Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Non-dual Jesus

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 10, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD 
THIS SUNDAY May 12!

This week’s Misa de Solidaridad
May 12 at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts. 

¡MISA SOLIDARIDAD
12 de Mayo!

La próxima Misa de Solidaridad 
12 de mayo a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Most of us were taught that God would love us if and when we change. In fact, God loves you so that you can change. What empowers change, what makes you desirous of change is the experience of love. It is that inherent experience of love that becomes the engine of change.

– Richard Rohr

Reflection: The Non-dual Jesus

This week’s reading is taken from the 10th Chapter of John with four declarative sentences: “My sheep hear my voice; I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish. No one can take them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all, and no one can take them out of the Father’s hand. The Father and I are one.” These verses conclude with the affirmation that Jesus and the Creator are not separate “things” but that both are ONE.  In today’s reflection we will work backwards beginning with the last declaration: “The Father and I are one.”
Jn 10:30 is a definite statement that Jesus is full Divinity and full Humanity put together. There is no duality (meaning, the separation of Divine from Human) in Jesus’ nature: there is only unity, that is, non-duality. The concept that Jesus is fully Divine and fully Human is indeed a difficult concept to logically string together because logically one is either Divine or Human: One cannot be both. Believing this non-logical assertion is unique to Christians and therefore it is something that  Christians are obliged to not simply believe, but to understand.

The total unity of the Divine and Human in Christ is called the Incarnation. (Keep in mind that one cannot therefore reduce the Incarnation to the Nativity virgin birth narrative of Luke and Matthew). One must struggle through John’s gospel to not merely believe but understand the foundational belief of Christian theology. Richard Rohr, OFM, a pre-eminent Catholic spiritual master and Catholic thought leader stated that basic Christian doctrines cannot be properly understood without embracing the concept of the non-dual nature of Jesus Christ.  (See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvg2DgjVgbE for a very brief conversation with Richard Rohr on non-dualism).

Western Christian mystics understood the mystery of the Incarnation because their focus was on the relationship with God, that is to say the direct experience of being in the Holy Presence. In mystical ecstasy, one is not separated from God, but enveloped in the Mystery itself. in Franciscan theology one does not understand the concept of Incarnation without first having the experience. As a Franciscan, Rohr’s approach is to embrace the interchange between understanding and experience. Unfortunately most Christians do not have the opportunity to read Franciscan theology or undergo training for mysticism. Most Christians would have a hard time giving up their reliance on the use of language to come to an understanding of the Incarnation. The over-reliance on coming to faith by way of doctrine rather than by having a direct experience of the Divine came about when Christians moved further and further away from their Jewish origins.

Christians turned to Greek philosophical categories to understand the Incarnation. This development in the history of the Church had mixed results.  On one hand the use of Greek philosophy set Christianity on a trajectory of establishing a stronghold in the West. On the other hand, the reliance on Greek philosophical methodology and categories pushed the Church to push believing in God over experiencing God. The bulk of the Christian faithful were taught about Christ, but were not taught how to experience Christ and as a result when came time for Trinity Sunday when the subject of Incarnation is central to the liturgical readings and prayers, Christians (including preachers) merely stumbled through the prayer texts and readings without fully grasping the depth of the Mystery. Rohr suggests that the way that Christians might come to better understand the Incarnation is not through the mind, but through the heart and in the context of experience.

Look at Jn 10:27, “My sheep hear my voice; I know them, and they follow me.” The verse suggests that there is a degree of recognition between the “sheep” and Jesus-as-the Christ. People follow Christ because they  “heard” Christ’s voice. The verse presumes a familiarity with the voice which implies a relationship of trust. One does not follow a strange voice, but rather a trusted voice. (Jn 10:5, “…they will not follow a stranger; they will run away from him, because they do not recognize the voice of strangers.”) The evangelist John has embedded the theme of “love” (chesed, חֶסֶד) throughout the gospel. Love demands mutuality, action and even self-sacrifice (see Jn 10:15, “I will lay down my life for the sheep.” and later in Jn 15:13, “There is no greater love than tp lay one’s life for one’s friends”). Love/chesed demands a mutually-transforming relationship. Jesus-as-rabbi and the Christ taught his disciples that love/chesed is the beginning and end of what he was sent to do in the world. Those that had to ask if he was the Christ, were stuck in wanting to know what they should believe rather than being caught up in the love/chesed of the Rabbi Jesus. (See Jn 10:24 the disciples said, “How long are you going to keep us in suspense? If you are the Messiah, tell us plainly.”  Jesus responded that those who asked did not experience the works of love/chesed —presumably because their faith was predicated on believing rather than experiencing — were not among the flock. Only those who were caught up in the love/chesed that Jesus manifested were among the flock that would follow Christ. The bond between those who were caught up in the love/chesed of Jesus would not be separated from him. They too would be swept up in the non-dual nature of Christ. In short, they would be caught up in the Eternal. (Jn 10:28, “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish. No one can take them out of my hand.”)

The challenge Christian leaders face today is not about the dwindling numbers of people in the pews, but whether Christians are creating space in which people can encounter the Divine. When Christian space is taken up by mean-spirited preaching intended to shame people into submission and apologias for the Empire or when clergy issue public absolutions to an unrepentant dictator and sport garb of lace and gold while obsessing about the intricacies of  liturgical rubrics, where gave they made room for the Divine? There are “other sheep” that are seeking an encounter with the Divine (see Jn 10: 16, “I have other sheep that do not belong to this fold. These also I must lead, and they will hear my voice, and there will be one flock, one shepherd.”)  We must clear the space for the Encounter. We must silence ourselves and trust in the experience that cannot nor should not be controlled. Let the Encounter and the experience become our way to understand the voice that bids us, “Follow me.”

Weekly Intercessions
Prayers for All Women” by Leah D. Schade. Leah is the Assistant Professor of Preaching and Worship at Lexington Theological Seminary (Kentucky) and author of the book Creation-Crisis Preaching: Ecology, Theology, and the Pulpit (Chalice Press, 2015). 
You can follow Leah on Twitter at @LeahSchade, and on Facebook at  https://www.facebook.com/LeahDSchade/.
 

As God’s beloved people, let us pray for the church, the whole human family, and God’s good Creation.

A We pray for women who are pregnant; those who are waiting with joyful expectation, and those who are filled with uncertainty and fear; we pray for women whose pregnancies are high-risk, and whose lives are in danger in the birthing process.  Hear us, Mothering God,

All:  Your mercy is great.

A  We pray for women and men who long to be parents, but who struggle with infertility.  Join their cries with those of Sarah and Abraham, Hannah and Elkanah, Elizabeth and Zecharias, that your will may be done in their lives.  Hear us, God of Life,

All:  Your mercy is great.

A   We pray for women who are mothers, either by birth, by adoption, or through foster care.  We pray that they may be supported in their mothering task by the men and other women in their lives; that their children may be provided with sufficient food, shelter and healthcare.  Hear us, Mothering Jesus.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A We pray for women who have lost children, either in utero, through sickness, through war and violence, or through tragic accident.  Comfort them, Holy Spirit with your everlasting presence and assure them of new life.  Hear us, Mothering Christ.

All:  Your mercy is great.

We pray for women who are incarcerated; women who have been abusive; women who have been hurtful and neglectful.  Hear us, Mothering Spirit.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A We pray for women who give of themselves not just through childbearing, but with their intellect, their skills, their gifts, and their physical abilities.  Bless all women, that they may receive equal compensation for their work, may be protected from abuse and harassment, and may be valued as unique individuals.  Hear us, Holy God.

All: Your mercy is great.

We pray for those who are transitioning, those who are seeking to understand who God has created them to be in their bodies, minds and spirits.  May they be protected from danger during their time of vulnerability, and guided by those who love and support them.   Hear us, Holy God.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A We pray for women who strive to protect and advocate for those most vulnerable – children, the poor, God’s Creation, the disenfranchised, other women, and those men and women whose voices go unheard.  Hear us, Holy Jesus.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A  We pray for those for whom this is a day of mourning and sadness.  For those who have lost mothers and other important women in their lives, that they may be comforted with the peace that passes all understanding.  Hear us, Comforting Spirit.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A We give thanks for women who have been our mothers, grandmothers, aunts, sisters, daughters, life-partners, and friends.  We give thanks for men who have mothered us with their own caring, affection, nurturing, and friendship.  We lift to you now the names of those who have mirrored your mothering spirit, Holy God. (congregation is invited to say names aloud) . . .

Give them your grace and bless them in their lives.  Hear us, Mothering God.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A For who else does the church pray today? . . . For all those we name, and for those who have no one to name them, Hear us, O God.

All:  Your mercy is great.

P   Holy God, we lift our prayers to you through the Holy Spirit in hope, entrusting all for whom we pray to your great goodness and mercy, made known to us in Jesus Christ, our Savior.

All:  Amen.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: El Señor que es Unico

La lectura de esta semana está tomada del Capítulo 10 de Juan con cuatro oraciones declarativas: “Mis ovejas oyen mi voz; Yo las conozco y ellas me siguen. Yo les doy vida eterna, y nunca perecerán. Nadie puede quitarlos de mi mano. Mi Padre, que me los ha dado, es más grande que todos, y nadie puede sacarlos de la mano del Padre. El Padre y yo somos uno “. Estos versículos concluyen con la afirmación de que Jesús y el Creador no son “cosas separadas, sino que ambas son UNA. En la reflexión de hoy trabajaremos al revés comenzando con la última declaración: “El Padre y yo somos uno”.

Jn 10:30 es una afirmación definitiva de que Jesús es la Divinidad plena y la Humanidad juntas. No hay dualidad (es decir, la separación de lo Divino de lo Humano) en la naturaleza de Jesús: solo hay unidad, es decir, no-dualidad. El concepto de que Jesús es totalmente divino y completamente humano es, de hecho, un concepto difícil de unir lógicamente porque lógicamente uno es divino o humano: uno no puede ser ambos. Creer que esta afirmación no lógica es exclusiva de los cristianos y, por lo tanto, es algo que los cristianos están obligados a no solo creer, sino a comprender.

La unidad total de lo Divino y lo Humano en Cristo se llama la Encarnación. (Tenga en cuenta que, por lo tanto, no se puede reducir la Encarnación a la narrativa de nacimiento virgen de Natividad de Lucas y Mateo). Uno debe luchar a través del evangelio de Juan para no simplemente creer, sino comprender la creencia fundamental de la teología cristiana. Richard Rohr, OFM, un maestro espiritual católico preeminente y líder de pensamiento católico declaró que las doctrinas cristianas básicas no pueden entenderse adecuadamente sin abrazar el concepto de la naturaleza nodual de Jesucristo. (Consulte https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvg2DgjVgbE para una breve conversación con Richard Rohr sobre el nodualismo).

Los místicos cristianos occidentales entendieron el misterio de la Encarnación porque se enfocaban en la relación con Dios, es decir, la experiencia directa de estar en la Santa Presencia. En el éxtasis místico, uno no está separado de Dios, sino que está envuelto en el Misterio mismo. En la teología franciscana uno no entiende el concepto de la Encarnación sin tener primero la experiencia. Como franciscano, el enfoque de Rohr es abrazar el intercambio entre comprensión y experiencia. Desafortunadamente, la mayoría de los cristianos no tienen la oportunidad de leer teología franciscana o de recibir capacitación para el misticismo. A la mayoría de los cristianos les resultaría difícil renunciar a su confianza en el uso del lenguaje para llegar a un entendimiento de la Encarnación. La excesiva dependencia de llegar a la fe por medio de la doctrina en lugar de tener una experiencia directa de lo Divino se produjo cuando los cristianos se alejaron más y más de sus orígenes judíos.

Los cristianos recurrieron a las categorías filosóficas griegas para entender la Encarnación. Este desarrollo en la historia de la Iglesia tuvo resultados mixtos. Por un lado, el uso de la filosofía griega sitúa al cristianismo en una trayectoria de establecimiento de una fortaleza en el oeste. Por otro lado, la dependencia de la metodología y las categorías empujaron a la Iglesia a empujar a creer en Dios, no a experimentar a Dios. A la mayoría de los fieles cristianos se les enseñó acerca de Cristo, pero no se les enseñó cómo experimentar a Cristo y, como resultado, cuando llegó el domingo para la Trinidad, cuando el tema de la Encarnación es fundamental para entender las lecturas y oraciones litúrgicas, los cristianos (incluidos los predicadores) simplemente tropezaron a través de los textos de oración y las lecturas sin comprender plenamente la profundidad del Misterio. Rohr sugiere que la forma en que los cristianos pueden llegar a entender mejor la Encarnación no es a través de la mente, sino a través del corazón y en el contexto de la experiencia.

Mira Jn 10:27, Mis ovejas oyen mi voz; Los conozco y ellos me siguen”. El versículo sugiere que existe un grado de reconocimiento entre las “ovejas” y Jesús-comoel Cristo. Las personas siguen a Cristo porque escucharonla voz de Cristo. El verso supone una familiaridad con la voz que implica una relación de confianza. Uno no sigue una voz extraña, sino una voz confiable. (Jn 10: 5, “… no seguirán a un extraño; huirán de él, porque no reconocen la voz de los extraños”.) El evangelista Juan ha incorporado el tema del “amor” (jesed,) a lo largo del evangelio. El amor exige la reciprocidad, la acción e incluso el sacrificio personal (ver Jn 10:15, “Daré mi vida por las ovejas”. Más adelante, en Jn 15:13, “No hay amor más grande que dar la vida por los amigos”). El amor / jesed exige una relación mutuamente transformadora. Jesús-comorabino-y-el-Cristo enseñaron a sus discípulos que el amor / jesed es el principio y el fin de lo que fue enviado a hacer en el mundo. Aquellos que tenían que preguntar si él era el Cristo, estaban atrapados en querer saber qué debían creer en lugar de quedar atrapados en el amor / jesed del Rabino Jesús. (Vea Jn 10:24, los discípulos dijeron: ¿Cuánto tiempo nos mantendrá en suspenso? Si usted es el Mesías, díganos claramente”. Jesús respondió que aquellos que preguntaron no experimentaron las obras de amor / jesed, presumiblemente porque su fe se basaba en creer más que en experimentar, no estaban entre el rebaño. Solo aquellos que estaban atrapados en el amor / jesed que Jesús manifestó estaban entre el rebaño que seguiría a Cristo. El vínculo entre los que estaban atrapados en el el amor / jesed de Jesús no se separaría de él. Ellos también serían arrastrados por la naturaleza no dual de Cristo. En resumen, serían atrapados en el Eterno (Jn 10:28, “Les doy eternos. vida, y nunca perecerán. Nadie puede quitarlos de mi mano “).

El desafío que enfrentan los líderes cristianos hoy en día no se trata de la disminución del número de personas en los bancos, sino de si los cristianos están haciendo un espacio en el que las personas puedan encontrar lo Divino. Cuando el espacio cristiano está ocupado por una predicación de espíritu mezquino con la intención de avergonzar a las personas para que se sometan y pedir disculpas por el Imperio o cuando el clero emita absoluciones públicas a un dictador impenitente y ponen vestidos de encaje y oro mientras se obsesiona con las complejidades de las rúbricas litúrgicas ¿Dónde dieron lugar a encontrar y experimentar la divinidad? Hay “otras ovejas” que están buscando un encuentro con lo Divino (ver Jn 10: 16, “Tengo otras ovejas que no pertenecen a este redil. Estas también las debo guiar, y oirán mi voz, y habrá sea ​​un rebaño, un pastor”. Debemos purificar el espacio para el Encuentro. Debemos silenciarnos y confiar en la experiencia que no puede ni debe controlarse. Deje que el Encuentro y la experiencia se conviertan en nuestra manera de entender la voz que ofrece nosotros, “gueme”.

Intercesiónes semanales
 “Oraciones para todas las mujeres” por Leah D. Schade. Leah es profesora asistente de Predicación y Adoración en el Seminario Teológico de Lexington (Kentucky) y autora del libro Predicación de Crisis y Crisis: Ecología, Teología y el Púlpito (Chalice Press, 2015).
Puede seguir a Leah en Twitter en @LeahSchade, y en Facebook en https://www.facebook.com/LeahDSchade/.
 
Oramos por las mujeres que están embarazadas; aquellos que esperan con gozosa espera, y aquellos que están llenos de incertidumbre y temor; oramos por las mujeres cuyos embarazos son de alto riesgo y cuyas vidas están en peligro en el proceso de parto. Escúchanos, Dios Madre.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por mujeres y hombres que anhelan ser padres, pero que luchan con la infertilidad. Únete a sus gritos con los de Sarah y Abraham, Hannah y Elkanah, Elizabeth y Zecharias, para que tu voluntad se haga en sus vidas. Escúchanos, Dios de la Vida,

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que son madres, ya sea por nacimiento, por adopción o por cuidado de crianza. Oramos para que los hombres y otras mujeres en su vida puedan apoyarlos en su tarea de maternidad; para que sus hijos reciban suficiente comida, refugio y atención médica. Escúchanos, Madre de Jesús.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que han perdido hijos, ya sea en el útero, a través de la enfermedad, a través de la guerra y la violencia, o por un trágico accidente. Consuélalas, Espíritu Santo con tu presencia eterna y asegúrales una nueva vida. Escúchanos, Madre Crística.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que están encarceladas; mujeres que han sido abusivas; Mujeres que han sido hirientes y negligentes. Escúchanos, Espíritu Materno.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que se dan a sí mismas no solo a través de la maternidad, sino también con su intelecto, sus habilidades, sus dones y sus capacidades físicas. Bendiga a todas las mujeres, para que puedan recibir una compensación igual por su trabajo, se les pueda proteger del abuso y el acoso, y se las pueda valorar como individuos únicos. Escúchanos, Santo Dios.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por aquellos que están en transición, aquellos que buscan entender quién Dios los ha creado para que estén en sus cuerpos, mentes y espíritus. Que estén protegidos contra el peligro durante su tiempo de vulnerabilidad y guiados por quienes los aman y los apoyan. Escúchanos, Santo Dios.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que luchan por proteger y abogar por las personas más vulnerables: los niños, los pobres, la Creación de Dios, los marginados, otras mujeres y aquellos hombres y mujeres cuyas voces no se escuchan. Escúchanos, santo Jesús.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por aquellos para quienes este es un día de luto y tristeza. Para aquellos que han perdido madres y otras mujeres importantes en sus vidas, que puedan ser consolados con la paz que supera toda comprensión. Escúchanos, Consolador Espíritu.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Agradecemos a las mujeres que han sido nuestras madres, abuelas, tías, hermanas, hijas, compañeras de vida y amigas. Damos gracias por los hombres que nos han educado con su propio cuidado, afecto, crianza y amistad. Ahora te elevamos los nombres de aquellos que han reflejado tu espíritu maternal, Santo Dios. (Se invita a la congregación a decir los nombres en voz alta). . .

Dales tu gracia y bendícelos en sus vidas. Escúchanos, Dios Madre.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

¿Por quién más ora la iglesia hoy? . . . Por todos aquellos a quienes nombramos, y por aquellos que no tienen a nadie que los nombre, escúchanos, oh Dios.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

P Santo Dios, elevamos nuestras oraciones hacia ti a través del Espíritu Santo con esperanza, confiando a todos por quienes oramos a tu gran bondad y misericordia, que se nos dio a conocer en Jesucristo, nuestro Salvador.

Todos:  Amén.

 
 

Faith does not need to push the river because faith is able to trust that there is a river. The river is flowing. We are in it.

La fe no necesita empujar el río porque la fe puede confiar en que hay un río. El rio esta fluyendo Estamos en ello.

― Richard Rohr

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Sessions: May 21st and June 4th.
7 pm – 9:00 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español : 14 y 28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9:00 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Love is Faith in Action

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 3, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD 
THIS SUNDAY May 5!

This week’s Misa de Solidaridad
May 5 at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts. 

¡MISA SOLIDARIDAD
5 de Mayo!

La próxima Misa de Solidaridad 
5 de mayo a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Parishioners at Our Lady of Refuge participate in our “Poverty Simulation” as part of Accompaniment Training. Participants learn about the various challenges people face each day. Many participants themselves live these challenges in their own lives.

Reflection: Love is Faith in Action 
Last week we covered Jn 20: 19-31. In that selection the disciples locked themselves in a room hoping that the authorities would pass over them but in spite of all the precautions they took to keep themselves safe, Jesus-as-the Risen Christ appeared to them proclaiming peace.  In short, Jesus-as-the Risen Christ imposed himself on his fearful disciples and challenged them to try on shalom as a way to break themselves out of their fear. Recall the passage from the Ta’anit (from ancient Rabbinic literature) that taught, ““By three things the world is preserved, by justice, by truth, and by peace, and these three are one: if justice has been accomplished, so has truth, and so has peace.” Jesus-as-the Risen Christ was calling his disciples to rise up and become the shalom to others. Today’s passage, Jn 21:1-19, serves as a kind of “epilogue” to the gospel. A minority opinion from scholars assert that Chapter 21 was written by someone other than the evangelist John; however, there is no evidence that would show that the gospel ended with Chapter 20.  It would appear that Chapter 21 was always included as a part of the body of the gospel, but perhaps the chapter is set at a much later date, indicating that some time has passed between the appearance to the apostles and the encounter with Jesus-as-the Risen Christ on the beach.

The gospel text indicates that the disciples were fishing which suggests that the disciples had gotten over their fear of being identified as disciples of Jesus and that they had returned to their former way of life. In the narrative Jesus-as-the Risen Christ appeared to the disciples yet no one recognized him until he told them to cast their nets to the “other side” of the boat. The disciples went along with the suggestion and they were overwhelmed with what they caught. At that moment the unnamed disciple whom Jesus loved (the identity of the unnamed disciple is associated with the evangelist himself), declared, “It is the Lord!”  (Jn 21:7) The inclusion of the unnamed disciple’s gut reaction to knowing Jesus’ identity in these verses further underscores the idea that knowing that Jesus-as-the Risen Christ is in our midst is accessed through a relational intimacy with the Christ himself. 

The reaction of Simon Peter further underscores the concept of the power of relationship. Peter held some kind of leadership over the other disciples. (see Jn 21:3.  “Simon Peter said to them, ‘I am going fishing.’ They said to him, ‘We also will come with you.’”). This leadership; however, took a back seat to the insight of the unnamed disciple. Note that in Jn 21:7 Simon Peter heard that the person who directed the men to cast their nets to the right side of the boat was Jesus-as-the Risen Christ, he jumped into the water and hauled the boat of fish to the shore.  The curious inclusion of the specific number of fish is interesting. The evangelist John seems to have more than a mere casual acquaintance with Jewish mysticism.  Throughout John’s gospel, certain phrases and vocabulary suggest that the evangelist was using common language and concepts familiar to the Essences. (The Essenes were an important Jewish mystical sect that were numerous throughout Judaea and had lived in communal groups practicing poverty, daily immersion and asceticism and some of them even practiced celibacy.  Some contemporary scholars have made the case that one can see the fingerprint of Essene thought and practice in John’s gospel and the Book of Revelation and the three letters of John.) One example of this possible influence is the specific reference to the 153 fish in Jn 21: 11: “So Simon Peter went over and dragged the net ashore full of one hundred fifty-three* large fish. Even though there were so many, the net was not torn.” 

Understanding the meaning of numbers was and is an important feature of Jewish life. Gematria, the art of understanding numbers, is a way to understand God for each number is assigned a particular meaning or holds a special symbolism for a greater mystery. If we accept that the Essenes yielded influence over the evangelist John and that the evangelist was specific about the number of fish caught and brought to shore, then we might ask, “What might be the evangelist’s intent?  What was the evangelist trying to communicate?”  Early scripture scholars like St. Jerome, believed that the great number of fish was linked to Ezekiel’s prophecy (Ez 47:10, “And it will come about that fishermen will stand beside it; from Engedi to Eneglaim there will be a place for the spreading of nets. Their fish will be according to their kinds, like the fish of the Great Sea, very many…” ) Most Christian scholars have accepted St. Jerome’s interpretation that the number of fish that the disciples caught represents the apostles gathering all the nations together.  St. Augustine made note that 153 is a “triangle” of 17, meaning that the sum of all natural numbers from one to the triangle of the number:1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10+11+12+13+14+15+16+17=153.  (Some scholars have applied Jewish numerology methods to texts as a way to see the deeper meaning.  For example, in Jn 21: 11 one looks at the root word, “gedi,” from engedi and Eglaim, (see Ezekial 47:10) one finds that gedi is the 153rd word in Ezekiel 47 and that the numerical value for gedi in the name “Engedi” adds up to 17 and that the numerical value for the word, eglaim in the name, “Eneglaim” adds up to 153. While this would seem coincidental, note that the image of flowing waters in Ezekiel 47 is also found in Jn 7:38, “From his innermost being will flow rivers of living water….” and Jn 19:34, “One of the soldiers pierced His side with a spear, and immediately blood and water came out.”) 

The study of the number 153 when connected to the narrative of the unnamed disciple suggests that if there is an intimate connection to Jesus-as-the Risen Christ there will be a large return. In verses 15-19 Jesus-as-the Risen Christ interrogated Simon Peter: Did Simon Peter love Christ? What Christ’s intent in asking Simon Peter again and again the same question? In Jewish teaching “love” is not understood as having emotional attachment toward a person, but rather doing the right thing for the person.  To “love” the immigrant does not mean I eat taco salads, but rather, to not exploit and profit from the blood of the immigrant. (See Dt 6).  Rabbinic literature teaches that love is a series of mandated behaviors from the Torah that require us to not merely refrain from mistreating others, but to proactively do things that would protect the life of others and to welcome others into the community.  The culture of the Empire did not codify ethical behavior in the same way as the Jewish custom. Judaism, unlike the Empire, was focused on personal integrity and the civil rights, especially the effect on how public decisions make an impact on those who were marginalized. Jesus-as-the Risen Christ responded when Peter responded, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.”  The Christ amplified Simon Peter’s response in a manner consistent with Jewish teaching, “Feed my lambs.” “Tend my sheep.” “Feed my sheep.” It was not enough to have emotional attachment to the Risen Christ, one had to have commitment to others, even to the point of surrendering one’s life in the face of possible death.  (c.f., Jn 21:18).  Only after Jesus explained the true meaning of “love,” did Simon Peter say, “Follow me.”  One cannot follow Christ unless one is fully engaged in the well-being of others.

As Christians we should be careful about our use of language around “love,” especially when Christians are quick to condemn, excommunicate or belittle others for their theology, life choices in partnership and family, and manner of worship. When Christians speak of love in terms of personal fondness and emotional attachment rather than in terms of how we actually speak about and treat others, it allows Christians to say and do horrible things to others while maintaining that they “love” Christ. For example, recall  Franklin Graham, a strong Trump supporter and public religious figure, criticizing Mayor Pete Buttigieg and calling Buttigieg’s faith into question because Mayor Pete is gay. Franklin’s remarks caught many people’s attention because he remained silent when Donald Trump separated families at the border and neglected the well being of children at the border by putting toddlers and teens into cages and placing minors into the custody of sadists who raped and tortured the children while they were in immigrant detention. Like Peter, it is not enough to say “Jesus, I love you.”  We must show that love in the way we tend and feed others around us. 

Weekly Intercessions
A couple of weeks ago a man plowed into a group of people in Sunnyvale because he thought that those people were Mus- lim. Last week a man entered into a synagogue in Poway and opened fire on worshippers. The Sunnyvale man suffered PTSD and was highly susceptible to suggestions from people in authority. A 2017 study published in the Association for Psychological Science showed that PTSD victims are at risk of producing false memories and acting on those memories when exposed to information that is related to their own ex- perience. In this man’s case, public statements and speeches that categorize Muslims as enemies of the people somehow triggered within him a reaction to act on an inner impulse of hatred toward people who were Muslim. The man who ente- red Chabad Synagogue with the intent to kill the congregants was inspired by the shooter at the ChristChurch Mosque. The Poway killer was a member of an evangelical church whe- re his father served as a leader in the congregation. The Sout- hern Poverty Law Center said that the increased profile of hate groups on social media is a significant factor in the in- crease of Islamophobia and Anti-Semitism. Online sites like Info-Wars and television personalities like Tucker Carlson, raise the alarm that the nation is under attack from immi- grants, LGBTQ, refugees, Muslims, Jews, etc… Facebook has finally responded to the calls from millions of users to take down those who promote hate: accounts from Louis Farrak- han, Alex Jones. Milo Yiannopoulos, and other extremists have been permanently closed as a way to curtain the influen- ce of hate groups in the public square. Our society is already permeated by racism and xenophobia. Social media merely amplifies that what people already believe. While there is no quick or easy fix to the sorry state of civil discourse, we should nonetheless support Facebook’s initial measures to reduce the hate speech on its own platform. Our role as members of the faith community is to patrol our own langua- ge and actions within our communities. Our preachers must choose their words carefully, our religious education teachers must look at content more closely, and our parish communi- ties must be places of unconditional welcome and support of all people. Let us pray for those caught up in a cycle of hate and intolerance and for those who work to bring healing to the victims of hate crimes.​

Intercesiónes semanales
Hace dos semanas, un hombre se lanzó contra un grupo de personas en Sunnyvale porque pensaba que esas personas eran musulmanas. La semana pasada, un hombre entró en una sinagoga en Poway y trato a matar la gente adentro. El hombre de Sunnyvale sufrió TEPT y fue altamente susceptible a las sugerencias de personas con autoridad. Un estudio de 2017 publicado en la Asociación para la Ciencia Psicológica mostró que las víctimas de TEPT corren el riesgo de producir memorias falsos y actuar sobre esos recuerdos cuando están expuestos a información relacionada con su propia experiencia. En el caso de este hombre, las declaraciones y discursos públicos que categorizan a los musulmanes como enemigos de la gente de alguna manera desencadenaron en su interior una reacción para actuar en un impulso interno de odio hacia las personas que eran musulmanes. El hombre que entró en la Sinagoga de Jabad con la intención de matar a los feligreses se inspiró en el tirador de la Mezquita de Christchurch, NZ. El asesino de Poway era miembro de una iglesia evangélica donde su padre servía como líder en la congregación. El Southern Poverty Law Center dijo que el mayor perfil de los grupos de odio en las redes sociales es un factor importante en el aumento de la islamofobia y el antisemitismo. Sitios en línea como Info- Wars y personalidades de la televisión como Tucker Carlson, dan la alarma de que la nación está siendo atacada por inmigrantes, LGBTQ, refugiados, musulmanes, judíos, etc. Facebook finalmente ha respondido a las llamadas de millones de usuarios para eliminarlos que promueven el odio: relatos de Louis Farrakhan, Alex Jones. Milo Yiannopoulos y otros extremistas han sido cerrados permanentemente como una forma de ocultar la influencia de grupos de odio en el zocalo. Nuestra sociedad ya está permeada por el racismo y la xenofobia. Las redes sociales simplemente amplifican lo que la gente ya cree. Si bien no existe una solución rápida o fácil para el lamentable estado del discurso civil, todavía debemos respaldar las medidas iniciales de Facebook para reducir el discurso de odio en su propia plataforma. Nuestro papel como miembros de la comunidad de fe es patrullar nuestro propio lenguaje y acciones dentro de nuestras comunidades. Nuestros predicadores deben elegir sus palabras con cuidado, nuestras catequistas deben analizar el contenido más detenidamente y nuestras comunidades parroquiales deben ser lugares de bienvenida y apoyo incondicionales para todas las personas. Oremos por aquellos atrapados en un ciclo de odio e intolerancia y por aquellos que trabajan para llevar la sanación a las víctimas de los delitos de odio.​

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Amor es Fe en Acción

La semana pasada cubrimos Jn 20: 19-31. En esa selección, los discípulos se encerraron en una habitación con la esperanza de que las autoridades los pasaran por alto, pero a pesar de todas las precauciones que tomaron para mantenerse a salvo, Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado, se les apareció proclamando la paz. En resumen, Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado se impuso a sus temerosos discípulos y los desafió a probar shalom como una manera de librarse de su miedo. Recuerde el pasaje de la Ta’anit (de la antigua literatura rabínica) que enseñó: “Por tres cosas, el mundo se preserva, por la justicia, por la verdad y por la paz, y estas tres son una: si se ha hecho justicia, así tiene verdad, y también la paz ”.Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado estaba llamando a sus discípulos a levantarse y convertirse en shalom para los demás. El pasaje de hoy, Jn 21: 1-19, sirve como una especie de “epílogo” al evangelio. Una opinión minoritaria de los estudiosos afirma que el Capítulo 21 fue escrito por alguien que no es el evangelista Juan; sin embargo, no hay evidencia que muestre que el evangelio terminó con el Capítulo 20. Parece que el Capítulo 21 siempre se incluyó como parte del cuerpo del Evangelio, pero tal vez el capítulo se establezca en una fecha muy posterior, lo que indica que Ha pasado algún tiempo entre la aparición de los apóstoles y el encuentro con Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado en la playa.

El texto del evangelio indica que los discípulos estaban pescando, lo que sugiere que los discípulos habían superado su temor de ser identificados como discípulos de Jesús y que habían regresado a su forma de vida anterior. En la narración Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado se apareció a los discípulos, pero nadie lo reconoció hasta que les dijo que arrojaran sus redes al “otro lado” de la barca. Los discípulos aceptaron la sugerencia y quedaron abrumados con lo que capturaron. En ese momento, el discípulo anónimo a quien Jesús amaba (la identidad del discípulo anónimo se asocia con el evangelista mismo), declaró: “¡Es el Señor!” (Jn 21, 7) La inclusión de la reacción de los discípulos anónimos al conocer la identidad de Jesus en estos versículos subraya aún más la idea de que el acceso a Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado está en nuestro medio a través de una intimidad relacional con el mismo Cristo.

El estudio del número 153 cuando está conectado a la narrativa del discípulo anónimo sugiere que si hay una conexión íntima con Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado, habrá un gran retorno. En los versículos 15-19, Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado interrogó a Simón Pedro: ¿Me Amó Pedro?” Me quieres, Pedro?  ¿Cuál fue la intención de Cristo al preguntarle a Simón Pedro una y otra vez la misma pregunta? En la enseñanza judía, el “amor” no se entiende como tener un vínculo emocional con una persona, sino hacer lo correcto para la persona. “Amar” al inmigrante no significa que yo coma ensaladas de tacos, sino más bien, no explotar y sacar provecho de la sangre del inmigrante. (Ver Dt 6). La literatura rabínica enseña que el amor es una serie de comportamientos obligatorios de la Torá que requieren que no nos limitemos a no maltratar a los demás, sino a hacer cosas de manera pro-activa que protejan la vida de los demás y que recibamos a otros en la comunidad. La cultura del Imperio no codificaba el comportamiento ético de la misma manera que la costumbre judía. El judaísmo, a diferencia del Imperio, estaba centrado en la integridad personal y los derechos civiles, especialmente el efecto sobre cómo las decisiones públicas tienen un impacto en los marginados. Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado respondió cuando Pedro respondió: “Sí, Señor, tú sabes que te amo”. El Cristo amplificó la respuesta de Simón Pedro de una manera consistente con la enseñanza judía: “Alimenta a mis corderos”. “Alimentar a mis ovejas”. No era suficiente tener un vínculo emocional con el Cristo resucitado, uno tenía que comprometerse con los demás, incluso hasta el punto de entregar la propia vida ante la posible muerte. (c.f., Jn 21:18). Solo después de que Jesús explicó el verdadero significado de “amor”, dijo Simón Pedro: “Sígueme”. Uno no puede seguir a Cristo a menos que esté completamente comprometido con el bienestar de los demás.

Como cristianos, debemos tener cuidado con nuestro uso del lenguaje en torno al “amor”, especialmente cuando los cristianos son rápidos para condenar, excomulgar o menospreciar a los demás por su teología, opciones de vida en sociedad y familia, y la liturgia. Cuando los cristianos hablan de amor en términos de afecto personal y apego emocional en lugar de en términos de cómo realmente hablamos y tratamos a los demás, les permite a los cristianos decir y hacer cosas horribles a los demás mientras mantienen que “aman” a Cristo. Por ejemplo, recuerde a Franklin Graham, un fuerte partidario de Trump y una figura religiosa pública, que critica al alcalde Pete Buttigieg y cuestiona la fe de Buttigieg porque el alcalde Pete es gay. Las declaraciones de Franklin atrajeron la atención de muchas personas porque permaneció en silencio cuando Donald Trump separó a las familias en la frontera y descuidó el bienestar de los niños en la frontera al poner a los niños pequeños y adolescentes en jaulas y poner a los menores bajo la custodia de sádicos que violaron y torturaron a los niños mientras Estaban en detención de inmigrantes. Al igual que Pedro, no es suficiente decir “Jesús, te amo”. Debemos mostrar ese amor en la forma en que cuidamos y alimentamos a los demás a nuestro alrededor.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Sessions: May 7th and 21st, and June 4th.
7 pm – 9:00 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español : 14 y 28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9:00 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Images from May Day 2019. Grupo Solidaridad and dozens of other organizations and people from Labor, Students, Mayfair Collective, LUNA, Sacred Heart Community Service, PACT and educators participated in the march.

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Unity and Solidarity Vigil this Thursday!

Please share this invitation from our our friends at Multifaith Voices for Peace & Justice:

Unity and Solidarity Vigil
Thursday, May 2, 5:30-6:30pm
El Camino Real and Sunnyvale-Saratoga Road
In light of attacks at this corner in Sunnyvale and in the Poway Synagogue
Please join us!

Marking the April 23 terrifying attack on pedestrians
because the driver believed some to be Muslim, and
the April 27 horrific shooting at the synagogue in Poway,
let us gather in
Unity and Solidarity with prayers
for healing, compassion and peace.

The vigil will be a quiet, positive presence to
acknowledge the pain and suffering of all people targeted
by violence and hate, and
to declare unequivocally that all lives are precious and
we are all part of the same human family.

Hosted by Multifaith Voices for Peace and Justice.
More information on our website, and forthcoming.
Please help spread the word.

Multifaith Voices for Peace & Justice
www.multifaithpeace.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Shalom!

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

April 25, 2019

DIFFERENT PLACE AND TIME FOR MISA
THIS SUNDAY April 28!

This week’s Misa de Solidaridad
April 28 at 10 am
Our Lady of Refuge Parish
2165 Lucretia Ave, San José

¡MISA 28 de ABRIL
tiempo y lugar diferente!

La próxima Misa de Solidaridad 
28 de abril a las 10 am
Nuestra Señora del Refugio
2165 Lucretia Ave, San Jose, CA  95122

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
The cast of the Resurrection Play offering the last scene at Misa Solidaridad on Easter Sunday.

Reflection:  Shalom!

Last week we heard the first Resurrection account from John’s gospel. This week we continue with the John,  (Jn 20: 19-31).  Recall that in John’s gospel, Resurrection takes on multiple meanings with each meaning arrived at by way of circumstance and place. In today’s Resurrection account we find the disciples huddled in a room out of fear that they would suffer the same fate that their rabbi did. They locked themselves in a room hoping that the authorities would pass over them…yet in spite of all the precautions, Jesus-as-the Risen Christ appeared to them proclaiming peace. 

The evangelist John’s intimate familiarity with Jewish thought seems evident in John 20:19 and 21, “Jesus came and stood in their midst and said to them, ‘Peace/shalom be with you.’” and “…Jesus said to them again, ‘Peace/shalom be with you. As the Father has sent me, so I send you.”  The word, “shalom,” (שׁלום) translated from Hebrew to “peace,” is more than the absence of war. The Hebrew concept of “shalom” means, “to be safe in mind, body or estate.”  Shalom is inclusive of well-being that is of “completeness,” “fullness” that is intense enough it generates an impulse in wanting to give back or re-pay something.  In ancient rabbinic teaching, shalom signifies an ethical category of over-coming strife, social tension, enmity, and the prevention of war. Some ancient rabbis wrote that shalom was the ultimate purpose of the Torah. Shalom is therefore not merely a concept or a state of public non-conflict, but rather a real embodied state of personal and social well-being.  Thus, when one says (in Hebrew), “Peace be with you,” one is literally saying, “May you be filled with a sense of such well-being that you give back and undo that which led to brokenness and fear.” The Ta’anit, a part of the basic works of rabbinic literature teaches, “By three things the world is preserved, by justice, by truth, and by peace, and these three are one: if justice has been accomplished, so has truth, and so has peace.”

The second factor that must be considered is Jesus’ breath.  Note in Jn 20:22, “And when he had said this, he breathed on them…” The question of breath is lost to those not familiar with Jewish categories of God.  The most sacred name of God, the tetragrammaton, YHWH, (יהוה) is never pronounced but read aloud using a different term, “Holy One,” “Blessed Be He” “LORD,” or “The Name.” If one were to sound out the tetragrammaton, it would come out as a breathy vocalization. The tetragrammaton also denotes the time-less-ness of God. 

(יהוה) provides the root letters of the verb, “To Be.” The name of God would literally be “The One who is, was and will be.”  Other translations simplify it to, “I am who am” or “I will be who I will be.”  The name of God cannot be contained in time or space. One can only grasp the meaning of the name by living completely in the present. That is to say, to live without fear of the future, regret of the past or demanding certainty of the present. By breathing (the name of God) on the disciples, Jesus-as-the Risen Christ affirmed that they they could no longer live in regret or fear.  They would have to be in the here and now!

The third consideration we must give to this passage is when Jesus “breathed” on the disciples uttering shalom and possibly the vocalization of God’s name, he invoked the Spirit (רוח). “Receive the holy Spirit.” (Jn 20:22).  The reference to Spirit underscores the intention of Jesus-as-the Risen Lord to restore shalom to his disciples. The disciples were frightened to point of paralysis and in order for them to go out into the world, they needed to be “remade.” Spirit in Hebrew means breath and harkens to the generative life-giving force (see Genesis 1:2, 6:17, 8:1) and live giving force (Num 27:16 and Job 33:4). Thus, when breathing new life into the disciples, Jesus-as-the Risen Lord prepared his disciples for recreating not only themselves, but for the re-creation of the world around them. Shalom is possible only when we can let go injury that comes from sin. Sin throws us into a never-ending cycle of injury, anger, resentment, thirst for revenge and acting out on our emotions. Jesus taught that if one does not forgive, one is forever trapped in a cycle of that ends in violence.

In Jn 20:24 Thomas enters into the narrative, but because he was not present when Jesus first appeared, he did not believe. Despite the other disciples witness, “We have seen the Lord…” Thomas’ reply, “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands and put my finger into the nailmarks and put my hand into his side, I will not believe.” (Jn 20:25), expressed the need for certainty.  Jesus-as-the Risen Lord responded,  “Put your finger here and see my hands, and bring your hand and put it into my side, and do not be unbelieving, but believe.” The narrative had Jesus-as-the Risen Christ invite Thomas literally to touch the pain points.  Thomas’ reaction to the invitation to touch the “pain points” was a heartfelt acclamation, “My Lord and my God.”  Thomas’ reaction showed that for him, shalom was the resilience of overcoming the specific pain points of suffering.

In summary, shalom is an inner-well-being that is at the same time a social and it is also an external well-being.  True shalom can only be given by God; it cannot be earned. Once given, shalom is tranformative.: those who live in fear become bold, those who live in regret and anger, become forgiving , and those to whom shalom is conferred, will be sent to bring shalom to others.

Weekly Intercessions
Last week, Easter morning, a series of explosions rocked Columbo, Sri Lanka. The explosions were from suicide bombers who entered into churches celebrating Easter mass and hotels frequented by Western tourists. The attack was seen as an act of terrorism because it was directed at non-combatants and civilians with the intention to create panic and chaos. Over 300 people were killed and over 500 injured. The bombings were well coordinated and executed with the intention to inflict maximum damage to civilians. Within a few hours investigators found that a “death cult” of terrorists connected to ISIS, (the international terrorist organization) was responsible for the attack. The news of ISIS’s involvement was not a surprise to most authorities in terrorism. The White House declared that ISIS was defeated and no longer poised a threat to the world and at the time of that announcement, several experts in terrorism vehemently disagreed with that assessment. In a February 12 article in Political Magazine, two terrorism experts, Christopher P. Costa and Joshua A. Geltzer wrote, “…ISIS…may be largely beaten, but it’s not gone—and many of the conditions that led to its rise remain, from an absence of political legitimacy to a failure of governance.”  The US pull out from the Middle East has left a “dangerous and cornered animal.” The article went on to say that ISIS “…might lash out with a fresh round of attacks to prove its relevance.”  Two months prior to last Sunday’s attack, the Sri Lankan government was briefed about a likely attack; however, they did very little to prepare for the attack. In the tragic aftermath of this violent act, the Sri Lankan government fired the officials that were charged with the responsibility of anti-terrorism activity.  Lastly, theologians, historians and social scientists widely concur that terrorism is not tied to a religion’s doctrine or religious custom. Terrorists may identify themselves with a particular religion by using religious language to justify their actions, but having terrorists that happen to be Catholics, Jews, Hindus, Muslims, etc… does not mean that the religion of the terrorist is in its creed, ritual and spiritual practice or theology is somehow approving of the use of violence. Let us pray for the victims in Sri Lanka and their families. Let us also pray for those who work to reduce terrorism in our world and for those who seek to bring peace through understanding.

Intercesiónes semanales
La semana pasada, en la mañana de Pascua, una serie de explosiones sacudió a Columbo, Sri Lanka. Las explosiones fueron de terroristas suicidas que entraron en templos que celebraban la misa de Pascua y hoteles frecuentados por turistas occidentales. El ataque fue visto como un acto de terrorismo porque estaba dirigido a no combatientes y civiles con la intención de crear pánico y caos. Más de 300 personas murieron y más de 500 resultaron heridas. Los terroristas fueron bien coordinados y ejecutados con la intención de infligir el máximo daño a la gente no-combatiente. En pocas horas, los investigadores descubrieron que un “culto a la muerte” de los terroristas relacionados con el ISIS (la organización terrorista internacional) fue el responsable del ataque. La noticia de la participación de ISIS no fue una sorpresa para la mayoría de las autoridades en materia de terrorismo. La Casa Blanca declaró que ISIS fue derrotado y ya no representaba una amenaza para el mundo y en el momento de ese anuncio, varios expertos en terrorismo discreparon con vehemencia con esa evaluación. En un artículo del 12 de febrero en la revista, Revista Política, dos expertos en terrorismo, Christopher P. Costa y Joshua A. Geltzer escribieron: “… ISIS … puede ser ampliamente golpeado, pero no se ha ido, y muchas de las condiciones que llevaron a su ascenso continúan, desde la ausencia de legitimidad política hasta el fracaso de la gobernabilidad “. La retirada de EE.UU. de Medio Oriente ha dejado a un “animal peligroso y acorralado “. El artículo continuó diciendo que ISIS ” … podría atacar con una nueva ronda de ataques para demostrar su relevancia ”.  Dos meses antes del ataque del domingo pasado, se informó al gobierno de Sri Lanka sobre un posible ataque; sin embargo, hicieron muy poco para prepararse para el ataque. En las trágicas secuelas de este acto violento, el gobierno de Sri Lanka despidió a los funcionarios acusados ​​de la responsabilidad de la actividad antiterrorista. Por último, los teólogos, los historiadores y los científicos sociales coinciden ampliamente en que el terrorismo no está ligado a la doctrina o costumbre religiosa de una religión. Los terroristas pueden identificarse con una religión en particular usando un lenguaje religioso para justificar sus acciones, pero tener terroristas que sean católicos, judíos, hindúes, musulmanes, etc. no significa que la religión del terrorista esté en su credo, ritual y la práctica espiritual o la teología es, de alguna manera, aprobar el uso de la violencia. Oremos por las víctimas en Sri Lanka y sus familias. Oremos también por aquellos que trabajan para reducir el terrorismo en nuestro mundo y por aquellos que buscan lograr la paz a través de la comprensión.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: ¡Shalom!

La semana pasada escuchamos el primer relato de Resurrección del evangelio de S Juan. Esta semana continuamos con el Juan, (Jn 20: 19-31). Recuerde que en el evangelio de Juan, la Resurrección adquiere múltiples significados con cada significado que se llega por medio de la circunstancia y el lugar. En el recuento de hoy de Resurrección, encontramos a los discípulos acurrucados en una habitación por temor a sufrir el mismo destino que su rabino. Se encerraron en una habitación con la esperanza de que las autoridades los pasaran… pero a pesar de todas las precauciones, Jesús-como-el Cristo Resucitado se les apareció proclamando la paz.

La familiaridad íntima del evangelista Juan con la cultura y teología judío parece evidente en Juan 20:19 y 21, “Jesús vino y se paró en medio de ellos y les dijo: ‘Paz / shalom esté con ustedes'” y “… Jesús les dijo otra vez, ‘La paz / shalom estar contigo. Como el Padre me envió, también yo os envío. La palabra “shalom” (שׁלום) traducida del hebreo a “paz” es más que la ausencia de guerra. El concepto hebreo de “shalom” significa estar seguros en mente, cuerpo o estado. Shalom incluye el bienestar que es de “integridad”, “plenitud” que es lo suficientemente intensa como para generar un impulso de querer compartir con otros o sea generoso con todos o de volver o pagar algo o para pagar a los que uno ha ofendido.  En la antigua enseñanza rabínica, shalom significa una categoría ética de conflictos que se superan, tensión social, enemistad y la prevención de la guerra. Algunos rabinos antiguos escribieron que shalom era el propósito final de la Torá. Shalom, por lo tanto, no es simplemente un concepto o un estado de no conflicto público, sino un estado real de bienestar personal y social. Por lo tanto, cuando uno dice (en hebreo), “La paz esté con ustedes”, se dice literalmente: “Que se llene con una sensación de tal bienestar que devuelva y deshaga lo que condujo al quebrantamiento y al miedo”. El Ta’anit, una parte de las obras básicas de la literatura rabínica, enseña: “Por tres cosas, el mundo está preservado, por la justicia, por la verdad y por la paz, y estas tres son una: si se ha logrado la justicia, también lo ha hecho la verdad y así tiene la paz “.

El segundo factor que debe ser considerado es el aliento de Jesús. Note en Jn 20:22, “Y cuando dijo esto, sopló sobre ellos …” La pregunta de la respiración se pierde para aquellos que no están familiarizados con las categorías judías de interpretación sobre Dios. El nombre más sagrado de Dios, el tetragrammaton, YHWH, (יהוה) nunca se pronuncia, sino que se lee en voz alta con un término diferente, “Santo”, “Bendito sea” “SEÑOR” o “El Nombre”. Si uno fuera a sonar el tetragrammaton, saldría como una vocalización entrecortada. El tetragrammaton (יהוה) también denota la falta de tiempo de Dios proporciona las letras de la raíz del verbo “Ser”. El nombre de Dios sería literalmente “El que es, fue y será”. Otras traducciones lo simplifican a “Yo soy quien soy” o “Yo será quien yo sea ”. El nombre de Dios no puede estar contenido en el tiempo o el espacio. Solo se puede comprender el significado del nombre viviendo completamente en el presente. Es decir, vivir sin miedo al futuro, arrepentirse del pasado o exigir la certeza del presente. Al respirar (el nombre de Dios) en los discípulos, Jesús-como-el Cristo Resucitado afirmó que ya no podían vivir con arrepentimiento o temor. ¡Tendrían que estar aquí y ahora!

La tercera consideración que debemos dar a este pasaje es cuando Jesús “sopló” sobre los discípulos, pronunciando shalom y posiblemente la vocalización del nombre de Dios, él invocó al Espíritu (רוח). “Recibe el Espíritu santo” (Jn 20, 22). La referencia al Espíritu subraya la intención de Jesús-como -el Cristo Resucitado para restaurar el shalom a sus discípulos. Los discípulos estaban atemorizados hasta el punto de la parálisis y para que salieran al mundo, tenían que ser “rehechos” o sea, “renacidos.”  El Espíritu en hebreo significa aliento y se adhiere a la fuerza generadora que da la vida (véase Génesis 1: 2, 6). : 17, 8: 1) y fuerza de dar en vivo (Núm. 27:16 y Job 33: 4). Por lo tanto, al dar nueva vida a los discípulos, Jesús-como-el Cristo Resucitado preparó a sus discípulos para recrear no solo a sí mismos, sino también a la recreación del mundo que los rodea. Shalom es posible solo cuando podemos dejar ir lesiones que provienen del pecado. El pecado nos lanza a un ciclo interminable de lesiones, enojo, resentimiento, sed de venganza y actuar sobre nuestras emociones. Jesús enseñó que si uno no perdona, uno queda atrapado para siempre en un ciclo que termina en violencia.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Sessions: May 7th and 21st, and June 4th.
7 pm – 9:00 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español : 14 y 28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9:00 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Resurrection

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

April 18, 2019

EASTER MISA THIS SUNDAY April 21!
The next Misa de Solidaridad will be
April 21 at 9 am
at the Newman Chapel
Corner of 10th and San Carlos Sts.

MISA DE PASCUA ESTE DOMINGO
21 de abril

La próxima Misa de Solidaridad  sera
21 de abril a las 9 am
en la Capilla de Newman
Esquina de las calles 10 y S. Carlos.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Reflection:  Resurrection

The concept of Resurrection from the dead is not unique to Christianity.  Jesus, the Apostles, disciples and early communities of believers were Jewish and their understanding of Resurrection was built on — t’chiyat hameitim, the Resurrection of the Dead. Around the time of Jesus the core prayer of the Jewish people, the Amidah, began to take shape. In one of the blessings, the text praises God as the “resurrector of the dead.”

The Jewish scriptures mention Resurrection twice: in Isaiah and Daniel and most Reform scholars would assert that the references to Resurrection are more suggestive of the immortality of the soul than a belief in the physical Resurrection. Orthodox scholars, on the other hand, believe that the Resurrection of the Dead will happen when the Messiah comes. We know from Christian texts that the Jewish community at the time of Jesus had not come to consensus in the Resurrection. The Essenes (the group to which John the Baptist appears to have been associated with) and the Pharisees (the group to which Jesus was most closely affiliated) believed in the Resurrection of the body.  For Essenes and Pharisees, Resurrection was invariably tied to the coming of the Messiah which ushered in a new Messianic era which signaled the end of the Empire. Sadducees did not believe in the Resurrection of the dead because there was no reference to Resurrection in the Torah. (NB., they were very “literal” in their understanding of the Scriptures. Note that the Sadducess’ theological position was not too dissimilar from the “sola scriptura” position of Reform and Fundamentalist Christians and so-called “Bible Christians” of modern Christianity). They instead held to the traditional belief that the dead resided in Sheol, the place of repose or “sleep.”

In the gospel of John, there are many references to Resurrection; however, there is no evidence in Scripture that would conclude that Jesus-as-the Christ’s decision to stand up to the Empire was driven by the foreknowledge that he himself would be raised from the tomb. To be clear, Jesus’ decision to go up to Jerusalem and defy the Empire was not predicated on knowing that God the Father would “bail out” him out of death by saving him from eternal sleep in Sheol.  Jesus was driven by the Spirit to confront the religious leadership held by Annas and Caiaphas and the political system controlled by Pilate. John’s gospel gives testimony that Jesus indeed rose from the dead and it took a lot of time for the Apostles, disciples and the wider circle of believers to come to understanding what rising from the dead meant.  Note the closing line of today’s gospel, “For they did not yet understand the Scripture that he had to rise from the dead…” (Jn 20:9)

The meaning of Resurrection is not limited to Jesus alone. His rising from the dead is the ultimate act of Divine Resistance to the Empire. The Empire that killed Jesus-as-the Christ and tried to seal his message by placing him in a tomb with a large stone was unsuccessful because God raised his Son. The power of that single Divine act reverberates across all generations and in every community. Thus, the meaning of the Resurrection will present itself in many different circumstances. Let us take time to reflect on what Resurrection might mean for us…

If you believe that long arc of history will inevitably bow in favor of Justice: you believe in the possibility of Resurrection. 

•    When self-sabotaging behaviors that lead to emotional and relational isolation are changed into self-acceptance, confidence, and appreciating the gift of who one is to one’s own self and to others: we experience the rebirth of Resurrection.    

•    When bitterness, resentment and a thirst for revenge are replaced by a desire to let go and move on: we feel the healing effects of Resurrection.

•    When racial prejudice, homo and transphobia, Islamophobia, Anti-Semitism, and the hatred of non-Western and Christian religions give way to respect and peaceful co-existence: we are enveloped in the unconditional love of Resurrection.

•    When the economic system that makes more people homelessness, hungry, and living in abject poverty while rewarding the already-wealthy with more wealth is dismantled: we unleash the Resurrection.

•    When policies denying entry to asylum seekers and refugees, separating children from their parents and placing children in cages at the border are replaced by policies shaped by humanitarian care and concern for the well-being of those fleeing famine, oppression and violence: we live out the compassion of Resurrection.

•    When money and resources spent on profiling, arresting, and incarcerating Black and Brown young adults are reinvested in jobs programs and education: we see the concrete application of Resurrection.

•    When domestic violence, urban gun violence and suburban mass shootings at schools and churches cease and families and students can live without fear: we are rescued by Resurrection.

•    When threats of war, the use military action, and the occupation of foreign countries are finally acknowledged as untenable and replaced by diplomacy and multi-national cooperation: we are touched by the wisdom of Resurrection.

•    When presidents and politicians who have come to office through corrupt means and playing on people’s prejudices by using hateful rhetoric, and abusing power to stay in control are finally deposed and held accountable for their crimes: we share the joy of Resurrection.

Weekly Intercessions
Two weeks before St. Oscar Romero was assassinated on March 24, 1980, he told a Guatemalan reporter, “If they kill me, I shall arise in the Salvadoran people. If the threats come to be fulfilled, from this moment I offer my blood to God for the redemption and resurrection of El Salvador. Let my blood be a seed of freedom and the sign that hope will soon be reality.” St. Oscar Romero was a sign of hope in a very difficult time in his country’s history.  During the time of his ministry, El Salvador was in the throws of a civil war waged by the Military and the ruling elite against their own people. The causes of the civil war were complicated by US involvement and interference in El Salvador’s agribusiness and a growing political movement that demanded accountability of the government and anti-corruption reforms in the central government and wider democratic and economic reforms. The wealth-gap between the elite and the majority of the population had grown so wide that the Salvadoran middle-class had virtually disappeared leaving the majority of the population living in poverty. Rather than enacting reforms, the government repressed dissent and academic freedom, controlled the media, and tired to suppress the growing movement of liberation theology within the Catholic community. St. Oscar Romero emerged as a sign of hope within this dark episode of political repression. His Sunday sermons, critical of the Military, the ruling elite, and the United States that supported the government, were broadcast widely. People reported that cities and towns came to a standstill during the broadcast and St. Oscar Romero’s words inspired millions of Latin Americans who also struggled for social, political and economic reforms in their own countries.  St. Oscar Romero spoke directly to members of the military calling them to stop killing their own people. He was not naive about his work. St. Oscar Romero received countless death threats and he knew that his defense of the poor would ultimately lead to martyrdom. His faith, not his fear, guided his prophetic ministry. St. Oscar Romero believed that the Resurrection redefined the rules of the world. Resurrection was not something that happened to Jesus, but rather, it was a cosmic transformation of everything. The Resurrection was an affirmation that justice, equity, compassion, generosity, cooperation, forgiveness and social and personal healing would win against political repression, corporate greed, and violence. Today El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala are embroiled in a civil war of drug and human trafficking and our own political culture seems to be devolving toward authoritarianism and despotism, similar to El Salvador of the 1970’s. Let us pray through the intercession of St. Oscar Romero that the violence in Central America give way to peace and that we who battle political corruption, national populism and injustice here in the US be strengthened by a true Resurrection Faith.

Intercesiónes semanales

Dos semanas antes de que San Oscar Romero fuera asesinado el 24 de marzo de 1980, le dijo a un reportero guatemalteco: “Si me matan, me resucitaré en el pueblo salvadoreño. Si las amenazas se cumplen, desde este momento ofrezco mi sangre a Dios para la redención y resurrección de El Salvador. Que mi sangre sea una semilla de libertad y el signo de que la esperanza pronto será una realidad “.   San Oscar Romero fue un signo de esperanza en un momento muy difícil en la historia de su país. Durante el tiempo de su ministerio, El Salvador estaba en medio de una guerra civil emprendida por los militares y la élite gobernante contra su propio pueblo. Las causas de la guerra civil se vieron complicadas por la participación e injerencia de los Estados Unidos en la agroindustria de El Salvador y un movimiento político creciente que exigía la rendición de cuentas del gobierno y reformas anticorrupción en el gobierno central y reformas económicas y democráticas más amplias. La brecha de riqueza entre la élite y la mayoría de la población había crecido tanto que la clase media salvadoreña prácticamente había desaparecido y la mayoría de la población vivía en la pobreza. En lugar de promulgar reformas, el gobierno reprimió la disidencia y la libertad académica, controló los medios de comunicación y se cansó de reprimir el creciente movimiento de teología de la liberación dentro de la comunidad católica. San Oscar Romero surgió como un signo de esperanza dentro de este episodio oscuro de represión política. Sus sermones dominicales, críticos del ejército, la elite gobernante y los Estados Unidos que apoyaron al gobierno, fueron difundidos ampliamente. Las personas informaron que las ciudades y pueblos se puso toda su atención durante la transmisión y las palabras de San Oscar Romero. Sus palabras inspiraron a millones de latinoamericanos que también lucharon por reformas sociales, políticas y económicas en sus propios países. San Oscar Romero habló directamente a los miembros de las fuerzas armadas y les pidió que dejaran de matar a su propia gente. No era ingenuo en su trabajo. San Óscar Romero recibió innumerables amenazas de muerte y sabía que su defensa de los pobres finalmente conduciría al martirio. Su fe, no su miedo, guió su ministerio profético. San Oscar Romero creyó que la Resurrección redefinió las reglas del mundo. La resurrección no fue algo que le sucedió a Jesús, sino que fue una transformación cósmica de todo. La resurrección fue una afirmación de que la justicia, la equidad, la compasión, la generosidad, la cooperación, el perdón y la curación social y personal ganarán contra la represión política, la codicia corporativa y la violencia. Hoy en día, El Salvador, Honduras y Guatemala están envueltos en una guerra de drogas y tráfico de personas y la cultura política de los EEUU parece estar evolucionando hacia el autoritarismo y el despotismo, similar a El Salvador de los años 70. Oremos por la intercesión de San Oscar Romero para que la violencia en Centroamérica dé paso a la paz y para que nosotros, quienes luchamos contra la corrupción política, el populismo nacional y la injusticia aquí en los Estados Unidos, sea fortalecidos por una verdadera Fe de resurrección.

Reflexión:  La Resurrección  

El concepto de la resurrección de entre los muertos no es exclusivo del cristianismo. Jesús, los apóstoles, los discípulos y las primeras comunidades de creyentes eran judíos y su comprensión de la Resurrección se construyó sobre el t’chiyat hameitim, la Resurrección de los Muertos. Alrededor del tiempo de Jesús, la oración central del pueblo judío, la Amidá, comenzó a tomar forma. En una de las bendiciones, el texto alaba a Dios como el “resucitador de los muertos”.

Las escrituras judías mencionan la Resurrección dos veces: en Isaías y Daniel y la mayoría de los eruditos del ramo de Judaísmo de la Reforma afirmarían que las referencias a la Resurrección sugieren más la inmortalidad del alma que una creencia en la Resurrección física. Los eruditos del ramo ortodoxo, por otro lado, creen que la resurrección de los muertos sucederá cuando venga el Mesías. Sabemos por los textos cristianos que la comunidad judía en el momento de Jesús no había llegado a un consenso en la Resurrección. Los Esenios (el grupo al que parece estar asociado Juan el Bautista) y los Fariseos (el grupo al que Jesús estaba más estrechamente afiliado) creyeron en la resurrección del cuerpo. Para los Esenios y los Fariseos, la resurrección estuvo invariablemente vinculada a la venida del Mesías, que dio paso a una nueva era mesiánica que marcó el fin del Imperio. Los Saduceos no creían en la resurrección de los muertos porque no había ninguna referencia a la resurrección en la Torá. (NB., Fueron muy “literales” en su comprensión de las Escrituras. Tenga en cuenta que la posición teológica de los saduceos no era muy diferente de la posición de “sola scriptura” de los cristianos reformistas y fundamentalistas y los llamados “cristianos bíblicos” de el cristianismo moderno). En cambio, sostuvieron la creencia tradicional de que los muertos residían en el Sheol, el lugar de reposo o “sueño”.

En el evangelio de Juan, hay muchas referencias a la resurrección; sin embargo, no hay evidencia en las Escrituras que concluya que la decisión de Jesús-como-el Cristo de enfrentarse al Imperio fue impulsada por la presciencia de que él mismo sería resucitado de la tumba. Para ser claros, la decisión de Jesús de ir a Jerusalén y desafiar al Imperio no se basó en saber que Dios el Padre lo “rescataría” de la muerte al salvarlo del sueño eterno en el Sheol. Jesús fue impulsado por el Espíritu para enfrentar a los líderes religiosos de Anás y Caifás y al sistema político controlado por Pilato. El evangelio de Juan da testimonio de que Jesús realmente se resucitó de entre los muertos y los apóstoles, los discípulos y el círculo más amplio de creyentes tardaron mucho tiempo en comprender lo que significa resucitar de entre los muertos. Nótese la línea final del evangelio de hoy: “Porque aún no entendían las Escrituras que tenía que levantarse de entre los muertos …” (Jn 20, 9)

El significado de la Resurrección no se limita a Jesús solo. Su levantamiento de entre los muertos es el último acto de la Resistencia Divina al Imperio. El Imperio que mató a Jesús-como-el Cristo y trató de sellar su mensaje al colocarlo en una tumba con una gran piedra no tuvo éxito porque Dios resucitó a su Hijo. El poder de ese único acto divino reverbera en todas las generaciones y en todas las comunidades. Por lo tanto, el significado de la Resurrección se presentará en muchas circunstancias diferentes. Tomemos un tiempo para reflexionar sobre lo que la Resurrección podría significar para nosotros …

Si crees que un largo arco de la historia se inclinará inevitablemente a favor de la justicia: crees en la posibilidad de la resurrección.

•    Cuando los comportamientos de auto-sabotaje que conducen al aislamiento emocional y relacional se convierten en auto-aceptación, confianza y aprecio por el don de quien uno es para sí mismo y para los demás: experimentamos el renacimiento de la Resurrección.

•    Cuando la amargura, el resentimiento y la sed de venganza son reemplazados por el deseo de dejar ir y seguir adelante: sentimos los efectos sanados de la Resurrección.

•    Cuando el prejuicio racial, el homo y la transfobia, la islamofobia, el antisemitismo y el odio a las religiones cristianas y no occidentales dan paso al respeto y la coexistencia pacífica: estamos envueltos en el amor incondicional de la Resurrección.

•    Cuando se desmantela el sistema económico que deja a más personas sin hogar, hambrientas y viviendo en una pobreza extrema mientras recompensa a los ya ricos con más riqueza: desatamos la Resurrección.

•    Cuando las políticas que niegan la entrada a los solicitantes de asilo y los refugiados, separan a los niños de sus padres y colocan a los niños en jaulas en la frontera son reemplazadas por políticas formadas por la atención humanitaria y la preocupación por el bienestar de quienes huyen de la hambruna, la opresión y la violencia: vivimos lLa compasión de la Resurrección.

•    Cuando el dinero y los recursos gastados en la elaboración de perfiles, el arresto y el encarcelamiento de adultos jóvenes negros y latinos se reinvierten en programas de empleo y educación: vemos la aplicación concreta de la Resurrección.

•    Cuando cesan la violencia doméstica, la violencia urbana con armas de fuego y los tiroteos en zonas urbanas en las escuelas e iglesias, las familias y los estudiantes pueden vivir sin miedo: somos rescatados por la Resurrección.

•    Cuando las amenazas de guerra, el uso de la acción militar y la ocupación de países extranjeros finalmente son reconocidos como insostenibles y reemplazados por la diplomacia y la cooperación multinacional: nos conmueve la sabiduría de la Resurrección.

•    Cuando los presidentes y los políticos que han asumido el cargo por medios corruptos y se han aprovechado de los prejuicios de la gente mediante el uso de una retórica odiosa y el abuso del poder para mantener el control, finalmente son depuestos y responsables de sus crímenes: compartimos la alegría de la Resurrección.

GOOD FRIDAY ACTION
APRIL 19 at NOON
Join members of LUNA, FACTR, GRUPO SOLIDARIDAD, PACT, AMIGOS DE GUADALUPE, and other organizations for a Good Friday Action at Cesar Chavez Park, downtown San José. This is an inter-faith event calling for the dismantlement of unjust social and political structures that result in caging separating families at the border and putting children in cages; wholesale destruction of our environment; racial profiling; the lack of affordable housing; the lack fo access to affordable health care; and living in severe poverty because our wages are so low.
ACCIÓN DE VIERNES SANTO
19 de abril al mediodía 

Únase a los miembros de LUNA, FACTR, GRUPO SOLIDARIDAD, PACT, AMIGOS DE GUADALUPE y otras organizaciones para una acción de Viernes Santo en el Parque César Chávez, en el centro de San José. Este es un evento interreligioso que exige el desman- telamiento de estructuras sociales y políticas injustas que resultan en la enjaulación que separa a las familias en la frontera y que po- nen a los niños en jaulas; destrucción masiva de nuestro medio ambiente; perfil racial la falta de viviendas asequibles; la falta de acce- so a servicios de salud asequibles; y viviendo en pobreza extrema porque nuestros salarios son muy bajo.
 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Sessions: May 7th and 21st, and June 4th.
7 pm – 9:00 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español : 14 y 28 de mayo y Junio 11
7 pm – 9:00 pm

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp