Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  The Baptism of the Lord

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

January 11, 2019

FIRST MISA SOLIDARIDAD
OF THE YEAR 2019

Sunday, January 20 at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

 

¡MISA SOLIDARIDAD 
PRIMERA MISA DEL AÑO 2019!

Domingo 20 de enero a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
The telephone line that runs through the grove reminded me that before we communicate to others, we might first consider that silence is also a form of communication.

Personal Reflection on the Gospel: 
The Baptism of the Lord

This week’s reflection will be a departure from the usual Resistance Theology because this past week I spent a week at St. Clare’s Retreat in a silent meditation retreat. This week’s reflection will therefore be a meditation regarding the Baptism of the Lord using photo images captured at the retreat center and other contemplative retreats. 

Reflexión Personal del Evangelio: 
El Bautizo del Señor

La reflexión de esta semana será un alejamiento de la Teología de la Resistencia habitual porque la semana pasada pasé una semana en el Retiro de Santa Clara en un retiro de meditación en silencio. Por lo tanto, la reflexión de esta semana será una meditación sobre el Bautismo del Señor utilizando algunas de las imágenes que capturé en el centro de retiro y otros lugares.

People’s hearts were filled with expectation that John the Baptist was the long-awaited Messiah.  They wanted to hold on to what they could see, feel and touch at the moment. They liked John’s strong message of Resistance. They did not know that the Messiah was already among them in the crowd.
 
Los corazones de las personas se llenaron de la expectativa de que Juan el Bautista era el Mesías tan esperado. Querían aferrarse a lo que podían ver, sentir y tocar en ese momento. Les gustó el fuerte mensaje de resistencia de Juan. Ellos no sabían que el Mesías ya estaba entre ellos en la multitud.

The first step to recognize Christ Jesus is to empty yourself. One must empty one’s self in order to be filled with the Spirit.

El primer paso para reconocer a Cristo Jesús es de quitar todas las expectativas, agendas, y presunciones: en otras palabras: ponernos completamente – totalmente – vacíos. Uno debe vaciarse para ser lleno del Espíritu.

Jesus entered the waters of the Jordan. As he stepped into the river, he symbolically entered into the wonderful chaos that is humanity.
 
Jesús entró en las aguas del Jordán. Cuando entró en el río, simbólicamente entró en el maravilloso caos que es la humanidad.

Washed in a river of our human condition, heaven opened up and the Spirit, the breath of the Creator came upon Jesus.  Only after Jesus stepped into the river and submitted himself for baptism like everyone else, God proclaimed, “You are my beloved Son; with you I am well pleased.”

Lavado en un río de nuestra condición humana, el cielo se abrió y el Espíritu, el aliento del Creador vino sobre Jesús. Solo después de que Jesús entró en el río y se sometió al bautismo como todos los demás, Dios proclamó: “Tú eres mi Hijo amado; contigo estoy muy contento”.

When the first Christians first submitted themselves for baptism, the focus was not solely on “washing away sin,” but rather, uniting one’s self to God through Christ and belonging to a community of fellow travelers seeking to know God and serving others. It is indeed a blessing to connect with others who share the journey. To know others is to know God and to know God is to love and serve your neighbor. Therefore when we choose a silent and contemplative path, we are not rejecting others.  In fact, it is quite the opposite. Silence does not mean rejection, but rather, silence creates the space for us to have more meaningful, intentional and authentic connection.   Thomas Merton wrote, “It is in deep solitude and silence that I find the gentleness with which I can truly love my brother and sister.”

Cuando los primeros cristianos se sometieron por primera vez al bautismo, el enfoque no se centró únicamente en “limpiar el pecado”, sino en unirnos a Dios por medio de Cristo y pertenecer a una comunidad de compañeros del camino que buscan conocer a Dios y servir a otros. De hecho, es una bendición hermanarse con otras personas que comparten el viaje. Conocer a otros es conocer a Dios y conocer a Dios es amar y servir a tu prójimo. Por lo tanto, cuando elegimos un camino silencioso y contemplativo, no estamos rechazando a otros. De hecho, es todo lo contrario. El silencio no significa rechazo, sino que el silencio crea el espacio para que tengamos una conexión más significativa, intencional y auténtica. Thomas Merton escribió: “Es en profunda soledad y silencio donde encuentro la amabilidad con la que puedo amar de verdad a mi hermano y mi hermana”.

Weekly Intercessions

This week we reflected on the spiritual power of silence that can bring clarity to a situation. Silence allows us to ponder and it allows us to feel what is going on within our selves — our bodies and soul.  Silence the space for God to act first thus, silence holds the ego in check and when we embrace the value of silence, we soon learn to be okay with not having to be first, loudest, or the most clever person in the room.  But the power of silence and contemplation is this: we are not retreating from the world, but rather, we become more committed.  True silence will lead us to action.  Thoughtful action. Strategic action. When we remain silent in the face of injustice, we violate the spirit of and intention of silence. We cannot use our contemplative practice as a pretext for not getting involved. Contemplation does not mean that we are going to turn our back to the world nor does contemplation mean we “spiritualize” suffering leading us down the pathway spiritual masochism. To remain silent while we or others suffer is an abuse of our spiritual tradition of contemplation.  While we honor silence and contemplation, we must also honor the activist tradition of engagement. The two traditions are not exclusive of each other. In fact, action without prior silence is nothing but a “noisy gong, a cymbal clashing.” Action without forethought and contemplation is essentially, a tantrum. This week’s intercession is an ask to our selves:  that we take the time for silence so that our minds be stilled and our hearts be opened so that when we act, we do so with clarity, purpose and compassion.  

Intercesiónes semanales

Esta semana reflexionamos sobre el poder espiritual del silencio que puede aportar claridad a una situación. El silencio nos permite reflexionar y nos permite sentir lo que sucede dentro de nosotros mismos: nuestros cuerpos y nuestra alma. Silencio el “espacio” para que Dios actúe primero, el silencio mantiene al ego bajo control y cuando aceptamos el valor del silencio, pronto aprendemos a estar de acuerdo con no tener que ser el primero a tomar acción, la más ruidosa, o la más inteligente de la sala. Pero el poder del silencio y la contemplación es este: no nos estamos retirando del mundo, sino que nos comprometemos más. El verdadero silencio nos llevará a la acción. Acción reflexiva. Acción estratégica. Cuando permanecemos en silencio frente a la injusticia, violamos el espíritu y la intención del silencio. No podemos usar nuestra práctica contemplativa como un pretexto para no involucrarnos. La contemplación no significa que vamos a dar la espalda al mundo, ni la contemplación significa que “espiritualizamos” el sufrimiento que nos conduce por el camino del masoquismo espiritual. Permanecer en silencio mientras nosotros u otros sufrimos es un abuso de nuestra tradición espiritual de contemplación. Si bien honramos el silencio y la contemplación, también debemos respetar la tradición activista de compromiso. Las dos tradiciones no son exclusivas una de la otra. De hecho, la acción sin silencio previo no es más que un “gong ruidoso, un choque de platillos”. La acción sin previsión y contemplación es esencialmente una rabieta. La intercesión de esta semana es una pregunta para nosotros mismos: que nos tomemos el tiempo del silencio para que nuestras mentes se calmen y nuestros corazones se abran de manera que cuando actuemos, lo hagamos con claridad, propósito y compasión.

Santa Teresa Social Action Ministry
Presents
Gaza-Israel Conflict:
What is happening and why does it matter?
 
Speaker:  Samir Laymourn
 
Wednesday, January 16th
7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Santa Teresa Parish
Avila Hall

 
Samir Laymoun is a former high-tech executive and an immigrant from Palestine who has lived in the U.S. for many years. As a human rights and social justice advocate, he is concerned for the ongoing Israeli attacks on civilians in Gaza and the bulldozing of Palestinian homes. Samir wants to present on the predicament many Palestinians find themselves in, and how violence is affecting their lives. He states:
 
“My goal is to bring to light the Palestinian narrative that has been subject to consistent marginalization and outright erasure. Recently a US Representative wrote to express support, saying “I have raised my concerns about the demolition of Palestinian settlements in West Bank.” but even our politicians who vote to give Israel $10 Million a day in military aid do not know who is bulldozing homes and who is building settlements!”
 
A Q&A session will follow the presentation.
 
For more information contact Lynda DeManti – 408 839-3163 or Lynda@SantaTeresaChurch.com
 

Ministerio de Acción Social Santa Teresa
Presenta
Conflicto Gaza-Israel:
¿Qué está pasando y por qué importa?

Ponente: Samir Laymourn

Miercoles 16 de enero
7:00 pm. a las 8:30 p.m.
Parroquia de santa teresa
Avila Hall

Samir Laymoun es un ex ejecutivo de alta tecnología y un inmigrante de Palestina que ha vivido en los EE. UU. Durante muchos años. Como defensor de los derechos humanos y la justicia social, le preocupan los continuos ataques israelíes contra civiles en Gaza y la demolición de hogares palestinos. Samir quiere presentar la situación en la que se encuentran muchos palestinos y cómo la violencia está afectando sus vidas. El afirma:

“Mi objetivo es sacar a la luz la narrativa palestina que ha sido objeto de una marginación constante y un borrado total. Recientemente, un representante de los EE. UU. Escribió para expresar su apoyo diciendo:” He expresado mi preocupación por la demolición de los asentamientos palestinos en Cisjordania “, pero ¡Incluso nuestros políticos que votan para darle a Israel $ 10 millones por día en ayuda militar no saben quién está arrasando casas y quién está construyendo asentamientos! “

Una sesión de preguntas y respuestas seguirá a la presentación.

Para obtener más información, comuníquese con Lynda DeManti – 408 839-3163 o Lynda@SantaTeresaChurch.com

HELP NEEDED
BY MEMBERS OF GRUPO SOLIDARIDAD

Fr Jon will be speaking at Our Lady of Refuge on the weekend of the 13th of January at all of their masses. We need people that can help answer questions about Grupo Solidaridad and share from your own experience of why “solidarity” with others has been a powerful part of your own spiritual life. You should be able to share in the language of the mass at which you wish to participate.  The setting is informal and sharing will be 1:1 or in small groups after the mass. If you are able to participate, please contact Judi Sanchez at judisanchez@gmail.com. The mass schedule for Our Lady of Refuge is:

10 am – Spanish; 12: English; 5:00 pm English; 7:00 pm Spanish
 

SE NECESITA AYUDA
POR LOS MIEMBROS DE GRUPO SOLIDARIDAD

El Padre Jon predicará en Nuestra Señora del Refugio el fin de semana del 13 de enero en todas las misas. Necesitamos personas que puedan ayudarlo a responder preguntas sobre el Grupo Solidaridad y compartir su propia experiencia de por qué la “solidaridad” con los demás ha sido una parte poderosa de su propia vida espiritual. Debe poder compartir en la misma idioma de la misa en cual puede participar. El ambiente es informal y se compartirá 1: 1 o en grupos pequeños después de la misa. Si puedes participar, por favor contacta a Judi Sanchez en judisanchez@gmail.com. El horario de las misas en Nuestra Señora del Refugio es:

10 am – español; 12: Inglés; 5:00 pm Inglés; 7:00 pm español

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Family Separation

Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:

Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen:

Next Misa Solidarid will be in January 20, 2019

La proxima misa del Grupo Solidaridad
sera el 20 de enero 2019

JEANS FOR THE JOURNEY
A little background on why we need jeans (and other things for the journey)

Families arrive to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, TX with only the clothes on their backs. Clothes that they’ve worn day after day as they walked, waited, slept, been detained, survived. Some families travel close to a month before we meet them at the Respite Center. When they arrive, we greet them with cheers and clapping, smiles and warm welcomes. Some have said this is the first time in over a month they’ve felt welcomed. A part of that welcome process is receiving a new backpack, a warm meal, and a place to rest. They are also gifted new clothes; clothes that fit and are chosen by them. Nothing tattered or full of holes but clean, well fitted clothing. They take a shower and come out clean. They throw their old clothes away and you can almost see a physical change in their persona. The newness in their journey and a step in this new chapter. We get to help them by physically walking alongside them. It may seem simple and unnecessary, but the sure fact they get a new pair of pants—one that fits them, one that has not been trudged along with them…but one that represents their new direction. It is a small thing that empowers them and restores a piece of dignity.

They are most in need of men’s and boys jeans. Here are the sizes of jeans most commonly needed and quantity per week:

  • Men’s Jeans: 28″-32″ waist (no longer than 32), 250-300 weekly
  • Boys Jeans: ages 7-14 (22″-24″ waist), 150 weekly
  • Women’s Jeans: 24″-29″ waist (or 00-7/8), 300 weekly 
  • Girl’s Jeans: 4-10, 150 weekly 
  • Toddlers pants 3-7T, 150 weekly
  • Men’s shoes sizes 6-9.

Please send your donations directly to 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501. We will also collect new and gently used and washed jeans at Grupo Solidaridad gatherings, misas, and events.

JEANS PARA EL CAMINO
Un poco de historia sobre por qué necesitamos jeans (y otras cosas para el viaje)

Las familias llegan al Centro de la Restauración Humanitaria en McAllen, TX con solo la ropa en la espalda. La ropa que han usado día tras día mientras caminan, esperan, duermen, han sido detenidas y han sobrevivido. Algunas familias viajan cerca de un mes antes de que nos encontremos con ellas en el Centro. Cuando llegan, los saludamos con aplausos y aplausos, sonrisas y cálidas bienvenidas. Algunos han dicho que esta es la primera vez en más de un mes que se sienten bienvenidos. Una parte de ese proceso de bienvenida es recibir una nueva mochila, una comida caliente y un lugar para descansar. También son nuevas prendas dotadas; ropa que se ajusta y es elegida por ellos. Nada desgarrado o lleno de agujeros, pero la ropa limpia y bien equipada. Se bañan y salen limpios. Se tiran la ropa vieja y casi se puede ver un cambio físico en su persona. La novedad en su viaje y un paso en este nuevo capítulo. Podemos ayudarlos caminando físicamente junto a ellos. Puede parecer simple e innecesario, pero el hecho seguro de que tienen un nuevo par de pantalones, uno que les queda bien, uno que no ha sido caminado con ellos … pero que representa su nueva dirección. Es algo pequeño que los empodera y restaura una pieza de dignidad.

Cada día nos quedamos sin pantalones de hombre. Aquí están el tamaño de los pantalones vaqueros más comúnmente necesarios y la cantidad por semana. Aquí hay necesidades específicas:

  • Jeans para hombres: cintura de 28 “-32” (no más de 32), 250-300 por semana
  • Jeans para niños: edades 7-14 (22 “-24” cintura), 150 semanal
  • Jeans para mujeres: cintura de 24 “-29” (o 00-7 / 8), 300 semanal
  • Jeans de niña: 4-10, 150 semanal
  • Los niños pequeños pantalones 3-7T, 150 semanales
  • Zapatos para hombres, tallas 6-9

Envíe sus donaciones directamente a 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501. También recogeremos jeans nuevos y usados con suavidad y lavados en las reuniones, misas y eventos de Grupo Solidaridad.

Images of the Holy Family

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Epiphany

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad January 3, 2019
============================================================ FIRST MISA SOLIDARIDAD OF THE YEAR 2019 Sunday, January 20 at 9 am Newman Chapel Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

