Judas “Iscariote” puede haber estado asociado con los Scicarii), Esenios y otras pequeñas facciones influyentes de judíos de mentalidad piadosa que resistieron al Imperio al retirarse de la sociedad, los Saduceos, Escribas y sacerdotes levitas que tomaron decisiones calculadas de compromisos políticos para sobrevive al Imperio, los fariseos descentralizados que tenían contacto cercano con la gente, itineran rabinos carismáticos y aquellos que colaboraron plenamente con el Imperio Romano. La violencia política fue utilizada tanto por los resistentes judíos como por el Imperio. La tensión de la violencia y el cambio no violento se expresa en Mt 10:34, Jesús dijo: “No he venido a traer paz, sino una espada”. Ese versícu- lo nos dice que la naciente religión cristiana no tenía la ilusión de que lo harían. No se librará de la violen- cia política. La idea se repite en Mt 11:12 “Desde los días de Juan el Bautista hasta ahora, el reino de los cielos sufre violencia, y los violentos lo toman por la fuerza”.

Estos versículos sobre la violencia son como artefactos antiguos que reflejan la tensión entre los métodos polarizados de resistencia: establecer resistencia basada en la no violencia (qaneh) o una resistencia violenta (qanah). El diálogo de Jesús con la multitud deja en claro que el Mesías no es una figura o un movimiento que perpetuaría un sistema de destrucción mutua. El evangelio de Mateo retrata a Jesús cuando el Dador de la Ley del Mesías trajo la vista a los ciegos, la movilidad a los cojos, la audición a los sordos y la esperanza a los pobres. Jesús, como Dador de la Ley del Mesías, sanará y restaurará la sociedad no a través de la violencia, sino mediante el Espíritu y el fuego, es decir, una fuerza que obliga a los corazones y las mentes de las personas a conectarse con las personas marginadas y remodelar una comunidad donde las manos de los débil y las rodillas de los débiles se fortalecen y los corazones de los temerosos se vuelven confiados. Es a través del poder de la conexión humana que la sociedad es sanada y reconstruida.

Intercesiónes semanales

Siete Pecados Mortales
Riqueza sin trabajo; Placer sin conciencia; Conocimiento sin carácter; Negocios sin moral; Ciencia sin amor a la humanidad; Religiosidad sin sacrificios; Política sin principios.

– Mahatma Gandhi

La reflexión de Gandhi sobre el pecado nos ayuda a comprender que el pecado no solo es algo que hacemos a otras personas, sino que el pecado es cualquier acción que sirva a nosotros mismos. Los imperios se construyen sobre el pecado de acumular riqueza y no distribuirla entre quienes trabajan. Aquellos que se benefician de la avaricia imperial no re- invierten lo que han tomado de la cosecha, sino que gastan su riqueza en placeres. La ciencia y el conocimiento sirven al fondo y no levantan el fondo. La política y el comercio solo sirven al interés de unos pocos de élite y no construyen el bien común. El Imperio se mantiene unido por un sistema de coerción y violencia y por divisiones fomentadas por aquellos en la cima de la sociedad.

Que nuestra religiosidad sea auténtica y esté llena de himnos, oraciones, textos sagrados y rituales que abran nuestros ojos al sufrimiento que nos rodea y nos alejen de nuestro sueño a comprometernos a hacer el trabajo de curación y liberación.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, January 11, 10am-12pm Sacred Heart Community Service 1381 South First St, Sa Jose 95110

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Misas del Barrio
 

<!–


–>

December/diciembre 12
Misa Indígena de Guadalupe
6 pm
1866 Mandarín Way, SJ 95122

December/diciember 15
Misa del Barrio
12 pm
620 S. White Road, SJ

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

December 13
1:30 -3:30 Equity Hearing at City Hall. 
Please come and bring others with you! Policies and politics must reflect the racial and social diversity of San José. 

<!–


–>

POSADA:
A Home for All, Un Hogar para Todos

December 17 7:00 pm,
Our Lady of Refuge Parish, 2165 Lucretia Ave. San José
Food! Music! Christmas Songs!
¡Comida! ¡Música en Vivo! ¡Cantos Navideños!

 

The theme of this Posada, “A Home For Everyone, Un Hogar por Todos” takes the Posada tradition of Mary and Joseph seeking a place to rest and support for Mary, who was about to give birth. We will celebrate the connections that thousands of people made through our Tuesday Night Community Market and community partners: Second Harvest, Martha’s Kitchen, Gardner Health Services, and Immigration Legal Services of Catholic Charities and our Parish Engagement Accompaniment and Referral Program. At the fiesta we will hear testimonials from clients who have been helped and volunteers. All are welcome!

La tema de esta Posada, “A Home For Everyone, un Hogar por Todos”, toma la tradición de la Posada de María y José buscando un lugar para descansar y apoyar a María, que estaba a punto de dar a luz. Celebraremos las conexiones que miles de personas hicieron a través de nuestro Mercado Comunitario y nuestros amigos comunitarios: Second Harvest, Martha’s Kitchen, Gardner Health Services y Immigration Legal Services de Caridades Católicas y nuestro Programa de Acompañamiento y Referencia de Parish Engagement. En la fiesta escucharemos testimonios de clientes que han sido ayudados y voluntarios. ¡Todos son bienvenidos!

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. ¡Gracias por un patron queen donó una televisión la semana pasada! El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. We need a television/screen with a DVR. Thanks to the generous donor who gave us a microwave! The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Prepare the Way of the Lord!

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

December 5, 2019

NO MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday

The next Misa at Newman Center will be 12/22/19
Join us at one of the upcoming misas del barrio   

NO HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo

La proxima misa solidaridad sera 12/22/19
Unase a una de las misas del barrio

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

From the Fiesta de Santa Gertrudes last month. The expression, “La Cultra Cura” literally means, “Culture Heals.” Immigrant celebrations are rooted in their ancient homelands; however, these traditions are adopted for life here in the States. American-born children of immigrant families learn resilience, community building and the power of the community when they celebrate their culture. Cultural events build confidence by offering opportunities for all people. Festive celebrations like Sta Gertrudes give hope and positive vision for those who find life difficult.

Gospel Reflection: Prepare the Way of the Lord!

The Advent themes of Preparing for the Lord are divided into two parts: the preparation as anticipating of the coming of the Messiah for judgment and redemption and the birth of Jesus for initiating hope and transformation. The coming of the Messiah-Lord at the end of time and the coming of the birth of the Messiah are distinct, yet connected spiritual paths. The former emphasizes the impending judgement against humankind for its lack of goodness toward the widow, orphan, foreigner (sojourner) and the poor and the latter emphasizes hope in amid an unjust world. Those who pray the daily office and follow the cycle of readings from daily mass see the distinct themes of future coming and the anticipation of the birth of the Messiah. Texts in the lectionary and prayers up until the 16th of December express the theme of reforming one’s life by helping the oppressed and overturning the social and economic systems that create poverty and the marginalization of others.  The prayers  on the 17th of December until the vigil of the Feast of the Nativity, December 24th, focus on the anticipated birth of the Messiah-Lord. The texts point to the much anticipated birth of the Messiah-Lord as a symbol of hope. Anticipating the birth of the Messiah-Lord is the joyful hope that there is a possibility of a different outcome for humanity. The texts of prayers and lectionary selections underscore the joy that with the birth of the Messiah, humanity, though deeply flawed, may not necessarily be stuck in a cycle of sin resulting in an unfavorable judgement at the Last Day.

The idea of salvation through a Messiah is embedded in Jewish texts in the Tanakh (the canonical collection of Hebrew Scriptures) and conditioned by the historical events and cultural influences surrounding the composition of the Scriptures.  By the First Century CE the spiritual faction of the Jewish Resistance drew hope from the belief that God would deliver Israel from tyranny and within that faction some believed that God would send a Messiah to lead the battle. Others within the faction were developing a broader interpretation of a Messianic salvation: that the Messiah was not necessarily a single person or the eschatological figure of Elijah coming down from the clouds, but rather, was the collective power of the people.  The emerging interpretation of the texts was a blend of spirituality and anti-Imperialism. This belief was that the entire community was the Messiah and that through acting together in a unified effort of Resistance in the name of God, the poor and oppressed would have freedom and justice and that the Empire and all the forces of oppression would end. The birth of the Messiah would be a clarion call for gathering together the Resistance.  Christian sacred texts reflect both positions: that the Messiah is a singular eschatological future and that the Messiah is the power of the people rising up against the powers of oppression.

Taking a deeper look at John the Baptist’s echo of Isaiah, “‘Prepare the way of the Lord, make straight his paths,’” we see the origin of the familiar Advent theme of “Preparing the Way of the Lord. ”  John the Baptist and Isaiah’s phrase is recast in an American cadence of, “Making A Way Out of No Way.”  This American interpretation comes from the rich history of African Americans, particularly among women leaders in the freedom movement and in Womanist theologians. (Layli Maparyan, a Womanist theologian says Womanism seeks to “restore the balance between people and the environment/nature and reconcil[e] human life with the spiritual dimension.” Womanist thought emerged from the reflected experience of African American women in daily life and reflects their struggled for respect, self-agency and collective power). As Resistance readers of the Communique, the phrase, “Making a way out of no way,” can evoke hope for those whose lives are, at present, not merely difficult, but impossible. Believing that God will make a way out of no way legitimizes the efforts rising up against the Empire. Pharaoh could not stop the march for freedom. The Red Sea parted when those who chose to march entered the water. God makes a way out of no way.  The walls of Jericho crumbled and so too will the walls that modern Pharaohs build. Advent is a time to hope…with our feet! With our voices!

Weekly Intercessions

Making A Way
(written by Carey Bursey)

Intro:
Making a way.
Making a way.
Making a way.

Chorus:
Oh Lord, You made a way
out of no way, out of no way.
You’ve been my bridge over troubled waters,
You’ve been my hope, hope for tomorrow;
making a way, making a way.

Vamp 1:
Making a way out of no way,
yes, He’s a waymaker.

Vamp 2:
Made a way out of no way,
turn my night into day,
yes, He’s a waymaker.

Vamp 3:
Made a way out of no way,
turn my night into day.
You made a way out of no way,
turn my night into day,
yes, He’s a waymaker.

 

Listen to the song on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTRFXABrMjM

 

Let us pray for those who are uncertain about where their next meal will come from, how they will pay rent and buy prescriptions for their children.  That those who feel that there is no way forward for them, will come to know that they are not only children of God but that they have a community of supporters ready to fight with them.

Let us pray for social service workers, therapists and counselors and others who work directly with people who suffer from some sort of debilitating trauma. May those who work in the healing professions bring hope to those who live in the valley of darkness.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 
¡Prepara el camino del Señor!

Los temas de Adviento de Preparación para el Señor se dividen en dos partes: la preparación como anticipación de la venida gloriosa del Mesías para el juicio y la redención y el nacimiento de Jesús para iniciar la esperanza y la transformación. La venida del Mesías-Señor al final de los tiempos y la venida del nacimiento del Mesías-Señor son caminos espirituales distintos pero conectados. El primero enfatiza el juicio inminente contra la humanidad por su falta de cuidar y proteger la viuda, el huérfano, el extranjero (el migrante) y los pobres, y el segundo enfatiza la esperanza en medio de un mundo injusto. Aquellos que rezan el oficio diario y siguen el ciclo de lecturas de la misa diaria ven los distintos temas de la venida futura y la anticipación del nacimiento del Mesías-Señor. Los textos en el leccionario y las oraciones hasta el 16 de diciembre expresan el tema de la reforma de la vida de uno al ayudar a los oprimidos y arrancar los sistemas sociales y económicos que crean pobreza y la marginación de los demás. Las oraciones del 17 de diciembre hasta la vigilia de la Fiesta de la Natividad, el 24 de diciembre, se centran en el nacimiento anticipado del Mesías-Señor. Los textos apuntan al tan esperado nacimiento del Mesías-Señor como un símbolo de esperanza. Anticiparse al nacimiento del Mesías-Señor es la alegre esperanza de que existe la posibilidad de un resultado diferente para la humanidad. Los textos de oraciones y selecciones leccionarias subrayan la alegría de que con el nacimiento del Mesías-Señor, la humanidad, aunque profundamente defectuosa, no necesariamente esté atrapada en un ciclo de pecado que resulta en un juicio desfavorable en el último día.

La idea de la salvación a través de un Mesías está integrada en textos judíos en el Tanakh (la colección canónica de las Escrituras hebreas) y condicionada por los eventos históricos y las influencias culturales que rodean la composición de las Escrituras. En el siglo I d. C., la facción espiritual de la resistencia judía despertó la esperanza de que Dios libraría a Israel de la tiranía, y dentro de esa facción algunos creían que Dios enviaría un Mesías para liderar la batalla.Otros dentro de la facción estaban desarrollando una interpretación más amplia de una salvación mesiánica: que el Mesías no era necesariamente una sola persona o la figura escatológica de Elías que bajaba de las nubes, sino que era el poder colectivo de la gente. La interpretación emergente de los textos fue una mezcla de espiritualidad y anti-imperialismo. Esta creencia era que toda la comunidad era el Mesías y que al actuar juntos en un esfuerzo unificado de Resistencia en nombre de Dios, los pobres y los oprimidos tendrían libertad y justicia y que el Imperio y todas las fuerzas de la opresión terminarían. El nacimiento del Mesías sería un llamado de atención para reunir a la Resistencia. Los textos sagrados cristianos reflejan ambas posiciones: que el Mesías-Señor es un futuro escatológico singular y que el Mesías-Señor es el poder del pueblo que se alza contra los poderes de la opresión.

Examinemos más profundo al eco de Juan el Bautista de Isaías, “‘Prepara el camino del Señor, endereza sus caminos’” vemos el origen del tema familiar de Adviento de “Preparando el Camino del Señor. “La frase de Juan el Bautista e Isaías se reformula en una cadencia estadounidense de “Hacer un camino fuera de ninguna manera” (Make a way out of no way). Esta interpretación estadounidense proviene de la rica historia de los afroamericanos, particularmente entre las mujeres líderes en el movimiento de libertad y en las teólogas mujerístas negras. (Layli Maparyan, una teóloga mujerísta negra, dice que el mujerlismo de los negras busca “restaurar el equilibrio entre las personas y el medio ambiente / naturaleza y reconciliar [e] la vida humana con la dimensión espiritual” refleja su lucha por el respeto, la auto-agencia y el poder colectivo. Como las reflexiones de Resistencia en el Communique, la frase, “Hacer un camino fuera de ninguna manera” (Make a way out of no way), puede evocar esperanza para aquellos cuyas vidas son, en la actualidad, no simplemente difíciles, sino que imposible. Creer que Dios saldrá de ninguna manera legitima los esfuerzos que se alzan contra el Imperio. Faraón no pudo detener la marcha por la libertad. El Mar Rojo se separó cuando aquellos que decidieron marchar entraron al agua. Dios abre un camino de ninguna manera. Los muros de Jericó se derrumbaron y también lo harán los muros que construyen los faraones modernos. El Adviento es un tiempo para esperar … ¡con nuestros pies! ¡Con nuestras voces!

Intercesiónes semanales

“Mientras tanto” –  Irene Gruss, poeta argentina
De Solo de contralto (Ed. Galerna, 1998) 

Yo estuve lavando ropa
mientras mucha gente
desapareció
no porque sí
se escondió
sufrió
hubo golpes
y
ahora no están
no porque sí
y mientras pasaban
sirenas y disparos, ruido seco
yo estuve lavando ropa,
acunando,
cantaba,
y la persiana a oscuras

 

Oremos por aquellos que no están seguros de dónde tendrá su próxima comida, cómo pagarán el alquiler y comprarán medicinas para sus hijos. Aquellos que sienten que no hay forma de avanzar para ellos, llegarán a saber que no solo son hijos de Dios, sino que tienen una comunidad de seguidores dispuestos a luchar con ellos.

Oremos por los trabajadores de servicios sociales, terapeutas y consejeros y otros que trabajan directamente con personas que sufren algún tipo de trauma debilitante. Que quienes trabajan en las profesiones de curación llevan la esperanza a quienes viven en desesperación.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, January 11, 10am-12pm Sacred Heart Community Service 1381 South First St, Sa Jose 95110

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Misas del Barrio
 

<!–


–>

December/diciembre 8
Celebración de la Virgen de Juquila
10 am
Cardoza Park
1525 Kennedy Drive, Milpitas CA

Misa del Barrio
12 pm
2158 Jamaica Way, SJ

December/diciembre 12
Misa Indígena de Guadalupe

December/diciember 15
Misa del Barrio
12 pm
620 S. White Road, SJ

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

December/diciembre 7
Congreso del Pueblo with Latinos in Action 2020

December/diciember 11
Poor People’s Campaign/Campaña de la gente pobre

December 13
1:30 -3:30 Equity Hearing at City Hall. 
Please come and bring others with you! Policies and politics must reflect the racial and social diversity of San José. 

<!–


–>

POSADA:
A Home for All, Un Hogar para Todos

December 17 7:00 pm,
Our Lady of Refuge Parish, 2165 Lucretia Ave. San José
Food! Music! Christmas Songs!
¡Comida! ¡Música en Vivo! ¡Cantos Navideños!

 

The theme of this Posada, “A Home For Everyone, Un Hogar por Todos” takes the Posada tradition of Mary and Joseph seeking a place to rest and support for Mary, who was about to give birth. We will celebrate the connections that thousands of people made through our Tuesday Night Community Market and community partners: Second Harvest, Martha’s Kitchen, Gardner Health Services, and Immigration Legal Services of Catholic Charities and our Parish Engagement Accompaniment and Referral Program. At the fiesta we will hear testimonials from clients who have been helped and volunteers. All are welcome!

La tema de esta Posada, “A Home For Everyone, un Hogar por Todos”, toma la tradición de la Posada de María y José buscando un lugar para descansar y apoyar a María, que estaba a punto de dar a luz. Celebraremos las conexiones que miles de personas hicieron a través de nuestro Mercado Comunitario y nuestros amigos comunitarios: Second Harvest, Martha’s Kitchen, Gardner Health Services y Immigration Legal Services de Caridades Católicas y nuestro Programa de Acompañamiento y Referencia de Parish Engagement. En la fiesta escucharemos testimonios de clientes que han sido ayudados y voluntarios. ¡Todos son bienvenidos!

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un horno de microondas y un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. This week we are asking for a MICROWAVE oven and a television/screen with a DVR. The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp