Blog

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Repentance and Growth

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

March 21, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD THIS SUNDAY
Sunday, March 24
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

MISA SOLIDARIDAD ESTE DOMINGO
La proxima misa solidaridad sera
Domingo 24 de marzo
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The first training session for the new Catholic Charities ministry of service navigation with accompaniment was held at Our Lady of Refuge. Pope Francis wrote, “The Church will have to initiate everyone—priests, religious and laity—into this “art of accompaniment” which teaches us to remove our sandals before the sacred ground of the other (cf. Ex 3:5). The pace of this accompaniment must be steady and reassuring, reflecting our closeness and our compassionate gaze which also heals, liberates and encourages growth in the Christian life.

Reflection on the Gospel:
Repentance and Growth

This Sunday’s Gospel is taken from Lk 13: 1-9 (the call to repentance and the parable of the fig tree). In the context of Lent, our penitential season, the pairing of verses 1-5 and 6-9, would seem to suggest the urgency for the need to repent of our sins. Lk 13:1-5 ends with the ominous warning, “….if you do not repent, you will perish as they did.”  And the parable in Lk 12:6-9 ends with a gentler warning, “‘…leave it (the fig tree) for this year also, and I shall cultivate the ground around it and fertilize it; it may bear fruit in the future. If not you can cut it down.’” This week’s reflection will take a closer look at these verses separately, then together, so that we might better understand the evangelist’s intent of pairing these verses.

Luke’s audience was not unfamiliar with the harsh treatment of the Galileans who suffered greatly under the Empire. (Lk 13:1, “At that time some people who were present there told him (Jesus) about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with the blood of their sacrifices.”) The specific historical reference is not verified by secondary sources; thus, we might suspect that the evangelist included this detail to illustrate the cruelty of the Empire over the region that was historically the organizing center of the Jewish Resistance. The evangelist recorded Jesus as comparing their deaths with the more recent deaths of people who were killed by a tragic accident at Siloam. The evangelist underscored the teaching that death is simply death and not a “punishment.” People merely die: by the hand of the unjust Empire that sought to stifle the voices of those who resisted or in a construction site accident. Was Jesus making the point about repentance (the urgency to resolve sinfulness before death) or was he on to something else?

Lk 13:1-5 must be read and interpreted within the broader narrative framework of Luke’s gospel. We Christians seem to latch on to the framework of sin…but was this passage was not originally written about sin.   Let us contextualize this passage within the narrative that Luke set out. In Lk 11, Jesus preached the “Sermon on the Plain” concluding the sermon with a severe critique of those who enjoyed the privileges of the Empire.  Luke appeared to have set up chapters 11-13 as a kind of catechesis/commentary with the intent to deepen his audience’s understanding of the Jesus’ teachings. Luke wove parables and sayings together as a part of the narrative that preceded Jesus’ journey to Jerusalem where he would confront the Empire, be arrested, tortured, publicly humiliated, crucified and buried.

The weight of literary context, therefore, compels us to be read Lk 13:1-5 within the framework of unpacking the powerful and antagonistic “Sermon on the Plain” rather than reducing the passage to a mere warning, “Get you life together!” Traditional interpreters would probably push back against  the literary approach citing the specific mention of “repentance, “…if you do not repent, you will all perish as they did!” But their argument cannot be sustained if we consider what “repentance” meant at the time of Luke’s writing, c. 85 CE.

After the destruction of the Temple, Jews could no longer offer sacrifices at the Temple (for the atonement of sin because there was no Temple!) Around the time when Luke composed his gospel, Jewish oral teaching from the Pharisaic/Galilean tradition emphasized that doing justice and studying the Torah were more pleasing to God than blood sacrifices; thus, even though the Temple was destroyed, the mechanism for forgiveness and grace transferred from animal blood sacrifices to personal repentance, or teshuva. Teshuva was not a personal confession as Catholics and Anglicans would do in the sacrament of penance, but rather a courageous act of Resistance, a confession of faith, not a confession of sin. The organization of Luke’s gospel, suggests that Gentiles needed some orientation around fundamental concepts of repentance/teshuva and making a commitment to follow Christ, even to the point of being crucified themselves.

Conditioned by “Catholic guilt” and a generalized fear of judgement, some Christians might read the parable of the fig tree in Lk 13:6-9 in trepidation. The parable’s claim is dependent on the disposition of the individual. For Christians who are still tied to the Church, the threat to cut down the unproductive fig tree might trigger an urgent conversion.  For Christians who have long since left the Church, the parable might be met with detached bemusement. Others my try to understand the parable from a practical point of view and would struggle to understand why the gardener would defend an unproductive fruit tree.  Let us take a moment and return to the possible origins of parable.

Fig trees, as it turns out, are indigenous to the area occupied by the Jewish people. Fig trees produce fruit at different times of the year and the fruit has different names that correspond to the season in which the fruit is ripened. Figs were used as dessert and as medicinal remedies. The fig tree was also associated with the vine as an emblem of peace and prosperity. In Psalm 33 the destruction of the fig tree was seen as  a punishment from God.  Jewish contemporaries of Luke would have been familiar with a story from the Midrash (an ancient Jewish commentary on the Torah) of an old man who planted a fig tree.  The man was asked if he expected to live long enough to enjoy the figs — that is, the fruit of his labor. The man replied that he was planting it for his children. The midrash story focused on a hopeful future and perhaps a Jewish reading of Luke’s parable might suggest a more positive outcome: that the gardener took on the role of the prophets who sought to cultivate and fertilize the ground around the tree. If Luke’s gospel served as a primer to give Gentiles an insight into the Jewish dimension of Jesus, might it be possible that the parable is not simply a one-dimensional story about the fear of impending judgement, but rather, a hopeful future harvest. 

The English translation of, “Lent” comes from the old English, “lencten” meaning, “springtime.” Lent is the time for the cultivation and fertilization of the soil. May this Lent be a time in which our roots are cultivated by Word and fertilized by the Sacrament that we might be ready to take up our cross — that is, accept the challenge to defy the Empire and thereby follow Jesus to Jerusalem and enjoy the fruit of  Eternal Life.

Prayers and Thoughts of Repentance from Three Traditions:

Muslim, Jewish and Hindu

Muslim

Returning to Allah and seeking his forgiveness whenever a slave commits a sin, is one of the most beloved forms of worship. Repentance has a status in Islam that no other act of worship has. Almighty Allah says:

“Indeed, Allah loves those who are constantly repentant and loves those who purify themselves.” (Al-Baqarah 2:222)

Anas (may Allah be pleased with him) narrated that the Messenger of Allah (peace be upon him) said, “All the sons of Adam are sinners, but the best of sinners are those who repent often.” (At-Tirmidhi and Ibn Majah)

Hindu

Forgiveness is virtue; forgiveness is sacrifice, forgiveness is the Vedas, forgiveness is the Shruti [revealed scripture]. He that knoweth this is capable of forgiving everything.

Forgiveness is Brahma [God]; forgiveness is truth; forgiveness is stored ascetic merit; forgiveness protecteth the ascetic merit of the future; forgiveness is asceticism; forgiveness is holiness; and by forgiveness is it that the universe is held together.

Jewish

The Hebrew term teshuvah (lit. “return”) is used to refer to “repentance”. This implies that transgression and sin are the natural and inevitable consequence of man’s straying from God and His laws, and that it is man’s destiny and duty to be with God.

Deut 30:1 When all these things befall you—the blessing and the curse that I have set before you—you will take them (והשבת) to heart amidst the various nations to which the LORD your God has banished you; 30:2 you will return (ושבת) to the LORD your God and heed His voice, according to all that I command you today, you and your children, with all your heart and soul; 30:3 the LORD will restore (ושב) you and take you back; and He will bring you together again (ושב) from all the peoples where the LORD your God has scattered you.

Weekly Intercessions

Last week as the Communique went out, we heard the unbelievable news that a gunman shot and killed 50 people in New Zealand while they were at prayer. The victims were mostly immigrants and refugees fleeing the violence of the birth lands at had resettled in one of the most peaceful countries of the world.  The attacker was identified as a part of the so-called “white supremacist” movement that has as its aim to protect “white” European social and political hegemony by any means necessary — including the use of violence. The massacre in New Zealand targeted Muslim refugees in a mosque while they were at prayer. The shooter left a “manifesto” that shown his hatred of non-whites, Jews, Muslims and immigrants and it underscored the unifying theme of white supremacists throughout the world: the fear that they will soon be outnumbered and subjugated to a non-white majority. The shooter also named Donald Trump as a model for white power.

White supremacy is not a new thing. Psychological research shows the power of social influence: behavior of others can make people become amoral, vengeful, and more violent. Research shows that people in authority have the power to influence opinion and action. Having said that, we cannot place the full blame on Trump. White supremacy has deep roots in Europe and the areas it colonized. American white supremacy can be traced to the East Coast European colonies, the South and the Spanish missions in the West. A new essay in the Atlantic by Adam Serwer wrote about Madison Grant who wore a book arguing that the “Nordic race” built America and that America was in danger of extinction unless immigration was severely curtailed, especially the immigration of Jews. In 1916 a young Adolf Hitler praised the book as his “bible.” The resurgence of white supremacy in this country began during the Obama administration and literally exploded under the Trump administration. The Southern Poverty Law Center provides ample data on the rise of racist groups since the 2016 elections. Political scientists note that the resurgence of these groups is not limited to our country.  Other countries are seeing the rise of white supremacist politicians who use “folksy” language wrapped in national pride.  Let us pray for the Muslim community in New Zealand who are still grieving and for Muslims living in hostile societies. That those who grieve are comforted and that a spirit of love and support drive out hatred.

Intercesiónes semanales

La semana pasada, cuando salió el Communique, escuchamos la increíble noticia de que un hombre armado disparó y mató a 50 personas en Nueva Zelanda mientras estaban en oración. Las víctimas eran en su mayoría inmigrantes y los refugiados que huían de la violencia de las tierras de nacimiento habían sido reasentados en uno de los países más pacíficos del mundo. El atacante fue identificado como parte del llamado movimiento “supremacista blanco” que tiene como objetivo proteger la hegemonía social y política europea “blanca” por cualquier medio necesario, incluido el uso de la violencia. La masacre en Nueva Zelanda apuntó a refugiados musulmanes en una mezquita mientras estaban en oración. El asesino dejó un “manifiesto” que mostraba su odio a los no blancos, judíos, musulmanes e inmigrantes y subrayó el tema unificador de los supremacistas blancos en todo el mundo: el temor de que pronto serán superados en número y subyugados a una mayoría no blanca. El asesino también nombró a Donald Trump como un modelo para el “poder blanco”. La supremacía blanca no es algo nuevo. Investigación psicológicas muestran el poder de la influencia social: el comportamiento de los demás puede hacer que las personas se vuelvan amorales, vengativas y más violentas. Las investigaciónes muestran que las personas con autoridad tienen el poder de influir en la opinión y la acción. Dicho esto, no podemos echarle toda la culpa a Trump. La “supremacía blanca” tiene profundas raíces en Europa y las áreas que colonizó. La supremacía blanca estadounidense se remonta a las colonias europeas de la costa este, el sur y las misiones españolas en el oeste. Un nuevo ensayo en el Atlántico, escrito por Adam Serwer, escribió sobre Madison Grant, quien lucía un libro en el que sostenía que la “raza nórdica” construyó a Estados Unidos y que Estados Unidos estaba en peligro de extinción a menos que se restringiera la inmigración, especialmente la inmigración de judíos. En 1916, un joven Adolf Hitler elogió el libro como su “biblia”. El resurgimiento de la supremacía blanca en este país comenzó durante la administración de Obama y literalmente explotó bajo la administración de Trump. El Southern Poverty Law Center proporciona amplios datos sobre el aumento de grupos racistas desde las elecciones de 2016. Los científicos políticos señalan que el resurgimiento de estos grupos no se limita a nuestro país. Otros países están viendo el surgimiento de políticos supremacistas blancos que usan lenguaje corriente envuelto en orgullo nacional. Oremos por la comunidad musulmana en Nueva Zelanda que todavía sufre y por los musulmanes que viven en sociedades hostiles. Que aquellos que lloran sean consolados y que un espíritu de amor y apoyo eche fuera el odio.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 

Arrepentimiento y Crecimiento Espiritual

El Evangelio de este domingo está tomado de Lc 13: 1-9 (el llamado al arrepentimiento y la parábola de la higuera). En el contexto de la Cuaresma, nuestra temporada penitencial, la combinación de los versículos 1-5 y 6-9, parece sugerir la urgencia de la necesidad de arrepentirse de nuestros pecados. Lc 13: 1-5 termina con la advertencia ominosa, “… si no te arrepientes, perecerás como ellos lo hicieron”. Y la parábola en Lc 12: 6-9 termina con una advertencia más suave, “‘… déjalo (la higuera) para este año también, y cultivaré el suelo a su alrededor y lo fertilizaré; Puede dar frutos en el futuro. Si no puede reducirlo “. La reflexión de esta semana analizará estos versículos más detenidamente por separado y luego de manera conjunta, para que podamos comprender mejor la intención del evangelista de combinar estos versículos.

