Blog

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Privilege Has No Rights

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad November 9, 2018
============================================================ MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD THIS SUNDAY
Misa Sunday, November 11 at 9 AM at Newman Chapel corner of San Carlos and 10th St

¡MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD ESTE DOMINGO!
La próxima misa será el 11 de noviembre a las 9 am en la Capilla de Newman en la esquina de S. Carlos y Calle 10. WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Sunday Reflection: Privilege Has No Rights The gospel text for this Sunday is from the Gospel of Mark, chapter 12:38-44. The last 4 verses are one of the most often quoted stories in Christian scripture: the Widow’s Mite. Using the lens of Resistance, we will see that the poor woman’s contribution into the Temple treasury is not about her generosity as much as it is a commentary about the Empire and the corrosive effects of power on the community. To appreciate the dimension of Resistance in the story of the widow, we must look at the story within a thematic arc starting with the Parable of Tenants and concluding with the Widow’s Mite.
In Mk 12:1-12 Jesus preached the Parable of Tenants to a receptive crowd. Christian supersessionists (a heretical position that believes that Christianity has “replaced” Judaism) have misunderstood — quite possibly with intention — this passage. Jesus’ parable is linked to Isaiah 5, when the prophet cried out for justice at the destruction of the house of Israel. Isaiah’s passage calls out the concentration of the land in the hands of a few privileged persons (Isaiah 5:8), the self-self-justification of the unjust (the Biblical version of the corrupt leader who calls out critics as “fake news”) Isaiah 5:20, and the inability of the unjust leaders to be self-critical (Isaiah 5:21). The destruction of the vineyard came about by those who participated with the Assyrian/Babylonian Empire. Jesus’ parable of the tenants is a commentary on the infidelity of those who abandoned the eternal faith of their ancestors in favor of the temporal power of the Empire. That the evangelist Mark placed the telling of the parable in front of the Temple is an intentional nod to the Resistance theme that courses through Mark’s gospel.
In the following verses, Mk 12:13-17, there were some Herodians (members of royal household put in place by the Roman Empire) and Pharisees (presumably a group of Pharisees who were associated with the royal household and not the Pharisees of Galilee who were associated with the growing Resistance in Galilee) came to try to trap Jesus in his subversive discourse. As in the previous verses, we must look at this passage in terms of Resistance: Jesus’ critics presented a Roman coin and asked about paying the census tax.
Jews were required to pay taxes using the Empire’s currency and they were also required to make contributions to the Temple (tithes) using Jewish currency. The purchase of animals to be used for Temple sacrifices (for the forgiveness of sins) had to be made with Jewish currency which would require that people go to money changers to exchange their Roman currency for Jewish currency. Holding up the coin, Jesus quipped, “Repay to Caesar what belongs to Caesar and to God what belongs to God.” (Mk 12:17). His response acknowledged that the Empire had unjustly imposed itself on the Jewish people without falling into the trap of being arrested for sedition.
Last week’s passage, Mk 12:18-34, was Jesus’ commentary on the Shema Israel. Jesus’ commentary provided an insight not only into the spiritual source for Jewish identity, but the ethical demand that flows from Jewish identity which is to love and serve one’s “neighbor” as one would love and serve one’s own family. Jesus’ teaching expanded the notion of neighbor to include everyone with whom we have contact, including people who are not of our family, tribe and nation. The Shema Israel stood as a reminder that the Jewish people must always remember who they are by remembering who God was — and is for them and that no Empire can stand in the way of Jewish people exercising the ethical demand to love and serve their neighbor.
The belief in the Messiah was a driving force for the Jewish Resistance. The belief in a Messiah that would restore the Jewish community (reclaim the Vineyard) was a powerful image in the Resistance. Most Resistance-oriented rabbis would subscribe to the belief that the Messiah was a strong military leader who would stand up to any occupying force. Jesus, who we consider a Resistance rabbi, differed from most of his contemporaries. In Mk 12:35-37 Jesus critiqued the Scribes’ claim that the Messiah is the Son of David (that is to say that the Messiah is in the Davidic, that is, the royal line of succession). Jesus rejects the common understanding of Messiah by saying, “David himself calls him ‘lord’; so how is he his son?” This rejection delights the crowd perhaps because the crowd is all too suspicious that anything good can come from the Davidic line because Herod himself is from the Davidic line and Herod is the Empire’s enabler. It would therefore appear that Jesus took a radical stance of Resistance: he stood not only in opposition to the Empire, but that the Resistance would be led by the entire people! The poor and neglected would lead the Resistance, not a member of the Davidic family.
Now we are ready to approach the verses in today’s gospel selection: Mk12:38-44. Jesus scathingly critiqued the Scribes who were honored and given public places of honor. Jesus was not only critiquing the Empire, he was addressing who thought were the enablers of the Roman occupation: the formal religious establishment. Jesus said, “They will receive a very severe condemnation.” (Mk12:40). Jesus’ words were limited to the Scribes who were self-aggrandizing, not all Scribes. (It would be important for preachers to understand the nuance in the gospel. Recall in Mk12:34 that Jesus regarded a Scribe favorably). Jesus’ critique was not a diatribe against all Scribes, but rather those who took on the trappings of the Empire and led people astray by having the people worry about smaller matters of purity rather than worrying about the oppressive force of the Empire.
The summation of the Resistance theme in the 12th chapter is in the story of the widow’s contribution. Because the events of the 12th chapter take place within the shadow of the Temple and Jesus commented specifically about the Temple treasury, it is worthwhile to look a little closer at how the Temple and giving to the Temple are powerful elements in preserving Jewish identity in the midst of the Empire’s social and political eco-system. Jews regarded the Temple as a sacred place in which God’s name resided on the earth. Jewish men (not women) living in Judea and Israel were obligated to visit the Temple to visit the Temple on Pesach (Passover), Shavuot (Pentecost) and the Sukkot (the Feast of Tabernacles). Those who lived outside of Judea tried to make at least one pilgrimage to Jerusalem during their lifetime. Thus, Jerusalem attracted the Jewish Diaspora from all over the Empire and each visitor brought money to give to the Temple. The pilgrimages and the donations to the Temple provided tangible connections not to Jerusalem and to the global Jewish community. The Temple and the treasury were important symbols of Jewish resilience that outlasted dozens of hostile invaders. The Temple stood as a sign of spiritual defiance against the Empire. The Roman authorities understood the power of a symbol to stir a nation, thus in 70 CE they sacked Jerusalem, confiscated the donations to the Temple, removed the sacred ritual objects associated with atonement sacrifice, and razed the Temple to the ground. This violent and psychologically cruel act; however, did not deter the Jewish Resistance.
Jewish identity continued to develop and spread throughout the Empire in spite of numerous attempts to destroy the Jewish people. Jewish identity persisted because people were fully committed to live their faith even in the face of death. Even though the military battle for Jewish sovereignty was lost, the Resistance persisted! Now, in light of this socio-historical background, let us revisit the story of the Widow’s Mite.
Jesus and his disciples noticed the people placing money in the Temple treasury and in particular the contribution of a poor widow. The widow embodied the sacrifice that Jesus preached for eternal life. (See Communique 11×2018 on the discussion on what one must do to inherit eternal life). Just as maintaining Jewish identity in a hostile political environment requires risk and sacrifice, so too the age of Olam Ha-Ba (the age of justice and peace) or the kingdom of God, requires unreserved commitment and a willingness to put one’s self last. (See Communique 24×2018). Are we willing to make such a commitment? How willing are we willing to take personal risks and sacrifice our comfort and security for the greater good? Will we be able to join Jesus-as-the Christ on the way to Calvary?
Weekly Intercessions
Earlier this week an armed gunman walked into a bar in Thousand Oaks and opened fire on the patrons resulting in 12 deaths. Among the victims were, Telemachus Orfanos, a survivor of the Las Vegas massacre where 58 people were killed. Telemachus’ mother said, “My son was in Las Vegas with a lot of his friends and he came home. He didn’t come home last night.” She continued, “I don’t want prayers, I don’t want thoughts, I want gun control.” Many public figures offer little more than words like, “You will be in my thoughts and prayers,” but do nothing to address the tragedy. Incident after incident, tragedy after tragedy, the same script is used by politicians who stand opposed to gun control. After a massacre, the elected officials who oppose gun control offer their “thoughts and prayers” and then warn others, “We cannot politicize this moment.” Those politicians hide behind a thin veil of piety and claim the moral high ground saying, “This is a time for prayers. Do not desecrate the memory of the victim by making this political.” When the massacre at Parkland, Florida happened resulting in the deaths of 17 students, the young survivors who saw their friends die did not follow the script. Instead, they immediately spoke up and challenged gun control lobbyists and called out politicians who opposed gun control. The Parkland students initiated a movement of gun control activism that swept the nation and within a very short time, influenced the electoral outcomes in dozens of states. No longer the survivors and families of those who died are going to accept “thoughts and prayers.” No longer will they endure the pro-gun elected officials’ admonition to remain silent. No longer will faith leaders enable those who call for a “cooling off period” by offering candle light vigils that conspicuously omit references to a call to action for gun control. The time for action is now. We’ve given all the thoughts and prayers that are necessary. We are beyond laying sentimental symbols of a victim’s life at a makeshift altar of remembrance. We must take action. Let us then work and commit ourselves to courageously speak and use the right words to express our outrage and demand a total overhaul of gun laws in this country.
Intercesiónes semanales
A principios de esta semana, un hombre armado entró en un bar en Thousand Oaks y mató 12 personas. Entre las víctimas se encontraba Telémaco Orfanos, un sobreviviente de la masacre de Las Vegas donde mataron a 58 personas. La madre de Telémaco dijo: “Mi hijo estaba en Las Vegas con muchos de sus amigos y él vino a casa. No vino a casa anoche”. Ella continuó: “No quiero oraciones, no quiero pensamientos. Quiero control de armas ”. Muchas figuras públicas ofrecen poco más que palabras como:“ Estarás en mis pensamientos y oraciones ”, pero no hacen nada para enfrentar la tragedia. Incidente tras incidente, tragedia tras tragedia, la misa canción esta usado por políticos que se oponen al control de armas. Después de una masacre, los funcionarios electos que se oponen al control de armas ofrecen sus “pensamientos y oraciones” y luego advierten a los demás: “No podemos politizar este momento”. Esos políticos se esconden detrás de un delgado velo de piedad y reclaman la moral moral diciendo: “Esto Es un tiempo para las oraciones. No profanen el recuerdo de la víctima haciendo esto político ”. Cuando ocurrió la masacre en Parkland, Florida, que causó la muerte de 17 estudiantes, los jóvenes sobrevivientes que vieron morir a sus amigos no siguieron el guión. En cambio, inmediatamente hablaron y desafiaron a los “lobbyists” de control de armas y llamaron a los políticos que se oponían al control de armas. Los estudiantes de Parkland iniciaron un movimiento de activismo de control de armas que barrió la nación y, en muy poco tiempo, influyó en los resultados electorales en docenas de estados. Ya no los sobrevivientes y las familias de los que murieron van a aceptar “pensamientos y oraciones”. Ya no soportarán la advertencia de los politicos pro-armas de permanecer en silencio. Los líderes religiosos ya no permitirán a los que piden un “período de reflexión” ofreciendo vigilias a la luz de las velas que omiten notoriamente las referencias a un llamado a la acción para el control de armas. El tiempo para la acción es ahora. Ya basta todos los pensamientos y oraciones que son necesarios. Estamos más allá de colocar símbolos sentimentales de la vida de una víctima en un altar improvisado para el recuerdo. Debemos tomar medidas. Entonces trabajemos y nos comprometamos a hablar valientemente y usar las palabras adecuadas para expresar nuestra indignación y exigir una revisión total de las leyes de armas en este país.
Reflexión del domingo: El privilegio no tiene ningún derecho
El texto del evangelio para este domingo es del Evangelio de Marcos, capítulo 12: 38-44. Los últimos 4 versos son una de las historias más citadas en las escrituras cristianas: la gran ofrenda de la viuda. Usando la perspectiva de la Resistencia, veremos que la ofrenda de la mujer pobre a la tesorería del Templo no se trata de su generosidad sino de un comentario sobre el Imperio y la corrupción del poder en la comunidad. Para apreciar la dimensión de la Resistencia en la historia de la viuda, debemos mirar la historia dentro de un arco temático que comienza con la parábola de los inquilinos y concluye con la ofrenda de la viuda.
En Mc 12: 1-12, Jesús predicó la parábola de los inquilinos a una multitud receptiva. Los super-sesionistas cristianos (una posición herética que cree que el cristianismo ha “reemplazado” al judaísmo) han malinterpretado, posiblemente con intención, este pasaje. La parábola de Jesús está vinculada a Isaías 5, cuando el profeta clamó por justicia en la destrucción de la casa de Israel. El pasaje de Isaías señala la concentración de la tierra en manos de unas pocas personas privilegiadas (Isaías 5: 8), la auto-justificación de los injustos (la versión bíblica del líder corrupto que llama a los críticos como “fake news” ) Isaías 5:20, y la incapacidad de los líderes injustos para ser autocríticos (Isaías 5:21). La destrucción de la viña se produjo por aquellos que participaron con el Imperio Asirio / Babilónico. La parábola de Jesús de los inquilinos es un comentario sobre la infidelidad de quienes abandonaron la fe eterna de sus antepasados ​​en favor del poder temporal del Imperio. Que el evangelista Mark colocó el relato de la parábola frente al Templo es un guiño intencional al tema de la Resistencia que se desarrolla en el evangelio de S. Marcos.
En los siguientes versículos, Mc 12: 13-17, había algunos herodianos (miembros de la familia real establecidos por el Imperio Romano) y fariseos (probablemente un grupo de fariseos que estaban asociados con la familia real y no los fariseos de Galilea). quienes estaban asociados con la creciente Resistencia en Galilea vinieron para tratar de atrapar a Jesús en su discurso subversivo. Al igual que en los versículos anteriores, debemos observar este pasaje en términos de Resistencia: los críticos de Jesús presentaron una moneda romana y preguntaron sobre el pago del impuesto del censo.
Los judíos debían pagar impuestos utilizando la moneda del Imperio y también debían hacer contribuciones al Templo (diezmos) utilizando la moneda judía. La compra de animales para ser utilizados para sacrificios en el Templo (para el perdón de los pecados) tenía que hacerse con moneda judía, lo que requeriría que las personas acudieran a los cambistas para cambiar su moneda romana por moneda judía. Jesús levantó la moneda y dijo: “Devuélvale a César lo que le pertenece a César y a Dios lo que le pertenece a Dios” (Mc 12,17). Su respuesta reconoció que el Imperio se había impuesto injustamente al pueblo judío sin caer en la trampa de ser arrestado por sedición.
El pasaje de la semana pasada, Mc 12: 18-34, fue el comentario de Jesús sobre el Shemá Israel. El comentario de Jesús proporcionó una visión no solo de la fuente espiritual de la identidad judía, sino también de la demanda ética que se deriva de la identidad judía que es amar y servir al “prójimo” de la misma manera que uno amaría y serviría a la propia familia. La enseñanza de Jesús amplió la noción de vecino para incluir a todas las personas con quienes tenemos contacto, incluidas las personas que no son de nuestra familia, tribu y nación. El Shemá Israel fue un recordatorio de que el pueblo judío siempre debe recordar quiénes son al recordar quién era Dios, y es para ellos y que ningún Imperio puede interponerse en el camino del pueblo judío que ejerce la demanda ética de amar y servir al prójimo.
La creencia en el Mesías fue una fuerza impulsora para la resistencia judía. La creencia en un Mesías que restauraría la comunidad judía (recuperar el viñedo) fue una imagen poderosa en la Resistencia. La mayoría de los rabinos orientados a la Resistencia estarían de acuerdo con la creencia de que el Mesías era un líder militar fuerte que se enfrentaría a cualquier fuerza de ocupación. Jesús, a quien consideramos un rabino de la Resistencia, difería de la mayoría de sus contemporáneos. En Mc 12: 35-37, Jesús criticó la afirmación de los escribas de que el Mesías es el Hijo de David (es decir, que el Mesías está en la linea davídica, es decir, la línea real de la sucesión). Jesús rechaza el entendimiento común del Mesías al decir: “David mismo lo llama” señor”; así que, ¿cómo es él su hijo?”. Este rechazo deleita a la multitud tal vez porque la multitud sospecha que algo bueno puede provenir de la línea davídica porque Herodes mismo es de la línea davídica y Herodes e s el facilitador del Imperio. Por lo tanto, parecería que Jesús adoptó una postura radical de Resistencia: ¡no solo se opuso al Imperio, sino que la Resistencia sería dirigida por todo el pueblo! Los pobres y descuidados liderarían la Resistencia, no un miembro de la familia davídica.
Ahora estamos listos para abordar los versículos en la selección del evangelio de hoy: Mk12: 38-44. Jesús criticó mordazmente a los escribas que eran honrado y otorgado lugares públicos de honor. Jesús no solo criticaba al Imperio, sino que se dirigía a quienes pensaban que eran los facilitadores de la ocupación romana: el establecimiento religioso formal. Jesús dijo: “Ellos recibirán una condena muy severa” (Mk12: 40). Las palabras de Jesús se limitaron a los escribas que se auto engrandecían, no a todos los escribas. (Sería importante que los predicadores comprendan los matices del evangelio. Recuerde en Mk12: 34 que Jesús consideraba favorablemente a un Escriba). La crítica de Jesús no fue una diatriba contra todos los Escribas, sino más bien los que tomaron las trampas del Imperio y desviaron a la gente al hacer que la gente se preocupara por asuntos más pequeños de pureza en lugar de preocuparse por la fuerza opresora del Imperio.
El resumen del tema de la Resistencia en el capítulo 12 se encuentra en la historia de la contribución de la viuda. Debido a que los eventos del capítulo 12 tienen lugar a la sombra del Templo y Jesús comentó específicamente sobre el tesoro del Templo, vale la pena mirar un poco más de cerca cómo el Templo y las donaciones al Templo son elementos poderosos para preservar la identidad judía en el mundo en medio del ecosistema social y político del Imperio. Los judíos consideraban el Templo como un lugar sagrado en el cual el nombre de Dios residía en la tierra. Los hombres judíos (no mujeres) que vivían en Judea e Israel estaban obligados a visitar el Templo para visitar el Templo en Pesach (Pascua), Shavuot (Pentecostés) y Sukkot (la Fiesta de los Tabernáculos). Los que vivían fuera de Judea intentaron hacer al menos una peregrinación a Jerusalén durante su vida. Así, Jerusalén atrajo a la diáspora judía de todo el Imperio y cada visitante trajo dinero para donar al Templo. Las peregrinaciones y las donaciones al Templo proporcionaron conexiones tangibles, no a Jerusalén y a la comunidad judía mundial. El Templo y el tesoro fueron símbolos importantes de la resistencia judía que sobrevivieron a decenas de invasores hostiles. El Templo era una señal de desafío espiritual contra el Imperio. Las autoridades romanas entendieron el poder de un símbolo para agitar una nación, por lo tanto, en el 70 EC saquearon Jerusalén, confiscaron las donaciones al Templo, eliminaron los objetos rituales sagrados asociados con el sacrificio de expiación y arrasaron el Templo hasta el suelo. Este acto violento y psicológicamente cruel; sin embargo, no disuadió a la Resistencia judía.
La identidad judía continuó desarrollándose y extendiéndose por todo el Imperio a pesar de los numerosos intentos de destruir al pueblo judío. La identidad judía persistió porque las personas estaban totalmente comprometidas a vivir su fe incluso frente a la muerte. ¡Aunque se perdió la batalla militar por la liberación judía, la Resistencia persistió! Ahora, a la luz de este trasfondo socio-histórico, repasemos la historia de la ofrenda de la viuda. Jesús y sus discípulos notaron que las personas depositaban dinero en la tesorería del Templo y en particular la contribución de una viuda pobre. La viuda encarnó el sacrificio que Jesús predicó para la vida eterna. (Vea el Comunicado 11×2018 sobre la discusión sobre lo que uno debe hacer para heredar la vida eterna). Del mismo modo que mantener la identidad judía en un ambiente político hostil requiere riesgo y sacrificio, también la edad de Olam Ha-Ba (la época de la justicia y la paz) o el reino de Dios, requiere un compromiso total e integral y la voluntad de poner al último. (Ver Comunicado 24×2018). ¿Estamos dispuestos a hacer tal compromiso? ¿Cuán dispuestos estamos dispuestos a asumir riesgos personales y sacrificar nuestra comodidad y seguridad por el bien mayor? ¿Podremos unirnos a Jesús como Cristo en el camino hacia el Calvario?
A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA. DO IT NOW.
Family Separation
Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:
Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen: * ** Families Belong Together (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=16c5c4614a&e=105d556a20) * ** CAIR (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=8f0071e6f1&e=105d556a20) * ** MoveOn (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=1a9921a7e5&e=105d556a20) * ** CredoAction (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=041228252a&e=105d556a20)
JEANS FOR THE JO

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Loving God, Loving Neighbor

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad November 2, 2018
============================================================ MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD REGULAR PLACE AND REGULAR TIME
Misa this Sunday, November 4 at 9 AM at Newman Chapel corner of San Carlos and 10th St

¡MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD ESTE SEMANA!
La próxima misa será el 4 de noviembre a las 9 am en la Capilla de Newman en la esquina de S. Carlos y Calle 10. WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Sunday Reflection: Loving God, Loving Neighbor
The gospel text for this Sunday is from the Gospel of Mark, chapter 12:28-34. In this passage Jesus-as-the Christ commented on Deuteronomy 6:4, the most well-known verse of the Torah that is recited multiple times daily by Jews: the Shema Israel, “שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵינוּ יְהוָה אֶחָֽד׃, Sh’ma Yisra’eil Adonai Eloheinu Adonai echad; Hear, Israel, the Lord is our God, the Lord is One.” Arguably the most sacred and basic texts of Judaism, the Shema Israel is recited in the morning and evening prayers, parents bless their children nightly with the prayer, and the Shema is the last words one recites before death. Using the lens of Resistance, this reflection will open up this Sunday’s gospel passage.
The Scribe who had asked Jesus the question, “Which is the first of all the commandments?” (Mk 12:28b) had watched how Jesus handled the Sadducee’s trap about resurrection and the commandment that the brother must take on the wife of his dead brother (Mk 12:18-27). Jesus response was summed up in his affirmation that God is the God of the living, inferring that the Law of Moses applies to the living. By stating that the Law deals with the issues of the living, not the dead and stating God is the God of the living and not the dead.
Jesus reaffirmed the concept of resurrection and at the same time exposed the Sadducee’s lack of understanding of the truth of the absolute ONE-NESS of God. The “oneness” of God upholds the concept that life defines who we are, not death. In life we make choices and these choices affect who to others. In death, we no longer make choices and our relationship to others simply ends. The Sadducee, (recall that Sadducees do not believe in the resurrection), did not consider the “oneness” of God, that is, the unlimited power of God to raise the dead. From the lens of Resistance, faith in the resurrection is an empowering belief because it affirms that God is mostly concerned about the here and now. Simply stated, the living conditions of people are more important than arguing about theoretical conflicts in the afterlife.
Sadducees were not as concerned about the complexity of choices that ethics would require in as much as they were concerned about the minutia of laws that pertained to purity of sacrifice, ritual requirements for atonement sacrifices at the Temple, and the purity of the priestly lineage. A Scribe who witnessed Jesus’ interchange with the Sadducee was impressed because he (and the Pharisees) believe in resurrection and the primacy of ethics as the defining characteristic of Jewish identity.
Pharisees and Scribes believed that ethics derived from the Torah, that is, the Law. The Torah was considered a living document that was meant to be interpreted within the context of the lived reality of the people. Scribes unpacked the ethical demands that the Torah through extensive consultation with ancient Torah commentators. Scribes and Pharisees used the Torah commentaries to provide ethical responses to contemporary problems. (This methodology continues through today).
Jesus differed from Pharisees and Scribes in that he turned first to the condition of the people before he turned to the Torah. For example he asked, “What do you want me to do for you?” (Mk 10:51). He did not ask, “What does the Law require?” Jesus saw the need of the individual or the needs of the collective people issuing the ethical demand, not the Torah: “The Sabbath exists for human beings, not human beings for the Sabbath.” (Mk 2:27). The differences in approach created a lingering tension throughout the gospel of Mark — a tension that was never resolved in the text. But let us return to the Scribe who was impressed by Jesus! The Scribe asked Jesus which commandment is the greatest as a way to truly discover what Jesus was truly about. Jesus responded by citing the Shema Israel, (c.f., Dt 6:4), “The first is this: ‘Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is Lord alone!” and mashed Deuteronomy with Leviticus 19:18, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself. I am the LORD,” and offered a one-line commentary, “There is no other commandment greater than these.” The one-liner commentary channeled Hillel’s most well-known sayings. (Hillel was one of ancient Judaism’s most influential commentator who lived 70 years prior to Jesus). One of Hillel’s Gentile postulants who asked if the Torah could be explained to him while he stood on one foot. Hillel responded, “What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: this is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation; go and learn. (See the Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 31a).
Hillel was concerned about the public order and the “repair” of the world and he worked within the structures of Judaism and his use of the term “fellow” referred to one’s own particular “tribe.” Hillel’s definition of “fellow” was much more tightly defined that Jesus’ use of the term “neighbor.” Jesus had a much broader definition of neighbor than Hillel and thus, his scope of the repair of the world was much broader. Hillel sought to repair the world by repairing Judaism. Jesus sought to repair the world by transforming the entire Empire — including elements of the religious structures that had become collaborators with the Empire. The Empire could only be destroyed by re-imagining “neighbor.” The kingdom of God is not about replacing the Roman Empire with a Jewish Empire, rather, replacing Empire with God’s kingdom: that is a renewed social order that is egalitarian, compassionate to the poor, welcoming of the foreigner (migrant and refugee) and just.
We must recognize that an honest faith demands an ethical dimension. As we look at the Empire and the spread of authoritarian regimes in the world — including here in the United States, we must become much more discerning about who might be considered a true believer. One cannot claim to love God with all one’s heart, soul and mind, yet support shooting unarmed refugee Honduran women and children. As people of faith, we cannot be silent when atrocities are committed by those who say they are people faith. To remain silent is to be complicit. We are obligated to speak up and make our opposition felt.
Weekly Intercessions
Last weekend an anti-anti-Semitic man burst through the doors of the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh and killed 11 people attending a Sabbath service. Just a few days before, a self-self-described racist man tried to break into a Black church and when unsuccessful in accomplishing that act, went into a Kroger grocery store and opened fire killing two Black persons. When confronting a white customer he said, “Whites don’t kill whites.” These crimes did not take place in a vacuum, but rather in a social and political environment that is racially charged and violent.
This week, let us remember the victims of these crimes.
Victims of the Kroger attack Maurice E. Stallard Vickie Lee Jones
Victims of the Tree of Life Massacre Joyce Fienberg Richard Gottfried Rose Malinger Jerry Rabinowitz Cecil Rosenthal David Rosenthal Bernice Simon Sylvan Simon Daniel Stein Melvin Wax Irving Younger
May we honor their memories by: confronting prejudice and hate speech immediately, especially public and online speech that is incendiary and harmful to vulnerable populations; challenging laws and policies that restrict the exercise of civil rights, limit due process and threaten the protection of refugees and immigrants; working with all people to build a better tomorrow when people, from all races, creeds and nations can gather together, embrace one another and banish hatred and violence from their sight.
May the memory of those who died, be a blessing upon the living.
May their souls and all the souls of the faithful departed rest in peace. Amen.
Intercesiónes semanales
El fin de semana pasado, un hombre anti-antisemita irrumpió por las puertas de la Sinagoga del Árbol de la Vida en Pittsburgh y mató a 11 personas que asistían a un servicio del sábado. Apenas unos días antes, un hombre racista que se describía a sí mismo trató de irrumpir en una iglesia negra y, cuando no lo logró, entró en una tienda Kroger y abrió fuego matando a dos personas negras. Cuando se enfrentó a un cliente güero, dijo: “Los blancos no matan a los blancos”. Estos crímenes no se cometieron en el vacío, sino en un ambiente social y político socialmente cargado y violento.
Esta semana, recordemos a las víctimas de estos crímenes.
Víctimas del ataque de Kroger. Maurice E. Stallard Vickie Lee Jones
Masacre de Víctimas del Árbol de la Vida Joyce Fienberg Richard Gottfried Rosa Malinger Jerry Rabinowitz Cecil Rosenthal David Rosenthal Bernice Simon Sylvan Simon Daniel Stein Melvin Wax Irving Younger
Podemos honrar sus vidas: confrontando los prejuicios y el discurso de odio de forma inmediata, especialmente el discurso público y en línea que es incendiario y perjudicial para las poblaciones vulnerables; desafiar las leyes y políticas que restringen el ejercicio de los derechos civiles, limitan el debido proceso y amenazan la protección de los refugiados e inmigrantes; trabajar con todas las personas para construir un futuro mejor cuando las personas, de todas las razas, credos y naciones puedan reunirse, abrazarse y desterrar el odio y la violencia de su vista.
Que la memoria de los que murieron sea una bendición para los vivos.
Que sus almas y todas las almas de los fieles difuntos descansen en paz. Amén.
Reflexión del domingo: Amar a nuestro Dios y amar a nuestro prójimo El texto del evangelio para este domingo es del Evangelio de Marcos, capítulo 12: 28-34. En este pasaje, Jesús como Cristo comentó sobre Deuteronomio 6: 4, el verso más conocido de la Torá que los judíos recitan varias veces al día: el Israel Shema, “מַע יִשְׂרָאֵל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵינוּ יְהוָה אֶחָֽד׃, Sh’ma Yisra’eil Adonai Eloheinu Adonai echad; Oye, Israel, el Señor es nuestro Dios, el Señor es el Unico”. Posiblemente los textos más sagrados y básicos del judaísmo, el Shema Israel se recita en las oraciones de la mañana y de la tarde, los padres bendicen a sus hijos todas las noches con la oración y el Shema. Son las últimas palabras que uno recita antes de la muerte. Usando el lente de la resistencia, esta reflexión abrirá el pasaje del evangelio de este domingo.
El escriba que le había preguntado a Jesús: “¿Cuál es el primero de todos los mandamientos?” (Mc 12, 28b) observó cómo Jesús manejó la trampa de Saduceo sobre la resurrección y el mandamiento de que el hermano debe enfrentarse a la esposa de su difunto. hermano (Mc 12: 18-27). La respuesta de Jesús se resumió en su afirmación de que Dios es el Dios de los vivos, deduciendo que la Ley de Moisés se aplica a los vivos. Al afirmar que la ley se ocupa de los asuntos de los vivos, no de los muertos y que Dios es el Dios de los vivos y no los muertos.
Jesús reafirmó el concepto de resurrección y, al mismo tiempo, expuso la falta de comprensión por parte de los saduceos de la verdad de la absoluta UNIDAD SINGULAR de Dios. La “unidad” de Dios sostiene el concepto de que la vida define quiénes somos, no la muerte. En la vida tomamos decisiones y estas elecciones afectan a quién a los demás. En la muerte, ya no tomamos decisiones y nuestra relación con otros simplemente termina. El Saduceo, (recuerde que los Saduceos no creen en la resurrección), no consideró la “unidad” de Dios, es decir, el poder ilimitado de Dios para resucitar a los muertos. Desde el lente de la Resistencia, la fe en la resurrección es una creencia empoderadora porque afirma que Dios está más preocupado por el aquí y el ahora. En pocas palabras, las condiciones de vida de las personas son más importantes que las discusiones sobre los conflictos teóricos en el más allá.
Los Saduceos no estaban tan preocupados por la complejidad de las elecciones que exigiría la ética, sino por la minucia de las leyes que se referían a la pureza del sacrificio, los requisitos rituales para los sacrificios de expiación en el Templo y la pureza del linaje sacerdotal. Un Escriba que presenció el intercambio de Jesús con el Saduceo quedó impresionado porque él (y los Fariseos) creen en la resurrección y la primacía de la ética como la característica definitoria de la identidad judía.
Los Fariseos y los Escribas creían que la ética derivaba de la Torá, es decir, la Ley. La Torá fue considerada un documento vivo que debía interpretarse en el contexto de la realidad vivida de las personas. Los Escribas desempaquetaron las demandas éticas de la Torá a través de una consulta extensa con los comentaristas antiguos de la Torá. Los Escribas y Fariseos utilizaron los comentarios de la Torá para proporcionar respuestas éticas a los problemas contemporáneos. (Esta metodología continúa hasta hoy).
Jesús se diferenció de los Fariseos y los Escribas en que recurrió primero a la condición de la gente antes de recurrir a la Torá. Por ejemplo, preguntó: “¿Qué quieres que haga por ti?” (Mc 10, 51). No preguntó: “¿Qué exige la ley?” Jesús vio la necesidad del individuo o las necesidades de las personas colectivas que emiten la demanda ética, no la Torá: “El sábado existe para los seres humanos, no los seres humanos para el sábado”. (Mc 2, 27). Las diferencias de enfoque crearon una tensión persistente en todo el evangelio de Marcos, una tensión que nunca se resolvió en el texto. ¡Pero volvamos al escriba que estaba impresionado por Jesús!
El Escriba le preguntó a Jesús qué mandamiento es el más grande para descubrir verdaderamente de qué se trataba realmente Jesús. Jesús respondió citando al Shemá Israel, (c.f., Dt 6: 4), “El primero es este: ‘¡Oye, Israel! ¡El Señor, nuestro Dios, es solo el Señor! Y combinó Deuteronomio con Levítico 19:18, “Amarás a tu prójimo como a ti mismo. Yo soy el SEÑOR”, y ofrecí un comentario de una línea, “No hay otro mandamiento más grande que estos”. El comentario de una sola línea canalizó los dichos más conocidos de Hillel. (Hillel fue uno de los comentaristas más influyentes del judaísmo antiguo que vivió 70 años antes de Jesús). Uno de los postulantes gentiles de Hillel que le preguntó si se le podía explicar la Torá mientras estaba sobre un pie. Hillel respondió: “Lo que es odioso para ti, no lo hagas a tu compañero: esta es toda la Torá; el resto es la explicación; ve y aprende (Ver el Talmud de Babilonia, Sábado 31a).
Hillel estaba preocupado por el orden público y la “reparación” del mundo y trabajó dentro de las estructuras del judaísmo y su uso del término “compañero” se refería a la “tribu” particular de cada uno. La definición de “compañero” de Hillel era mucho más definió firmemente que el uso de Jesús del término “vecino”. Jesús tenía una definición de vecino mucho más amplia que Hillel y, por lo tanto, su alcance de la reparación del mundo era mucho más amplio.
Hillel buscó reparar el mundo reparando el judaísmo. Jesús buscó reparar el mundo transformando todo el Imperio, incluidos elementos de las estructuras religiosas que se habían convertido en colaboradores del Imperio. El Imperio solo podría ser destruido re-imaginando al “vecino”. El reino de Dios no se trata de reemplazar el Imperio Romano con un Imperio Judío, sino del Imperio con el reino de Dios: ese es un orden social renovado que es igualitario y compasivo. los pobres, acogedores del extranjero (migrante y refugiado) y justo. Debemos reconocer que una fe honesta exige una dimensión ética.
Al observar el Imperio y la expansión de los regímenes autoritarios en el mundo, incluso aquí en los Estados Unidos, debemos ser mucho más exigentes acerca de quién puede ser considerado un verdadero creyente. No se puede afirmar que se ama a Dios con todo el corazón, alma y mente, pero se puede apoyar a disparar a mujeres y niños hondureños refugiados sin armas. Como personas de fe, no podemos permanecer en silencio cuando las atrocidades son cometidas por aquellos que dicen que son personas de fe. Permanecer en silencio es ser cómplice. Estamos obligados a hablar y hacer sentir nuestra oposición.
Family Separation
Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:
Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen: * ** Families Belong Together (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=bda4fcc97d&e=105d556a20) * ** CAIR (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=2d37e85f4f&e=105d556a20) * ** MoveOn (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=24b6af1581&e=105d556a20) * ** CredoAction (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=4b65509b1c&e=105d556a20)
JEANS FOR THE J

Newsletter

Interfaith Vigil in Support of the Pittsburgh Community/Vigilia interreligiosa en apoyo de la comunidad de Pittsburgh

View this email in your browser

Interfaith Vigil in Support of the Pittsburgh Community
Please join us Tuesday, October 30, 5:00 pm, at the San Jose City Hall outside plaza, as we stand together in solidarity and in support of the Pittsburgh community . Free parking in garage at 5th & Santa Clara streets or underneath City Hall (via 6th St.).

Vigilia interreligiosa en apoyo de la comunidad de Pittsburgh
Únase a nosotros el martes, 30 de octubre, a las 5:00 pm, en el ayuntamiento de San José, afuera de la plaza, mientras nos unimos en solidaridad y en apoyo de la comunidad de Pittsburgh. Aparcamiento gratuito en el garaje en las calles 5th y Santa Clara o debajo del Ayuntamiento (a través de 6th St.).

Copyright © 2018 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Our mailing address is:

Friends of Jon Pedigo

2164 Cottle Avenue

San Jose, CA 95125

Add us to your address book

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

SPECIAL Solidarity Prayer Service TOMORROW 10/28. ALL ARE WELCOME!

View this email in your browser

Come to Newman Center (corner of 10th of San Carlos) tomorrow to hold silence, prayer and a commitment of action in respect for those killed at The Tree of Life Synagogue. We will hold the prayer after Misa Solidaridad at 10:30 am. All faith traditions and non-faith traditions are welcome. Please spread the word!

 

Venga al Centro Newman (esquina de las calles 10 y San Carlos)  mañana para guardar silencio, orar y comprometerse a actuar con respeto por los muertos en la Sinagoga del Árbol de la Vida. Celebraremos la oración después de la misa a las 10:30 am. Todas las tradiciones religiosas y no religiosas son bienvenidas. ¡Pasen la voz!

Copyright © 2018 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Our mailing address is:

Friends of Jon Pedigo

2164 Cottle Avenue

San Jose, CA 95125

Add us to your address book

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Dismantling the Walls of Jericho

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad October 24, 2018
============================================================ MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD REGULAR PLACE AND REGULAR TIME
Misa this Sunday, October 28 at 9 AM at Newman Chapel corner of San Carlos and 10th St

¡MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD ESTE SEMANA!
La próxima misa será el 28 de octubre a la 9 am en la Capilla de Newman en la esquina de S. Carlos y Calle 10. WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Grupo Solidaridad participated in a Dia de los Muerto altar build at the Billy de Frank LGBTQ Resource Center. The activitye enabled the two communities to interact and understand each other in a common activity to honor our ancestors.
Sunday Reflection: Dismantling the Walls of Jericho
The gospel text for this Sunday is from the Gospel of Mark, chapter 10:46-52. Today’s passage closes out the arc of the Passion Predictions that framed the multiple conversations around the conditions of discipleship spanning from Mk 8:31 through Chapter 10. Today’s passage about the blind son of Timeaus, encapsulates the theme of the condition of discipleship from the point of view of one of the oppressed and in doing so, sets up the evangelist Mark’s narrative of the Passion which begins in Chapter 11 with the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem.
The story of the son of Timaeus, the blind man, takes place in Jericho, a prosperous trade city. The choice of setting the story in Jericho is not incidental, but rather, a deliberate and key clue to understanding the resistance dimension of the gospel narrative. The evangelist Mark has chosen Jericho as the setting for the story of Timaeus’s son to underscore why the systemic nature of oppression requires systemic dismantling of oppression. To understand this perspective, we need to take a side bar into understanding the narrative of Jericho’s role within Jewish history.
Jericho, a Canaanite city, was the first city that the Israelites settled upon entering Canaan. After wandering in the desert for 40 years, God directed Joshua to conquer Jericho by marching around the wall of city for six days with the Arc of the Covenant and on the seventh day blow rams’ horns (shofarot). When the walls fell on the seventh day, the Israelites entered and slaughtered every man, woman and child, sparing only a Canaanite prostitute, Rahab, because she had sheltered Israelite spies. This horrific narrative is not a historical account of how the Jericho became a Jewish city, but rather, a symbolic, ritual narrative of how the people of faith must dismantle an Empire. Like the Israelites who marched around the city for several days carrying the Arc of the Covenant, that is, the living Law of God, the people of faith must also walk at the periphery of the city until God signals action.
Jericho, one of the world’s oldest cities, was graced with natural springs and throughout history was a prosperous community. Because it was located along ancient trade routes, it was at times the target of invading Empires. By the First Century Common Era, Jericho became the “winter retreat” for Jerusalem’s aristocracy. The city reflected more of the culture and external trappings of the Empire than the reserved architecture and culture of Judaism. Because Jericho was an “exclusive” city, service workers did not live in Jericho itself, but lived in a village north of the Jericho and commented into the city to work. It is in this context that we encounter Timeaus’ blind son, begging at the roadside on the periphery of Jericho.
The blind man cried out, “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” The phrase was a politically charged phrase that would have attracted the unwanted attention of the authorities because the term, “Son of David” refers to the Mashiach (Messiah) or “the anointed one” or “The Christ.” The very call for Mashiach is an admission that difficult times are upon the Jewish people and the people are hungering for peace and justice. Public expressions of Mashiach would be considered subversive because the Mashiach is supposed to bring about political freedom and spiritual renewal for the Jewish people. A powerful symbol of Resistance, Mashiach brings hope to those who long to rid Jerusalem of foreign dominance and the Masiach will establish the seat of world power in Israel, not Rome.
The blind man’s insistence on calling out, “Son of David, have pity on me,” was also a challenge to Jesus and the disciples. As these disciples circled the periphery of Jericho like Joshua’s men, would Jesus (who the blind man declared as Mashiach) usher in a new age (Olam Ha-Ba)? The Olam Ha-Ba was the complete antithesis of the dictatorial nightmare of the Empire. Olam Ha-Ba is age of peaceful co-existence of all people, a time free from intolerance and hatred and war would cease to exist. The planet and all social systems would not depend on a system of predation that demands the death of the weak and vulnerable members of society so that the strong would survive. Olam Ha-Ba returns exiles home and reinstates the law of Jubilee (economic justice for the poor). Unlike the Empire that insists on the worship of Ceasar, Olam Ha-Ba recognizes God alone and Judaism as the one true religion. Lastly, Olam Ha-Ba ends the need for expiatory blood offerings in the Temple and thus only thanksgiving offerings would be needed.
Authorities, hearing the cries of the man, would very likely be curious to find out the identity of the man whom the blind man addressed as Mashiach because the Empire and its surrogates did not want any talk of Olam Ha-Ba or the Mashiach coming to change their comfortable lifestyle. Olam Ha-Ba is indeed the complete destruction of the old order and consequent birth of a new order. The walls of Jericho needed to once again come down. The time for reckoning; however, was not at that moment.
Jericho in many ways was a good example of the Empire’s appropriation of Judaism. This may have been the reason why the disciples tried to rebuke the man to be quiet. (Mk 10:48). The blind man who was known only in reference to his father, Timaeus, believed in the coming of Mashiach. The man sat the periphery of Jericho begging was too poor to enter the city, was waiting for a real change in his life. Jesus recognized that the old order that resulted in the marginalization of the blind man, had to end…but the way that change was going to happen was not through a single act of the Mashiach, but rather through the collective work of a community of people who walk along the periphery of the community picking up the lost, forsaken and forgotten. Thus Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.”
The disciples encouraged the man to get up and go to Jesus-as-the Christ. The man understood that the entire system that created Jericho as the winter palace of the aristocracy had to come down. He knew that the walls of Jericho were built of the bricks and mortar of systemic exclusion of poor and marginalized people. These walls had to crumble before the people blew into their shovarot a song of Resistance and freedom. Jesus-as-the Christ asked the man, “What do you want me to do for you?” The man could have responded, “Take down the damn wall!” But he did not. The man wanted to see.
Recall the Torah, Dt 11:27, “See, today I am setting before you a blessing and a curse: There will be blessing if you obey the commandments of the LORD your God that I am giving you today, but a curse if you do not obey the commandments of the LORD your God and turn aside from the path I command you today by following other gods, which you have not known.…” In Judaism, “sight” is not simply the ability to see, but rather, to have insight. Sight is not about looking out one’s own concerns and needs. Sight, like all things, must serve God, and when the man asked for sight, he was not asking for just physical sight. He was asking for self-empowerment, that is, the ability to see for one’s own self and to freely decide to participate in the dismantling of Jericho’s walls. By choosing to follow Jesus (c.f., “…Immediately he received his sight and followed (Jesus) on the way.” Mk10:52), the man claimed his place in the Resistance. He will blow the shofar of Freedom and Justice and, like Joshua, will enter Jerusalem with Jesus-as-the Christ.
In a time of political demagoguery and white nationalism disguised as patriotism, we might be tempted to turn away from the pain of those who live at the periphery of Jericho. Will we be courageous and filled with the faith of the blind man, the son of Timeaus? Will we truly see the work that needs to be done? Will we be willing to walk along the margins of Jericho and speak to those who are excluded and pushed out of the city? Will we blow the shovarot of justice and watch the walls of injustice crumble?
Weekly Intercessions
Did you know that 43 of the most 50 homicidal cities in the world are in Latin America and the Caribbean? According to the Guardian Newspaper, several countries in that region registered more killings and disappearances than some of the world’s most violent conflicts. The Humanitarian Practice Network released a study last year that showed that the threat of violence is not random, but rather, a cruel policy designed to make the population submit under the control of armed gangs. The violence in Central America was made worse by mass deportations of hundreds of thousands of Hondurans, Guatemalans and Salvadorans from the US. Those deported were convicted felons and upon their return to Central America, their presence over-taxed local criminal justice systems to the breaking point. Rather than rehabilitate the person, jails and prisons became “crime colleges” and “finishing schools for crime.” Central American governments do not have the resources to reintegrate the hundreds of thousands of deportees back into the community. Central American governments have resorted to militarizing local police which has resulted in exacerbating a culture of violence and mass incarceration. Violence continues to escalate which destabilizes the population. People in Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Guatemala are suffering from the effects of rampant violence, a lack of governmental control on crime, and a destabilized economy. Parents are making the difficult decision to take their children to a safer place. Thousands of parents flee their villages and cities every month and head north to Mexico in the hope that they will eventually find their way to a relative’s home in the US where they hope to start a new life. Because those who head north are not motivated primarily by the desire for work, but because they are escaping certain death, they cannot be considered as migrants. Those who have fled their homes are better understood as refugees and asylum seekers. It is therefore unconscionable that the White House would issue false statements about the so-called caravan as a way to score political points with his base. Let us pray for the safety and security of those fleeing violence and terror.
Intercesiónes semanales
¿Sabías que 43 de las 50 ciudades más homicidas del mundo se encuentran en América Latina y el Caribe? Según el periódico The Guardian, varios países de esa región registraron más asesinatos y desapariciones que algunos de los conflictos más violentos del mundo. La Red de Práctica Humanitaria publicó un estudio el año pasado que mostró que la amenaza de violencia no es aleatoria, sino más bien, una política cruel diseñada para hacer que la población se someta al control de pandillas armadas. La violencia en Centroamérica se agravó por las deportaciones masivas de cientos de miles de hondureños, guatemaltecos y salvadoreños de los Estados Unidos. Los deportados fueron condenados por delitos graves y, a su regreso a Centroamérica, su presencia sobrepasó los sistemas locales de justicia penal hasta el punto de ruptura. En lugar de rehabilitar a la persona, las cárceles y las prisiones se convirtieron en “colegios de delincuencia” y “escuelas de etiquete” del crimen. Los gobiernos de Centroamérica no tienen los recursos para reintegrar a los cientos de miles de deportados en la comunidad. Los gobiernos centroamericanos han recurrido a la militarización de la policía local, lo que ha llevado a exacerbar una cultura de violencia y encarcelamiento masivo. La violencia sigue escalando lo que desestabiliza a la población. Las personas en Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua y Guatemala están sufriendo los efectos de la violencia desenfrenada, la falta de control gubernamental sobre el crimen y una economía desestabilizada. Los padres están tomando la decisión deficíl de llevar a sus hijos a un lugar más seguro. Miles de padres huyen de sus pueblitos y ciudades cada mes y se dirigen al norte a México con la esperanza de que eventualmente encuentren el camino a la casa de un familiar en los EE. UU., Donde esperan comenzar una nueva vida. Debido a que quienes se dirigen al norte no están motivados principalmente por el deseo de trabajar, sino porque están escapando de una muerte segura, no pueden ser considerados como migrantes. Aquellos que han huido de sus hogares se entienden mejor como refugiados y solicitantes de asilo. Por lo tanto, es inconcebible que Trump emita mentiras sobre la llamada caravana como una forma de sumar puntos políticos con su base. Oremos por la seguridad de quienes huyen de la violencia y el terror.
Reflexión del domingo: Desmantelando los muros de Jericó
El texto del evangelio para este domingo es del Evangelio de Marcos, capítulo 10: 46-52. El pasaje de hoy cierra el arco de las Predicciones de la Pasión de Jesucristo que enmarcan las múltiples conversaciones en torno a las condiciones de discipulado que van desde Mc 8:31 hasta el Capítulo 10. El pasaje de hoy sobre el hijo ciego de Timeo, resume el tema de la condición de discipulado desde el punto de vista de uno de los oprimidos y al hacerlo, establece la narrativa de la Pasión del evangelista Marcos que comienza en el Capítulo 11 con la entrada de Jesús a Jerusalén.
La historia del hijo de Timeo, el ciego, tiene lugar en Jericó, una ciudad comercial próspera. La elección de establecer la historia en Jericó no es incidental, sino más bien, una clave deliberada y clave para comprender la dimensión de resistencia de la narrativa del evangelio. Marcos, el evangelista, eligió a Jericó como escenario de la historia del hijo de Timeo para subrayar por qué la naturaleza sistémica de la opresión requiere un desmantelamiento sistémico de la opresión. Para comprender esta perspectiva, debemos tomar una barra lateral para comprender la narrativa del papel de Jericó en la historia judía.
Jericó, una ciudad cananea, fue la primera ciudad en la que los israelitas se asentaron al entrar en Canaán. Después de vivir por el desierto durante 40 años, Dios le ordenó a Josué que conquistara Jericó marchando alrededor de la muralla de la ciudad durante seis días con el Arco del Pacto y en el séptimo día sopla cuernos de carnero (shofarot). Cuando los muros cayeron en el séptimo día, los israelitas entraron y mataron a cada hombre, mujer y niño, evitando solo a una prostituta cananea, Rahab, porque había albergado a espías israelitas. Esta narrativa horrible no es un relato histórico de cómo Jericó se convirtió en una ciudad judía, sino más bien, una narrativa simbólica y ritual de cómo las personas de fe deben desmantelar un Imperio. Al igual que los israelitas que marcharon alrededor de la ciudad durante varios días portando el Arco del Pacto, es decir, la Ley de Dios viviente, el pueblo de fe también debe caminar en las margines de la ciudad hasta que Dios señale la acción.
Jericó, una de las ciudades más antiguas del mundo, estaba adornada con fuentes naturales y, a lo largo de la historia, era una comunidad próspera. Debido a que estaba ubicado a lo largo de antiguas rutas comerciales, a veces era el objetivo de los imperios invasores. En la era común del primer siglo, Jericó se convirtió en el “retiro de invierno” para la aristocracia de Jerusalén. La ciudad reflejó más de la cultura y las trampas externas del Imperio que la arquitectura y la cultura reservadas del judaísmo. Debido a que Jericó era una ciudad “exclusiva”, los trabajadores del servicio no vivían en Jericó en sí, sino que vivían en una aldea al norte de Jericó y comentaron sobre la ciudad para trabajar. Es en este contexto que nos encontramos con el hijo ciego de Timeo, mendigando en la carretera en las margines de Jericó.
El ciego gritó: “Jesús, hijo de David, ten piedad de mí”. La frase era una frase políticamente cargada que habría atraído la atención no deseada de las autoridades porque el término “Hijo de David” se refiere al Mashiach ( Mesías) o “el ungido” o “El Cristo”. El mismo llamado a Mashiach es una confesión de que los tiempos difíciles están sobre el pueblo judío y que la gente está hambrienta de paz y justicia. Las expresiones públicas de Mashiach serían consideradas subversivas porque se supone que el Mashiach debe generar libertad política y renovación espiritual para el pueblo judío. Un poderoso símbolo de la Resistencia, Mashiach brinda esperanza a aquellos que anhelan librar a Jerusalén del dominio extranjero y el Masiach establecerá la sede del poder mundial en Israel, no en Roma.
La insistencia del ciego en gritar: “Hijo de David, ten piedad de mí”, fue también un desafío para Jesús y los discípulos. Cuando estos discípulos rodearon la periferia de Jericó como los hombres de Josué, ¿Jesús (a quien el hombre ciego declaró como Mashiach) inauguraría una nueva era (Olam Ha-Ba)? El Olam Ha-Ba fue la antítesis completa de la pesadilla dictatorial del Imperio. Olam Ha-Ba es una época de coexistencia pacífica de todas las personas, un tiempo libre de intolerancia y odio y guerra dejaría de existir. El planeta y todos los sistemas sociales no dependerían de un sistema de depredación que exija la muerte de los miembros débiles y vulnerables de la sociedad para que los fuertes sobrevivan. Olam Ha-Ba devuelve a los exiliados a sus hogares y restablece la ley del Jubileo (justicia económica para los pobres). A diferencia del Imperio que insiste en la adoración de César, Olam Ha-Ba reconoce a Dios solo y al judaísmo como la única religión verdadera. Por último, Olam Ha-Ba elimina la necesidad de ofrendas de sangre expiatoria en el Templo y, por lo tanto, solo se necesitarían ofrendas de acción de gracias.
Las autoridades, al oír los gritos del hombre, muy probablemente tendrían curiosidad por descubrir la identidad del hombre a quien el ciego se dirigió como Mashiach porque el Imperio y sus sustitutos no querían hablar de Olam Ha-Ba o el Mashiach que venía a cambiar su estilo de vida cómodo. Olam Ha-Ba es, de hecho, la destrucción completa del antiguo orden y el consiguiente nacimiento de un nuevo orden. Los muros de Jericó debían volver a bajar. El tiempo para enfrentar el Imperio; sin embargo, no fue en ese momento.
Jericho en muchos sentidos fue un buen ejemplo de la apropiación del judaísmo por parte del Imperio. Esta puede haber sido la razón por la cual los discípulos intentaron reprender al hombre para que se callara. (Mc 10:48). El ciego que era conocido solo en referencia a su padre, Timeo, creía en la llegada de Mashiach. El hombre sentado en la periferia de Jericó rogando era demasiado pobre para entrar en la ciudad, estaba esperando un cambio real en su vida. Jesús reconoció que el antiguo orden que resultó en la marginación del hombre ciego debía terminar … pero la forma en que iba a ocurrir el cambio no fue a través de un solo acto del Mashiach, sino a través del trabajo colectivo de una comunidad de personas. Quienes caminan por la periferia de la comunidad recogiendo a los perdidos, abandonados y olvidados. Así Jesús se detuvo y dijo: “Llámalo”.
Los discípulos animaron al hombre a levantarse e ir a Jesús como el Cristo. El hombre entendió que todo el sistema que creó a Jericó como palacio de invierno de la aristocracia tuvo que derrumbarse. Sabía que los muros de Jericó estaban construidos con ladrillos y mortero de exclusión sistémica de personas pobres y marginadas. Estas paredes tuvieron que derrumbarse antes de que la gente tocara en su shovarot una canción de Resistencia y libertad. Jesús como el Cristo le preguntó al hombre: “¿Qué quieres que haga por ti?” El hombre podría haber respondido: “¡Derribar el maldito muro!” Pero no lo hizo. El hombre quería ver.
Recuerda la Torá, Dt 11:27, “Mira, hoy presento ante ti una bendición y una maldición: Habrá bendición si obedeces los mandamientos del SEÑOR tu Dios que te estoy dando hoy, pero una maldición si no obedezcas los mandamientos del SEÑOR tu Dios y desvíate del camino que te mando hoy al seguir a otros dioses que no conoces …” En el judaísmo, “vista” no es simplemente la capacidad de ver, sino más bien, tener visión. La vista no se trata de cuidar las propias preocupaciones y necesidades. La vista, como todas las cosas, debe servir a Dios, y cuando el ciego pidió la vista, no estaba pidiendo solo la vista física. Estaba pidiendo el auto-empoderamiento, es decir, la capacidad de ver por sí mismo y decidir libremente participar en el desmantelamiento de los muros de Jericó. Al elegir seguir a Jesús (c.f., “… Inmediatamente recibió la vista y siguió a (Jesús) en el camino”. Mc10: 52), el hombre reclamó su lugar en la Resistencia. Tocará el shofar de Libertad y Justicia y, como Josué, entrará a Jerusalén con Jesús como el Cristo.
En una época de demagogia política y nacionalismo blanco disfrazado de patriotismo, podríamos sentirnos tentados a alejarnos del dolor de quienes viven en la periferia de Jericó. ¿Seremos valientes y estaremos llenos de la fe del ciego, el hijo de Timeo? ¿Veremos realmente el trabajo que hay que hacer? ¿Estaremos dispuestos a caminar a lo largo de los márgenes de Jericó y hablar con los excluidos y expulsados ​​de la ciudad? ¿Soplaremos el shovarot veremos cómo se derrumban los muros de la injusticia?
Family Separation
Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:
Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen: * ** Families Belong Together (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=93b9b69a1a&e=105d556a20) * ** CAIR (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=861ea55df1&e=105d556a20) * ** MoveOn (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=8f2c0aaf33&e=105d556a20) * ** CredoAction (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=59b89de008&e=105d556a20)
JEANS FOR THE J