¡MISA SOLIDARIDAD PRIMERA MISA DEL AÑO 2019!
Domingo 20 de enero a las 9 am Capilla Newman Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10 WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE This image, from Erie PA, shows that many people from other communities understand the striking images from the narrative from the 2nd chapter of the Gospel of Matthew and what we see happening on the Southern Border.
Gospel Reflection: The Epiphany
The Epiphany, the “Three Kings Day,” is celebrated in many Catholic cultures with the exchange of gifts. In those countries, children would leave their shoes by the door and the Three Kings would come by and place gifts in the shoes. In many Spanish-speaking countries, the Epiphany is celebrated with great fervor. Churches and public halls are decorated to welcome the Three Kings who would enter the space and distribute candies and gifts to children. Designated members of the community would be dressed as Mary, Joseph and the child Jesus and others would be dressed as shepherds and angels. The cultural expression of Epiphany does not truly reflect the literary context of Epiphany which is quite dark and foreboding. The week’s reflection, using the optic of Resistance, will survey Matthew 2:1-12 within the context of the Holy Family’s sojourn to Egypt as refugees and their return to Nazareth.
The evangelist Matthew is the only evangelist to include the narrative of the Magi, the three travelers from outside of Israel who were later identified culturally as “kings.” Matthew wrote his gospel roughly the same time as Luke’s gospel and well after Mark’s gospel was written. Unlike Luke’s audience that was largely non-Jewish, many scholars believe that Matthew’s audience was a mixture of people who were familiar with Jewish customs (who may or may not have been Jewish) and a newer crowd of people who converted to Judaism from Gentile religions and were then becoming interested in being a part of the renewal movement that Jesus initiated. From a literary point of view, the evangelist Matthew portrayed Jesus as a contemporary Moses, that is to say, a law giver identified with the Resistance against Egypt. Scholars who hold this position cite today’s passage as evidence of Matthew’s intent to establish Jesus as the new Lawgiver. Resistance theology would not completely agree with that assessment because it appears that Jesus is not giving “new laws,” (therefore he was not a “Law Giver,” but rather he was the Interpreter of the Law par excellence. Jesus’ Torah commentaries were not merely a part of an on-going dialog with other commentators (Jesus’ contemporaries and the commentators of previous generations), but rather, Matthew the evangelist portrays Jesus as the final and definitive interpreter of the Torah.
The evangelist Matthew’s infancy narrative is not like an overture of upcoming themes that will be developed throughout the course of the gospel as we found in Luke’s infancy narrative. The purpose of Matthew’s narrative, would seem be, according to mainline scholars, to establish a parallel origin story of Jesus with Moses: like Moses, Jesus was in Egypt and then he was “called out” of Egypt. The narrative of the slaughter of the children evokes Exodus 1:16.
Let us take a closer look at the narrative of the Magi. The three Magi, were most likely of Persian origin and by Jewish standards, were not particularly “wise.” We suspect this because the term, “Magos” is used in a pejorative context (see Daniel 2.2 and the ancient Jewish tome, “The Life of Moses,” 1.264). The Magi, foolishly, went to Herod, who was widely known to be a corrupt, cruel, and duplicitous ruler. The Magi were at first foolish because they followed protocol, but when God intervened, (see Mt 2: 12) they did not follow protocol, but rather took a different route which put them outside of Herod’s influence. The true fool in the infancy narrative is Herod.
In Matthew’s gospel, Herod and his descendants were portrayed as a corrupt family that relied on the pretense of religious to give legitimacy to their role as the royal “Jewish” family that ruled Israel. The evangelist portrays them as crooked and depraved vassals of the Empire with little to no knowledge of Jewish culture, ethics and religious practice. (See Mt 2:1-12 and Mt. 14:1-12). Herod the Great and his son Herod Antipas, were opportunists who acted out of their own interests. Herod Antipas was the rash and volatile despot who beheaded John the Baptist. Matthew’s portrayal and of Herod would have led his audience to believe that the Herodian’s cooperation with the Roman led to the ultimate downfall of Jerusalem. This would suggest that for Matthew the Resistance must be rooted in the “proper” understanding of Jewish law and ethics and furthermore, the proper understanding of Torah and the ethical demands of Jewish Law is taught by Jesus-as-the Christ (and his successors, the Apostles). Resistance to the Empire begins by rejecting the legitimacy and authority of Herod. From a Resistance optic, the narrative of the Magi suggests that the true “King of the Jews” is not Herod, but the child Jesus. Knowledge of who yields true authority and power is revealed to those who are in search of “truth” (the Magi).
In short, Epiphany, in the perspective of a Theology of Resistance, is the awakening (being “WOKE”) to the lie perpetuated by the Empire. Epiphany is the naivite of searching for “truth” in a time of deception and believing that it is indeed possible to find what one is looking for as long as one is willing to follow the light under the conditions of deep darkness. Epiphany means that one can see the duplicity of inauthentic leadership, courageously support those who need help and refuge, and then be able to out-smart an evil despot. Let our celebration of the Epiphany lead us to believe that we, like the Magi in the narrative, will bear witness to the undoing of an evil despot and the downfall of a corrupt Empire.
Weekly Intercessions
National Migration Week
(From the USCCB Website)
January 7-13, 2018 – Many Journeys, One Family
For nearly a half century, the Catholic Church in the United States has celebrated National Migration Week, which is an opportunity for the Church to reflect on the circumstances confronting migrants, including immigrants, refugees, children, and victims and survivors of human trafficking. The theme for National Migration Week 2017, “Many Journeys, One Family,” draws attention to the fact that each of our families have a migration story, some recent and others in the distant past. Regardless of where we are and where we came from, we remain part of the human family and are called to live in solidarity with one another.
Unfortunately, in our contemporary culture we often fail to encounter migrants as persons, and instead look at them as unknown others, if we even notice them at all. We do not take the time to engage migrants in a meaningful way, as fellow children of God, but remain aloof to their presence and suspicious or fearful of them. During this National Migration Week, let us all take the opportunity to engage migrants as community members, neighbors, and friends.
Let us pray for the asylum seekers from Central America who seek safety and security from the chaos and violence in their home countries. Let us pray for courageous leadership in the New Congress to provide ethical guidance and oversight to the Border Patrol who use tear gas on children and parents.
Check out the ** petitions (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=6578bf5586&e=105d556a20) that reflect the situation confronting migrants and refugees and the ** National Migration Week Toolkit (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=1327f2df79&e=105d556a20)
Intercesiónes semanales
Semana Nacional de la Migración
(Desde el sitio web de la USCCB)
7 al 13 de enero de 2018 – Muchos jornadas, una familia.
Durante casi 50 años la Iglesia Católica en los Estados Unidos ha celebrado la Semana Nacional de la Migración, que es una oportunidad para que la Iglesia reflexione sobre las circunstancias que enfrentan los migrantes, incluidos los inmigrantes, los refugiados, los niños y las víctimas y sobrevivientes de la trata de personas.
El tema de la Semana Nacional de la Migración 2018, “Muchos jornadas, una familia”, llama la atención sobre el hecho de que cada una de nuestras familias tiene una historia sobre la migración, algunas recientes y otras en el pasado lejano. Independientemente de dónde estemos y de dónde venimos, seguimos siendo parte de la familia humana y estamos llamados a vivir en solidaridad con los demás.
Desafortunadamente, en nuestra cultura contemporánea a menudo no encontramos a los migrantes como personas, y en cambio los vemos como otros desconocidos, si es que los notamos. No nos tomamos el tiempo para involucrar a los migrantes de manera significativa, como compañeros hijos de Dios, sino que nos mantenemos al margen de su presencia y desconfiamos o tememos por ellos.
Durante esta Semana Nacional de la Migración, aprovechemos la oportunidad para involucrar a los migrantes como miembros de la comunidad, vecinos y amigos.
Oremos por los solicitantes de asilo de Centroamérica que buscan seguridad y protección del caos y la violencia en sus países de origen. Oremos por un liderazgo valiente en el Nuevo Congreso para proporcionar orientación ética y supervisión a la Patrulla Fronteriza que usa gas lacrimógeno en niños y padres.
Reflexión del evangelio: La Epifanía
La Epifanía, el “Día de los Reyes Magos”, se celebra en muchas culturas católicas con el intercambio de regalos. En esos países, los niños dejaban sus zapatos junto a la puerta y los Reyes Magos venían y ponían regalos en los zapatos. En muchos países de habla español, la Epifanía se celebra con gran fervor. Las iglesias y los pasillos públicos están decorados para dar la bienvenida a los Reyes Magos que entrarían al espacio y distribuirían dulces y regalos a los niños. Los miembros designados de la comunidad se vestirían como María, José y el niño Jesús, y otros se vestirían de pastores y ángeles. La expresión cultural de la Epifanía no refleja verdaderamente el contexto literario de la Epifanía, que es bastante oscuro y premonitorio. La reflexión de la semana, utilizando la óptica de la Resistencia, examinará Mateo 2: 1-12 dentro del contexto de la permanencia de la Sagrada Familia en Egipto como refugiados y su regreso a Nazaret.
El evangelista Mateo es el único evangelista que incluye la narrativa de los Magos, los tres viajeros de fuera de Israel que luego fueron identificados culturalmente como “reyes”. Mateo escribió su evangelio aproximadamente al mismo tiempo que el evangelio de Lucas y mucho después de que se escribió el evangelio de Marcos. La diferencia de la audiencia de Lucas que no era en gran parte judía, muchos escolásticos de las escrituras creen que la audiencia de Mateo era una mezcla de personas que estaban familiarizadas con las costumbres judías (que pueden o no haber sido judías) y una nueva multitud de personas que se convirtieron al judaísmo de religiones gentiles y luego nos interesamos en ser parte del movimiento de renovación que Jesús inició. Desde un punto de vista literario, el evangelista Mateo describió a Jesús como un Moisés contemporáneo, es decir, un Dador de la Le identificado con la Resistencia contra Egipto. Los profesores de la Biblia que sostienen este puesto citan el pasaje de hoy como evidencia de la intención de Mateo de establecer a Jesús como el Dador de la Le. La Teología de la Resistencia no estaría completamente de acuerdo con esa evaluación porque parece que Jesús no está dando “nuevas leyes” (por lo tanto, no fue un “Dador de la ley”, sino que fue el intérprete de la Ley por excelencia. Los comentarios de la Torá de Jesús fueron no solo como parte de un diálogo continuo con otros comentaristas (los contemporáneos de Jesús y los comentaristas de generaciones anteriores), sino más bien, el evangelista Mateo presenta a Jesús como el intérprete definitivo y definitivo de la Torá.
La narrativa de la infancia del evangelista Mateo no es como una obertura de los próximos temas que se desarrollarán a lo largo del curso del evangelio, como lo encontramos en la narrativa de la infancia de Lucas. El propósito de la narrativa de Mateo parece ser, según los profesores de la Biblia de la línea principal, establecer una historia de origen paralelo de Jesús con Moisés: como Moisés, Jesús estaba en Egipto y luego fue “expulsado” de Egipto. La narrativa de la matanza de los niños evoca Éxodo 1:16.
Revisamos la narrativa de los reyes magos. Los tres Magos, que eran muy probablemente de origen persa y para los estándares judíos, no eran particularmente “sabios”. Sospechamos esto porque el término “Magos” se usa en un contexto peyorativo (ver Daniel 2.2 y el antiguo tomo judío, “El Vida de Moisés “, 1.264). Los magos, tontamente, acudieron a Herodes, quien era ampliamente conocido por ser un gobernante corrupto, cruel y duplicado. Los Magos fueron al principio tontos porque seguían el protocolo, pero cuando Dios intervino (ver Mt 2: 12) no siguieron el protocolo, sino que tomaron un camino de regreso diferente que los puso fuera de la territorio de Herodes. El verdadero tonto en la narrativa de la narrative de los Magos es Herodes.
En el evangelio de Mateo, Herodes y sus descendientes fueron representados como una familia corrupta que dependía de la pretensión de los religiosos para dar legitimidad a su papel como la familia real “judía” que gobernaba a Israel. El evangelista los presenta como vasallos torcidos y depravados del Imperio con poco o ningún conocimiento de la cultura judía, la ética y la práctica religiosa. (Ver Mt 2: 1-12 y Mt. 14: 1-12). Herodes el Grande y su hijo Herodes Antipas, fueron oportunistas que actuaron por sus propios intereses. Herodes Antipas fue el impotente y volátil personaje que decapitó a Juan el Bautista. La representación de Mateo y de Herodes habría llevado a su audiencia a creer que la cooperación del Herodiano con el romano llevó a la caída final de Jerusalén. Esto sugeriría que para Mateo, la Resistencia empieza en la comprensión “correcta” de la ley y la ética judías y, además, la comprensión correcta de la Torá y las demandas éticas de la Ley judía es enseñada por Jesús como Cristo (y sus sucesores, los apóstoles). La Resistencia al Imperio comienza rechazando la legitimidad y la autoridad de Herodes. Desde una óptica de la Resistencia, la narrativa de los Magos sugiere que el verdadero “Rey de los judíos” no es Herodes, sino el niño Jesús. El conocimiento de quién cede la verdadera autoridad y el poder se revela a quienes buscan la “verdad” (los Reyes Magos).
En resumen, la Epifanía, en la perspectiva de una Teología de la Resistencia, es el despertar (ser “Concientizado/‘WOKE“) de la mentira perpetuada por el Imperio. La Epifanía es la ingenuidad de buscar la “verdad” en un momento de engaño y creer que es posible encontrar lo que uno está buscando, siempre que esté dispuesto a seguir la luz en las condiciones de oscuridad profunda. Epifanía significa que uno puede ver la duplicidad de un liderazgo no auténtico, respaldar valientemente a quienes necesitan ayuda y refugio, y luego ser capaz de superar a un déspota malvado. Dejemos que nuestra celebración de la Epifanía nos lleve a creer que nosotros, como los Magos en la narrativa, daremos testimonio de la ruina de un déspota malvado y la caída de un Imperio corrupto.
HELP NEEDED BY MEMBERS OF GRUPO SOLIDARIDAD
Fr Jon will be speaking at Our Lady of Refuge on the weekend of the 13th of January at all of their masses. We need people that can help answer questions about Grupo Solidaridad and share from your own experience of why “solidarity” with others has been a powerful part of your own spiritual life. You should be able to share in the language of the mass at which you wish to participate. The setting is informal and sharing will be 1:1 or in small groups after the mass. If you are able to participate, please contact Judi Sanchez at judisanchez@gmail.com. The mass schedule for Our Lady of Refuge is:
10 am – Spanish; 12: English; 5:00 pm English; 7:00 pm Spanish
SE NECESITA AYUDA POR LOS MIEMBROS DE GRUPO SOLIDARIDAD
El Padre Jon predicará en Nuestra Señora del Refugio el fin de semana del 13 de enero en todas las misas. Necesitamos personas que puedan ayudarlo a responder preguntas sobre el Grupo Solidaridad y compartir su propia experiencia de por qué la “solidaridad” con los demás ha sido una parte poderosa de su propia vida espiritual. Debe poder compartir en la misma idioma de la misa en cual puede participar. El ambiente es informal y se compartirá 1: 1 o en grupos pequeños después de la misa. Si puedes participar, por favor contacta a Judi Sanchez en judisanchez@gmail.com. El horario de las misas en Nuestra Señora del Refugio es:
10 am – español; 12: Inglés; 5:00 pm Inglés; 7:00 pm español Santa Teresa Social Action Ministry Presents Gaza-Israel Conflict: What is happening and why does it matter?
Speaker: Samir Laymourn
Wednesday, January 16th 7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Santa Teresa Parish Avila Hall
Samir Laymoun is a former high-tech executive and an immigrant from Palestine who has lived in the U.S. for many years. As a human rights and social justice advocate, he is concerned for the ongoing Israeli attacks on civilians in Gaza and the bulldozing of Palestinian homes. Samir wants to present on the predicament many Palestinians find themselves in, and how violence is affecting their lives. He states:
“My goal is to bring to light the Palestinian narrative that has been subject to consistent marginalization and outright erasure. Recently a US Representative wrote to express support, saying “I have raised my concerns about the demolition of Palestinian settlements in West Bank.” but even our politicians who vote to give Israel $10 Million a day in military aid do not know who is bulldozing homes and who is building settlements!”
A Q&A session will follow the presentation.
For more information contact Lynda DeManti – 408 839-3163 or Lynda@SantaTeresaChurch.com
Ministerio de Acción Social Santa Teresa Presenta Conflicto Gaza-Israel: ¿Qué está pasando y por qué importa?
Ponente: Samir Laymourn
Miercoles 16 de enero 7:00 pm. a las 8:30 p.m. Parroquia de santa teresa Avila Hall Samir Laymoun es un ex ejecutivo de alta tecnología y un inmigrante de Palestina que ha vivido en los EE. UU. Durante muchos años. Como defensor de los derechos humanos y la justicia social, le preocupan los continuos ataques israelíes contra civiles en Gaza y la demolición de hogares palestinos. Samir quiere presentar la situación en la que se encuentran muchos palestinos y cómo la violencia está afectando sus vidas. El afirma:
“Mi objetivo es sacar a la luz la narrativa palestina que ha sido objeto de una marginación constante y un borrado total. Recientemente, un representante de los EE. UU. Escribió para expresar su apoyo diciendo:” He expresado mi preocupación por la demolición de los asentamientos palestinos en Cisjordania “, pero ¡Incluso nuestros políticos que votan para darle a Israel $ 10 millones por día en ayuda militar no saben quién está arrasando casas y quién está construyendo asentamientos! ”
Una sesión de preguntas y respuestas seguirá a la presentación.
Para obtener más información, comuníquese con Lynda DeManti – 408 839-3163 o Lynda@SantaTeresaChurch.com
A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA. DO IT NOW.
Family Separation
Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:
Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen: * ** Families Belong Together (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=2dd32846c5&e=105d556a20) * ** CAIR (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=6fc727368e&e=105d556a20) * ** MoveOn (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=b8f51fdbac&e=105d556a20) * ** CredoAction (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=3c9fd57d28&e=105d556a20)
Next Misa Solidarid will be in January 20, 2019
La proxima misa del Grupo Solidaridad sera el 20 de enero 2019 JEANS FOR THE J

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Nativity of Jesus

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad December 21, 2018
============================================================ LAST MISA SOLIDARIDAD OF THE YEAR Sunday, December 23 at 9 am Newman Chapel Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts. There will be a potluck after mass so please bring your favorite dish to share!

¡MISA SOLIDARIDAD ÚLTIMA MISA DEL AÑO!
Domingo 23 de diciembre a las 9 am Capilla Newman Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10 Tendremos una convivencia después de la misa, así que traiga su platillo favorito para compartir. WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
The Posada: Making a Home for All, at Santa Teresa Parish with Bishop Oscar Cantú combined the traditional elements of the Posada with the localized message that there are many Joseph’s and Mary’s who look for housing every night of the year.
Gospel Reflections: The Nativity of Jesus
The gospel reflection in this edition of the Communique will be based on the arc of the Nativity Narrative inclusive of the Fourth Sunday of Advent, the Christmas Midnight Mass and the Feast of the Holy Family, (Luke 1:39-2:52). These readings come on the heel of John the Baptist’s message of Resistance and preparation. Recall that last week we analyzed the figure of John the Baptist from the optic of community organizing. Like a good community organizer, John got people to imagine a society of equity free of Roman interference. He agitated the people to ask themselves, what each person should do to bring about such a new society. John responded that everyone at the very least should care for the poorest among them. Provide food, shelter and clothing to those who are in need. Publicans/tax-collectors were told not to charge beyond what the Empire asked which would over time result in drying up the revenue stream toward Rome. Soldiers were told not to extort and intimidate the people which would undercut the Empire’s tactic of using fear and physical intimidation as a way to control the occupied territories. The evangelist Luke essentially has set the thematic stage for the coming of the Messiah. The nativity narrative, which precedes the ministry of John the Baptist, also contains elements of resistance and anticipation of a new and better tomorrow but in a non-Jewish context.
In the gospel reading from the 4th Sunday of Advent (Lk 1:39-45) we find Mary setting out across the hill country of Judah in haste. It is interesting to note that the evangelist did not indicate that Mary’s parents would have accompanied her. Given that the evangelist’s audience was not Jewish, they would most likely not know the geography or topography of the hills of Judah. It is interesting of note that the hills of Judah were filled with shepherds and displaced people whose property was confiscated from them by the Empire because they could not pay the tax. These displaced people typically robbed travelers, which would explain why Mary traveled in haste. Take a moment and imagine a young (pregnant) woman crossing through a dangerous area unaccompanied. What motivated Mary to take that journey? Her elderly cousin, Elizabeth, who was near term with her own child, the yet to be born John the Baptist.
The evangelist introduces the concept of the personalization of the holy Spirit in verse 41: “When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the infant leaped in her womb, and Elizabeth, filled with the holy Spirit, cried out in a loud voice and said, ‘Most blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb…’” At the time of the writing of Luke’s gospel, mystical Jewish schools from Galilee that had been developing the concept that holy Spirit/Ruach/Breath of God was also a personal transformative phenomenon, seemed to have influenced Luke in his narrative. The personal inhabitation of the Spirit in Elizabeth gave her the ability to recognize the Spirit working in her cousin, Mary. In response to this exchange of acknowledgment of the Spirit working mutually in them, Mary responded with what some scholars speculate, a pre-existent hymn of praise that the evangelist placed upon the lips of Mary. (Lk 1:67-39). Note that Luke’s Magnificat Lk 1:46-55) borrowed liberally from 1 Samuel 2:1-10, the Canticle of Hannah where Hannah glorified God for giving her a child.
Two of the theme’s developed throughout the gospel of Luke are telegraphed in the Magnificat: The lowly shall be lifted up (Lk 1:48, 51-53) and God’s mercy (Lk 1:50, 54). Following the Magnificat, Luke draws our attention to the birth of John the Baptist followed by Zechariah’s Canticle (Lk 1:67-79). In that canticle, also most likely drawn from a pre-existent hymn, introduces themes that will be developed through the rest of Luke’s gospel: Redemption for God’s people (Lk 1:68, 69, 71, 74; Mercy/forgiveness and healing Lk 1:72, 77, 78;79.
Christmas, the Feast of the Incarnation, is a completely foreign concept to mainstream Judaism. Because the evangelist Luke was several generations removed from Judaism, the gospel was organized similarly to the “birth of a ‘hero,’” a common literary form among Hellenistic audiences, but…unlike Greek and Roman stories, the birth narrative of Jesus-as-the Christ is rooted in poverty. Luke’s attention to establishing a timeline and political context overshadows the Jewish elements that are more common in Matthew and John’s gospels (and to a lesser extent, but present nonetheless), in Mark’s gospel.
In Lk2:1-2, the references are clearly geared toward a Gentile audience from whom the mention of name and place would allow them to tap into the theme of Resistance within a largely Gentile context. What is important to note is that the announcement of the birth of Jesus-as-the Christ went forth first to the displaced people and shepherds (Lk 2:8). The reversal of social expectations is one of the key features of Luke’s gospel: The theme of radical inclusion of women as free people; the respectful and regal treatment given to the shepherds (Lk 2:8-3) and closing with an affirmation hymn, Lk2:14. These theme will be fully developed through Luke’s gospel that we will visit in this coming liturgical cycle.
Finally we come to the Feast of the Holy Family that uses Lk 2:41-52, finding the boy Jesus in the Temple of Jerusalem. The passage is preceded by an encounter of two elderly prophets, Simeon and Anna. Simeon who had long waited for the “consolation of Israel” had been overcome by the Spirit (see the earlier reference of the development of thought regarding the personal inhabitation of the Spirit). Simeon declared that by holding Jesus he recognized that he had finally encountered what he was hoping for: the glory for the people, Israel. Simeon told Mary, “Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted (and you yourself a sword will pierce) so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.” The evangelist included this rather ominous prophecy as a portent for the type of life that Jesus-as-the Christ would live. The reference to her own heart being pierced also serves as a literary device about the inner-work of the Spirit. The life of Jesus-as-the Christ is something that would touch and change our life as well. The Prophetess Anna underscored Simeon’s prophecy that the infant would be identified with those who await the redemption of Jerusalem.
Keep in mind that those reading the gospel of Luke realized that Jerusalem had already been destroyed and that the Jews — including those who had converted to be disciples of Jesus, were dispersed throughout the Empire. Luke’s audience, not being Jewish and having lost direct touch with Jesus’ Jewish life needed to understand the intimate (and quite troubling) connection between Jesus, the Temple and Jerusalem because their own act of Resistance to the Empire cannot be a political movement, but rather a spiritual movement rooted in Jewish ethics of equality, social and economic justice, and the healing of society. The narrative connection of Jesus to the Temple, therefore, is not merely a historical point of interest, but a key thematic point.
The specific verses used in the Holy Family liturgy (Lk 2:41-52) are a kind of “transition” between Jesus’ early life and his adult ministry. As stated earlier evangelist needed to establish the strong connection between Jesus, the Temple and Jerusalem. Vs 41 established the connection to Jerusalem and the Passover which could become the primary Jewish lens of the Resistance. While most scholars believe that the time fo three days in the Temple alludes to the three days in the tomb, there might be another dimension to consider: the practicality of staying in one place that is secure and safe. Having been at the Temple for some time, it seemed as if Jesus as the child had formed connections to the resident scholars. The evangelist affirmed Jesus’ connection to Jerusalem and the Temple with verses 48-49, “When his parents saw him, they were astonished, and his mother said to him, ‘Son, why have you done this to us? Your father and I have been looking for you with great anxiety.’ And he said to them, ‘Why were you looking for me? Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?’” The acclamation that the Temple is the “Father’s House” and that Jesus as the child would find himself not only secure and safe there, but that he would be inspired enough to learn and question the teachers (questioning was a fundamental element of the education and religious formation process in the Near East, particularly for Jews), is an affirmation that Jesus is not against the Jews or against the Temple, but rather was a “protector” of what he held close to his own heart. The evangelist Luke would cast Jesus as a reformer who wanted the best of Jewish thought and life and that any opposition to Jewish life was targeted against those who corrupted the Temple with ambition and power.
Weekly Intercessions Christmas Poem by Howard Thurman
When the song of the angels is stilled, When the star in the sky is gone, When the kings and princes are home, When the shepherds are back with their flock, The work of Christmas begins: To find the lost, To heal the broken, To feed the hungry, To release the prisoner, To rebuild the nations, To bring peace among others, To make music in the heart.
From Wikipedia:Howard Washington Thurman (November 18, 1899 – April 10, 1981) was an African-American author, philosopher, theologian, educator, and civil rights leader. As a prominent religious figure, he played a leading role in many social justice movements and organizations of the twentieth century. Thurman’s theology of radical nonviolence influenced and shaped a generation of civil rights activists, and he was a key mentor to leaders within the movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.
Thurman served as dean of Rankin Chapel at Howard University from 1932 to 1944 and as dean of Marsh Chapel at Boston University from 1953 to 1965. In 1944, he co-founded, along with Alfred Fisk, the first major interracial, interdenominational church in the United States.
Howard Thurman died on April 10, 1981 in San Francisco, California.
Let us pray that our first humble and noble work of Christmas be the Eucharist. As we come to the altar for worship, may the Body and Blood of Christ send us forth to share the LIGHT of HOPE with our world.
Intercesiónes semanales
Un poema navideña de Howard Thurman
Cuando la canción de los ángeles termine en la quietud, Cuando la estrella en el cielo desaparece en el amanecer Cuando los reyes y los príncipes regresan a sus castillos, Cuando los pastores están de regreso con su rebaño en los campos, Comienza la obra de Navidad: Para encontrar a los perdidos, Abrazar a los inconsolables Dar comida a los hambrientos, Liberar al prisionero, Reconstruir las naciones, Llevar la paz entre otros, Para hacer la música en el corazón.
De wikipedia: Howard Washington Thurman (18 de noviembre de 1899 – 10 de abril de 1981) fue un autor afroamericano, filósofo, teólogo, educador y líder de los derechos civiles. Como una figura religiosa prominente, desempeñó un papel destacado en muchos movimientos y organizaciones de justicia social del siglo XX. La teología de Thurman sobre la no violencia radical influyó y dio forma a una generación de activistas de los derechos civiles, y fue un mentor clave para los líderes dentro del movimiento, incluido Martin Luther King, Jr.
Thurman se desempeñó como decano de Rankin Chapel en la Universidad de Howard de 1932 a 1944 y como decano de Marsh Chapel en la Universidad de Boston de 1953 a 1965. En 1944, co-fundó, junto con Alfred Fisk, la primera gran iglesia interracial e interdenominacional en los Estados Unidos.
Howard Thurman murió el 10 de abril de 1981 en San Francisco, California.
Oremos para que nuestra primera humilde y noble obra de Navidad sea la Eucaristía. Al acercarnos al altar para la adoración, que el Cuerpo y la Sangre de Cristo nos envíen a compartir la LUZ de ESPERANZA con nuestro mundo.
Reflexión del evangelio: La Natividad de Jesús La reflexión del evangelio en esta edición del Communique se basará en el arco de la Narrativa de la Natividad, incluido el Cuarto Domingo de Adviento, la Misa de medianoche de Navidad y la Fiesta de la Sagrada Familia (Lucas 1: 39-2: 52). Estas lecturas vienen después del mensaje de resistencia y preparación de Juan el Bautista. Recordemos que la semana pasada analizamos la figura de Juan el Bautista desde la óptica de la organizarse la comunidad. Como un buen organizador comunitario, Juan logró que la gente imaginara una sociedad de equidad libre de interferencias romanas. Agitaba a la gente a preguntarse qué debía hacer cada persona para crear una sociedad tan nueva. Juan respondió que al menos todos deberían cuidar de los más pobres entre ellos. Proporcionar comida, posada y ropa a los necesitados. A los publicanos se les dijo que no cobraran más allá de lo que el Imperio preguntaba, lo que con el tiempo daría lugar a que se secara el flujo de ingresos hacia Roma. Se les dijo a los soldados que no extorsionaran e intimidaran a la gente, lo que socavaría la táctica del Imperio de usar el miedo y la intimidación física como una forma de controlar los territorios ocupados. El evangelista Lucas esencialmente ha establecido el escenario temático para la venida del Mesías. La narrativa de la natividad, que precede al ministerio de Juan el Bautista, también contiene elementos de resistencia y anticipación de un mañana nuevo y mejor, pero lo hace en el contexto de una sociedad no-judía.
En la lectura del evangelio del 4º domingo de Adviento (Lc 1: 39-45) encontramos a María saliendo apresuradamente por la región montañosa de Judá. Es interesante notar que el evangelista no indicó que los padres de María la hubieran acompañado. Dado que la audiencia del evangelista no era judía, probablemente no conocerían la geografía o topografía de las colinas de Judá. Es interesante notar que las colinas de Judá estaban llenas de pastores y personas desplazadas cuyas propiedades les fueron confiscadas por el Imperio porque no podían pagar el impuesto. Estas personas desplazadas solían robar a los viajeros, lo que explicaría por qué María viajaba a toda prisa. Tómese un momento e imagine a una mujer joven (embarazada) que cruza una zona peligrosa sin compañía. ¿Qué motivó a María a emprender ese viaje? Su prima mayor, Isabel, que estaba cerca de su propio hijo, aún no había nacido Juan el Bautista.
El evangelista introduce el concepto de personalización del Espíritu Santo en el versículo 41: “Cuando Isabel escuchó el saludo de María, la niña saltó en su vientre y Isabel, llena del Espíritu Santo, gritó en voz alta y dijo: ‘La mayoría bendita tú eres entre todas las mujeres, y bendito es el fruto de tu vientre …’” En el momento de escribir el evangelio de Lucas, las escuelas místicas judías de Galilea que habían estado desarrollando el concepto de que el Espíritu Santo / Ruach / Aliento de Dios también era una fenómeno transformador personal, parecía haber influenciado a Lucas en su narrativa. La habitación personal del Espíritu en Isabel le dio la capacidad de reconocer al Espíritu que trabaja en su prima, María. En respuesta a este intercambio de reconocimiento del Espíritu trabajando mutuamente en ellos, María respondió con lo que algunos eruditos especulan, un himno de alabanza preexistente que el evangelista puso en los labios de María. (Lc 1: 67-39). Note que el Magnificat de Lucas, Lc 1: 46-55, tomó prestado generosamente de 1 Samuel 2: 1-10, el Cántico de Ana, dónde Ana glorificó a Dios por haberle dado un hijo.
Dos de los temas desarrollados a lo largo del evangelio de Lucas se telegrafían en el Magnificat: los humildes serán levantados (Lc 1:48, 51-53) y la misericordia de Dios (Lc 1:50, 54). Después del Magnificat, Lucas nos llama la atención sobre el nacimiento de Juan el Bautista, seguido por el Cántico de Zacarías (Lucas 1: 67-79). En ese cántico, también muy probablemente extraído de un himno preexistente, se presentan temas que se desarrollarán a través del resto del evangelio de Lucas: Redención para el pueblo de Dios (Lucas 1:68, 69, 71, 74; Misericordia / perdón y sanidad Lucas). 1:72, 77, 78; 79.
La Navidad, la Fiesta de la Encarnación, es un concepto completamente extraño para la corriente principal del judaísmo. Debido a que el evangelista Lucas estuvo varias generaciones alejado del judaísmo, el evangelio se organizó de manera similar al “nacimiento de un” héroe “, una forma literaria común entre las audiencias helenísticas, pero … a diferencia de las historias griegas y romanas, la narrativa del nacimiento de Jesús como -El Cristo está enraizado en la pobreza. La atención de Lucas a establecer una línea de tiempo y un contexto político eclipsa a los elementos judíos que son más comunes en los evangelios de Mateo y Juan (y en menor medida, pero presentes, no obstante), en el evangelio de Marcos.
En Lc2: 1-2, las referencias están claramente orientadas hacia una audiencia gentil de la cual la mención de nombre y lugar les permitiría aprovechar el tema de la resistencia dentro de un contexto en gran parte gentil. Lo que es importante tener en cuenta es que el anuncio del nacimiento de Jesús como el Cristo salió primero a los desplazados y pastores (Lucas 2: 8). La inversión de las expectativas sociales es una de las características clave del evangelio de Lucas: el tema de la inclusión radical de las mujeres como personas libres; el trato respetuoso y real dado a los pastores (Lc 2: 8-3) y finalizando con un himno de afirmación, Lk2: 14. Este tema se desarrollará completamente a través del evangelio de Lucas que visitaremos en este ciclo litúrgico que se avecina.
Finalmente llegamos a la fiesta de la Sagrada Familia que usa Lc 2: 41-52, encontrando al niño Jesús en el Templo de Jerusalén. El pasaje está precedido por un encuentro de dos profetas ancianos, Simeón y Ana. Simeón, quien había esperado durante mucho tiempo el “consuelo de Israel” había sido vencido por el Espíritu (ver la referencia anterior del desarrollo del pensamiento con respecto a la habitabilidad personal del Espíritu). Simeón declaró que al sostener a Jesús reconoció que finalmente había encontrado lo que esperaba: la gloria para el pueblo, Israel. Simeón le dijo a María: “He aquí, este niño está destinado a la caída y el ascenso de muchos en Israel, y para ser una señal que será contradicha (y tú mismo la espada te perforará) para que los pensamientos de muchos corazones puedan ser revelados”. El evangelista incluyó esta profecía bastante siniestra como un portento para el tipo de vida que viviría Jesús como el Cristo. La referencia a la perforación de su propio corazón también sirve como un recurso literario sobre el trabajo interno del Espíritu. La vida de Jesús como Cristo es algo que tocaría y cambiaría nuestra vida también. La profetisa Ana subrayó la profecía de Simeón de que el infante se identificaría con aquellos que esperan la redención de Jerusalén.
Tenga en cuenta que quienes leyeron el evangelio de Lucas se dieron cuenta de que Jerusalén ya había sido destruida y que los judíos, incluidos aquellos que se habían convertido para ser discípulos de Jesús, estaban dispersos por todo el Imperio. La audiencia de Lucas al no ser judío y haber perdido el contacto directo con la vida judía de Jesús, necesitaba comprender la conexión íntima (y bastante preocupante) entre Jesús, el Templo y Jerusalén porque su propio acto de Resistencia al Imperio no puede ser un movimiento político, pero más bien un movimiento espiritual arraigado en la ética judía de la igualdad, la justicia social y económica y la curación de la sociedad. La conexión narrativa de Jesús con el Templo, por lo tanto, no es meramente un punto de interés histórico, sino un punto temático clave.
Los versículos específicos utilizados en la liturgia de la Sagrada Familia (Lc 2, 41-52) son una especie de “transición” entre la vida temprana de Jesús y su ministerio de adultos. Como se dijo anteriormente, el evangelista necesitaba establecer la fuerte conexión entre Jesús, el Templo y Jerusalén. Vs. 41 estableció la conexión con Jerusalén y la Pascua, que podría convertirse en el principal lente judío de la Resistencia. Si bien la mayoría de los eruditos creen que el tiempo durante tres días en el Templo alude a los tres días en la tumba, podría haber otra dimensión a considerar: la practicabilidad de permanecer en un lugar que sea seguro. Habiendo estado en el Templo por algún tiempo, parecía como si Jesús, como el niño, hubiera formado conexiones con los eruditos residentes. El evangelista afirmó la conexión de Jesús con Jerusalén y el Templo con los versículos 48-49: “Cuando sus padres lo vieron, se asombraron y su madre le dijo: ‘Hijo, ¿por qué nos has hecho esto? Tu padre y yo te hemos estado buscando con gran ansiedad “. Y él les dijo: “¿Por qué me estabas buscando? ¿No sabías que debo estar en la casa de mi Padre? “. La aclamación de que el Templo es la “Casa del Padre” y que Jesús como el niño se encontraría a sí mismo no solo seguro, sino que estaría lo suficientemente inspirado para aprender y preguntar a los maestros (el cuestionamiento fue un elemento fundamental del proceso de educación y formación religiosa en el Cercano Oriente, especialmente para los judíos), es una afirmación de que Jesús no está contra los judíos o contra el Templo, sino que fue un “protector” de lo que sostenía cerca de su propio corazón. El evangelista Lucas consideraría a Jesús como un reformador que quería lo mejor del pensamiento y la vida judía y que cualquier oposición a la vida judía se dirigía contra aquellos que corrompían el Templo con ambición y poder
A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA. DO IT NOW.
Family Separation
Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:
Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen: * ** Families Belong Together (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=86002fff9d&e=105d556a20) * ** CAIR (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=2b879bf977&e=105d556a20) * ** MoveOn (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=be384a5e59&e=105d556a20) * ** CredoAction (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=a1d0509a8b&e=105d556a20)
Next Misa Solidarid will be in January 2019
La proxima misa del Grupo Solidaridad sera en enero 2019 JEANS FOR THE JO

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  What Should We Do?

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad December 14, 2018
============================================================ MISA SOLIDARIDAD THIS WEEKEND USUAL TIME AND PLACE Sunday, December 16 at 9 am Newman Chapel Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

¡MISA SOLIDARIDAD ESTE DOMINGO! MISMO TIEMPO Y LUGAR COMO SIEMPRE
La próxima misa será el 16 de diciembre a 9 am Capilla Newman Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10 WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE Danzantes sing and dance at the Misa del Barrio honoring Our Lady of Guadalupe. Indigenous elements of Guadalupe are integral to the celebration of the feast. The image of Guadalupe contains both indigenous and Castilian symbols creating a very complex image of the Virgin Mary.
Sunday’s Gospel Reflection: What Should We Do?
The gospel text for this Sunday is taken from the Gospel of Luke chapter 3: 10-18, a continuation of John the Baptist’s message of preparation from the previous week’s readings. Recall that John the Baptist’s mission of proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of acquiescing to the Empire. John the Baptist’s role in the resistance is a role of preparing people for welcoming the new messianic age of liberation, social justice and freedom. Some might see John as a “proto-community organizer”. He inspired the people to imagine society in which a “way” is made when there was no way — to vision a society where the valleys and mountains that block opportunities for equality are filled and leveled so that all people might have equal access to well-being and happiness. Drawing upon Isaiah’s vision for a new and better tomorrow, John the Baptist presented the people with a possibility that was not available to them from the Empire. In the following verses leading up to this week’s selection, John anticipated counter-organizing by those sympathetic to the Empire. But before we address the counter-organizing in Lk 3:7-9, we have to take a pause and recall last week’s commentary so that we can move through those three verses and address today’s gospel selection (Lk 3:10-18).
Recall that the evangelist Luke is writing decades after the death and resurrection of Jesus and that Luke is writing to a specific community of people who have their roots in Hellenistic culture rather than in the religion of Jesus, Judaism. This presents serious challenges because Jesus is historically and politically rooted in the Jewish Resistance. Luke’s gospel is a kind of “translator” of the Jewish Resistance Movement for Luke’s Hellenistic community. Because the Jewish elements of Jesus are but distant memory at best to the Greek speaking audience, the evangelist Luke recast the narrative of Jesus (and the pre-narrative: the nativity narrative and John the Baptist’s mission) in such a way that non-Jewish converts to Christianity could not only access the purpose, mission and message of Jesus-as-the Christ but also apply the concept of Resistance to their own social and historical location. Luke’s audience could then take the Jewish categories of egalitarianism (economic and social), freedom of religious and cultural expression and political autonomy and apply them in a way that would address the injustices of the Empire in the late First Century CE . Having said that, let us turn to Lk3:7-9 (the verses that set up today’s selection of Lk 3:10-18)
In Lk 3:7 John turned to the crowd and called them a “brood of vipers!” From a community-organizing perspective one might read into this aggressive language as being mere hyperbole intended to agitate the crowd into making a choice. Going with the proposal that John the Baptist was a proto-community organizer, one would ask, “Was this language effective in getting people to make a choice?” Verse 10-14 might suggest that John’s challenge did inspire reaction.
The first level reaction was what everyone should do: shift the culture! “Whoever has two tunics should share with the person who has none. And whoever has food should do likewise.” (Lk 3:11) John was demanding a cultural shift from a culture of self-preservation to a culture of care and compassion for others. Such a shift was significant in the context of the Empire. In a non-Jewish context self-preservation was normal because Romans typically did not value the weak and vulnerable unless the person in question was a member of one’s own immediate family. Jewish ethics; however, demanded a higher standard of care. All people, regardless of one’s blood ties, deserve the dignity of clothing and a meal. It would seem that the evangelist Luke inserted this and the following verses as a way to underscore the ethics of social and economic justice.
The second response was from tax collectors. (Lk 3:12-13) Tax collectors, who provided the financial means for the Empire to maintain its stranglehold on Israel, were particularly hated because they were Jews, not Romans. Tax revenue flowed from the provinces (the conquered territories) up to Rome. The local government had the discretion of raising taxes above the assessment given by Rome. These tax increases created massive displacement: subsistence farmers lost their land. The farmers went into debt and became mere tenants on the land they formerly owned and if they could not pay, they were thrown into “debtor’s prison” where family members would work to pay off the debt to secure their freedom. The Galilean countryside suffered significant displacement. Many people left looking for work in other cities. Some became landless persons and the most desperate left their country in search of a better life elsewhere. Tax collectors made their income by imposing collector fees on top of the taxes that were already owned to the Empire. Many tax collectors took advantage of the system and over-charged people and thus tax collectors were seen as the face of the Empire and had become pariah to their own people. In the context of applying the Jewish Resistance to the Empire, the very idea of stopping collecting more than what is prescribed would mean that the revenue flow up to Rome would dry out. Without the tax revenue from the provinces, Caesar would not be able to pay the soldiers that provided the muscle or insurance that taxes would in fact be collected and that local rebellions would be held in check. Verse 13, when read with the lens of an organizer is a very subversive demand. The halt of ill-gotten tax revenue that has caused so much suffering is indeed a powerful strategy that could very well topple an Empire.
Turning now to the third response from soldiers: The soldiers, non-Jews, were particularly problematic because they represented the Empire’s repression. It would seem historically unlikely that tax collectors and especially soldiers would ask publicly, “what should we do?” Soldiers were common sights throughout the Empire at the time of Jesus and certainly at the time when Luke wrote the gospel. In the Roman Empire soldiers functioned in multiple ways: as a defense force, an invading army, an occupying force and as law keepers. Soldiers had multiple functions and it would seem that certain members of the Empire’s legions were specialized in warfare and invasion and others in civilian control. Soldiers that had the most contact with people in the Empire of the late First and early Second Century were those who acted like police. By the time Luke’s gospel was written the distinction between Temple police and soldiers was only academic. Luke’s audience was most likely familiar with the soldiers that patrolled the city, functioning like police. These soldiers were paid a subsistence wage and thus they leveraged their position as a way to augment their meager pay by extorting people to pay bribes. Luke’s inclusion of soldiers in the John the Baptist narrative served a very powerful message to those in the Second Century CE who looked for hope in the midst of intense daily repression.
The remaining verses from today’s selection strike an ominous tone. “I am baptizing you with water, but one mightier than I is coming. I am not worthy to loosen the thongs of his sandals. He will baptize you with the holy Spirit and fire. His winnowing fan is in his hand to clear his threshing floor and to gather the wheat into his barn, but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire.” (Lk 3:16-17). Luke’s reference to the holy Spirit hearkens to the (then) emerging concept that God’s Spirit is a life-force that not only animates the universe, but animates individuals to do amazing things. (Galilean and Dead Sea mystics were developing powerful concepts about the power of God’s Spirit/Ruach. The Galilean mystics wedded Spirit to public action and the Dead Sea mystics wedded Spirit to purification. Over the centuries Jewish thought continued to develop concepts of God’s Spirit. The Jewish sect that eventually became “Christianity” developed the concept of Spirit/Ruach as the Third Person in the Holy Trinity). The words of John the Baptist were bad news for those who wanted to keep the status quo (see Lk 3:19-20) but were indeed “good news” to those who were looking for a change (Lk 3:18). Reading John the Baptist as an organizer suggests that John helped people understand that change is not in the hands of destiny, but rather in the hands of those who dare to shape destiny. Are we willing to ask the question, “What should we do?” And would we be willing to take a prophetic stand against the Empire in which we find our selves?
Weekly Intercessions
There are 7, 394 people who are considered houseless in Santa Clara County according to the 2017 Homeless Census and Survey. 74% of the houseless population are completely unsheltered. Take a moment to take in those figures and consider that Santa Clara County is the wealthiest county in California and the 14th wealthiest county in the country. We are Silicon Valley, the home of the most innovative and “forward-thinking” companies in the world, yet we also have a very high population of homeless persons in our midst. Let us look more closely at the statistics: 15% of homeless persons are under 18. 28% are young adults 18-24 and 57% are over 25. We use the term “houseless” rather than homeless because 61% of the people who are living in shelters or on the street have called Santa Clara County their home for 10 years or more! These folks are our neighbors, relatives and friends. We went to school with them and we work along side them. The Homeless Census and Survey asked if the respondents would accept affordable permanent housing if it became immediately available and 89% said YES, they would want housing. The top obstacles to permanent housing are: The rent is too high (62%); No job or insufficient income (56%); No money for moving costs (23%) and bad credit (20%). The lack of housing also affects our best and brightest. NBC did a story on SJSU students who are unhoused last week and they found that 13.2% of SJSU students experienced homelessness during the past year, one of the highest rates of homeless among all the Cal State colleges. Students without housing sleep in cars, in the library, or “couch surf.” There are food pantries scattered throughout the SJSU campus and a nearby church has some lodging options for some students. Sadly, there is no plan in place to address this problem. One of the many solutions underway to address this problem is building more affordable housing, but one of the biggest obstacles is the lack of support among neighbors. Social media platforms like “Next Door” have exacerbated the problem by allowing hate speech against the houseless population go unchecked. We cannot address this problem unless all of us work together. Let us pray for a spirit of generosity and love so that all of us can work together for a positive solution to homelessness. May the Spirit of Advent keep us hopeful in a time of darkness.
Intercesiónes semanales
De acuerdo con el Censo y la Eencuesta de Personas Sin Hogar de 2017, hay 7, 394 personas consideradas sin hogar en el Condado de Santa Clara. El 74% de la población sin hogar está completamente sin techo. Tómese un momento para analizar esas cifras y considere que el condado de Santa Clara es el condado más rico de California y el 14º condado más rico del país. Somos Silicon Valley, el hogar de las compañías más innovadoras y con visión de futuro en el mundo, sin embargo, también tenemos una población muy alta de personas sin hogar entre nosotros. Veamos más de cerca las estadísticas: el 15% de las personas sin hogar son menores de 18 años. El 28% son adultos jóvenes de 18 a 24 años y el 57% tiene más de 25. Usamos el término “sin hogar” porque el 61% de las personas que viven en refugios o en la calle han llamado a su condado de Santa Clara su hogar por ¡10 años o más! Estas personas son nuestros vecinos, familiares y amigos. Fuimos a la escuela con ellos y trabajamos junto a ellos. El Censo y la Encuesta de Personas Sin Hogar pregunto si los encuestados aceptarían viviendas permanentes asequibles si estuvieran disponibles de inmediato y el 89% dijo que SI, que querrían una vivienda. Los principales obstáculos para la vivienda permanente son: El alquiler es demasiado alto (62%); Sin trabajo o ingresos insuficientes (56%); No muchos por costos de mudanza (23%) y mal crédito (20%). La falta de vivienda también afecta a nuestros mejores y más brillantes. La NBC hizo una historia sobre los estudiantes de SJSU que no se abrigaron la semana pasada y encontraron que el 13.2% de los estudiantes de SJSU experimentaron la falta de vivienda durante el año pasado, una de las tasas más altas de personas sin hogar entre todas las universidades de Cal State. Los estudiantes sin alojamiento duermen en automóviles, en la biblioteca o en “couch surfing”. Hay despensas de alimentos dispersas por todo el campus de SJSU y una iglesia cercana tiene algunas opciones de alojamiento para algunos estudiantes. Lamentablemente, no hay un plan en marcha para abordar este problema. Una de las muchas soluciones en curso para abordar este problema es construir viviendas más asequibles, pero uno de los mayores obstáculos es la falta de apoyo entre los vecinos. Las plataformas de medios sociales como “Next Door” han exacerbado el problema al permitir que los discursos de odio contra la población sin hogar no sean controlados. No podemos abordar este problema a menos que todos trabajemos juntos. Oremos por un espíritu de generosidad y amor para que todos podamos trabajar juntos por una solución positiva para la falta de vivienda. Que el Espíritu de Adviento nos mantenga esperanzados en un tiempo de oscuridad.
Reflexión del evangelio: ¿Qué debemos hacer?
El texto del evangelio para este domingo está tomado del capítulo 3: 10-18 del Evangelio de Lucas, una continuación del mensaje de preparación de Juan el Bautista de las lecturas de la semana anterior. Recordemos que la misión de Juan el Bautista de proclamar un bautismo de arrepentimiento para el perdón de consentir al Imperio. El papel de Juan el Bautista en la resistencia es el papel de preparar a las personas para dar la bienvenida a la nueva era mesiánica de la liberación, la justicia social y la libertad. Algunos pueden ver a Juan como un “proto-organizador de la comunidad”. Él inspiró a la gente a imaginar una sociedad en la que se hace un “camino” cuando no había manera de hacerlo, para ver una sociedad donde los valles y montañas que bloquean las oportunidades de igualdad se llenan y nivelan para que todas las personas puedan tener igual acceso al bienestar y la felicidad. Basándose en la visión de Isaías de un mañana nuevo y mejor, Juan el Bautista presentó a la gente una posibilidad que no estaba disponible para ellos desde el Imperio. En los siguientes versículos previos a la selección de esta semana, Juan anticipó la contra-organización de aquellos que simpatizan con el Imperio. Pero antes de abordar la contra organización en Lc 3: 7-9, tenemos que hacer una pausa y recordar el comentario de la semana pasada para que podamos avanzar a través de esos tres versículos y abordar la selección del evangelio de hoy (Lc 3:10-18).
Recuerde que el evangelista Lucas escribe décadas después de la muerte y resurrección de Jesús y que Lucas escribe a una comunidad específica de personas que tienen sus raíces en la cultura helenística más que en la religión de Jesús, que es judaísmo. Esto presenta serios desafíos porque Jesús está arraigada histórica y políticamente en la Resistencia judía. El evangelio de Lucas es una especie de “traductor” del Movimiento de Resistencia Judía para la comunidad helenística de Lucas. Debido a que los elementos judíos de Jesús son, en el mejor de los casos, un recuerdo lejano para el público de habla griega, el evangelista Lucas replantea la narrativa de Jesús (y la pre-narrativa: la narrativa de la natividad y la misión de Juan el Bautista) de tal manera que los no judíos los conversos al cristianismo no solo podían acceder al propósito, la misión y el mensaje de Jesús-como-el Cristo, sino que también podían aplicar el concepto de resistencia a su propia ubicación social e histórica. La audiencia de Lucas podría entonces tomar las categorías judías de igualitarismo (económico y social), libertad de expresión religiosa y cultural y autonomía política y aplicarlas de una manera que abordara las injusticias del Imperio a fines del primer siglo EC. Dicho esto, pasemos a Lc3: 7-9 (los versículos que configuran la selección de hoy de Lc 3: 10-18).
En Lc 3: 7, John se dirigió a la multitud y los llamó “crías de víboras”. Desde una perspectiva organizadora de la comunidad, uno podría leer en este lenguaje agresivo como una mera hipérbole con la intención de agitar a la multitud a tomar una decisión. Continuando con la propuesta de que Juan el Bautista era un proto-organizador comunitario, uno preguntaría: “¿Fue este lenguaje efectivo para que las personas tomaran una decisión?” El versículo 10-14 podría sugerir que el desafío de Juan inspiró la reacción.
La reacción de primer nivel fue lo que todos deberían hacer: ¡cambiar la cultura! “Quien tenga dos túnicas debe compartir con la persona que no tiene ninguna. Y quienquiera que tenga comida debe hacer lo mismo ”(Lc 3, 11). Juan estaba exigiendo un cambio cultural de una cultura de auto-conservación a una cultura de cuidado y compasión por los demás. Tal cambio fue significativo en el contexto del Imperio. En un contexto no judío, la auto-conservación era normal porque los romanos normalmente no valoraban a los débiles y vulnerables a menos que la persona en cuestión fuera un miembro de su propia familia inmediata. Ética judía; Sin embargo, exigió un mayor nivel de atención. Todas las personas, independientemente de sus vínculos de sangre, merecen la dignidad de la ropa y la comida. Parecería que el evangelista Lucas insertó este y los siguientes versículos como una forma de subrayar la ética de la justicia social y económica.
La segunda respuesta fue de los publicanos. (Lc 3: 12-13) Los publicanos (en hecho, recaudadores de impuestos), que proporcionaron los medios financieros para que el Imperio mantuviera su dominio en Israel, fueron especialmente odiados porque eran judíos, no romanos. Los ingresos fiscales fluyeron desde las provincias (los territorios conquistados) hasta Roma. El gobierno local tenía la discreción de aumentar los impuestos por encima de la evaluación dada por Roma. Estos aumentos de impuestos crearon desplazamientos masivos: los agricultores de subsistencia perdieron sus tierras. Los granjeros se endeudaron y se convirtieron en simples inquilinos en las tierras que antes poseían y, si no podían pagar, se les echaba en el “cárcel de deudores”, donde los miembros de la familia trabajaban para pagar la deuda para asegurar su libertad. El campo galileo sufrió importantes desplazamientos. Mucha gente se fue a buscar trabajo en otras ciudades. Algunos se convirtieron en personas sin tierra y los más desesperados abandonaron su país en busca de una vida mejor en otro lugar. Los publicanos obtuvieron sus ingresos mediante la imposición de tarifas de recaudador además de los impuestos que ya eran propiedad del Imperio. Muchos cobradores de impuestos aprovecharon el sistema y sobrecargaron a las personas, por lo que los recaudadores de impuestos fueron vistos como la cara del Imperio y se convirtieron en parias de su propia gente. En el contexto de la aplicación de la Resistencia judía al Imperio, la sola idea de dejar de recolectar más de lo que se prescribe significaría que el flujo de ingresos hacia Roma se secaría. Sin los ingresos fiscales provenientes de las provincias, César no podría pagar a los soldados que proporcionaron la fuerza o el seguro de que los impuestos en realidad serían recaudados y que las rebeliones locales se mantendrían bajo control. El verso 13, cuando se lee con la lente de un organizador, es una demanda muy subversiva. El cese de los ingresos fiscales mal obtenidos que han causado tanto sufrimiento es, de hecho, una estrategia poderosa que podría muy bien derrocar a un Imperio.
Volviendo ahora a la tercera respuesta de los soldados: los soldados, no judíos, fueron particularmente problemáticos porque representaban la represión del Imperio. Parecería históricamente improbable que los recaudadores de impuestos y especialmente los soldados preguntaran públicamente, “¿qué debemos hacer?” Los soldados eran lugares comunes en todo el Imperio en el momento de Jesús y ciertamente en el momento en que Lucas escribió el Evangelio. En el Imperio Romano, los soldados funcionaban de múltiples maneras: como una fuerza de defensa, un ejército invasor, una fuerza de ocupación y como guardianes de la ley. Los soldados tenían múltiples funciones y parece que algunos miembros de las legiones del Imperio estaban especializados en la guerra y la invasión y otros en el control civil. Los soldados que tuvieron más contacto con las personas en el Imperio de finales del primer siglo y principios del segundo siglo fueron los que actuaron como policías. Cuando se escribió el evangelio de Lucas, la distinción entre la policía del templo y los soldados era solo académica. La audiencia de Lucas probablemente estaba familiarizada con los soldados que patrullaban la ciudad, funcionando como la policía. A estos soldados se les pagó un salario de subsistencia y, por lo tanto, aprovecharon su posición como una forma de aumentar su escaso pago al extorsionar a las personas para que paguen sobornos. La inclusión de soldados de Lucas en la narrativa de Juan el Bautista sirvió un mensaje muy poderoso para aquellos en el siglo II CE que buscaban esperanza en medio de la intensa represión diaria.
Los versos restantes de la selección de hoy tienen un tono ominoso. “Es cierto que yo bautizo con agua, pero ya viene otro más poderoso que yo, a quien no merezco desatarle las correas de sus sandalias. Él los bautizará con el Espíritu Santo y con fuego. Él tiene el bieldo en la mano para separar el trigo de la paja; guardará el trigo en su granero y quemará la paja en un fuego que no se extingue”. (Lc 3, 16-17). La referencia de Lucas al Espíritu Santo se refiere al concepto (entonces) emergente de que el Espíritu de Dios es una fuerza vital que no solo anima el universo, sino que anima a las personas a hacer cosas asombrosas. (Los místicos de Galilea y del Mar Muerto estaban desarrollando conceptos poderosos sobre el poder del Espíritu de Dios / Ruach. Los místicos de Galilea se unieron al Espíritu con la acción pública y los místicos del Mar Muerto se unieron a la purificación. A lo largo de los siglos, el pensamiento judío continuó desarrollando conceptos del Espíritu de Dios. La secta judía que eventualmente se convirtió en el “cristianismo” desarrolló el concepto de Espíritu / Ruach como la Tercera Persona en la Santísima Trinidad). Las palabras de Juan el Bautista fueron malas noticias para aquellos que querían mantener el status quo (vea Lc 3: 19-20), pero en realidad eran “buenas noticias” para aquellos que buscaban un cambio (Lc 3:18). Leer a Juan el Bautista como organizador sugiere que Juan ayudó a las personas a entender que el cambio no está en manos del destino, sino en las manos de aquellos que se atreven a moldear el destino. ¿Estamos dispuestos a hacer la pregunta: “¿Qué debemos hacer?” ¿Y estaríamos dispuestos a tomar una posición profética contra el Imperio en el que nos encontramos?
A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA. DO IT NOW.
Family Separation
Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:
Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen: * ** Families Belong Together (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=edf90ea8c8&e=105d556a20) * ** CAIR (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=e2286faf51&e=105d556a20) * ** MoveOn (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=e8f7859a70&e=105d556a20) * ** CredoAction (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=d2bfc358b7&e=105d556a20)
We will be making goodie bags for the posada on 12/20 after mass this Sunday. Come join us!
Vamos a hacer los aguinaldos para la posada el 20/12 después de la misa este domingo. ¡Venga y únase a nosotros! JEANS FOR THE J

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Prepare the Way of the Lord

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad December 7, 2018
============================================================ MISA DEL BARRIO THIS WEEKEND DIFFERENT TIME AND PLACE MISA OAXAQUEÑA con banda, danza y ballet folklorico! Misa Sunday, December 9 at NOON at Cardoza Park, Kennedy Drive Milpitas, CA 95035

¡MISA DEL BARRIO ESTE DOMINGO! TIEMPO Y LUGAR DIFERENTE MISA OAXAQUEÑA con banda, danza y ballet folklorico!
La próxima misa será el 9 de diciembre al mediodia 12 pm en Cardoza Park, Kennedy Drive Milpitas, CA 95035 WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Members of Grupo Solidaridad and Families Belong Together participated in a sit in at City Hall to protest the use of tear gas against asylum seekers
Sunday’s Gospel Reflection: Prepare the Way of the Lord The gospel text for this Sunday is taken from the Gospel of Luke chapter 3: 1-6, the announcement of John the Baptist’s mission of proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. This Sunday’s reading unites the messianic expectation expressed in Isaiah with the theme of preparing the way for the Messiah. Recall that the evangelist Luke is writing about Jesus decades after his death and that most of Luke’s immediate audience was Gentile, not Jewish and many of them were unfamiliar with the Jewish interpretive context of the Prophet Isaiah. Gentiles who became Christian had to decode the Torah and the prophets in light of their already-established relationship with Jesus-as-the Christ. This meant that Christian readers (include this present generation) read passages from the Jewish Scriptures with the lens of messianic fulfillment rather than within the original Jewish context of messianic expectation.
Around the mid-First Century CE, the Jewish people were ready for a change. The Hasmonean dynasty that had been established right after the Seleucid Empire disintegrated amidst a violent Jewish revolt in 167 BCE. After 103 years the Roman Empire invaded Judea and set up Judea as a Roman client state and placed the Herodian dynasty as surrogate rulers for the Empire. The royal family of the Herodian dynasty was aware that their subjects did not recognize them as true kings and so they were consumed with the need to “legitimize” their reign. They also planned to kill any remaining Hasmonean heirs who might claim the right to succession. The Herodians were grotesque power hungry pretenders to the throne and their struggle to remain in power was filled with intrigue, deceit and violence. The Jewish population was understandably unhappy with the Herodians and as the Herodians exercised their authority over the population, the Jewish Resistance increased their Resistance.
Jesus was born into this political context and the evangelist Luke captured fragments of that interesting historical background. The fragments of Jewish history; however, provided a powerful counter-narrative to those living in under the oppressive Roman Empire. Borrowing the passage from Isaiah 40:3, the evangelist Luke creates a backstory for Jesus. John the Baptist, quotes Isaiah, “A voice of one crying out in the desert: “Prepare the way of the Lord, make straight his paths. Every valley shall be filled and every mountain and hill shall be made low. The winding roads shall be made straight, and the rough ways made smooth, and all flesh shall see the salvation of God.’ (Lk 3: 4-6/Is 40:3-5) Luke places this passage on the lips of John the Baptist as a way to harken the preparation of the coming of Jesus-as-the Christ.
The community of the evangelist Luke, not being Jewish, probably did not understand the full depth of expectations of the Messiah. Because The Gentile concept of “kingship” would be more akin to politics and governance rather than the Jewish concept of a systemic overhaul of the status quo with the outcome being the restoration of the true Davidic line and the restoration of rights and privileges of the Jewish people, the Gentile audience would have to learn the basic ethics of living together in community (which you will see through the course of year as we study the gospel of Luke) before grasping the concept of Messiah. This is why the evangelist Luke in the first three chapters (the pre-birth and birth narratives introduce the concepts of compassion, kindness, healing, inclusion, reconciliation, and economic and political equity). The evangelist Luke connects these concepts with the theology of preparation for final judgement, (c.f., Lk3:4, “Prepare the way of the Lord, make straight his paths…”) The theme of “preparation” connects final judgment, the Messiah, the effort of the people bringing about a just social order all together. This tripartite connection of final judgment, the coming of the Messiah (and identifying the Messiah as Jesus) and doing justice is Luke’s theological fulcrum. The evangelist identifies compassion, kindness, healing etc…as indicators that the kingdom of God is breaking through the exterior crust of the Empire.
The evangelist Luke takes care to include the social and political location in which Jesus-as-the Christ will be introduced. In Lk3:1-2, the evangelist laid out that the ministry of Jesus will unfold during the governorship of Pontius Pilate and that the titular head of Galilee was Herod and that Annas and Chaiaphas were appointed as the chief priests in Jerusalem. The evangelist’s narrative continues by placing John the Baptist in the region of the Jordan river. This background might suggest that what ever will unfold in the following chapters will be set within the political reality of the Empire. John the Baptist’s message of repentance would not be simply a spiritual repentance, but rather a social and political repentance of surrendering power over to the Empire. In this context we can see how the Empire came to fear John the Baptist as a populist agitator and enemy of the people.
As Christians we might ask: When the Messiah comes and we must hold ourselves to account to whether our actions served to prepare the way of the Lord, that is, have we ushered in the kingdom or have our deeds contributed to building up the Empire? And reading the Prophet Isaiah in its proper Jewish context, we might ask: Have we collectively prepared the world for the Messiah by reconciling with our enemies, vanquishing inequity and exploitation, and lifting up those bound by oppression?
Weekly Intercessions
Earlier this week the City Council voted unanimously to sell public land to Google. The evening meeting was marked by dozens of impassioned speakers and a poetical protest. The decision to sell the public land raised a lot of concern around issues of transparency and lack of adequate public comment as well as several legal concerns raised by public advocates. The heart of the issue is future displacement and advanced gentrification in communities of color. At the center of the heart of the issue is Google. Google will be building a campus in the adjacent neighborhood west of downtown San José with 20,000 employees. The Diridon Station (as a part of the plan with the Google campus, will also undergo a major renovation making Diridon Station the largest public transportation hub in the West Coast. The public has had opportunities to voice concern over these developments; however, many feel that the consultation process — including the decision to sell public land — was mere “window dressing.” Critics of the City Council say that public officials basically “sold the farm” from under the feet of San Joseans. Advocates for unhoused persons claim that decisions were made in advance and without public consent and that moderate and low-income residents in the area (including those who live in the East Side), will be displaced. East Side schools report plummeting enrollment because families are moving out. Working families with children cannot afford the rent and wages are insufficient to meet the cost of living. Hundreds of students at SJSU and community colleges, thousands of service workers and young families live without a roof over their heads already and with the impending development, thousands more join the ranks of the unhoused. Middle class families with young adults at home are concerned that their children and grandchildren will never be able to live in the area. One advocate said, “We will keep fighting as long as there are people being displaced.” Let us pray for the advocates for affordable housing and unhoused persons that they not give up the fight.
Intercesiónes semanales
La semana pasada, los solicitantes de asilo de Centroamérica fueron rechazados de ingresar al país con gas lacrimógeno y balas de goma. La mayoría de los afectados por esta hostilidad eran padres con niños pequeños. Los fotos de niños descalzos con sus caras manchadas de lágrimas y polvo se compartieron en todo el mundo. Como dicen, “una imagen vale más que mil palabras”. Trump ha presentado a los solicitantes de asilo como criminales, “gente mala” y “terroristas”. Justo antes de las elecciones, el gobierno envió más de 5,000 soldados a la frontera de Texas/México para apoyar a la patrulla fronteriza y dio “luz verde” a la patrulla fronteriza de los EE. UU para utilizar la fuerza letal. El lenguaje inflamatorio descriptivo y las declaraciones bélicas no ralentizaron a los solicitantes de asilo que dejaron atrás a las bandillas armadas que patrullan las ciudades y el campo en busca de muchachos jóvenes para reclutar y niñas jóvenes para abusar. Dejaron atrás el caos político y la corrupción. Los valientes padres e hijos a menudo viajan en grupos grandes como una forma de compartir recursos entre sí y brindar protección a los viajeros vulnerables. Cuando uno de los grupos más grandes llegó a Tijuana, se encontraron con protestas de muchos residentes de Tijuana que no los querían en la ciudad. Los solicitantes de asilo ya habían caminado durante semanas y la inhabilidad de los detractores enojados no iban a hacer que regresaran a casa. Habían llegado tan lejos y podían ver los EEUU. Las llegadas anticipadas ya habían estado esperando varios días en la frontera para comenzar el primer paso en un proceso largo y detallado para ganar en el corte de asilo. Según la ley estadounidense, los solicitantes de asilo tienen derecho a ingresar al país y solicitar una audiencia de asilo. Trump; sin embargo, está trabajando para cambiar esa regla y obligar a la gente a esperar en Tijuana. La decisión aún no se ha finalizado y, a pesar de los intentos ilegales de la administración por evitar que las personas soliciten asilo, los solicitantes de asilo perseverarán para tener su día en la corte. Oremos por los que buscan asilo, por los voluntarios que los están ayudando en ambos lados de la frontera y por los países que dejaron atrás.
Reflexión del evangelio: Preparar el camino del Señor
El texto del evangelio para este domingo está tomado del Evangelio de Lucas capítulo 3: 1-6, el anuncio de la misión de Juan el Bautista de proclamar un bautismo de arrepentimiento para el perdón de los pecados. La lectura de este domingo une la expectativa mesiánica expresada en Isaías con el tema de preparar el camino para el Mesías. Recuerde que el evangelista Lucas está escribiendo sobre Jesús décadas después de su muerte y que la mayor parte de la audiencia inmediata de Lucas era gentil, no judía y muchos de ellos no estaban familiarizados con el contexto interpretativo judío del profeta Isaías. Los gentiles que se convirtieron en cristianos tuvieron que de-codificar la Torá y los profetas a la luz de su relación ya establecida con Jesús como Cristo. Esto significó que los lectores cristianos (incluyendo esta generación actual) leyeron pasajes de las Escrituras judías con la perspectiva interpretativa (lentes) de la realización mesiánica en lugar de dentro del contexto judío original de la expectativa mesiánica.
A mediados del siglo I BCE, el pueblo judío estaba listo para un cambio. La Dinastía Hasmoneana que se había establecido justo después del Imperio Seléucida se desintegró en medio de una violenta revuelta judía en 167 BCE. Después de 103 años, el Imperio Romano invadió Judea y estableció a Judea como un “estado cliente” romano y colocó a la Dinastía Herodiana como gobernantes sustitutos del Imperio. La familia real de la Dinastía Herodiana era consciente de que sus súbditos no los reconocían como verdaderos reyes (eran títeres políticos), por lo que se consumían ante la necesidad de “legitimar” su reinado. También planearon matar a cualquier heredero Hasmoneano restante que pudiera reclamar el derecho a la sucesión. Los Herodianos eran pretendientes grotescos y hambrientos de poder en el trono y su lucha por permanecer en el poder estaba llena de intrigas, engaños y violencia. La población judía estaba comprensiblemente descontenta con los Herodianos y, como los Herodianos ejercían su autoridad sobre la población, la resistencia judía aumentó su resistencia.
Jesús nació en este contexto político y el evangelista Lucas capturó fragmentos de ese interesante trasfondo histórico. Los fragmentos de la historia judía; sin embargo, proporcionó una poderosa contra-narrativa para aquellos que viven bajo el opresivo Imperio Romano. Tomando prestado el pasaje de Isaías 40: 3, el evangelista Lucas crea una historia de fondo para Jesús. Juan el Bautista, cita a Isaías: “Voz del que clama en el desierto: ‘Preparad el camino del Señor, enderezad sus caminos. Cada valle se llenará y toda montaña y colina se hará baja. Los caminos sinuosos se enderezarán y los caminos ásperos se suavizarán, y toda la carne verá la salvación de Dios’”. (Lc 3: 4-6 / Is 40: 3-5) Lucas coloca este pasaje en los labios de Juan. El Bautista como una forma de escuchar la preparación de la venida de Jesús-como-el Cristo.
La comunidad del evangelista Lucas, al no ser judío, probablemente no entendió las matices y profundidad de las expectativas del Mesías según las categorías judías. Debido a que el concepto gentil de “reinado” sería más parecido a la política y al gobierno que al concepto judío de una revisión sistémica del status quo con el resultado de la restauración de la verdadera línea davídica y la restauración de los derechos y privilegios de los judíos. Para la gente, la audiencia gentil tendría que aprender la ética básica de vivir juntos en comunidad (que verán a lo largo del año cuando estudiemos el evangelio de Lucas) antes de comprender el concepto del Mesías. Es por esto que el evangelista Lucas en los primeros tres capítulos (las narraciones previas al nacimiento y al nacimiento introducen los conceptos de compasión, bondad, sanación, inclusión, reconciliación y equidad económica y política). El evangelista Lucas conecta estos conceptos con la teología de la preparación para el juicio final (cf. Lc 3, 4, “Prepare el camino del Señor, enderezando sus caminos …”) El tema de la “preparación” conecta el juicio final, el Mesías, el esfuerzo de la gente por lograr un orden social justo todos juntos. Esta conexión tripartita del juicio final, la venida del Mesías (y la identificación del Mesías como Jesús) y hacer justicia es el punto de apoyo teológico de Lucas. El evangelista identifica la compasión, la bondad, la sanación, etc., como indicadores de que el reino de Dios se está rompiendo rompiendo el duro exterior del imperio.
El evangelista Lucas se preocupa la ubicación por social y político en el que se presentará a Jesús-como-el Cristo. En Lucas 3: 1-2, el evangelista estableció que el ministerio de Jesús se desarrollará durante el gobierno de Poncio Pilato y que el jefe titular de Galilea era Herodes y que Annas y Chaifás fueron nombrados como los principales sacerdotes en Jerusalén. La narrativa del evangelista continúa ubicando a Juan el Bautista en la región del río Jordán. Estos antecedentes podrían sugerir que lo que se desarrollará en los siguientes capítulos se establecerá dentro de la realidad política del Imperio. El mensaje de arrepentimiento de Juan el Bautista no sería simplemente un arrepentimiento espiritual, sino más bien un arrepentimiento social y político de entregar el poder al Imperio. En este contexto, podemos ver cómo el Imperio llegó a temer a Juan el Bautista como agitador populista y enemigo del pueblo.
Como cristianos, podríamos preguntar: Cuando el Mesías venga y tengamos que darnos cuenta de si nuestras acciones sirvieron para preparar el camino del Señor, es decir, ¿hemos introducido el reino o nuestras acciones han contribuido a construir el Imperio? Y al leer al profeta Isaías en su propio contexto judío, podríamos preguntar: ¿Hemos preparado colectivamente el mundo para el Mesías al reconciliarnos con nuestros enemigos, vencer la inequidad y la explotación, y alzar a los atados por la opresión?
A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA. DO IT NOW.
Family Separation
Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:
Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen: * ** Families Belong Together (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=9d99fd76d4&e=105d556a20) * ** CAIR (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=206b668534&e=105d556a20) * ** MoveOn (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=a14d0dae63&e=105d556a20) * ** CredoAction (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=eb6df4ebb1&e=105d556a20)
JEANS FOR THE J