La audiencia de Lucas no estaba familiarizada con el duro trato de los galileos que sufrieron mucho bajo el Imperio. (Lc 13: 1, “En ese momento algunas personas que estaban presentes le contaron (a Jesús) sobre los galileos cuya sangre Pilato se había mezclado con la sangre de sus sacrificios”). La referencia histórica específica no está verificada por fuentes secundarias; por lo tanto, podríamos sospechar que el evangelista incluyó este detalle para ilustrar la crueldad del Imperio sobre la región que históricamente fue el centro organizador de la Resistencia judía. El evangelista registró a Jesús comparando sus muertes con las muertes más recientes de personas que murieron por un trágico accidente en Siloé. El evangelista subrayó la enseñanza de que la muerte es simplemente la muerte y no un “castigo”. La gente simplemente muere: de la mano del imperio injusto que buscaba sofocar las voces de quienes se resistieron o en un accidente en una obra de construcción. ¿Estaba Jesús enfatizando el tema del arrepentimiento (la urgencia de resolver el pecado antes de la muerte) o estaba en otra cosa?

Lc 13: 1-5 debe leerse e interpretarse dentro del marco narrativo más amplio del evangelio de Lucas. Los cristianos parecemos aferrarnos al marco del pecado … pero este pasaje no se escribió originalmente sobre el pecado. Contextualicemos este pasaje dentro de la narrativa que Lucas expuso. En Lc 11, Jesús predicó las Bienaventuranzas y concluyó el sermón con una severa crítica de quienes disfrutaron de los privilegios del Imperio. Lucas parecía haber establecido los capítulos 11-13 como una especie de catequesis / comentario con la intención de profundizar la comprensión de su audiencia sobre las enseñanzas de Jesús. Lucas tejió parábolas y dichos juntos como parte de la narrativa que precedió al viaje de Jesús a Jerusalén, donde se enfrentaría al Imperio, sería arrestado, torturado, humillado públicamente, crucificado y enterrado.

El peso del contexto literario, por lo tanto, nos obliga a leer Lc 13: 1-5 en el marco de desempaquetar el poderoso y antagónico las Bienaventuranzas en lugar de reducir el pasaje a una mera advertencia: “¡Reúnanse la vida juntos”!  Los intérpretes tradicionales probablemente rechazarían el enfoque literario citando la mención específica de “arrepentimiento”, “si no te arrepientes, todos perecerán como lo hicieron ellos”. Pero su argumento no puede sostenerse si consideramos lo que significa “arrepentimiento” en el momento de la escritura de Lucas, c. 85 CE.

Después de la destrucción del Templo, los judíos ya no podían ofrecer sacrificios en el Templo (¡por la expiación del pecado porque no había Templo!) En la época en que Lucas compuso su evangelio, las enseñanzas orales judías de la tradición fariseo / galileo enfatizaron que hacer la justicia y el estudio de la Torá eran más agradables a Dios que los sacrificios de sangre; así, aunque el Templo fue destruido, el mecanismo para el perdón y la gracia se transfirió de los sacrificios de sangre animal al arrepentimiento personal, o teshuvá. Teshuvá no fue una confesión personal, sino un acto valiente de Resistencia, una confesión de fe, no una confesión de pecado personal como Católicos hacen en el sacramento de penitencia. La organización del evangelio de Lucas sugiere que los gentiles necesitaban cierta orientación en torno a los conceptos fundamentales del arrepentimiento / teshuvá y de comprometerse a seguir a Cristo, incluso hasta el punto de ser crucificados ellos mismos.

Condicionados por la “culpa católica” y un temor generalizado al juicio, algunos cristianos pueden leer la parábola de la higuera en Lc 13: 6-9 en su trepidación. El reclamo de la parábola depende de la disposición del individuo. Para los cristianos que todavía están atados a la Iglesia, la amenaza de cortar la higuera improductiva podría provocar una conversión urgente. Para los cristianos que desde hace mucho tiempo han abandonado la Iglesia, la parábola podría encontrarse con un desconcierto desconsolado. Otros intentan entender la parábola desde un punto de vista práctico y tendrían dificultades para entender por qué el jardinero defendería un árbol frutal improductivo. Tomemos un momento y volvamos a los posibles orígenes de la parábola.

Las higueras, como resulta ser, son indígenas al área ocupada por el pueblo judío. Las higueras producen frutos en diferentes épocas del año y la fruta tiene diferentes nombres que corresponden a la estación en la que se madura la fruta. Los higos fueron utilizados como postre y cómo remedios medicinales. La higuera también se asoció con la vid como un símbolo de paz y prosperidad. En el Salmo 33 (32), la destrucción de la higuera fue vista como un castigo de Dios. Los contemporáneos judíos de Lucas habrían estado familiarizados con una historia del Midrash (un antiguo comentario judío sobre la Torá) de un anciano que plantó una higuera. Se le preguntó al hombre si esperaba vivir lo suficiente para disfrutar de los higos, es decir, el fruto de su labor. El hombre respondió que lo estaba plantando para sus hijos. La historia de Midrash se centró en un futuro esperanzador y quizás una lectura judía de la parábola de Lucas podría sugerir un resultado más positivo: que el jardinero asumió el papel de los profetas que trataron de cultivar y fertilizar el suelo alrededor del árbol. Si el evangelio de Lucas sirvió como una enseñanza para dar a los gentiles una idea de la dimensión judía de Jesús, ¿podría ser posible que la parábola no sea simplemente una historia unidimensional sobre el temor al juicio inminente, sino más bien, una futura cosecha esperanzadora?

La traducción al inglés de “Cuaresma” proviene del inglés antiguo, que significa “lencten”, o sea, “primavera”. La Cuaresma es el momento del cultivo y la fertilización del “tierra”. Que esta Cuaresma sea un tiempo en el que nuestras raíces sean cultivadas por la Palabra y fertilizadas por el Sacramento para que podamos estar listos para tomar nuestra cruz, es decir, aceptar el desafío de desafiar al Imperio y, por lo tanto, seguir a Jesús a Jerusalén y disfrutar del fruto de la vida eterna.

 

Oraciones y pensamientos de arrepentimiento
de tres tradiciones:
musulmán, judío e hindú

 

Musulmán

Volver a Alá y buscar su perdón cada vez que un esclavo comete un pecado, es una de las formas de adoración más amadas. El arrepentimiento tiene un estatus en el Islam que ningún otro acto de adoración tiene. Todopoderoso Alá dice:

“De hecho, Alá ama a los que se arrepienten constantemente y ama a los que se purifican”. (Al-Baqarah 2: 222)

Anas (que Allah esté complacido con él) narró que el Mensajero de Allah (la paz sea con él) dijo: “Todos los hijos de Adán son pecadores, pero los mejores de los pecadores son los que se arrepienten con frecuencia”. (At-Tirmidhi e Ibn Majah)

Hindú

El perdón es virtud; el perdón es sacrificio, el perdón es el Vedas, el perdón es el Shruti [escritura revelada]. El que sabe esto es capaz de perdonar todo.

El perdón es Brahma [Dios]; el perdón es verdad El perdón se acumula mérito ascético; el perdón protege el mérito ascético del futuro; el perdón es ascetismo; el perdón es santidad; y por el perdón es que el universo se mantiene unido.

Judío

El término hebreo teshuvá (lit. “retorno”) se usa para referirse al “arrepentimiento”. Esto implica que la transgresión y el pecado son la consecuencia natural e inevitable de que el hombre se aleje de Dios y sus leyes, y que el destino y el deber del hombre es estar con Dios.

Deut 30: 1 Cuando todas estas cosas te ocurran, la bendición y la maldición que he puesto delante de ti, las llevarás (והשבת) a corazón en medio de las diversas naciones a las que el SEÑOR tu Dios te ha desterrado; 30: 2 regresarás (ושבת) al SEÑOR tu Dios y escucharás su voz, conforme a todo lo que te mando hoy, tú y tus hijos, con todo tu corazón y alma; 30: 3 el SEÑOR te restaurará (ושב) y te devolverá; y Él te volverá a reunir (ושב) de todos los pueblos donde el SEÑOR tu Dios te ha dispersado.

 

REHEARSAL FOR GOOD FRIDAY 

We will be participating in a public action on Good Friday to express solidarity with our brothers and sisters who are applying for asylum at the US-Mexico Border and families separated by deportation and detention. 
 
Our first rehearsal for Good Friday will be this Sunday after mass. Join us!

 

ENSAYO DE VIERNES SANTO

Estaremos participando en una acción pública el Viernes Santo para expresar nuestra solidaridad con nuestros hermanos y hermanas que están solicitando asilo en la frontera de EE. UU. y México y las familias separadas por deportación y detención.
 
Nuestro primer ensayo para el Viernes Santo será este domingo después de la misa. ¡Únase a nosotros!

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

PROYECTO DE COMPROMISO PARROQUIAL PARA LAS CARIDADES CATÓLICAS: NAVEGACIÓN Y ACOMPAÑAMIENTO DEL SERVICIO

Profundiza tu fe en un ministerio de servicio.
Vive el llamado del Papa Francisco para servir a los más necesitados
Enriquecimiento espiritual y ministerial.
Compromiso de cuatro horas al mes, incluyendo sesiones de enriquecimiento.
Crece más cerca de Cristo convirtiéndose en sus manos y pies en el mundo.

El ministerio es un programa de base de navegación de servicios sociales y de acompañamiento personal a los necesitados administrado por Caridades Católicas en colaboración con la parroquia para ayudar a aquellos que vienen a la parroquia a lograr un nivel de vida digno y autosuficiente en el que las personas puedan alcanzar metas personales mediante la creación de redes sociales solidarias y acceso a programas de servicios vitales.

Nuestra Señora de Refugio
Salón Parroquial
Martes 26 de marzo español
7 – 8:30 pm

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Transfiguration

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

March 15, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD THIS SUNDAY
Sunday, March 17
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

MISA SOLIDARIDAD ESTE DOMINGO
La proxima misa solidaridad sera
Domingo 17 de marzo
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Bishop Oscar Cantú spoke at the Catholic Immigrant Integration Initiative Conference hosted at Santa Clara University. There are millions of refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants throughout the world. Each society and country must do their part to address this situation. Building walls and incarcerating immigrants is not a solution.

Reflection on the Gospel: Transfiguration

The second theme of the Gospels on the Sunday Lenten cycle of readings is the Transfiguration of Jesus. This liturgical cycle we have Luke’s version. Like Matthew and Mark’s gospels, the sequence of the Transfiguration narrative in Luke follows after the prediction of the passion.  Because Mark, Matthew and Luke have different socio-historic locations, each gospel narrative has a few subtle differences.  Recall that Luke’s audience is historically and geographically removed from the politics and revolt of the Jewish Resistance that runs throughout Mark’s gospel and the theological nostalgia of Matthew’s.

As a whole, Luke’s gospel presents the narrative of Jesus-as-the Christ in the context of an audience that is only tangentially familiar with fundamental Jewish concepts of the Resistance and Luke had to orient his people little by little to understand the spiritual, historical, and theological roots of Jesus-as-the Christ. Thus we find Luke’s gospel contextualizing the Resistance elements of Jesus’ entanglement with the Empire within a Gentile framework.  Dr. Amy-Jill Levine, a leading Jewish scholar on the New Testament writes that Luke’s use of the passive voice in Lk 9:22 “subtly exonerates,” the Gentile actor, Pilate, who was ultimately responsible for Jesus’ death. The shift of blame from Pilate to the Jewish people shows that the further the narrative of Jesus-as-the Christ was displaced from the original context of the Jewish Resistance, the greater the emphasis on the “spiritualization” of those key historical events that led to the crucifixion.

Luke’s Transfiguration narrative, for example, recasts the reference of “eight days” (Lk 9:28) normally associated with elevating a male child as a part of God’s “Chosen Ones” through circumcision, to a subtle reference to the Resurrection. A Jewish study of the Transfiguration text would suggest that the meaning of “eight days” is a reference to setting one’s self apart for a special mission.  Luke’s Gentile audience, with very little experience or spiritual investment in the practice of circumcision and its meaning, would see Resurrection as the primary if not only reference. The Transfiguration narrative; however, is written within the context of the Passion, and thus, one cannot ignore the implications of taking up the cross (Lk 9:23) and preparing one’s self for a conflict between the kingdom of God and the Empire. Luke’s version retains the narrative arc of prediction of the passion (Lk 9:22), the conditions of discipleship (taking up the cross, Lk 9:23-27) and the Transfiguration itself.

Turning once again to the Transfiguration narrative, we note the appearance of Jesus’ face and clothing as “dazzling white” that might suggest, according to narratives in the Torah, a mystical experience that is not only personal, but outwardly seen by others.  This element is also found in Mark and Matthew’s narratives. All three gospels include  the figures of Moses and Elijah. (Lk 9: 30). Unlike Matthew and Mark’s audiences that would more easily see the reference to Torah and the Prophets, Luke’s audience, being removed from the Jewish community, would most likely have seen the Moses and Elijah as representing the heavenly elect. The Transfiguration in Luke might have been seen as a “preview” or “teaser” to the Resurrection. It would seem that the disciples wanted to hold on to the mystical moment.  “‘Master, it is good that we are here; let us make three tents, one for you, one for Moses, and one for Elijah.’” The evangelists recognized that this would most likely be  But he did not know what he was saying.” The voice from the cloud stated, “This is my chosen Son; listen to him.” (Lk 9:35)  God directly intervened at that point indicating that the disciples must pay attention to what Jesus-as-the Christ commands. The gospel selection ends with Jesus admonishing the disciples to keep the entire matter to themselves. Mark’s gospel ties the admonition to the literary theme, “The Messianic Secret” (a reference that the full identity of Jesus cannot be revealed until the crucifixion).  Luke’s audience, who were much more woven into the fabric of the Empire than Mark’s audience, would have seen the admonition to keep silent as a sign that the disciples were special witnesses who were chosen to witness the power of the Transfiguration. They would perhaps see the passage as a teaching suggesting that they too are a “chosen” people privileged to walk the way of the cross.

The distinct perspective of Luke is that Jesus did not command his disciples to remain silent, rather the disciples “fell silent.” Also interesting to note that in Luke the disciples entered the cloud whereas in Matthew and Mark, the cloud covered the disciples — which would be more consistent with a Jewish narrative in which God is the actor. That the disciples entered the cloud (Lk 9:34), would underscore Luke’s theme of “chosenness,” that is, being a chosen one. Why would that be important to Luke’s audience rather than to that of Mark and Matthew? The answer is obvious: the soci0-historic and political location of Luke’s audience. Luke’s audience is more concerned about how they as Gentiles navigate their faith as they live inside the Empire.  Mark’s poor and revolutionary audience and Matthew’s audience who were a mixed group of Jews who converted to Christianity and learned Gentiles who converted first to Judaism and then later to Christianity were more firmly rooted in communities of Resistance. Luke’s audience did not seem to be grounded in a systemic push back against the Empire, but rather concerned with presenting a spiritual, ethical and theological differentiation that would (hopefully) become an “inside voice of the Resistance” within the Empire.

The members of Luke’s audience were indeed the chosen ones who had become enlightened and awake (interiorly transfigured) and yet had to live their daily lives “down the mountain.”  Some members of our community are by dint of the color of their skin, status of their US citizenship, or their gender or sexual identity, marginalized by the Empire. Like the Roman Empire that treated the Jewish as non-persons, so too the American Empire under this present political climate, treats those who are “different” as non-persons of the Empire. Those who “pass” as full members of the Empire, like Luke’s community, were called out to “let their lights shine!” Like the Transfiguration, their faith had to be outwardly visible.  We who live among the thorns of the Empire must be willing to stand out by taking a stand.  We too must be willing to let our voices be heard and our actions be seen and felt.

Weekly Intercessions

This week another weather phenomena, a “bomb cyclone”  (technically, an “explosive cyclogenesis”) fell upon the center of the country. The bomb cyclone rammed through Colorado with hurricane-force winds and snow. The winds were so strong that they nearly stalled a jet over Colorado at 37,000 ft. As the cyclone continued on its path, it left heavy rains, floods and tornadoes in its wake affecting over 105 million people.  Climatologists say that the rare weather phenomena occurs when a sudden and severe drop in ground-level air pressure occurs. This drop in ground level air pressure was the most pronounced drop since 1950. Records show that violent weather phenomenon are happening at more frequent intervals that in the years’ past. In 2014 the Pentagon found that Climate change posed “immediate risks” to national security and will have broad and costly impacts on the way the US military carries out its missions. Then US Defense Secretary claimed that climate change was a “threat multiplier,” meaning that rising seas and increasing numbers of severe weather events would heighten the dangers of infections diseases to terrorism. Climate change affects weather patterns which in turn disrupt growing and harvesting seasons. When food sources are compromised, people have very little to eat and they move to another place. Today we see massive movements of people which in turn create social and political tensions. These tensions end in violence and populations fleeing for their lives. A study in the UK, “Climate, conflict and forced migration” shown the correlation between armed conflict, climate change, and political violence. It is therefore unconscionable that world leaders would ignore the environmental, agricultural, social and political implications caused by changing patterns in the weather. Let us pray for all people who are struggling with the effects of climate change and for elected leaders to take courageous steps toward addressing this problem.

AT THE TIME OF PUBLISHING THIS COMMUNIQUE, 49 MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN WERE GUNNED DOWN WHILE IN PRAYER AT TWO MOSQUES IN CHRISTCHURCH NEW ZEALAND BY A SELF-AVOWED ANTI-IMMIGRANT WHITE SUPREMACIST.   Let us pray for the souls of those who perished, their grieving families, and an end to the ideology of hate.

Intercesiónes semanales

Esta semana, otro fenómeno climático, una “bomba ciclón” (técnicamente, una “ciclogénesis explosiva”) cayó sobre el centro del país. La bomba del ciclón atravesó Colorado con vientos huracanados y nieve. Los vientos eran tan fuertes que casi detuvieron un jet sobre Colorado a 37,000 pies. Cuando el ciclón continuó su camino, dejó fuertes lluvias, inundaciones y tornados que afectaron a más de 105 millones de personas. Los climatólogos dicen que los fenómenos climáticos raros ocurren cuando ocurre una caída repentina y severa en la presión del aire a nivel del suelo. Esta caída en la presión del aire a nivel del suelo fue la caída más pronunciada desde 1950. Los registros muestran que el fenómeno del clima violento ocurre a intervalos más frecuentes que en el pasado. En 2014, el Pentagon descubrió que el cambio climático planteaba “riesgos inmediatos” para la seguridad nacional y que tendría un impacto amplio y costoso en la forma en que el ejército de los Estados Unidos lleva a cabo sus misiones. Luego, el Secretario de Defensa de los EE. UU. Afirmó que el cambio climático era un “multiplicador de amenazas”, lo que significa que el aumento de los mares y la creciente cantidad de fenómenos meteorológicos severos aumentarían los peligros de las enfermedades infecciosas para el terrorismo. El cambio climático afecta los patrones climáticos que a su vez interrumpen las estaciones de crecimiento y cosecha. Cuando las fuentes de alimentos se ven comprometidas, las personas tienen muy poco que comer y se salen a otro lugar. Hoy vemos movimientos masivos de personas que a su vez crean tensiones sociales y políticas. Estas tensiones terminan en violencia y las poblaciones huyen por sus vidas. Un estudio en el UK, “Clima, conflicto y migración forzada” mostró la correlación entre conflicto armado, cambio climático y violencia política. Por lo tanto, es inconcebible que los líderes mundiales ignoren las implicaciones ambientales, agrícolas, sociales y políticas causadas por los cambios en los patrones climáticos. Oremos por todas las personas que luchan contra los efectos del cambio climático y que los líderes electos tomen medidas valientes para abordar este problema.

AL MOMENTO DE PUBLICAR ESTE COMUNICADO, 49 HOMBRES, MUJERES Y NIÑOS FUERON BALEADO MIENTRAS EN ORACION EN DOS MEZQUITAS EN CHRISTCHURCH, NUEVA ZELANDA, POR UN SUPREMACISTA BLANCO ANTI-IMMIGRANTE. Oremos por las almas de los que perecieron, sus familias afligidas y el fin de la ideología del odio.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Transfiguración

El segundo tema de los evangelios sobre el ciclo de lecturas de la Cuaresma dominical es la Transfiguración de Jesús. En este ciclo litúrgico tenemos la versión de Lucas. Al igual que los evangelios de Mateo y Marcos, la secuencia de la narrativa de la Transfiguración en Lucas sigue la predicción de la pasión. Debido a que Marcos, Mateo y Lucas tienen diferentes ubicaciones socio-históricas, cada narración del evangelio tiene algunas diferencias sutiles. Recuerde que la audiencia de Lucas está alejada histórica y geográficamente de la política y la revuelta de la Resistencia judía que recorre todo el evangelio de Marcos y la nostalgia teológica de Mateo.

En general, el evangelio de Lucas presenta la narrativa de Jesús-como-el Cristo en el contexto de una audiencia que solo está familiarizada tangencialmente con los conceptos judíos fundamentales de la Resistencia, y Lucas tuvo que orientar a su gente poco a poco para comprender la espiritualidad, la historia histórica, y las raíces teológicas de Jesús- como-el Cristo. Por lo tanto, encontramos el evangelio de Lucas contextualizando los elementos de Resistencia del enredo de Jesús con el Imperio dentro de un marco gentil. La Dra. Amy-Jill Levine, una destacada erudita judía en el Nuevo Testamento, escribe que el uso de la voz pasiva de Lucas en Lc 9:22 “exime sutilmente”, el actor gentil, Pilato, quien fue el responsable final de la muerte de Jesús. El cambio de culpa de Pilato al pueblo judío muestra que cuanto más se desplaza la narrativa de Jesús- como-el Cristo del contexto original de la Resistencia judía, mayor es el énfasis en la “espiritualización” de esos eventos históricos clave que llevaron a a la crucifixión.

La narrativa de la Transfiguración de Lucas, por ejemplo, reformula la referencia de “ocho días” (Lc 9:28), normalmente asociada con la elevación de un hijo varón como parte de los “Elegidos” de Dios a través de la circuncisión, a una referencia sutil a la Resurrección. Un estudio judío del texto de la Transfiguración sugeriría que el significado de “ocho días” es una referencia a la separación de uno mismo para una misión especial. La audiencia gentil de Lucas, con muy poca experiencia o inversión espiritual en la práctica de la circuncisión y su significado, vería la Resurrección como la referencia principal, si no la única. La narrativa de la Transfiguración; sin embargo, está escrito dentro del contexto de la Pasión, y por lo tanto, uno no puede ignorar las implicaciones de tomar la cruz (Lc 9:23) y prepararse para un conflicto entre el reino de Dios y el Imperio. La versión de Lucas conserva el arco narrativo de la predicción de la pasión (Lc 9, 22), las condiciones del discipulado (tomar la cruz, Lc 9: 23-27) y la Transfiguración en sí.

Volviendo una vez más a la narrativa de la Transfiguración, notamos la apariencia del rostro y la ropa de Jesús como “blanco deslumbrante” que podría sugerir, de acuerdo con las narraciones en la Torá, una experiencia mística que no solo es personal, sino que también es vista por otros. Este elemento también se encuentra en las narraciones de Marcos y Mateo. Los tres evangelios incluyen las figuras de Moisés y Elías. (Lc 9: 30). A diferencia de las audiencias de Mateo y Marcos que verían más fácilmente la referencia a la Torá y los Profetas, la audiencia de Lucas, al ser removida de la comunidad judía, muy probablemente hubiera visto a Moisés y Elías como representantes de los elegidos celestiales. La Transfiguración en Lucas podría haber sido vista como una “vista previa” a la Resurrección. Parecería que los discípulos querían aferrarse al momento místico. “Maestro, es bueno que estemos aquí; hagamos tres carpas, una para ti, otra para Moisés y otra para Elías “. Los evangelistas reconocieron que esto sería muy probable: Pero no sabía lo que estaba diciendo”. La voz desde la nube decía: “Esto es mi Hijo elegido; escúchenlo.(Lc 9:35) Dios intervino directamente en ese punto, indicando que los discípulos deben prestar atención a lo que Jesús-como-el Cristo manda. La selección del evangelio termina con Jesús amonestando a los discípulos para que se reserven todo el asunto. El evangelio de Marcos relaciona la admonición con el tema literario, “El secreto mesiánico” (una referencia que la identidad completa de Jesús no puede revelarse hasta la crucifixión). La audiencia de Lucas, que estaba mucho más entretejida en el tejido del Imperio que la audiencia de Marcos, habría visto la advertencia de guardar silencio como una señal de que los discípulos eran testigos especiales que fueron elegidos para presenciar el poder de la Transfiguración. Quizás vean el pasaje como una enseñanza que sugiere que ellos también son personas “elegidas” que tienen el privilegio de caminar por el camino de la cruz.

La perspectiva distinta de Lucas es que Jesús no ordenó a sus discípulos que permanecieran en silencio, sino que los discípulos “se quedaron en silencio”. También es interesante notar que en Lucas los discípulos entraron en la nube mientras que en Mateo y Marcos, la nube cubrió a los discípulos, lo cual sería más consistente con una narrativa judía en la que Dios es el actor. Que los discípulos entraran en la nube (Lc 9, 34), subrayaría el tema de “elección” de Lucas, es decir, ser elegido. ¿Por qué sería eso importante para la audiencia de Lucas más que para Marcos y Mateo? La respuesta es obvia: la ubicación socio-histórica y política de la audiencia de Lucas. La audiencia de Lucas está más preocupada por la forma en que los gentiles navegan su fe mientras viven dentro del Imperio. La audiencia pobre y revolucionaria de Marcos y la audiencia de Mateo que eran un grupo mixto de judíos que se convirtieron al cristianismo y aprendieron que los gentiles que se convirtieron primero al judaísmo y luego al cristianismo estaban más firmemente enraizados en las comunidades de Resistencia. La audiencia de Lucas no parecía estar basada en un retroceso sistemático contra el Imperio, sino más bien en presentar una diferenciación espiritual, ética y teológica que (con suerte) se convertiría en una “voz interna de la Resistencia” dentro del Imperio.

Los miembros de la audiencia de Lucas fueron, de hecho, los elegidos que se iluminaron y despertaron (se transfiguraron interiormente) y, sin embargo, tuvieron que vivir su vida cotidiana “en la montaña”. Algunos miembros de nuestra comunidad se encuentran a fuerza del color de su piel de su ciudadanía estadounidense, o su género o identidad sexual, marginados por el Imperio. Al igual que el Imperio Romano que trató a los judíos como no personas, también el Imperio Americano en este clima político actual, trata a aquellos que son “diferentes” como no personas del Imperio. Aquellos que “pasaron” como miembros de pleno derecho del Imperio, como la comunidad de Lucas, fueron llamados a “dejar que sus luces brillaran”. Al igual que la Transfiguración, su fe tenía que ser visible desde el exterior. Nosotros, los que vivimos entre las espinas del Imperio, debemos estar dispuestos a sobresalir tomando una posición. Nosotros también debemos estar dispuestos a dejar que nuestras voces sean escuchadas y nuestras acciones sean vistas y sentidas.

HOPE VILLAGE NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT!

On Monday, March 18th from 7:00 to 9:00 pm at the Gardner Community Center (520 W. Virginia Street), there will be a public meeting to receive input on the moving of San Jose Hope Village to a lot at the corner of Willow St. and Lelong St. The meeting is being sponsored by Council member Dev Davis and the City of San Jose Housing Department.
THIS MEETING IS UNFORTUNATELY ALREADY FULL. AN OVERFLOW MEETING IS PLANNED FOR WEDNESDAY, THE 20TH AT 7  PM.  A CLERGY LED ACTION WILL BE ANNOUNCED IN SUPPORT OF HOPE VILLAGE. CHECK YOUR TEXT AND EMAIL ALERTS FOR THE TIME AND PLACE.

PLANNING COMMITTEE
FOR GOOD FRIDAY ACTION

We will be participating in a public action on Good Friday to express solidarity with our brothers and sisters who are applying for asylum at the US-Mexico Border and families separated by deportation and detention. 
 
We need people interested in planning this action: contact Judi Sanchez or Jesus Montoya to be included in the planning committee.

MEETING TONIGHT FRIDAY 3/15 at 6 PM
at the LUNA office located at 1692 Story Rd. Suite 225.

 

COMITE DE PLANEAR
LA ACCION DE VIERNES SANTO

Estaremos participando en una acción pública el Viernes Santo para expresar nuestra solidaridad con nuestros hermanos y hermanas que están solicitando asilo en la frontera de EE. UU. y México y las familias separadas por deportación y detención.
 
Necesitamos personas interesadas en planificar esta acción: comuníquese con Judi Sanchez o Jesus Montoya para ser incluido en el comité de planificación.

JUNTA ESTA TARDE EL VIERNES 15 de MARZO a las 6 PM
en la oficina de LUNA ubicada en 1692 Story Rd. Suite 225.

Join PACT on Tuesday, March 19, for a dialogue and action with police chiefs and the county sheriff to unpack Senate Bill 1421 and push for stronger police accountability. Register here.

Únase a PACT el martes 19 de marzo para un diálogo y acción con los jefes de policía y el alguacil del condado para desempaquetar el Proyecto de Ley Senatorial 1421 y presionar por una mayor responsabilidad de la policía. Regístrese aquí.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

ACCOMPANIMENT TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION AND ACCOMPANIMENT

Deepen your faith in a ministry of service
Live Pope Francis’ call to serve those most in need
Spiritual and ministry enrichment
Four hour commitment a month, including  enrichment sessions
Grow closer to Christ by becoming his hands and feet in the world

The ministry is a community-based accompaniment and volunteer service navigation program managed by Catholic Charities in cooperation with the parish to help those who come to the parish achieve a dignified, self-sustaining level of living in which people can realize personal goals through, creating supportive social networks and accessing vital service programs.

Tuesday March 19 English
OUR LADY OF REFUGE PARISH HALL
7 – 8:30 pm

 

PROYECTO DE COMPROMISO PARROQUIAL PARA LAS CARIDADES CATÓLICAS: NAVEGACIÓN Y ACOMPAÑAMIENTO DEL SERVICIO

Profundiza tu fe en un ministerio de servicio.
Vive el llamado del Papa Francisco para servir a los más necesitados
Enriquecimiento espiritual y ministerial.
Compromiso de cuatro horas al mes, incluyendo sesiones de enriquecimiento.
Crece más cerca de Cristo convirtiéndose en sus manos y pies en el mundo.

El ministerio es un programa de base de navegación de servicios sociales y de acompañamiento personal a los necesitados administrado por Caridades Católicas en colaboración con la parroquia para ayudar a aquellos que vienen a la parroquia a lograr un nivel de vida digno y autosuficiente en el que las personas puedan alcanzar metas personales mediante la creación de redes sociales solidarias y acceso a programas de servicios vitales.

Nuestra Señora de Refugio
Salón Parroquial
Martes 26 de marzo español
7 – 8:30 pm

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Temptations and Perserverance

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

March 8, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD THIS SUNDAY
Sunday, March 10
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

MISA SOLIDARIDAD ESTE DOMINGO
La proxima misa solidaridad sera
Domingo 10 de marzo
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
On Monday, March 18th from 7:00 to 9:00 pm at the Gardner Community Center (520 W. Virginia Street), there will be a public meeting to receive input on the moving of San Jose Hope Village to a lot at the corner of Wil- low St. and Lelong St. The meeting is being sponsored by Council member Dev Davis and the City of San Jose Housing Department.
It is important that we have a large number of people in support of this, as these meetings can become hostile due to people opposed to any services for housing and the homeless.

Reflection on the Gospel: Temptations and Perserverence
The first of the Sunday Lenten cycle of readings is always situated with Jesus tempted in the desert. The evangelist Luke frames the temptation episode with the Holy Spirit, “Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, returned from the Jordan and was led by the Spirit in the wilderness.” (Lk 4:1). At the time of Jesus’ initial ministry (circa 30 CE), Judaism was undergoing developments: synagogues and Pharisees began to rise in prominence and the Jewish resistance was gathering steam. There were also developments in mysticism: the nascent belief in the power of the indwelling of the Holy Spirit. Textual evidence in the early influence of this belief is found in the concluding verses of Chapter 3, the Holy Spirit descended upon Jesus, “…the holy Spirit descendedupon him in bodily form like a dove. And a voice came from heaven, ‘ You are my beloved Son; with you I am well pleased.’” The Spirit was seen as the “feminine” dimension of God, a kind of personification of Wis- dom. When God’s spirit dwells upon a person, the presence of God becomes more perceivable. After the Fall of Jerusalem (70 CE) the concept of God’s indwelling became developed and found its way in rabbinical writings and the Christian gospels. Luke’s gospel has several references to Spirit and how the Spirit affects the activity surrounding Jesus. In Lk 4:1, the Spirit led Je- sus into the wilderness which would suggest that the events in the wilderness (the tempta- tion of Jesus by the devil) were all influenced by God’s Spirit.

The interchange between Jesus and the devil is, on one level, a dramatic exchange of wills be- tween Jesus-as-the Christ and the devil. Using a literalist perspective, the exchange itself serves as a catechism on Jesus-as-the Christ’s mission and identity. When tempted to eat, Jesus response, “One does not live on bread alone.” When tempted by lordship over the kingdom’s of the world, Jesus responded, “Worship the Lord your God and serve only him.” And when tempted by self-preservation, Jesus responded, “Do not put the Lord your God to the test.” In a framework where Jesus- as-the Christ had a direct conversation with the devil we are left with the impression that Jesus-as-the Christ was perceived as Divine by the power of sheer will. Jesus literally over- came hunger, he rose above ambition and re- jected the notion of self-preservation.

Through the temptation narrative, Luke intro- duced three basic Jewish notions of persever- ance through faith in difficult times with the intention that Luke’s Gentile audience be formed by a religious tradition that had a theo- logical and spiritual framework of Resistance to the Empire. In the spirit that inspired these texts, let us now put on the lens of Resistance as we read through this narrative that we might glean some insight into the struggles of our own times. 

Consider the location of the narrative: the wilderness. “Wilderness” is a literary allusion to an area that is unpopulated and untamed and it also suggests the wilderness of the former slaves of Egypt who wandered in wilderness fighting to establish their Jewish identity in the generations following the Exodus from Egypt. Recall that the former slaves bitterly complained about food insecurity (Ex 16:2-3, “Here in the wilderness the whole Israelite community grumbled against Moses and Aaron. The Israelites said to them, ‘If only we had died at the LORD’s hand in the land of Egypt, as we sat by our kettles of meat and ate our fill of bread! But you have led us into this wilderness to make this whole assembly die of famine!’”). Jesus-as-the Christ, on the other hand did not give into the temptation to return to a condition of servitude where a slave would be fed but remain unfree. No. Jesus refused to turn away from the wilderness, instead, he leaned into the challenge of the wilderness choosing freedom over food. Now consider Luke’s Gentile audience. They were faced with the challenge to remain a part of the Empire where obedience to the Empire would be rewarded by never going hungry, but at the expense of their dignity and their souls. The evangelist’s text made his readers consider the power of taking a stand against he Empire and to be very aware of the real cost of resistance. The struggle of the Farm Workers and Cesar Chavez’s hunger strikes and the Selma Bus boycott are con- temporary American examples of times when those who struggled for freedom chose to embrace the challenging conditions of the wilderness rather than bed themselves down with the deceptive comfort of living in captivity.

The second temptation is a matter of choosing power. The Torah is filled with lessons on power. Basic to Jewish teaching on power is that God alone has power. Thus, any power that human beings think they pos- sess is a mere illusion. The Torah teaches us that if human beings wish to exercise their own religious and political power, they must do so only in a covenantal relationship with God. The covenant ensures that the migrant, orphan and widow’s rights and well-being are protected and that prisoners will eventually be freed. When human beings exercise power on their own, they create unjust systems that reflect their blind ambition for power and misplaced loyalty to those whom they perceive are “in charge.” In the story of the Tower of Babel the leadership of Babel persuaded the residents to build a large tower that would reach to the level of God. The leaders of Babel were unsatisfied with their status as human beings walking humbly upon the earth. Instead their political ambitions were directed toward building a physical tower — a standing testament to their twisted amoral ambitions. Might we consider how today’s toxic political rhetoric of fear, nativism, and xenophobia has persuaded so many people to support the construction of prisons that hold disproportionate numbers of people of color, the judicial decisions exonerating officers who used deadly force against unarmed Black youth, and the policy of separating families at the border and placing children in freezing warehouses to sleep in cages and cover themselves with aluminum blankets?

Lastly, let us consider the third temptation. This last temptation is at the heart of discipleship: trusting God. The Torah, Prophets and Wisdom literature are infused with the question of trust. From Abraham to Moses, Isaiah to Zechariah, The Book of Esther to the Psalms, God’s people are encouraged to trust God, even when facing immanent death. Why are there so many lessons around trusting God? Because there are countless incidents in which God’s people did not trust God and chose self-preservation. Luke’s audience no doubt needed encouragement in their faith journey. They knew as they pushed up against the Empire, the Empire would push back. They knew that each disciple would be faced with the temptation  save him or herself rather trust that God would take care of them, in the now or hereafter. As Christians today are we spiritually conditioned sufficiently to overcome the temptation of saving our- selves? Do we see challenge and opposition as an opportunity to live out God’s plan or do we see it as God abandoning us? These temptations of Jesus are not simply a historic account of Jesus’ “40 Day Re- treat,” but rather a catechesis of living our faith in the real world.

Weekly Intercessions
Every March 8 the world celebrates, International Woman’s Day. The day celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The celebration was started over 100 years ago in 1908 when 15,000 women marched in New York City demanding fair wages and the right to vote. The celebration and public cause for women went global in 1913. This year’s theme is, “ Balance for Better.” The theme advocates gender balance in industry, media coverage, enter- tainment, etc. In years past the Vatican has hosted a “Voices of Faith” event on International Women’s Day. That event ampli- fied the voices of women from throughout the world who live out their faith through works of justice and charity. Partici- pants shared their stories that speak to a collective vision of full and total inclusion of women in the world. Last year the Vatican refused to host the event because one of the speakers was a Lesbian. The event moved to the headquarters of the Jesuits, just across the road from the Vatican. This year Pope Francis addressed International Women’s Day in the context of a meeting between himself and a delegation of the American Jewish Committee. He remarked that women make the world more beautiful by protecting it and keeping it alive. Vatican News reported, “Speaking about the role of women in ‘making humanity a family’, the Pope said that peace, born of women, ‘arises and is rekindled by the tenderness of mothers….Thus the dream of peace becomes a reality when we look towards women.’ He said they ‘dream of love into the world…If we take to heart the importance of the future, if we dream of a future peace, we need to give space to women,’ the Pope urged.” Giving “space to women,” is the key concept that is missing within a conversation of women in a Catholic context. Pope John Paul II forbade any discussion on the ordination of women, thus it is very hard to “give space” when space has been taken away. In 2018 the space at the Vatican was taken away because there was no “space” for a Lesbian speaker. When it comes to the full experience of women, the Church has a difficult time “giving space” for stories and life experien- ces that do not fit within viewpoints of the Vatican. Last week Sr. Veronica Openibo, a Nigerian sister who earned her docto- rate in pastoral education at Boston College and the leader of her religious order, The Society of the Holy Child Jesus, was one of three women who were given space at the Vatican summit on clergy sexual abuse. Sr. Veronica Openibo challen- ged the culture of silence and the uncritical support given to clergy. Giving space to women — to all women — was and will remain difficult for many traditionalists in the Vatican. Unless we hear their stories from their own voice, anything that we as Church say about women will be derivative and inauthentic. Let us pray for all women, an in particular, Catholic women who struggle to have their life experience and voice heard by their own Church.

Intercesiónes semanales

Cada 8 de marzo el mundo celebra el Día Internacional de la Mujer. Este día celebra los logros sociales, económicos, culturales y políticos de las mujeres. La celebración comenzó hace más de 100 años en 1908, cuando 15,000 mujeres marcharon en la ciudad de Nueva York exigiendo salarios justos y el derecho a votar. La celebración y la causa pública para las mujeres se globalizaron en 1913. El tema de este año es “Balance para mejorar”. El tema aboga por el equilibrio de género en la industria, la cobertura de los medios de comunicación, el entretenimiento, etc. En otros años, el Vatican organizó un evento en el Día Internacional de la Mujer, “Voces de Fe”. Ese evento amplificó las voces de mujeres de todo el mundo que viven su fe a través de obras de justicia y caridad. Los participantes compartieron sus historias que hablan de una visión colectiva de la inclusión total de toda de las mujeres en el mundo. El año pasado, el Vaticano se negó a organizar el evento porque uno de los oradores era una lesbiana. El evento se trasladó a la sede de los jesuitas, proximo al otro lado de la calle del Vaticano. Este año, el Papa Francisco se dirigió al Día Internacional de la Mujer en el contexto de una reunión entre él y una delegación del Comité Judío Americano. Señaló que las mujeres hacen que el mundo sea más hermoso al protegerlo y mantenerlo vivo. Vatican News informó: “Hablando sobre el papel de las mujeres en ‘hacer de la humanidad una familia’, el Papa dijo que la paz, nacida de mujeres ‘, surge y es reavivada por la ternura de las madres … Así, el sueño de paz se hace realidad cuando miramos hacia las mujeres ‘. Dijo que’ sueñan con el amor en el mundo … Si tomamos en serio la importancia del futuro, si soñamos con una paz futura, tenemos que dar espacio a las mujeres ‘, instó el Papa’ ‘. Dar “espacio a las mujeres” es el concepto clave que falta en una conversación de mujeres en un contexto católico. El Papa Juan Pablo II prohibió cualquier diálogo sobre la ordenación de mujeres, por lo que es muy difícil “dar espacio” cuando se ha quitado el espacio. En 2018, el espacio en el Vaticano fue retirado porque no había “espacio” para una lesbiana. Cuando se trata de la experiencia completa de las mujeres, la Iglesia tiene dificultades para “dar espacio” a historias y experiencias de vida que no encajan dentro de los puntos de vista del Vaticano. La semana pasada, la Hermana Veronica Openibo, una hermana nigeriana que obtuvo su doctorado en educación pastoral en el Boston College y la líder de su orden religiosa, La Sociedad del Santo Niño Jesús, fue una de las tres mujeres que recibieron un espacio en la cumbre del Vaticano a dirigir comentarios sobre el Abuso sexual del clero. La Hna. Veronica Openibo desafió la cultura del silencio y el apoyo acrítico dado al clero. Dar espacio a las mujeres, a todas las mujeres, fue y seguirá siendo difícil para muchos tradicionalistas en el Vaticano. A menos que escuchemos sus historias desde su propia voz, cualquier cosa que nosotros, como Iglesia digamos acerca de las mujeres, será derivada e inauténtica. Oremos por todas las mujeres, en particular, las mujeres católicas que luchan para que su propia Iglesia aprecian su experiencia de vida y su voz.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Tenataciones y perseverancia

El primero del ciclo de lecturas de la Cuaresma dominical siempre se sitúa con Jesús tentado en el desier- to. El evangelista Lucas enmarca el episodio de la tentación con el Espíritu Santo: “Jesús, lleno del Espíritu Santo, regresó del Jordán y fue guiado por el Espíritu en el desierto” (Lc 4, 1). En el momento del ministerio inicial de Jesús (alrededor del 30 EC), el judaísmo estaba experimentando desarrollos: las sinagogas y los fariseos comenzaron a aumentar en prominencia y la resistencia judía estaba cobrando fuerza. También hubo de- sarrollos en el misticismo: la creencia naciente en el poder de la morada del Espíritu Santo. La evidencia textual en la influencia temprana de esta creencia se encuentra en los versículos finales del Capítulo 3, el Espíritu Santo descendió sobre Jesús, “… el Espíritu Santo descendió sobre él en forma corporal como una paloma. Y vino una voz del cielo: Tú eres mi Hijo amado; estoy muy complacido contigo “. El Espíritu fue visto como la di- mensión” femenina “de Dios, una especie de personificación de la Sabiduría. Cuando el espíritu de Dios mora en una persona, la presencia de Dios se hace más perceptible. Después de la caída de Jerusalén (70 dC), el concepto de la morada de Dios se desarrolló y se abrió camino en los escritos rabínicos y los evan- gelios cristianos. El evangelio de Lucas tiene varias referencias al Espíritu y cómo el Espíritu afecta la ac- tividad que rodea a Jesús. En Lc 4: 1, el Espíritu llevó a Jesús al desierto, lo que sugeriría que los eventos en el desierto (la tentación de Jesús por el diablo) estaban todos influenciados por el Espíritu de Dios.

El intercambio entre Jesús y el diablo es, en un nivel, un intercambio dramático de voluntades entre Jesús como el Cristo y el diablo. Usando una perspectiva literalista, el intercambio en sí mismo sirve como un catecismo sobre la misión e identidad de Jesús-como-el Cristo. Cuando fue tentado a comer, Jesús re- spondió: “Uno no vive solo de pan”. Cuando fue tentado por el señorío sobre el reino del mundo, Jesús re- spondió: “Adora al Señor tu Dios y sirve solo a él”. Y cuando fue tentado por el egoísmo. preservación, Jesús respondió: “No pongas a prueba al Señor, tu Dios”. En un marco donde Jesús-como-el Cristo tuvo una conver- sación directa con el diablo, nos quedamos con la impresión de que Jesús-como-el Cristo fue percibido tan divino por el poder de la pura voluntad. Jesús, literalmente, superó el hambre, se elevó por encima de la ambición y rechazó la noción de auto-preservación.

A través de la narración de la tentación, Lucas introdujo tres nociones judías básicas de perseverancia a través de la fe en tiempos difíciles con la intención de que la audiencia gentil de Lucas estuviera formada por una tradición religiosa que tuviera un marco teológico y espiritual de Resistencia al Imperio. En el espíritu que inspiró estos textos, ahora pongámonos la lente de la Resistencia mientras leemos esta narrativa para que podamos tener una idea de las luchas de nuestros tiempos.

Considere la ubicación de la narrativa: el desierto. “Desierto” es una alusión literaria a un área que no está poblada e indomable y también sugiere el desierto de los an- tiguos esclavos de Egipto que vagaban en el desierto luchando por establecer su identidad judía en las generaciones poste- riores al Éxodo de Egipto. Recuerde que los antiguos esclavos se quejaron amarga- mente de la inseguridad alimentaria (Ex. 16: 2-3, “Aquí en el desierto toda la comunidad israelita se quejaba contra Moisés y Aarón. Los israelitas les dijeron: ‘Si tan solo hubiéramos muerto a manos del Señor en ¡La tierra de Egip- to, mientras nos sentábamos junto a nuestras calderas de carne y comíamos hasta llenarnos de pan! ¡Pero nos has conducido a este desierto para hacer que toda esta asamblea muera de hambre! ”). Jesús-como-el Cristo, por otra parte, no cedió a la tentación de volver a una condi- ción de servidumbre donde un esclavo sería alimentado, pero permanecería libre. No. Jesús se negó a alejarse del desierto, en cambio, se inclinó hacia el desafío de que el desierto eligiera la libertad sobre la co- mida. Ahora considere la audiencia gentil de Lucas. Se enfrentaron con el desafío de seguir siendo parte del Imperio donde la obediencia al Imperio sería recompensada por no pasar hambre, pero a expensas de su dignidad y sus almas. El texto del evan- gelista hizo que sus lectores consideraran el poder de tomar una posición contra el Imperio y ser muy conscientes del costo real de la resistencia. La lucha de los traba- jadores agrícolas y las huelgas de hambre de César Chávez y el boicot de Selma Bus son ejemplos contemporáneos de Estados Unidos en los que quienes lucharon por la libertad optaron por abrazar las desafiantes condiciones de la vida en el desierto en lugar de acostarse con el engañoso confort de vivir en cautiverio.

La segunda tentación es una cuestión de elegir el poder. La Torá está llena de lecciones sobre el poder. Lo básico de la enseñanza judía sobre el poder es que solo Dios tiene poder. Por lo tanto, cualquier poder que los seres humanos crean que poseen es una mera ilusión. La Torá nos enseña que si los seres humanos de- sean ejercer su propio poder religioso y político, deben hacerlo solo en una relación de pacto con Dios. El pacto garantiza que los derechos y el bienestar de los migrantes, huérfanos y viudas estén protegidos y que los prisioneros finalmente serán liberados. Cuando los seres humanos ejercen el poder por sí mismos, cre- an sistemas injustos que reflejan su ambición ciega por el poder y la lealtad fuera de lugar con quienes perciben que están “a cargo”. En la historia de la Torre de Babel, el liderazgo de Babel persuadió a los resi- dentes para que construye una gran torre que alcance el nivel de Dios. Los líderes de Babel estaban insatis- fechos con su condición de seres humanos caminando humildemente sobre la tierra. En cambio, sus ambi- ciones políticas se dirigieron hacia la construcción de una torre física, un testimonio permanente de sus retorcidas ambiciones amorales. ¿Podríamos considerar cómo la retórica política tóxica de hoy del miedo, el nativismo y la xenofobia ha persuadido a tantas personas a apoyar la construcción de prisiones que al- bergan números desproporcionados de personas de color, las decisiones judiciales que eximen a los ofi- ciales que utilizaron la fuerza letal contra jóvenes negros desarmados, y ¿La política de separar a las famil- ias en la frontera y colocar a los niños en almacenes congelados para que duerman en jaulas y se cubran con mantas de aluminio?

Por último, consideremos la tercera tentación. Esta última tentación está en el corazón del discipulado: confiar en Dios. La literatura de la Torá, los Profetas y la Sabiduría están infundidas con la cuestión de la confianza. Desde Abraham hasta Moisés, Isaías hasta Zacarías, El libro de Ester y los Salmos, se alienta al pueblo de Dios a confiar en Dios, incluso cuando se enfrenta a una muerte inmanente. ¿Por qué hay tantas lecciones acerca de confiar en Dios? Porque hay innumerables incidentes en los que el pueblo de Dios no confió en Dios y eligió la auto-preservación. La audiencia de Luke, sin duda, necesitaba estímulo en su camino de fe. Ellos sabían que mientras se empujaban contra el Imperio, el Imperio lo rechazaría. Sabían que cada discípulo se enfrentaría a la tentación de salvarse a sí mismo y no a la confianza de que Dios los cuidaría, ahora o en el futuro. Como cristianos de hoy, ¿estamos espiritualmente lo suficientemente condi- cionados para vencer la tentación de salvarnos a nosotros mismos? ¿Vemos el desafío y la oposición como una oportunidad para vivir el plan de Dios o lo vemos como Dios abandonándonos? Estas tentaciones de Jesús no son simplemente un relato histórico del “Retiro de 40 días” de Jesús, sino más bien una cateque- sis de vivir nuestra fe en el mundo real.

Register Here

PLANNING COMMITTEE
FOR GOOD FRIDAY ACTION

We will be participating in a public action on Good Friday to express solidarity with our brothers and sisters who are applying for asylum at the US-Mexico Border and families separated by deportation and detention. 
 
We need people interested in planning this action: contact Judi Sanchez or Jesus Montoya to be included in the planning committee.
 

COMITE DE PLANEAR
LA ACCION DE VIERNES SANTO

Estaremos participando en una acción pública el Viernes Santo para expresar nuestra solidaridad con nuestros hermanos y hermanas que están solicitando asilo en la frontera de EE. UU. y México y las familias separadas por deportación y detención.
 
Necesitamos personas interesadas en planificar esta acción: comuníquese con Judi Sanchez o Jesus Montoya para ser incluido en el comité de planificación.

Join PACT on Tuesday, March 19, for a dialogue and action with police chiefs and the county sheriff to unpack Senate Bill 1421 and push for stronger police accountability. Register here.

Únase a PACT el martes 19 de marzo para un diálogo y acción con los jefes de policía y el alguacil del condado para desempaquetar el Proyecto de Ley Senatorial 1421 y presionar por una mayor responsabilidad de la policía. Regístrese aquí.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Rapid Response Training

Join the Rapid Response Network
to fight deportations with power, not panic!

The Rapid Response Network in Santa Clara County is a community defense project that protects immigrant families from deportation and provides them with moral support when a loved one has been detained.  

Wednesday, March 13
6:30-8:30pm

Sacred Heart Community Service
1381 South First St. San Jose 95110

Register Here: bit.ly/RRNSCCtraining

Hope Village Needs Your Support!

On Monday, March 18th from 7:00 to 9:00 pm at the Gardner Community Center (520 W. Virginia Street), there will be a public meeting to receive input on the moving of San Jose Hope Village to a lot at the corner of Willow St. and Lelong St. The meeting is being sponsored by Council member Dev Davis and the City of San Jose Housing Department.

Please support Hope Village by advertising this information through as many channels as possible. Please use email and phone calls to encourage people to come. Specifically, we ask that you:
1. Share this post with your friends.
2. Direct your friends to the SJHV Facebook page, which will provide updates and reminders.
3. Ask organizations friendly to this cause to publicize the event.
4. Send reminders to your friends on Sunday 3/17 and a final reminder on the morning of 3/18. 5. Reach out to people in any way that you can.
6. Attend the meeting on 3/18 and bring small signs showing support for Hope Village.
Thank you for your support, and we look forward to seeing you on the 18th!

– Hope Village Leadership Team

ACCOMPANIMENT TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION AND ACCOMPANIMENT

Deepen your faith in a ministry of service
Live Pope Francis’ call to serve those most in need
Spiritual and ministry enrichment
Four hour commitment a month, including  enrichment sessions
Grow closer to Christ by becoming his hands and feet in the world

The ministry is a community-based accompaniment and volunteer service navigation program managed by Catholic Charities in cooperation with the parish to help those who come to the parish achieve a dignified, self-sustaining level of living in which people can realize personal goals through, creating supportive social networks and accessing vital service programs.

Tuesday March 19 English
OUR LADY OF REFUGE PARISH HALL
7 – 8:30 pm

 

PROYECTO DE COMPROMISO PARROQUIAL PARA LAS CARIDADES CATÓLICAS: NAVEGACIÓN Y ACOMPAÑAMIENTO DEL SERVICIO

Profundiza tu fe en un ministerio de servicio.
Vive el llamado del Papa Francisco para servir a los más necesitados
Enriquecimiento espiritual y ministerial.
Compromiso de cuatro horas al mes, incluyendo sesiones de enriquecimiento.
Crece más cerca de Cristo convirtiéndose en sus manos y pies en el mundo.

El ministerio es un programa de base de navegación de servicios sociales y de acompañamiento personal a los necesitados administrado por Caridades Católicas en colaboración con la parroquia para ayudar a aquellos que vienen a la parroquia a lograr un nivel de vida digno y autosuficiente en el que las personas puedan alcanzar metas personales mediante la creación de redes sociales solidarias y acceso a programas de servicios vitales.

Nuestra Señora de Refugio
Salón Parroquial
Martes 26 de marzo español
7 – 8:30 pm

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: In the Garden of Good and Evil

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

March 1, 2019

Misa THIS SUNDAY
MARCH 3
Noon
1984 SENTER RD. SAN JOSE

We will be celebrating a Oaxacan mass
at NOON at the above hall
There will not be a 9 am mass.

MISA ESTE DOMINGO
3 de marzo
12 pm
1984 SENTER RD
San Jose, CA 95112

Estaremos celebrando una misa oaxaqueña
al 12 mediodía en el salón de arriba
No habrá una misa de 9 am.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
There is no good or evil, there is only the garden.
What you choose to do in the garden is your free will.
Choose well.

Reflection on the Gospel:
In the Garden of Good and Evil

The question of the origin of good and evil is one of the most common inquiries of world religions. The passage,  Lk 6: 39-45, is a continuation of the “Sermon on the Plain” and frames the question of good and evil within the human condition rather than as something external or preternatural. Gentile culture was much more superstitious than Jewish culture and Gentiles were much more susceptible to suggestions of ghosts and hauntings. Gentiles believed in a dualistic cosmos in which human reality was constantly barged by other-worldly forces. Human beings were fragile in comparison to the will of capricious deities and vulnerable to attack from evil spirits.  Jewish belief, on the other hand, saw the world not as a battle ground of good and evil, but rather as a place of blessing and opportunity for human beings to express their gratitude to their Creator through caring for the world so that their children and their children’s children might also bless God for Creation. Luke the evangelist had to orient his Gentile audience to the world of Jewish ethics because Jesus’ teaching was Jewish.  Ethics demand that each person take personal responsibility for his or her actions and to decide to make a positive difference but in a Gentile context of an authoritarian regime, good behavior was a matter of obedience, not discernment. Behavior in the Empire was deemed “Good” by obedience to the Emperor rather than by being authentic to one’s self and caring of others. “Evil spirits” were the cause of “bad behavior” (which included disobedience to the Empire) and those who led others to oppose the Empire were deemed to be in league with evil spirits.  Jews believed that the Law (Torah) demanded that each person must contribute to the well being of the community, not the king and that all things done must take into account the condition of the most vulnerable and the impact that decisions would have on future generations (e.g., one is ethically bound to consider the land and water, distribution, and manner of harvest. These considerations are enumerated in the  Torah).

Luke introduced Gentile audiences to an alternative ethical framework through the Sermon on the Plain. Jesus-as-the Christ challenged the notion that supernatural forces and blind obedience. Luke’s portrayal of Jesus challenged the individual and community to take responsibility for the consequences of one’s own decisions. Gentile audiences could not longer remain fatalists and passive in “accepting their lot in life.”  Disciples were not blind loyalists to the Emperor, their eyes had been opened and they were not going to follow the Empire with blind faith. (c.f., Lk 39, “Can a blind person guide a blind person? Will not both fall into a pit?”) Disciples were taught to take responsibility for what is in their own life rather than blame another person. (c.f. Lk 6: 41, “Why do you notice the splinter in your brother’s eye, but do not perceive the wooden beam in your own?”) We see in this text how Discipleship became an emerging subversive force within the Empire.

In the Sermon on the Plain Jesus-as-the Christ instructed disciples to understand the difference between his world view (the kingdom of God) and the Empire and to empower the disciples to change the system. His teaching empowered the disciples to cast off the former world view of superstition than left them seeing themselves as hapless victims to the whims of deities and evil spirits and the unjust circumstances of the Empire. They had to act on what Jesus-as-the Christ said. Jesus has just condemned the rich and powerful — that is, those who benefitted from the Empire. He compelled his disciples to make a choice: will they remain blind and obedient or will they wake up and take action?  The fruits of the Empire were the suffering of the poor, the exploitation of the lower classes, and the repression of free thought and dissent.  He said, “A good tree does not bear rotten fruit, nor does a rotten tree bear good fruit. For every tree is known by its own fruit.” (Lk 6:43-44). 

In a Jewish world view, human beings have ultimate control of their own lives because within each person one has the capacity to act in a good way and an evil way.  There is no “angel” and “devil” on one’s shoulders telling the individual what to do nor is there a malignant force that has more power than the Creator than can make evil rise. There is good and evil in the garden and as free persons, we must choose. We must choose between the Empire and God. We can succumb to loyalty and obedience to the Emperor and the Empire or we can choose God and surrender our faithfulness to the commandment of love of God and neighbor. The legionary does not include the concluding comments in the Sermon, but in the context of this week’s reflection, let us reflect on the final verses of the Sermon to strengthen our decision of having chosen God above the Empire. May we remain strong in the Resistance!
 

“I will show you what someone is like who comes to me, listens to my words, and acts on them. That one is like a person building a house, who dug deeply and laid the foundation on rock; when the flood came, the river burst against that house but could not shake it because it had been well built. But the one who listens and does not act is like a person who built a house on the ground without a foundation. When the river burst against it, it collapsed at once and was completely destroyed.”

Weekly Intercessions
This week we heard Trump’s former lawyer, Michael Cohen, give public testimony before Congress. Cohen admitted on how he eagerly participated in intimidating those who presented a threat to his client, Donald Trump; subverted the truth and lied to Congress; and how he went along with what are soon to be litigated as illegal actions on behalf of and what may soon be proved, at the direction of Trump himself. When asked what made him change his mind and want to come forth and cooperate with investigations, he stated that as a son of a Holocaust survivor he could not longer support his former employer. “As the son of a Polish Holocaust survivor, the images and sounds of this family separation policy is heart wrenching.”  Michael Cohen’s father, Maurice said to his son that he (Maurice) did not survive the camps to have Donald Trump sully the family name. It is impossible to verify whether it was Cohen’s faith or the preponderance of evidence and the walls of justice closing in on him with the threat of a very long prison sentence hanging over his head that drove him to cooperate with Congressional investigations. No doubt there will be, in the future, memoirs of the transgressions, sorrow, confession surrounding these events written by former repentant Trump Organization staff, White House cabinet members, lawyers, financial advisors, etc…We can expect books, movies, mini-series appearances on talk shows and maybe an opera, musical and a Broadway Play. But, will any of these yet to be written/yet to be published narratives provide us with how the individual changed his/her/their mind?  Will any of the narratives give us insight into the change of heart? Will we have any insights into the “cognitive dissonance” between their principles and the actions that they took? Will they provide us with a glimpse into their faith lives? Will White House staff eventually provide explanations as to how they continued to support their boss even when the evidence of corruption was so thick that you could cut it with a knife? As the public see the evidence of corruption pile up, they are asking how is it that people like Sarah Sanders who grew up in a strict Christian home could participate in a broken and hypocritical regime.  It is clear that Michael Cohen’s family raised the question of his Jewish heritage and family history as a pressure point for him to reconsider his role as a “fixer” and enabler to Trump, it is less clear if his old Christian team mates are having a conversation about how their Christian faith informs/informed their decision to remain blindly loyal to Trump. Let us pray for those who continue to serve in the White House: that God will stir their hearts to do the right thing according to their conscience and faith and that, as (verifiable)  facts come to light, a swift, fair and transparent process be used to hold those found to be culpable in playing a part in criminality  be held accountable.

Intercesiónes semanales

Esta semana escuchamos al ex-abogado de Trump, Michael Cohen, dar testimonio público ante el Congreso. Cohen confesó cómo participó con entusiasmo en la intimidación de quienes presentaron una amenaza para su cliente, Donald Trump; subvirtió la verdad y mintió al Congreso; y cómo estuvo de acuerdo con lo que pronto será litigado como acciones ilegales en nombre de y lo que pronto se podrá probar, bajo la dirección del propio Trump. Cuando se le preguntó qué le hizo cambiar de opinión y que deseaba venir y cooperar con las investigaciones, afirmó que como hijo de un sobreviviente del Holocausto ya no podía soportar a su ex-empleador. “Como hijo de un sobreviviente del Holocausto polaco, las imágenes y los sonidos de esta política de separación familiar son desgarradores”. El padre de Michael Cohen, Maurice, le dijo a su hijo que él (Maurice) no sobrevivió a el Holocausto para que Donald Trump manchara el nombre de su familia. Es imposible verificar si fue la fe de Cohen o la preponderancia de las pruebas y los muros de la justicia que se cierran sobre él con la amenaza de una sentencia de prisión muy larga sobre su cabeza lo que lo llevó a cooperar con las investigaciones del Congreso. Sin duda habrá, en el futuro, memorias de transgresiones, tristezas, confesiones en torno a estos eventos, escritas por el ex-personal arrepentido de la Organización Trump, miembros del gabinete de la Casa Blanca, abogados, asesores financieros, etc. Podemos esperar libros, películas, “mini-series,” entrevistas y tal vez una ópera, un musical y una obra de Broadway. Pero, ¿alguna de estas narraciones que aún no se hayan escrito o se publiquen nos proporcionará la forma en que el individuo cambió su mente? ¿Alguno de los relatos nos dará una idea del cambio de corazón? ¿Tendremos alguna información sobre la “disonancia cognitiva” entre sus principios y las acciones que tomaron? ¿Nos darán un vistazo a sus vidas de fe? ¿El personal de la Casa Blanca finalmente brindará explicaciones sobre cómo continuaron apoyando a su jefe incluso cuando el ambiente de corrupción era tan grande que se podía cortar con un cuchillo? Mientras el público ve que se acumulan pruebas de corrupción, se preguntan cómo es posible que personas como Sarah Sanders, que crecieron en un hogar cristiano estricto, puedan participar en un régimen quebrantado e hipócrita. Está claro que la familia de Michael Cohen planteó la cuestión de su herencia judía y su historia familiar como un punto de presión para que reconsidere su papel como “fixer” y facilitador de Trump, es menos claro si sus viejos compañeros de equipo cristianos están teniendo una conversación sobre cómo su fe cristiana informa / informó su decisión de permanecer ciegamente leales a Trump. Oremos por aquellos que continúan sirviendo en la Casa Blanca: que Dios agite sus corazones para hacer lo correcto de acuerdo con su conciencia y fe y que, a medida que los hechos (verificables) salgan a la luz, sea un proceso rápido, justo y transparente ser usado para responsabilizar a aquellos que son culpables de desempeñar un papel en la criminalidad.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 

El Jardín del Bien y el Mal

La cuestión del origen del bien y del mal es una de las preguntas más comunes de las religiones del mundo. El pasaje, Lc 6: 39-45, es una continuación del “Sermón en la llanura” y enmarca la cuestión del bien y el mal dentro de la condición humana en lugar de ser algo externo o preternatural. La cultura gentil era mucho más supersticiosa que la cultura judía y los gentiles eran mucho más susceptibles a las sugerencias de fantasmas y fantasmas. Los gentiles creían en un cosmos dualista en el que la realidad humana era constantemente invadida por fuerzas de otro mundo. Los seres humanos eran frágiles en comparación con la voluntad de las deidades caprichosas y vulnerables al ataque de los espíritus malignos. La creencia judía, por otro lado, veía al mundo no como un campo de batalla entre el bien y el mal, sino como un lugar de bendición y oportunidad para que los seres humanos expresen su gratitud a su Creador cuidando al mundo para que sus hijos y los hijos de sus hijos también podrían bendecir a Dios por la creación. Lucas el evangelista tuvo que orientar a su audiencia gentil hacia el mundo de la ética judía porque la enseñanza de Jesús era judía. La ética exige que cada persona asuma la responsabilidad personal de sus acciones y decida hacer una diferencia positiva, pero en un contexto gentil de un régimen autoritario, el buen comportamiento era una cuestión de obediencia, no de discernimiento. El comportamiento en el Imperio se consideraba “bueno” por la obediencia al Emperador en lugar de ser auténtico a sí mismo y preocuparse por los demás. Los “espíritus malignos” fueron la causa de la “mala conducta” (que incluía la desobediencia al Imperio) y se consideró que aquellos que llevaron a otros a oponerse al Imperio estaban aliados con los espíritus malignos. Los judíos creían que la Ley (Torá) exigía que cada persona contribuya al bienestar de la comunidad, no al rey, y que todo lo que se haga debe tener en cuenta la condición de los más vulnerables y el impacto que las decisiones tendrían en las generaciones futuras. (Por ejemplo, uno tiene la obligación ética de considerar la tierra y el agua, la distribución y la forma de cosecha. Estas consideraciones se enumeran en la Torá).

Lucas presentó a las audiencias gentiles un marco ético alternativo a través de las Bienaventuranzas. Jesús-como-el Cristo desafió la idea de que las fuerzas sobrenaturales y la obediencia ciega. La descripción de Lucas de Jesús desafió a la persona y la comunidad a asumir la responsabilidad de las consecuencias de las propias decisiones. Las audiencias gentiles ya no podían seguir siendo fatalistas y pasivas al aceptar su suerte en la vida. Los discípulos no eran “leales ciegos” al Emperador, habían abierto los ojos y no iban a seguir al Imperio con fe ciega. (c., Lc 39, “¿Puede una persona ciega guiar a una persona ciega? ¿No caerán ambos en un pozo?”) Se les enseñó a los discípulos a responsabilizarse de lo que está en su propia vida en lugar de culpar a otra persona. (c. Lc 6, 41, “¿Por qué notas la astilla en el ojo de tu hermano, pero no percibes la viga de madera en la tuya?”) Vemos en este texto cómo el discipulado se convirtió en una fuerza subversiva emergente dentro del Imperio.

En la Bienaventuranzas, Jesús-como-el Cristo instruyó a los discípulos a comprender la diferencia entre su visión del mundo (el reino de Dios) y el Imperio ya capacitar a los discípulos para cambiar el sistema. Su enseñanza dio poder a los discípulos para deshacerse de la antigua visión del mundo de la superstición que los dejó a sí mismos como víctimas desventuradas de los caprichos de las deidades y los espíritus malignos y las circunstancias injustas del Imperio. Tenían que actuar de acuerdo con lo que decía Jesús-como-el Cristo. Jesús acaba de condenar a los ricos y poderosos, es decir, a aquellos que se beneficiaron del Imperio. Obligó a sus discípulos a tomar una decisión: ¿permanecerán ciegos y obedientes o se despertarán y tomarán acción? Los frutos del Imperio fueron el sufrimiento de los pobres, la explotación de las clases más bajas y la represión del libre pensamiento y la disensión. Él dijo: “Un buen árbol no da frutos podridos, ni un árbol podrido da buenos frutos. Porque cada árbol es conocido por su propio fruto” (Lc 6, 43-44).

En una cosmo-visión judía, los seres humanos tienen el control final de sus propias vidas porque dentro de cada persona uno tiene la capacidad de actuar de una manera buena y de una manera mala. No hay un “ángel” y un “diablo” en los hombros de uno que le dicen al individuo qué hacer, ni hay una fuerza maligna que tenga más poder que el Creador de lo que puede hacer que el mal se levante. Hay bien y mal en el jardín y como personas libres, debemos elegir. Debemos elegir entre el Imperio y Dios. Podemos sucumbir a la lealtad y la obediencia al Emperador y al Imperio o podemos elegir a Dios y rendir nuestra fidelidad al mandamiento del amor de Dios y el prójimo. El leccionario no incluye los comentarios finales en las Bienaventuranzas, pero en el contexto de la reflexión de esta semana, reflexionemos sobre los versos finales del Sermon para fortalecer nuestra decisión de haber elegido a Dios por encima del Imperio. ¡Que sigamos siendo fuertes en la Resistencia!
 

Te mostraré cómo es alguien que viene a mí, escucha mis palabras y actúa sobre ellas. Esa es como una persona que construye una casa, que cavó profundamente y colocó los cimientos sobre la roca; cuando llegó la inundación, el río estalló contra esa casa, pero no pudo sacudirla porque estaba bien construida. Pero el que escucha y no actúa es como una persona que construyó una casa en el suelo sin cimientos. Cuando el río estalló contra él, colapsó de inmediato y quedó completamente destruido “.

Register Here

PLANNING COMMITTEE
FOR GOOD FRIDAY ACTION

We will be participating in a public action on Good Friday to express solidarity with our brothers and sisters who are applying for asylum at the US-Mexico Border and families separated by deportation and detention. 
 
We need people interested in planning this action: contact Judi Sanchez or Jesus Montoya to be included in the planning committee.
 

COMITE DE PLANEAR
LA ACCION DE VIERNES SANTO

Estaremos participando en una acción pública el Viernes Santo para expresar nuestra solidaridad con nuestros hermanos y hermanas que están solicitando asilo en la frontera de EE. UU. y México y las familias separadas por deportación y detención.
 
Necesitamos personas interesadas en planificar esta acción: comuníquese con Judi Sanchez o Jesus Montoya para ser incluido en el comité de planificación.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Rapid Response Training

Join the Rapid Response Network
to fight deportations with power, not panic!

The Rapid Response Network in Santa Clara County is a community defense project that protects immigrant families from deportation and provides them with moral support when a loved one has been detained.  

Wednesday, March 13
6:30-8:30pm

Sacred Heart Community Service
1381 South First St. San Jose 95110

Register Here: bit.ly/RRNSCCtraining

ACCOMPANIMENT TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION AND ACCOMPANIMENT

Deepen your faith in a ministry of service
Live Pope Francis’ call to serve those most in need
Spiritual and ministry enrichment
Four hour commitment a month, including  enrichment sessions
Grow closer to Christ by becoming his hands and feet in the world

The ministry is a community-based accompaniment and volunteer service navigation program managed by Catholic Charities in cooperation with the parish to help those who come to the parish achieve a dignified, self-sustaining level of living in which people can realize personal goals through, creating supportive social networks and accessing vital service programs.

Tuesday March 19 English
OUR LADY OF REFUGE PARISH HALL
7 – 8:30 pm

 

PROYECTO DE COMPROMISO PARROQUIAL PARA LAS CARIDADES CATÓLICAS: NAVEGACIÓN Y ACOMPAÑAMIENTO DEL SERVICIO

Profundiza tu fe en un ministerio de servicio.
Vive el llamado del Papa Francisco para servir a los más necesitados
Enriquecimiento espiritual y ministerial.
Compromiso de cuatro horas al mes, incluyendo sesiones de enriquecimiento.
Crece más cerca de Cristo convirtiéndose en sus manos y pies en el mundo.

El ministerio es un programa de base de navegación de servicios sociales y de acompañamiento personal a los necesitados administrado por Caridades Católicas en colaboración con la parroquia para ayudar a aquellos que vienen a la parroquia a lograr un nivel de vida digno y autosuficiente en el que las personas puedan alcanzar metas personales mediante la creación de redes sociales solidarias y acceso a programas de servicios vitales.

Nuestra Señora de Refugio
Salón Parroquial
Martes 26 de marzo español
7 – 8:30 pm

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Resisting by Love

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

February 21, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD THIS SUNDAY
Next Misa Solidaridad
Sunday, February 24
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

MISA SOLIDARIDA ESTE DOMINGO
La proxima misa solidaridad sera
Domingo 24 de febrero
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
The South Bay community came together President’s Day to protest  Trump’s decision to bypass Congress and execute an executive action to build a wall on the US-Mexico border on the pretext of a (fabricated) national emergency.

Reflection on the Gospel: Resisting by Love

Dr. King once said, “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only Light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only LOVE can do that.”  Today’s gospel passage continues the“Sermon on the Plain.” Last week’s selection from the Sermon on the Plain opened up a conversation the concept of “blessing” (ashrei) and the prophetic call for justice for those who live hand-to-mouth and are despised by society. We ended the reflection asking if the wealthy, healthy and well-fed, and those who enjoy praises of others have considered the condition of those who do not have access to power and the luxury of good food and stable housing. Luke’s community probably found those words somewhat uncomfortable because the evangelist Luke was working within a Gentile social system that rewarded those with ties to power, wealth and possessions with social privilege.

The Gentile system was not a system built on opportunity, but rather, a closed system that rewarded those who already have with more and subjugated those who do not have with less. Last week’s reflection (Communique 14ii2019) stated that Gentile audience needed a primer in basic Jewish ethics and egalitarian social theory because (as Gentiles) they had a poor understanding of the essential connection between God and the ethical demands related to improving the human condition.

Luke’s gospel is not a primer on Jewish thought and ethics, but rather, it integrates key explanations of Jewish practices for the purpose of informing the non-Jewish audience with key concepts that have ethical ramifications. Luke’s challenge was to help his audience know the difference between the authentic faith and discipleship of Jesus which came from his Jewish context from the materialistic values that came from the Empire. Luke also had to deal with the issue of Resistance in a way that his Gentile community would understand and embrace.

 Jesus-as-the Christ cannot be understood apart from Resistance to the Empire: his Passion and Death are at the core of every gospel narrative. Luke’s gospel, like the three other gospel narratives, sought to provide a specific Christian community (each evangelist wrote to and for a specific community) a way of understanding, embracing and living out Resistance informed by Jewish ethical categories and contextualized to their specific social location. The tension among the disparate Christian colonies was over the question of how to live out Resistance without being annihilated by the Empire. For example, unlike Mark who framed the Resistance as a political struggle for Jewish sovereignty and religious freedom, Luke framed the Resistance as a social and economic struggle for inclusion and equality with the expectation that in place of the Empire, the kingdom of God would be established.

Communique 14ii2019 referred to the concept of blessing (ashrei) which stated people are restored to a state of “happiness” or “blessedness” when they are in relationship to God; that God cares for those who poor and oppressed; and that God ultimately rewards good behavior (and punishes evil).  Love, in the context of the “Sermon on the Plain,” is merely living out the blessing of God:

  • We are loving God. 
  • God loves those who are poor and oppressed.
  • We, therefore, also love the poor and oppressed by the way “…we bring glad tidings to the poor…proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind…let the oppressed go free and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.” (Lk4: 18-19).

Let us finally turn to today’s text.  The gospel selection provides the seminal example of how love can subvert the status quo of the Empire.  Luke’s narration has Jesus-as-the Christ teaching his disciples that they should never perpetuate the cycle of hatred: “…love your enemies, do good to those who hate you…bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you…To the person who strikes you on one cheek, offer the other one as well.”  (Lk 6:27-29) Secondly, he addressed the motivation behind the action: “…For if you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners love those who love them…And if you do good to those who do good to you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners do the same.  If you lend money to those from whom you expect repayment, what credit [is] that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, and get back the same amount.” Love must come from a place of “no-power.”  “No-power” refers to the purest act that requires no reciprocity or even acknowledgment. In the Empire every action begets a reaction, in the kingdom of God, every act is an act of love, of creation.  Every act is ashrei, or blessing.  Therefore, the only fitting reaction is thanksgiving and a life of gratitude. With “no power,” the Empire cannot operate because the Empire depends on reaction. 

Social transformation is driven by a change of heart and a commitment of communities which in turn “revolutionize” the Empire from within. The re-ordering of social relationships are subversive acts because the Empire’s continued hold over the people depended on people accepting the social order of a caste-based society. Returning now to the “Sermon on the Plain,” Jesus-as-the Christ, taught his disciples to step back from the Empire — do not engage: “To the person who strikes you on one cheek, offer the other one as well, and from the person who takes your cloak, do not withhold even your tunic.” (Lk 6:29)  Non-Engagement is a powerful tool of resistance, Ghandi called this practice, “Passive resistance,” an integral part of his teaching on Satyagraha.  Ghandi looked toward creating new, alternative forms of political and economic institutions rather than violently opposing the British Empire’s oppressive system.  Satyagraha is not a form of governance, but rather, it is a spiritual and social catalyst that results in a conversion and the creation of a new harmony in which all people (and the planet) are restored to a positive, loving and sustainable relationship. 

Luke anticipated a change in the Empire. With “no-power”/non-engagement/satyagraha, the Empire will fall.  Note Mary’s professed a reversal of imperial power, “He has shown might with his arm, dispersed the arrogant of mind and heart. He has thrown down the rulers from their thrones but lifted up the lowly. The hungry he has filled with good things; the rich he has sent away empty….” (Lk 1:51-53). The gospels give us examples of how people of faith engaged in the Resistance in the past.  In our specific context of living in the heart of the Empire, how might we love our enemies and those who hate us? How might we engage with those who strike our cheek and take our tunic?

Weekly Intercessions

Pope Francis gathered Bishops and Cardinals from around the world to discuss the clergy abuse crisis this week. The crisis has many facets: the abuse itself — the abuse done to children and young adolescents, to seminarians and deacons who were under the care and watch of superiors, to women religious, and to address the cover-up of these abuses.  The abuse crisis first came to public recognition in 1985 in the United States. In the late 1980’s and 90’s many Catholic Church officials spoke about the abuse in terms of a localized phenomenon of the United States.  As more cases of abuse were reported in the US, new cases were reported in  England, Canada and Australia. At that time traditionalist Catholic commentators said that the phenomenon of abuse was an American and English issue due to their “lax morality.” When cases were reported in Ireland, Mexico, and Latin America staunch Catholic strongholds, traditionalist commentators were stunned and confused. They began to question whether abuse of children was a result of the culture or something within the Church itself. The Irish laity did not waste time to parse the difference. Large numbers of people simply walked away from the Church. In 2002 headlines across the world exploded with news about widespread abuse of children in Boston and the systemic cover-up. Law suits poured in and the US Bishops created a non-binding protocol to deal with abuse claims. Around that time traditionalist commentators and several bishops avoided the issue of systemic coverups and instead shifted the conversation to locate the cause of abuse and many of them placed the blame on individual clergy and “homosexual” clergy. Shortly after that more reports of abuse surfaced from Europe, Asia and Africa and it became clearer (to some) that the problem was not about clergy or homosexuality, but about the system itself and in particular the process of training clergy (seminary formation).  No bishop was ready to address the “complicated” understanding of sexuality in respect that that ordination to the priesthood and religious life demanded celibacy. Rather than having discussions about sexual development of candidates for the priesthood and addressing those issues within seminary formation with a protocol that encouraged frank and honest discussions, many bishops turned toward antiquated seminary formation methods and expelled candidates who raised uncomfortable questions. In the mid 2000’s reports of clergy abuse began to come in from non-Catholic religions and people realized that clergy abuse of children was not limited to the West or to Catholics. Upon Pope Francis’ election, the conversation widened to include the culpability of bishops and cardinals and their contribution to the problem. Several prelates were removed from their posts and some even laicized.  Clergy abuse is an ongoing and global conversation and it will take time for all of this to sort out.  Let us pray for Pope Francis’ efforts to address this issue and for the difficult work ahead in making amends to survivors of clergy abuse and holding those responsible for the abuse — both perpetrators and enablers. Let us pray that the laity will press religious institutions to make changes in practice and theology so as to prevent future abuse.

Intercesiónes semanales

El Papa Francisco reunió a obispos y cardenales de todo el mundo para hablar sobre la crisis de abuso de clérigos esta semana. La crisis tiene muchas facetas: el abuso hecho a los niños y adolescentes, a los seminaristas y diáconos que estaban bajo el cuidado de las superiores, a las religiosas, y para abordar el encubrimiento de estos abusos. La crisis de abuso primero llegó al reconocimiento público en 1985 en los Estados Unidos. A fines de los años 80 y 90, muchos funcionarios de la Iglesia Católica hablaron sobre el abuso en términos de un fenómeno localizado de los Estados Unidos. A medida que se informaron más casos de abuso en los EE. UU., Se informaron nuevos casos en Inglaterra, Canadá y Australia. En ese momento, los comentaristas católicos tradicionalistas dijeron que el fenómeno del abuso era un problema estadounidense e inglés debido a su “moral relajada”. Cuando se informaron casos en Irlanda, México, y America Latina bastiónes católicos incondicionales, los comentaristas tradicionalistas se sorprendieron y se confundieron. Comenzaron a cuestionar si el abuso de los niños era un resultado de la cultura o algo dentro de la Iglesia misma. Los laicos irlandeses no perdieron el tiempo para analizar la diferencia. Un gran número de personas simplemente se alejaron de la Iglesia. En 2002, los titulares en todo el mundo explotaron con noticias sobre el abuso generalizado de niños en Boston y el encubrimiento sistémico. Se presentaron demandas legales y los Obispos de EE. UU. Crearon un protocolo no vinculante para tratar las denuncias de abuso. Alrededor de ese tiempo, comentaristas tradicionalistas y varios obispos evitaron el tema de los encubrimientos sistémicos y en cambio cambiaron la conversación para localizar la causa del abuso y muchos de ellos culparon al clero individual y al clero “homosexual”. Poco después surgieron más denuncias de abusos en Europa, Asia y África y se hizo más claro (para algunos) que el problema no era sobre el clero o la homosexualidad, sino sobre el sistema en sí y, en particular, sobre el proceso de formación del clero (formación del seminario). Ningún obispo estaba preparado para abordar el “complicado” entendimiento de la sexualidad con respecto a que esa ordenación al sacerdocio y la vida religiosa exigía el celibato. En lugar de tener diálogo sobre el desarrollo sexual de los candidatos al sacerdocio y abordar esos temas dentro de la formación del seminario con un protocolo que alentaba las discusiones francas y honestas, muchos obispos se volvieron hacia métodos anticuados de formación en el seminario y expulsaron a los candidatos que hicieron preguntas incómodas. A mediados de 2000, comenzaron a llegar informes de abusos del clero de religiones no católicas y la gente se dio cuenta de que el maltrato de niños por parte del clero no se limitaba a Occidente ni a los católicos. Tras la elección del Papa Francisco, la conversación se amplió para incluir la culpabilidad de los obispos y cardenales y su contribución al problema. Varios prelados fueron removidos de sus puestos y algunos incluso laicados. El abuso del clero es una conversación continua y global y tomará tiempo para que todo esto se resuelva. Oremos por los esfuerzos del Papa Francisco para abordar este problema y por el difícil trabajo que queda por hacer para reparar a los sobrevivientes del abuso del clero y responsabilizar a los responsables del abuso, tanto perpetradores como facilitadores. Oremos para que los laicos presionen a las instituciones religiosas para hacer cambios en la práctica y la teología para prevenir abusos en el futuro.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:
Resistiendo por el amor

El Dr. King dijo una vez: “La oscuridad no puede expulsar a la oscuridad; Sólo la Luz puede hacer eso. El odio no puede expulsar al odio; solo el AMOR puede hacer eso ”.  El pasaje del evangelio de hoy continúa con “Las Bienaventuranzas de S. Lucas”. La selección de la semana pasada de “Las Bienaventuranzas de S. Lucas” abrió una conversación sobre el concepto de “bendición” (ashrei) y el llamado profético de justicia para aquellos que vivir cara a boca y son despreciados por la sociedad. Terminamos la reflexión preguntando si los ricos, sanos y bien alimentados, y aquellos que disfrutan de los elogios de otros, han considerado la condición de aquellos que no tienen acceso al poder y el lujo de una buena comida y una vivienda estable. La comunidad de Lucas probablemente encontró esas palabras algo incómodas porque el evangelista Lucas estaba trabajando dentro de un sistema social gentil que recompensaba a los que tenían vínculos con el poder, la riqueza y las posesiones con privilegios sociales.

El sistema gentil no era un sistema basado en la oportunidad, sino más bien, un sistema cerrado que recompensaba a los que ya tenían más y subyugaba a los que no lo tenían con menos. La reflexión de la semana pasada (Comunicado 14ii2019) declaró que la audiencia gentil necesitaba un manual básico de ética judía básica y teoría social igualitaria porque (como gentiles) tenían una comprensión deficiente de la conexión esencial entre Dios y las demandas éticas relacionadas con el mejoramiento de la condición humana.

El evangelio de Lucas no es una introducción al pensamiento y la ética judíos, sino que integra explicaciones clave de las prácticas judías con el propósito de informar a la audiencia no judía con conceptos clave que tienen ramificaciones éticas. El desafío de Lucas era ayudar a su audiencia a conocer la diferencia entre la fe auténtica y el discipulado de Jesús que provenía de su contexto judío, de los valores materialistas que venían del Imperio. Lucas también tuvo que lidiar con el tema de la Resistencia de una manera que su comunidad gentil entendería y abrazaría. 

Jesús-como-el Cristo no puede entenderse aparte de la Resistencia al Imperio: su Pasión y Muerte están en el centro de cada narrativa del evangelio. El evangelio de Lucas, al igual que los otros tres relatos del evangelio, buscó proporcionar una comunidad cristiana específica (cada evangelista escribió para y para una comunidad específica) una forma de entender, abrazar y vivir la Resistencia informada por categorías éticas judías y contextualizada a su ubicación social específica. La tensión entre las colonias cristianas dispares estaba sobre la cuestión de cómo vivir la Resistencia sin ser aniquilado por el Imperio. Por ejemplo, a diferencia de Marcos, quien encuadró la resistencia como una lucha política por la soberanía judía y la libertad religiosa, Lucas encuadró la Resistencia como una lucha económica y social por la inclusión y la igualdad con la expectativa de que en lugar del Imperio, el reino de Dios sería establecido.

El Communique 14ii2019 se refirió al concepto de bendición (ashrei), en el cual las personas declaradas son restauradas a un estado de “felicidad” o “bienaventuranza” cuando están en relación con Dios; que Dios cuida a los pobres y oprimidos; y que Dios finalmente recompensa el buen comportamiento (y castiga el mal). El amor, en el contexto del “Las Bienaventuranzas de S. Lucas”, es simplemente vivir la bendición de Dios:

  • Estamos amando a Dios.
  • Dios ama a los pobres y oprimidos.
  • Por lo tanto, también amamos a los pobres y oprimidos por el camino “… traemos buenas nuevas a los pobres … proclamamos la libertad a los cautivos y la recuperación de la vista a los ciegos … dejemos que los oprimidos salgan libres y proclamen un año aceptable para el Señor”. ”(Lc4: 18-19).

Pasemos finalmente al texto de hoy. La selección del evangelio proporciona el ejemplo seminal de cómo el amor puede subvertir el status quo del Imperio. La narración de Lucas tiene a Jesús-como-el Cristo enseñando a sus discípulos que nunca deben perpetuar el ciclo de odio: “… ama a tus enemigos, haz el bien a los que te odian … bendice a los que te maldicen, ora por los que te maltratan … Para la persona que te golpea en una mejilla, ofrece la otra también ”. (Lc 6: 27-29) En segundo lugar, abordó la motivación detrás de la acción: “ … Porque si amas a los que te aman, ¿qué crédito tienes? ¿para ti? Incluso los pecadores aman a quienes los aman … Y si les haces bien a los que te hacen bien, ¿qué mérito tienes? Incluso los pecadores hacen lo mismo. Si le presta dinero a aquellos de quienes espera el reembolso, ¿qué crédito le otorga eso? Incluso los pecadores prestan a los pecadores, y recuperan la misma cantidad”. El amor debe venir de un lugar de “no poder “. “No-poder” se refiere al acto más puro que no requiere reciprocidad ni reconocimiento. En el Imperio cada acción genera una reacción, en el reino de Dios, cada acto es un acto de amor, de creación. Cada acto es ashrei, o bendición. Por lo tanto, la única reacción adecuada es la acción de gracias y una vida de gratitud. Con “no poder”, el Imperio no puede operar porque el Imperio depende de la reacción.

La transformación social es impulsada por un cambio de corazón y un compromiso de las comunidades que, a su vez, “revolucionan” el Imperio desde adentro. El reordenamiento de las relaciones sociales es un acto subversivo porque el dominio continuo del Imperio sobre las personas dependía de que las personas aceptaran el orden social de una sociedad basada en la casta. Volviendo ahora al “Las Bienaventuranzas de S. Lucas”,  Jesús-como-el Cristo, enseñó a sus discípulos a alejarse del Imperio, no se involucre: “A la persona que te golpea en una mejilla, ofrece la otra también…y de la persona que toma su manto, no retenga ni siquiera su túnica “. (Lc 6, 29). El no-co-operación es una poderosa herramienta de resistencia, Ghandi llamó a esta práctica, “resistencia pasiva”, una parte integral de su enseñanza sobre Satyagraha. Ghandi buscó crear nuevas formas alternativas de instituciones políticas y económicas en lugar de oponerse violentamente al sistema opresivo del Imperio Británico. Satyagraha no es una forma de gobierno, sino que es un catalizador espiritual y social que resulta en una conversión y la creación de una nueva armonía en la que todas las personas (y el planeta) se restauran a una relación positiva, amorosa y sostenible.

Lucas anticipó un cambio en el Imperio. Con “no-power” / non-engagement / Satyagraha, el Imperio caerá. Tenga en cuenta que María profesó una inversión del poder imperial: Él ha demostrado poder con su brazo, ha dispersado a los arrogantes de la mente y el corazón. Ha derribado a los gobernantes de sus tronos, pero ha elevado a los humildes. El hambriento lo ha llenado de cosas buenas; a los ricos los ha enviado vacíos … “(Lc 1: 51-53). Los evangelios nos dan ejemplos de cómo las personas de fe se comprometieron con la Resistencia en el pasado. En nuestro contexto específico de vivir en el corazón del Imperio, ¿cómo podemos amar a nuestros enemigos y aquellos que nos odian? ¿Cómo podríamos involucrarnos con aquellos que golpean nuestra mejilla y toman nuestra túnica?

Images from the South Bay protest against the border wall. Women religious and Fr. Jon represented the Catholic presence at the protest. Many groups, including Japanese Americans (Nikkei Resisters), Indivisible, Unitarian Universalists, and students showed up with less than 48 hours notice. Over 200 protests occurred throughout the nation.

Photos from the “Day of Remembrance,” in Japantown. Grupo Solidaridad joined the Japanese American community in commemorating one of the ugliest chapters in American history: the unconstitutional internment of persons of Japanese ancestry during WWII. Over 120,000 people were interned in camps, most of whom were American citizens. Japanese Americans lost property, jobs, and places at university because President FDR acted on a nativist platform of “Yellow Peril.”  Speakers and performers from other communities, including Teresa Castellanos, the Muslim, Latinx, and other communities presented reflections on the theme, “Never Again is Now.” Formerly interned persons spoke and told the audience that anti-Japanese rhetoric preceded the decision to intern Japanese persons. They cautioned that the dangerous trend in nativist rhetoric from Trump and other public officials could very well result in the interment of new groups of people. 
Never again is Now!

PLANNING COMMITTEE
FOR GOOD FRIDAY ACTION

We will be participating in a public action on Good Friday to express solidarity with our brothers and sisters who are applying for asylum at the US-Mexico Border and families separated by deportation and detention. 
 
We need people interested in planning this action: contact Judi Sanchez or Jesus Montoya to be included in the planning committee.
 

COMITE DE PLANEAR
LA ACCION DE VIERNES SANTO

Estaremos participando en una acción pública el Viernes Santo para expresar nuestra solidaridad con nuestros hermanos y hermanas que están solicitando asilo en la frontera de EE. UU. y México y las familias separadas por deportación y detención.
 
Necesitamos personas interesadas en planificar esta acción: comuníquese con Judi Sanchez o Jesus Montoya para ser incluido en el comité de planificación.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

College Scholarships

Amigos de Guadalupe is offering scholarships for entering and continuing college students. Please click the below links for applications and share with students who might be eligible.

Amigos de Guadalupe está ofreciendo becas para estudiantes quien están empezando o continuando sus estudios universitarios. Haga clic en los enlaces de abajo para las aplicaciones y pasen la voz a estudiantes que podrían ser elegibles.

Graduating High School Students
Current College Students

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp