Blog

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Peace I Leave with You

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 24, 2019

NO MISA THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon is away this weekend. Our next mass is June 2 at 9 am at SJSU Newman Chapel,
the corner of San Carlos and 10th.

¡NO MISA este domingo!
P. Jon no esta aquí este fin de semana. La próxima misa sera a 2 de junio a las 9 am en la Capilla de SJSU, la esquina de 10 y S. Carlos.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The Catholic Community of the Diocese of San Jose gathered to celebrate with our Bishop Oscar Cantú on the occasion of his 25th anniversary as priest. Bishop Cantú spoke about the importance of Catholic Charities as helping address poverty, homelessness, hunger, and immigrants rights.

Reflection: Peace I Leave with You

Today’s gospel is taken from one of the series of “Last Supper Discourses” (John 14 – 17). Do not forget that the context of the “Last Supper discourses” is the Passover meal, the Seder.  Commemorating the passage of the Hebrew slaves who, through the urging of Moses and empowerment by God’s Spirit, threw off the yoke of their oppressors and began a new journey of cultural, religious independence and social and economic self-determination.  The prayers and rituals of the Seder demarcate the dimensions of freedom and are intended to help the people remember their true nature as free persons, not slaves. The ritual texts are not history lessons. By reciting prayers and enacting the prescribed rituals, the past is made into the present.  Seder prayers bring the longing for freedom into the present. Participants begin to feel the stirring for justice within themselves and as the Seder continues, the prayer texts urge them to take responsibility for making others free.  What we have in John’s gospel are possibly fragments of Jesus’ own Seder commentary given at a time when the Roman Empire dominated Jewish life. Therefore, we must consider the agitational context of Jesus’ discourse. 

Let us return once again to verse 23 and consider Jesus’ commentary, “Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him.” Recall from previous communiques that the “indwelling of God’s Spirit” was a powerful theme first emerging from Galilean Judaism.  God’s Spirit comes upon prophets and those who live lives of religious and spiritual integrity.  The personal contact of the Spirit is transformative for the individual and for those whom the individual touches because it is God’s work that generates change, not human initiative. In this line of thought, social changes — that is, changes outside of the individual in whom the Spirit indwells, come about because the Spirit within the individual effects key changes in those whom that individual touches.  Now connect this teaching with the context of the Seder.  Do you see the thematic connection of personal awareness and identity and liberation and freedom? Imagine the disciple’s own anxiety levels rise as they are challenged by their rabbi to live free in the context of a regime hell-bent on oppressing them. Jesus-as-the Christ says to them, “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give it to you. Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid.” Jesus-as-the Risen Christ will repeat those words to the disciples when they are huddled in the room with the doors and windows locked after the crucifixion. It would seem that the evangelist was making the point that one must believe that one is free before actually one becomes free.  The role of the Spirit is to agitate the individual into some kind of action. Jesus-as-the Christ states that the indwelling of the Spirit is not without conditions: one must keep the words of Jesus. Disciple must recall what was demanded of them. They must know what Jesus taught them about freedom and apply those words to their present context of oppression. 

Let us take a moment to remember the ethical commitments that Jesus demanded of his disciples (and of us!) as a way to help us understand and ultimately embrace the call for freedom.  (NB, The selected passages are distinguished from dozens of other passages that demand a theological or belief commitment. The passages below pertain to the inner work of being free and corresponding demand to free others).  

Be of service to others  (see Jn 13:1-20, “If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet, you ought to wash one another’s feet. I have given you a model to follow, so that as I have done for you, you should also do.”)

Unbind others from the bonds of death  (see Jn 11:1-44 “The dead man came out, tied hand and foot with burial bands, and his face was wrapped in a cloth. So Jesus said to them, “Untie him and let him go.”)
Open your eyes to others and see them for who they are, not for whom we want them to be. (c.f., Jn 9:1-41, “I came into this world for judgment, so that those who do not see might see, and those who do see might become blind.” Some of the Pharisees who were with him heard this and said to him, “Surely we are not also blind, are we?” Jesus said to them, “If you were blind, you would have no sin; but now you are saying, ‘We see,’ so your sin remains.”)

Be merciful rather than judge others. (See Jn 8:1-11, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” She replied, “No one, sir.” Then Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you. Go, [and] from now on do not sin any more.”)

Do not judge others by what they appear to be, but rather judge on the basis of one’s character. (Jn 7:24, “Stop judging by appearances, but judge justly.” )
Consume the words of Jesus (especially in the context of Eucharist) as a hungry person would consume food. (See Jn 6:22-71, “Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him on the last day.”)

Do not be afraid in times of tribulation. (See Jn 6:16-21, “It is I, do not be afraid.”)

Be confident in being made whole and living your life as a free person. (See Jn 5:1-18, “Take up your mat and walk.”)

Live your life in Spirit and truth, not in shame and self-loathing. (See Jn 4:4-42, “God is Spirit, and those who worship him must worship in Spirit and truth.”)

Live your faith as an affirmation of love for others and for creation. (See Jn 3:1-21, “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through him.”)

Serve the best of who you are to others. (See Jn 2:1-12, “Everyone serves good wine first, and then when people have drunk freely, an inferior one; but you have kept the good wine until now.”)

Follow Christ with a sense of wonder and openness. (See Jn 1:35-51, “Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, I saw you under the fig tree.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel.” Jesus answered and said to him, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this.”).

Weekly Intercessions
Memorial Day

Memorial Day honors the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades.

Hear Our Prayer This Day
In the quiet sanctuaries of our own hearts,
let each of us name and call on the One whose power over us
is great and gentle, firm and forgiving, holy and healing …
You who created us,
who sustain us,
who call us to live in peace,
hear our prayer this day.
Hear our prayer for all who have died,
whose hearts and hopes are known to you alone … Hear our prayer for those who put the welfare of others
ahead of their own
and give us hearts as generous as theirs …
Hear our prayer for those who gave their lives
in the service of others,
and accept the gift of their sacrifice …
Help us to shape and make a world
where we will lay down the arms of war
and turn our swords into ploughshares
for a harvest of justice and peace …
Comfort those who grieve the loss of their loved ones
and let your healing be the hope in our hearts… Hear our prayer this day
and in your mercy answer us
in the name of all that is holy.
The peace of God be with you.

– Austin Fleming

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La Paz os dejo

El evangelio de hoy está tomado de una de las series de “Discursos de la última cena” (Juan 14 – 17). No olvide que el contexto de los “Discursos de la última cena” es la cena de la Pascua, el Seder. Conmemorando el paso de los esclavos hebreos que, a través de la insistencia de Moisés y el poder del Espíritu de Dios, se despojaron del yugo de sus opresores y comenzaron un nuevo viaje de independencia cultural, religiosa y de autodeterminación social y económica. Las oraciones y los rituales del Seder demarcan las dimensiones de la libertad y están destinadas a ayudar a las personas a recordar su verdadera naturaleza como personas libres, no como esclavos. Los textos rituales no son cuentas de la historia de los Judós. Al recitar las oraciones y realizar los rituales prescritos, el pasado se convierte en el presente: las oraciones del Seder traen el anhelo de libertad al presente. Los participantes comienzan a sentir la agitación de la justicia dentro de sí mismos y, a medida que el Seder continúa, los textos de oración los alientan a asumir la responsabilidad de liberar a otros. Lo que tenemos en el evangelio de Juan son posiblemente fragmentos del comentario del propio Seder de Jesús dado en un momento en que el Imperio Romano dominaba la vida judía. Por lo tanto, debemos considerar el contexto agitativo del discurso de Jesús.

Regresemos una vez más al versículo 23 y consideremos el comentario de Jesús: “Quien me quiera, mantendrá mi palabra, y mi Padre lo amará, y vendremos a él y haremos nuestra morada con él”. Recuerde de comunicados anteriores que La “morada del Espíritu de Dios” fue un tema poderoso que surgió por primera vez del judaísmo galileo. El Espíritu de Dios viene sobre los profetas y aquellos que viven vidas de integridad religiosa y espiritual. El contacto personal del Espíritu es transformador para el individuo y para aquellos a quienes el individuo toca porque es la obra de Dios la que genera el cambio, no la iniciativa humana. En esta línea de pensamiento, los cambios sociales, es decir, los cambios fuera del individuo en el que reside el Espíritu, se producen porque el Espíritu dentro de los efectos individuales cambia de manera clave en aquellos a quienes ese individuo toca.

Ahora conecta esta enseñanza con el contexto del Seder. ¿Ves la conexión temática de la conciencia personal y la identidad y la liberación y la libertad? Fija que los niveles de ansiedad del discípulo aumentan a medida que su rabino los desafía a vivir libres en el contexto de un régimen empeñado en oprimirlos. Jesús-como-el Cristo les dice: “La paz os dejo; te doy mi paz. No como el mundo te lo doy. No dejes que tus corazones se angustien o teman ”. Jesús-como-el Cristo-Resucitado les repetirá esas palabras a los discípulos cuando estén acurrucados en la habitación con las puertas y ventanas cerradas después de la crucifixión. Parecería que el evangelista estaba señalando que uno debe creer que uno es libre antes de que realmente se haga libre. El papel del Espíritu es agitar al individuo en algún tipo de acción. Jesús-como-el Cristo afirma que la morada del Espíritu no está exenta de condiciones: uno debe guardar las palabras de Jesús. El discípulo debe recordar lo que se les exigía. Deben saber lo que Jesús les enseñó acerca de la libertad y aplicar esas palabras a su contexto actual de opresión.

Tomemos un momento para recordar los compromisos éticos que Jesús exigió de sus discípulos (¡y de nosotros!) Como una forma de ayudarnos a comprender y, en última instancia, a aceptar el llamado a la libertad. (NB, los pasajes seleccionados se distinguen de docenas de otros pasajes que exigen un compromiso teológico o de creencias. Los pasajes a continuación se refieren al trabajo interno de ser libres y la demanda correspondiente para liberar a otros).
Preste servicio a los demás (vea Jn 13: 1-20, “Si yo, por lo tanto, el maestro y el maestro, les lavé los pies, deberían lavarse los pies unos a los otros. Les he dado un modelo para que los siga, de modo que He hecho por ti, también deberías hacerlo”.)

Desconecte a los demás de los lazos de la muerte (vea Jn 11: 1-44 “Salió el hombre muerto, atado de pies y manos con cintas de entierro, y su rostro estaba envuelto en una tela. Entonces Jesús les dijo:” Desatenlo y dejen él va”.)

Abre tus ojos a los demás y míralos por quienes son, no por quienes queremos que sean. (cf. Jn 9: 1-41, “Vine a este mundo para juzgarme, para que vean los que no ven, y los que vean, se vuelvan ciegos”. Algunos de los fariseos que estaban con él oyeron esto y Le dijo: “Seguro que no somos también ciegos, ¿verdad?” Jesús les dijo: “Si fueras ciego, no tendrías pecado; pero ahora estás diciendo: ‘Vemos’, entonces tu pecado permanece”. )

Sé misericordioso en lugar de juzgar a los demás. (Vea Jn 8: 1-11, “Mujer, ¿dónde están? ¿Nadie te ha condenado?” Ella respondió: “Nadie, señor”. Entonces Jesús dijo: “Tampoco yo te condeno. Ve, [y] desde ahora en adelante no peques más”.)

No juzgue a los demás por lo que parecen ser, sino juzgue sobre la base de su carácter. (Jn 7:24, “Deja de juzgar por las apariencias, pero juzga con justicia”.)
Consumir las palabras de Jesús (especialmente en el contexto de la Eucaristía) como una persona hambrienta consumiría alimentos. (Vea Jn 6: 22-71, “El que come mi carne y bebe mi sangre tiene vida eterna, y yo lo resucitaré el último día”.)

No temas en tiempos de tribulación. (Vea Jn 6: 16-21, “Soy yo, no tenga miedo”.)

Confíe en sentirse completo y viva su vida como una persona libre. (Vea Jn 5: 1-18, “Toma tu camilla y camina”.)

Vive tu vida en espíritu y en verdad, no en vergüenza y falta de autoestima. (Vea Jn 4: 4-42, “Dios es Espíritu, y los que lo adoran deben adorar en Espíritu y en verdad”.)

Vive tu fe como una afirmación de amor por los demás y por la creación. (Vea Jn 3: 1-21, “Porque tanto amó Dios al mundo que dio a su único Hijo, para que todo el que cree en él no perezca sino que tenga la vida eterna. Porque Dios no envió a su Hijo al mundo para condenen al mundo, pero para que el mundo sea salvo por medio de él “.)

Sirve lo mejor de quien eres a los demás. (Vea Jn 2: 1-12, “Todos sirven el buen vino primero, y luego cuando la gente ha bebido libremente, uno inferior; pero usted ha mantenido el buen vino hasta ahora”.)

Sigue a Cristo con un sentido de maravilla y franqueza. (Vea Jn 1: 35-51, “Natanael le dijo:” ¿Cómo me conoces? “Respondió Jesús y le dijo:” Antes de que Felipe te llamara, te vi debajo de la higuera. “Natanael le respondió: Rabí, tú eres el Hijo de Dios; tú eres el Rey de Israel. “Jesús le respondió y le dijo:” ¿Crees porque te dije que te vi debajo de la higuera? * Verás cosas más grandes que esto. ”)

 

Intercesiónes semanales
El Día de los Caídos en Guerra

El Día de los caídos en guerra o Memorial Day es una fecha conmemorativa de carácter federal que tiene lugar en los Estados Unidos de América el último lunes de mayo de cada año, con el objetivo de recordar a los soldados estadouni- denses que murieron en combate. Inicialmente fue estable- cido para conmemorar a los soldados caídos de la Unión americana que participaron en la Guerra Civil estadouni- dense, aunque tras la primera guerra mundial fue extendido para rendir homenaje a todos los soldados estadounidenses fallecidos en las guerras en las que participó ese país.

Los Héroes En Silencio
(Desde las Hermanas Misioneras Auxiliares del Sagrado Corazón)

Caminando sobre la línea,
fatigados y cansados, en los espesos campos de batalla, van los soldados defendiendo su honor,
y su patria que llevan por dentro,
arriesgando su vida,
en medio del peligro de poder quedar dormidos,
en un desafío entre la victoria y la muerte,
que dejarían su sangre derramada,
que tiñen la tierra y los campos vestidos de verde,
que serian los testigos del sufrimiento de los soldados en guerra,
atravesando ríos y praderas,
y en medio del frio que les llega hasta los huesos,
y el calor que les reseca la boca
Pero, como buenos guerreros siguen adelante,
tratando de pasar la línea imaginaria
entre las oscuras noches,
llevando la esperanza de volver,
y repitiendo las palabras “Dios mío ayúdame ”
y llevando en su mente la palabra “Victoria”
para alzar las manos de alegría
y no volver con la cabeza viendo hacia el suelo,
o en un ataúd, por defender su patria,
y que los reconozcan como unos verdaderos héroes,
por ser quienes sufrieron en los campos,
y que hasta dejaron sus mejores amigos dormidos.

PARA LOS SOLDADOS QUE DAN SU VIDA

POR DEFENDER SU PATRIA QUE LOS VIO NACER.

LOS HÉROES EN SILENCIO.

News – Noticias
NO misa solidaridad this Sunday, but everyone is invited to Fernanda’s Quinceaños Mass on Saturday at 2 pm at the Newman Center.
Also, please mark your calendars: we will be having a community dialog on Sunday June 2 at 10:30 am after Misa at the Newman Center about the children who died while under US custody.  We will dialog about how we might honor their memory with an all-faiths religious service and/or requiem mass and community rally.  All are welcome! Invite others!  

NO misa solidaridad este domingo, pero todos están invitados a la Misa de Quinceaños de Fernanda el sábado a las 2 pm en la Capilla de SJSU.
Además, marque sus calendarios: tendremos un diálogo con la comunidad el domingo 2 de junio a las 10:30 am después de Misa en el Centro Newman sobre los niños que murieron mientras estaban bajo la custodia de los EE. UU. Vamos a dialogar sobre cómo podríamos honrar su memoria con un servicio religioso de todas las fes y / o una misa y una acción comunitario. ¡Todos son bienvenidos! ¡Corre la voz!

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Session: 
June 4th  7 pm – 9 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español:
28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Community dialogue about the children dying in US custody at the border Sunday, June 2 at 10:30 am

Diálogo comunitario sobre los niños que mueren bajo custodia estadounidense en la frontera el domingo 2 de junio a las 10:30 am

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Catholic Charities Appeal Sunday – Setting Love Into Action

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 16, 2019

NO MISA THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon is preaching at various parishes
for Catholic Charities Annual Appeal.
Please join him at one of those masses.

¡NO MISA este domingo!
P. Jon esta predicando en varias parroquias
por la Campaña Anual de Caridades Católicas.
Favor acompaña el Padre en unas de estas misas.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Members of Grupo Solidaridad and visitors to Misa del Grupo de Solidaridad share in small groups the way that they will live out loving others at work, in school and in neighborhoods. In a society fraught with division fueled by the language of intolerance and hate, spaces like Grupo Solidaridad provide opportunities to connect with others across the differences of language, age, and economic standing.

Reflection: 

Catholic Charities Appeal Sunday – 
Setting Love Into Action

In the mid-1960’s our country underwent deep soul searching as we debated the issues of poverty, war, and race. At that time social divisions were strong and sometimes these divisions descended into violence. Dr. Martin Luther King recognized that the fight for equality would be met with serious opposition. Grounded in non-violence, Dr. King and his followers made a commitment to find love, even in the face of hate. In his book, “Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?” Dr. King wrote, “Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”  Such a beautiful quote was born from his faith.  Dr. King was a preacher and he believed that love, not hate, will transform the world.

This spirit of transformation is found in today’s gospel. Jesus preached, “I give you a new commandment: love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another.”  Today’s set of readings is about setting love into action.

As Jesus formed and shaped his believers, he wanted them to know that whatever they do, they would have to do it in the spirit of love.  In John’s gospel love is the central theme: God came into the world not to condemn us, but rather, to love the world. God’s love is transformative. Recall our Lenten scrutiny readings: Jesus embraced the Samaritan woman whom everyone else rejected.  This woman was scorned by everyone in the village and so she chose to fetch water when no one else was around.  Rather than agreeing with the majority, Jesus chose to sit with the woman and offer her friendship. In the second scrutiny, the man born blind gained more and more confidence to stand up for himself because he recognized that Jesus’ loving touch healed him. Through the love of God, this young man’s confidence grew. He knew who he was and then he knew who Jesus was. And in the final scrutiny, Lazarus stood at the open door of the tomb and rather than untying the burial clothes himself, Jesus called on the community to come forward and set Lazarus free. The community came to embrace Lazarus whom they thought had succumbed to the dark night of death. They untied him and Lazarus’ life was restored when the people embraced him.

These stories are stories of setting love into action. As Catholics, we too are called to demonstrate love. We are called to be, as our second reading says, “born anew.” Our newness is born when those we have touched in ministry or in practical support feel the loving support of others, especially during the most difficult of times. Our faith calls us to join others on a journey — that is, to walk alongside those who struggle with life because of poverty, poor health or hunger.  We are called to journey with those burdened by violence, the lack of housing, or discrimination. As Paul and Barnabas strengthened the disciples to persevere in faith in difficult times, we too must take on the task of encouraging others to persevere. Our encouragement is not mere words, it is the commitment to journey with those who struggle, even in the hardest of times.

An older woman who had been homeless for 17 years, moving from couch to couch, garage to garage, living under the stars with a blue tarp and in vehicles was asked by a social worker what she really wanted. To protect her privacy, I’ll call her Gloria. Did Gloria want to remain unhoused? Did she mind the cold? Did she mind the uncertainty of where her next meal was coming from?  The social worker realized that Gloria most importantly needed someone to listen to her. Gloria needed someone to understand her multiple personal challenges, not someone to judge her. Gloria’s greatest challenge toward becoming self-sufficient was not the lack of opportunity; it was the lack of real human contact.  This social worker was from Catholic Charities.

Gloria’s social worker knew that Gloria needed a kind of treatment that would encourage personal growth that would eventually transform Gloria from within. This transformation led Gloria to believe enough in herself so that she would follow through on appointments, make the deadlines for applications for housing and maintain an emotionally stable life. Today Gloria is living in a beautiful affordable housing unit built by Charities Housing and supported by Catholic Charities’ Supportive Houses Services.

This week is our annual Catholic Charities appeal. Gloria’s story is not unique; there are thousands of people helped each year by Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County. Catholic Charities programs are innovative and participants are offered opportunities that lead to individual progress. In the spirit of love we are asking that all of us take a minute to consider how we might support the ministry of Catholic Charities this year.  Will we walk alongside those whom we are called to serve? Will we join them on their journey?

Please use this link: https://www.catholiccharitiesscc.org/donate to make a donation to Catholic Charities. Through your generosity, you will help the next Gloria on her journey of hope.

Weekly Intercessions
Over the past few weeks our Advocacy and Community Engagement project at Our Lady of Refuge has engaged approximately 50 people in “accompaniment training.”  These volunteers will be participating in a pilot program for Parish Engagement called: “Accompaniment with Service Navigation.” This program is designed to help regular people develop the skills to help those who come to the parish for services (e.g., food, shelter, social services, etc…). Volunteers are training to become “service navigators”  who will help those in need find their way to get connected to Catholic Charities programs and external agencies that offer social services. While service navigation is a practical resource, it is not the heart of our work.  The real work of the volunteers is to “accompany” people along the process of becoming self-sufficient.  Our accompaniment training teaches people to be active listeners and companions along the journey. They are taught to create the space so that individuals in need are able to reach their goals of self-reliance.  Through the process of “accompaniment” volunteers create space for those being helped to become more self-reliant. Volunteers are taught how to help clients figure out for themselves ways that they can reach their own goals. When people reach their goals, they grow in confidence, connect to social support systems and participate in society and ultimately advocate for themselves by using their own voice, their own story. This entire process of growth is called “self-empowerment” because one is encouraged to discover one’s own power and to take back control over one’s life. When all is said and done, would this program “lift” a person out of poverty? Not directly; however, this program helps individuals and families develop the essential emotional and psychological tools needed to ensure stability and fortitude in the face of dealing with the challenges of poverty and the ability for individuals to do strategic planning for their future goals. Maybe some will decide to finish their schooling and train for a better job, others may decide to take control over their health and diet and work on preventative health measures rather than relying on the emergency room at the hospital. Let us pray for those who are being trained in this new ministry: that they will become powerful neighborhood resources and that through their ministry will become more compassionate. We pray also for those who will be served: that they will find their own voice and advocate for what they need to become self-reliant.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 

Domingo de Caridades Católicas –
Poniendo el Amor en Acción

A mediados de la década de 1960, nuestro país experimentó una profunda búsqueda de conciencia mientras debatíamos los temas de la pobreza, la guerra y la raza. En ese momento las divisiones sociales eran fuertes y, a veces, estas divisiones descendían hacia la violencia. El Dr. Martin Luther King reconoció que la lucha por la igualdad se encontraría con una oposición seria. Con sus pies plantadas en la no-violencia, el Dr. King y sus seguidores se comprometieron a encontrar el amor, incluso frente al odio. En su libro, “¿Adónde vamos desde aquí: el caos o la comunidad?”, El Dr. King escribió: “Devolver la violencia por la violencia multiplica la violencia, agregando una oscuridad más profunda a una noche ya sin estrellas. La oscuridad no puede expulsar a la oscuridad; Sólo la luz puede hacer eso. El odio no puede expulsar al odio; solo el amor puede hacer eso”. Una cita tan hermosa nació de su fe, el Dr. King era un predicador y creía que el amor, no el odio, transformará el mundo.

Este espíritu de transformación se encuentra en el evangelio de hoy. Jesús predicó: Te doy un nuevo mandamiento: amaos unos a otros. Como te he amado, también deberías amarte el uno al otro”.  Las lecturas de hoy trata de poner en práctica el amor.

Cuando Jesús formó a sus creyentes, quiso que supieran que hicieran lo que hicieran, tendrían que hacerlo con el espíritu de amor. En el evangelio de Juan, el amor es el tema central: Dios vino al mundo no para condenarnos, sino para amar al mundo. El amor de Dios es transformador. Recordemos las lecturas de los escrutinios de Cuaresma: Jesús abrazó a la mujer samaritana a quien todos los demás rechazaron. Esta mujer fue despreciada por todos en el pueblo y por eso eligió ir a buscar agua cuando no había nadie más alrededor. En lugar de estar de acuerdo con la mayoría, Jesús eligió sentarse con la mujer y ofrecerle su amistad. En el segundo escrutinio, el hombre que nació ciego ganó más y más confianza para defenderse porque reconoció que el toque amoroso de Jesús lo había curado. A través del amor de Dios, la confianza de este joven creció. Sabía quién era y luego sabía quién era Jesús. Y en el escrutinio final, Lázaro se paró en la puerta abierta de la tumba y, en lugar de desatarse la ropa del entierro, Jesús llamó a la comunidad a presentarse y liberar a Lázaro. La comunidad vino a abrazar a Lázaro, a quien creían que había sucumbido a la noche oscura de la muerte. Lo desataron y la vida de Lázaro se restauró cuando la gente lo abrazó.

Estas historias son historias de poner el amor en acción. Como católicos, nosotros también estamos llamados a demostrar amor. Estamos llamados a ser, como dice nuestra segunda lectura, “nacer de nuevo”. Nuestra novedad nace cuando los que hemos tocado en el ministerio o en el apoyo práctico sienten el apoyo amoroso de los demás, especialmente durante los momentos más difíciles. Nuestra fe nos llama a unirnos a otros en un viaje, es decir, a caminar junto a aquellos que luchan con la vida por la pobreza, la mala salud o el hambre. Estamos llamados a viajar con los agobiados por la violencia, la falta de vivienda o la discriminación. Cuando Pablo y Bernabé fortalecieron a los discípulos para que perseveraran en la fe en tiempos difíciles, nosotros también debemos asumir la tarea de alentar a otros a perseverar. Nuestro aliento no son meras palabras, es el compromiso de acompañar con aquellos que luchan, incluso en los momentos más difíciles.

Una señora mayor que había estado sin hogar durante 17 años, mudándose de un sofá a otro, de un garaje a otro, viviendo bajo las estrellas con una lona azul y en vehículos le preguntó qué quería realmente. Para proteger su privacidad, la llamaré “Gloria.” ¿Gloria quería quedarse sin vivienda? ¿Le importaba el frío? ¿Le importaba la incertidumbre de dónde venía su próxima comida? El trabajador social se dio cuenta de que Gloria lo más importante era que alguien la escuchara. Gloria necesitaba que alguien entendiera sus múltiples desafíos personales, no alguien que la juzgara. El mayor desafío de Gloria para ser autosuficiente no fue la falta de oportunidades; fue la falta de contacto humano real. Esta trabajadora social era de Caridades Católicas.

La trabajadora social de Gloria sabía que Gloria necesitaba un tipo de tratamiento que alentara el crecimiento personal que eventualmente transformaría a Gloria desde adentro. Esta transformación llevó a Gloria a creer lo suficiente en sí misma para poder cumplir con las citas, establecer los plazos para las solicitudes (aplicaciones) de vivienda y mantener una vida emocionalmente estable. Hoy Gloria vive en una hermosa apartamento de vivienda asequible construida por “Charities Housing” y apoyada por los servicios de Caridades Católicas.

Esta semana es nuestro atractivo anual de Caridades Católicas. La historia de Gloria no es única; Hay miles de personas ayudadas cada año por Caridades Católicas del Condado de Santa Clara. Los programas de Caridades Católicas son innovadores y a los participantes se les ofrecen oportunidades que conducen al progreso individual. En el espíritu de amor, pedimos que todos nos tomemos un minuto para considerar cómo podríamos apoyar el ministerio de Caridades Católicas este año. ¿Caminaremos junto a aquellos a quienes estamos llamados a servir? ¿Nos uniremos a ellos en su viaje?

Por favor use este enlace: https://www.catholiccharitiesscc.org/donate para hacer una donación a Caridades Católicas. A través de su generosidad, ayudará a la próxima Gloria en su viaje de esperanza.

Intercesiónes semanales
Durante las últimas semanas, nuestro proyecto de Promoción y Participación Comunitaria en Ntra. Sra de Refugio ha involucrado a aproximadamente 50 personas en la “capacitación de acompañamiento”. Estos voluntarios participarán en un programa piloto para Participación Parroquial llamado: “Acompañamiento con Servicio de Navegación”. Este programa está diseñado para ayudar la gente del pueblo a desarrollar las habilidades para ayudar a quienes acuden a la parroquia para obtener servicios (por ejemplo, comida, vivienda, servicios sociales, etc.). Los voluntarios se están capacitando para convertirse en “navegadores de servicios” que ayudarán a los necesitados a encontrar la manera de conectarse con los programas de Caridades Católicas y las agencias externas que ofrecen servicios sociales. Si bien la navegación de servicio es un recurso práctico, no es el núcleo de nuestro trabajo. La clave del trabajo es acompañamiento: que es de “acompañar” a las personas a lo largo del proceso de volverse autosuficientes. Nuestro entrenamiento de acompañamiento enseña a las personas a ser acompañantes activos a lo largo del camino. Se les enseña a crear el espacio para que las personas necesitadas puedan alcanzar sus metas de autosuficiencia. A través del proceso de “acompañamiento”, los voluntarios crean un espacio para que aquellos que reciben ayuda se vuelvan más autosuficientes. A los voluntarios se les enseña cómo ayudar a los clientes a descubrir por sí mismos formas en que pueden alcanzar sus propios objetivos. Cuando las personas alcanzan sus metas, crecen en confianza, se conectan a los sistemas de apoyo social y participan en la sociedad y, en última instancia, se defienden utilizando su propia voz, su propia historia. Todo este proceso de crecimiento se denomina “autoempoderamiento” porque uno se alienta a descubrir su propio poder y a recuperar el control sobre su vida. Cuando todo esté dicho y hecho, ¿este programa “sacaría” a una persona de la pobreza? No directamente; sin embargo, este programa ayuda a los individuos y las familias a desarrollar las “herramientas” emocionales y psicológicas esenciales necesarias para garantizar la estabilidad y la fortaleza frente a los desafíos de la pobreza y la capacidad de los individuos para realizar una planificación estratégica para sus objetivos futuros. Tal vez algunos decidan seguir adelante en su educación y entrenarse para un mejor trabajo, otros pueden decidir tomar control de su salud y su dieta y trabajar en medidas preventivas de salud en lugar de depender de la sala de emergencias del hospital. Oremos por aquellos que están siendo capacitados en este nuevo ministerio: que se conviertan en poderosos recursos del vecindario y que a través de su ministerio sean más compasivos. También oramos por aquellos a quienes servirán: que encuentren su propia voz y aboguen por lo que necesitan para ser autosuficientes.

Fr. Jon’s Sunday Outreach Schedule
Horario del domingo de
Caridades Católicas por el P. Jon
 

8:15 a.m. – Christ the King – español
*Presiding* 10:00 a.m. – St. Joseph Mountain View – English
1:00 p.m. – St. Lucy – español
5:00 p.m. – Our Lady of Guadalupe – español
:30 p.m. – Our Lady of Guadalupe – English
 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Sessions: May 21st and June 4th.
7 pm – 9:00 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español : 14 y 28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9:00 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Non-dual Jesus

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 10, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD 
THIS SUNDAY May 12!

This week’s Misa de Solidaridad
May 12 at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts. 

¡MISA SOLIDARIDAD
12 de Mayo!

La próxima Misa de Solidaridad 
12 de mayo a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Most of us were taught that God would love us if and when we change. In fact, God loves you so that you can change. What empowers change, what makes you desirous of change is the experience of love. It is that inherent experience of love that becomes the engine of change.

– Richard Rohr

Reflection: The Non-dual Jesus

This week’s reading is taken from the 10th Chapter of John with four declarative sentences: “My sheep hear my voice; I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish. No one can take them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all, and no one can take them out of the Father’s hand. The Father and I are one.” These verses conclude with the affirmation that Jesus and the Creator are not separate “things” but that both are ONE.  In today’s reflection we will work backwards beginning with the last declaration: “The Father and I are one.”
Jn 10:30 is a definite statement that Jesus is full Divinity and full Humanity put together. There is no duality (meaning, the separation of Divine from Human) in Jesus’ nature: there is only unity, that is, non-duality. The concept that Jesus is fully Divine and fully Human is indeed a difficult concept to logically string together because logically one is either Divine or Human: One cannot be both. Believing this non-logical assertion is unique to Christians and therefore it is something that  Christians are obliged to not simply believe, but to understand.

The total unity of the Divine and Human in Christ is called the Incarnation. (Keep in mind that one cannot therefore reduce the Incarnation to the Nativity virgin birth narrative of Luke and Matthew). One must struggle through John’s gospel to not merely believe but understand the foundational belief of Christian theology. Richard Rohr, OFM, a pre-eminent Catholic spiritual master and Catholic thought leader stated that basic Christian doctrines cannot be properly understood without embracing the concept of the non-dual nature of Jesus Christ.  (See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvg2DgjVgbE for a very brief conversation with Richard Rohr on non-dualism).

Western Christian mystics understood the mystery of the Incarnation because their focus was on the relationship with God, that is to say the direct experience of being in the Holy Presence. In mystical ecstasy, one is not separated from God, but enveloped in the Mystery itself. in Franciscan theology one does not understand the concept of Incarnation without first having the experience. As a Franciscan, Rohr’s approach is to embrace the interchange between understanding and experience. Unfortunately most Christians do not have the opportunity to read Franciscan theology or undergo training for mysticism. Most Christians would have a hard time giving up their reliance on the use of language to come to an understanding of the Incarnation. The over-reliance on coming to faith by way of doctrine rather than by having a direct experience of the Divine came about when Christians moved further and further away from their Jewish origins.

Christians turned to Greek philosophical categories to understand the Incarnation. This development in the history of the Church had mixed results.  On one hand the use of Greek philosophy set Christianity on a trajectory of establishing a stronghold in the West. On the other hand, the reliance on Greek philosophical methodology and categories pushed the Church to push believing in God over experiencing God. The bulk of the Christian faithful were taught about Christ, but were not taught how to experience Christ and as a result when came time for Trinity Sunday when the subject of Incarnation is central to the liturgical readings and prayers, Christians (including preachers) merely stumbled through the prayer texts and readings without fully grasping the depth of the Mystery. Rohr suggests that the way that Christians might come to better understand the Incarnation is not through the mind, but through the heart and in the context of experience.

Look at Jn 10:27, “My sheep hear my voice; I know them, and they follow me.” The verse suggests that there is a degree of recognition between the “sheep” and Jesus-as-the Christ. People follow Christ because they  “heard” Christ’s voice. The verse presumes a familiarity with the voice which implies a relationship of trust. One does not follow a strange voice, but rather a trusted voice. (Jn 10:5, “…they will not follow a stranger; they will run away from him, because they do not recognize the voice of strangers.”) The evangelist John has embedded the theme of “love” (chesed, חֶסֶד) throughout the gospel. Love demands mutuality, action and even self-sacrifice (see Jn 10:15, “I will lay down my life for the sheep.” and later in Jn 15:13, “There is no greater love than tp lay one’s life for one’s friends”). Love/chesed demands a mutually-transforming relationship. Jesus-as-rabbi and the Christ taught his disciples that love/chesed is the beginning and end of what he was sent to do in the world. Those that had to ask if he was the Christ, were stuck in wanting to know what they should believe rather than being caught up in the love/chesed of the Rabbi Jesus. (See Jn 10:24 the disciples said, “How long are you going to keep us in suspense? If you are the Messiah, tell us plainly.”  Jesus responded that those who asked did not experience the works of love/chesed —presumably because their faith was predicated on believing rather than experiencing — were not among the flock. Only those who were caught up in the love/chesed that Jesus manifested were among the flock that would follow Christ. The bond between those who were caught up in the love/chesed of Jesus would not be separated from him. They too would be swept up in the non-dual nature of Christ. In short, they would be caught up in the Eternal. (Jn 10:28, “I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish. No one can take them out of my hand.”)

The challenge Christian leaders face today is not about the dwindling numbers of people in the pews, but whether Christians are creating space in which people can encounter the Divine. When Christian space is taken up by mean-spirited preaching intended to shame people into submission and apologias for the Empire or when clergy issue public absolutions to an unrepentant dictator and sport garb of lace and gold while obsessing about the intricacies of  liturgical rubrics, where gave they made room for the Divine? There are “other sheep” that are seeking an encounter with the Divine (see Jn 10: 16, “I have other sheep that do not belong to this fold. These also I must lead, and they will hear my voice, and there will be one flock, one shepherd.”)  We must clear the space for the Encounter. We must silence ourselves and trust in the experience that cannot nor should not be controlled. Let the Encounter and the experience become our way to understand the voice that bids us, “Follow me.”

Weekly Intercessions
Prayers for All Women” by Leah D. Schade. Leah is the Assistant Professor of Preaching and Worship at Lexington Theological Seminary (Kentucky) and author of the book Creation-Crisis Preaching: Ecology, Theology, and the Pulpit (Chalice Press, 2015). 
You can follow Leah on Twitter at @LeahSchade, and on Facebook at  https://www.facebook.com/LeahDSchade/.
 

As God’s beloved people, let us pray for the church, the whole human family, and God’s good Creation.

A We pray for women who are pregnant; those who are waiting with joyful expectation, and those who are filled with uncertainty and fear; we pray for women whose pregnancies are high-risk, and whose lives are in danger in the birthing process.  Hear us, Mothering God,

All:  Your mercy is great.

A  We pray for women and men who long to be parents, but who struggle with infertility.  Join their cries with those of Sarah and Abraham, Hannah and Elkanah, Elizabeth and Zecharias, that your will may be done in their lives.  Hear us, God of Life,

All:  Your mercy is great.

A   We pray for women who are mothers, either by birth, by adoption, or through foster care.  We pray that they may be supported in their mothering task by the men and other women in their lives; that their children may be provided with sufficient food, shelter and healthcare.  Hear us, Mothering Jesus.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A We pray for women who have lost children, either in utero, through sickness, through war and violence, or through tragic accident.  Comfort them, Holy Spirit with your everlasting presence and assure them of new life.  Hear us, Mothering Christ.

All:  Your mercy is great.

We pray for women who are incarcerated; women who have been abusive; women who have been hurtful and neglectful.  Hear us, Mothering Spirit.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A We pray for women who give of themselves not just through childbearing, but with their intellect, their skills, their gifts, and their physical abilities.  Bless all women, that they may receive equal compensation for their work, may be protected from abuse and harassment, and may be valued as unique individuals.  Hear us, Holy God.

All: Your mercy is great.

We pray for those who are transitioning, those who are seeking to understand who God has created them to be in their bodies, minds and spirits.  May they be protected from danger during their time of vulnerability, and guided by those who love and support them.   Hear us, Holy God.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A We pray for women who strive to protect and advocate for those most vulnerable – children, the poor, God’s Creation, the disenfranchised, other women, and those men and women whose voices go unheard.  Hear us, Holy Jesus.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A  We pray for those for whom this is a day of mourning and sadness.  For those who have lost mothers and other important women in their lives, that they may be comforted with the peace that passes all understanding.  Hear us, Comforting Spirit.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A We give thanks for women who have been our mothers, grandmothers, aunts, sisters, daughters, life-partners, and friends.  We give thanks for men who have mothered us with their own caring, affection, nurturing, and friendship.  We lift to you now the names of those who have mirrored your mothering spirit, Holy God. (congregation is invited to say names aloud) . . .

Give them your grace and bless them in their lives.  Hear us, Mothering God.

All:  Your mercy is great.

A For who else does the church pray today? . . . For all those we name, and for those who have no one to name them, Hear us, O God.

All:  Your mercy is great.

P   Holy God, we lift our prayers to you through the Holy Spirit in hope, entrusting all for whom we pray to your great goodness and mercy, made known to us in Jesus Christ, our Savior.

All:  Amen.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: El Señor que es Unico

La lectura de esta semana está tomada del Capítulo 10 de Juan con cuatro oraciones declarativas: “Mis ovejas oyen mi voz; Yo las conozco y ellas me siguen. Yo les doy vida eterna, y nunca perecerán. Nadie puede quitarlos de mi mano. Mi Padre, que me los ha dado, es más grande que todos, y nadie puede sacarlos de la mano del Padre. El Padre y yo somos uno “. Estos versículos concluyen con la afirmación de que Jesús y el Creador no son “cosas separadas, sino que ambas son UNA. En la reflexión de hoy trabajaremos al revés comenzando con la última declaración: “El Padre y yo somos uno”.

Jn 10:30 es una afirmación definitiva de que Jesús es la Divinidad plena y la Humanidad juntas. No hay dualidad (es decir, la separación de lo Divino de lo Humano) en la naturaleza de Jesús: solo hay unidad, es decir, no-dualidad. El concepto de que Jesús es totalmente divino y completamente humano es, de hecho, un concepto difícil de unir lógicamente porque lógicamente uno es divino o humano: uno no puede ser ambos. Creer que esta afirmación no lógica es exclusiva de los cristianos y, por lo tanto, es algo que los cristianos están obligados a no solo creer, sino a comprender.

La unidad total de lo Divino y lo Humano en Cristo se llama la Encarnación. (Tenga en cuenta que, por lo tanto, no se puede reducir la Encarnación a la narrativa de nacimiento virgen de Natividad de Lucas y Mateo). Uno debe luchar a través del evangelio de Juan para no simplemente creer, sino comprender la creencia fundamental de la teología cristiana. Richard Rohr, OFM, un maestro espiritual católico preeminente y líder de pensamiento católico declaró que las doctrinas cristianas básicas no pueden entenderse adecuadamente sin abrazar el concepto de la naturaleza nodual de Jesucristo. (Consulte https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvg2DgjVgbE para una breve conversación con Richard Rohr sobre el nodualismo).

Los místicos cristianos occidentales entendieron el misterio de la Encarnación porque se enfocaban en la relación con Dios, es decir, la experiencia directa de estar en la Santa Presencia. En el éxtasis místico, uno no está separado de Dios, sino que está envuelto en el Misterio mismo. En la teología franciscana uno no entiende el concepto de la Encarnación sin tener primero la experiencia. Como franciscano, el enfoque de Rohr es abrazar el intercambio entre comprensión y experiencia. Desafortunadamente, la mayoría de los cristianos no tienen la oportunidad de leer teología franciscana o de recibir capacitación para el misticismo. A la mayoría de los cristianos les resultaría difícil renunciar a su confianza en el uso del lenguaje para llegar a un entendimiento de la Encarnación. La excesiva dependencia de llegar a la fe por medio de la doctrina en lugar de tener una experiencia directa de lo Divino se produjo cuando los cristianos se alejaron más y más de sus orígenes judíos.

Los cristianos recurrieron a las categorías filosóficas griegas para entender la Encarnación. Este desarrollo en la historia de la Iglesia tuvo resultados mixtos. Por un lado, el uso de la filosofía griega sitúa al cristianismo en una trayectoria de establecimiento de una fortaleza en el oeste. Por otro lado, la dependencia de la metodología y las categorías empujaron a la Iglesia a empujar a creer en Dios, no a experimentar a Dios. A la mayoría de los fieles cristianos se les enseñó acerca de Cristo, pero no se les enseñó cómo experimentar a Cristo y, como resultado, cuando llegó el domingo para la Trinidad, cuando el tema de la Encarnación es fundamental para entender las lecturas y oraciones litúrgicas, los cristianos (incluidos los predicadores) simplemente tropezaron a través de los textos de oración y las lecturas sin comprender plenamente la profundidad del Misterio. Rohr sugiere que la forma en que los cristianos pueden llegar a entender mejor la Encarnación no es a través de la mente, sino a través del corazón y en el contexto de la experiencia.

Mira Jn 10:27, Mis ovejas oyen mi voz; Los conozco y ellos me siguen”. El versículo sugiere que existe un grado de reconocimiento entre las “ovejas” y Jesús-comoel Cristo. Las personas siguen a Cristo porque escucharonla voz de Cristo. El verso supone una familiaridad con la voz que implica una relación de confianza. Uno no sigue una voz extraña, sino una voz confiable. (Jn 10: 5, “… no seguirán a un extraño; huirán de él, porque no reconocen la voz de los extraños”.) El evangelista Juan ha incorporado el tema del “amor” (jesed,) a lo largo del evangelio. El amor exige la reciprocidad, la acción e incluso el sacrificio personal (ver Jn 10:15, “Daré mi vida por las ovejas”. Más adelante, en Jn 15:13, “No hay amor más grande que dar la vida por los amigos”). El amor / jesed exige una relación mutuamente transformadora. Jesús-comorabino-y-el-Cristo enseñaron a sus discípulos que el amor / jesed es el principio y el fin de lo que fue enviado a hacer en el mundo. Aquellos que tenían que preguntar si él era el Cristo, estaban atrapados en querer saber qué debían creer en lugar de quedar atrapados en el amor / jesed del Rabino Jesús. (Vea Jn 10:24, los discípulos dijeron: ¿Cuánto tiempo nos mantendrá en suspenso? Si usted es el Mesías, díganos claramente”. Jesús respondió que aquellos que preguntaron no experimentaron las obras de amor / jesed, presumiblemente porque su fe se basaba en creer más que en experimentar, no estaban entre el rebaño. Solo aquellos que estaban atrapados en el amor / jesed que Jesús manifestó estaban entre el rebaño que seguiría a Cristo. El vínculo entre los que estaban atrapados en el el amor / jesed de Jesús no se separaría de él. Ellos también serían arrastrados por la naturaleza no dual de Cristo. En resumen, serían atrapados en el Eterno (Jn 10:28, “Les doy eternos. vida, y nunca perecerán. Nadie puede quitarlos de mi mano “).

El desafío que enfrentan los líderes cristianos hoy en día no se trata de la disminución del número de personas en los bancos, sino de si los cristianos están haciendo un espacio en el que las personas puedan encontrar lo Divino. Cuando el espacio cristiano está ocupado por una predicación de espíritu mezquino con la intención de avergonzar a las personas para que se sometan y pedir disculpas por el Imperio o cuando el clero emita absoluciones públicas a un dictador impenitente y ponen vestidos de encaje y oro mientras se obsesiona con las complejidades de las rúbricas litúrgicas ¿Dónde dieron lugar a encontrar y experimentar la divinidad? Hay “otras ovejas” que están buscando un encuentro con lo Divino (ver Jn 10: 16, “Tengo otras ovejas que no pertenecen a este redil. Estas también las debo guiar, y oirán mi voz, y habrá sea ​​un rebaño, un pastor”. Debemos purificar el espacio para el Encuentro. Debemos silenciarnos y confiar en la experiencia que no puede ni debe controlarse. Deje que el Encuentro y la experiencia se conviertan en nuestra manera de entender la voz que ofrece nosotros, “gueme”.

Intercesiónes semanales
 “Oraciones para todas las mujeres” por Leah D. Schade. Leah es profesora asistente de Predicación y Adoración en el Seminario Teológico de Lexington (Kentucky) y autora del libro Predicación de Crisis y Crisis: Ecología, Teología y el Púlpito (Chalice Press, 2015).
Puede seguir a Leah en Twitter en @LeahSchade, y en Facebook en https://www.facebook.com/LeahDSchade/.
 
Oramos por las mujeres que están embarazadas; aquellos que esperan con gozosa espera, y aquellos que están llenos de incertidumbre y temor; oramos por las mujeres cuyos embarazos son de alto riesgo y cuyas vidas están en peligro en el proceso de parto. Escúchanos, Dios Madre.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por mujeres y hombres que anhelan ser padres, pero que luchan con la infertilidad. Únete a sus gritos con los de Sarah y Abraham, Hannah y Elkanah, Elizabeth y Zecharias, para que tu voluntad se haga en sus vidas. Escúchanos, Dios de la Vida,

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que son madres, ya sea por nacimiento, por adopción o por cuidado de crianza. Oramos para que los hombres y otras mujeres en su vida puedan apoyarlos en su tarea de maternidad; para que sus hijos reciban suficiente comida, refugio y atención médica. Escúchanos, Madre de Jesús.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que han perdido hijos, ya sea en el útero, a través de la enfermedad, a través de la guerra y la violencia, o por un trágico accidente. Consuélalas, Espíritu Santo con tu presencia eterna y asegúrales una nueva vida. Escúchanos, Madre Crística.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que están encarceladas; mujeres que han sido abusivas; Mujeres que han sido hirientes y negligentes. Escúchanos, Espíritu Materno.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que se dan a sí mismas no solo a través de la maternidad, sino también con su intelecto, sus habilidades, sus dones y sus capacidades físicas. Bendiga a todas las mujeres, para que puedan recibir una compensación igual por su trabajo, se les pueda proteger del abuso y el acoso, y se las pueda valorar como individuos únicos. Escúchanos, Santo Dios.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por aquellos que están en transición, aquellos que buscan entender quién Dios los ha creado para que estén en sus cuerpos, mentes y espíritus. Que estén protegidos contra el peligro durante su tiempo de vulnerabilidad y guiados por quienes los aman y los apoyan. Escúchanos, Santo Dios.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por las mujeres que luchan por proteger y abogar por las personas más vulnerables: los niños, los pobres, la Creación de Dios, los marginados, otras mujeres y aquellos hombres y mujeres cuyas voces no se escuchan. Escúchanos, santo Jesús.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Oramos por aquellos para quienes este es un día de luto y tristeza. Para aquellos que han perdido madres y otras mujeres importantes en sus vidas, que puedan ser consolados con la paz que supera toda comprensión. Escúchanos, Consolador Espíritu.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

Agradecemos a las mujeres que han sido nuestras madres, abuelas, tías, hermanas, hijas, compañeras de vida y amigas. Damos gracias por los hombres que nos han educado con su propio cuidado, afecto, crianza y amistad. Ahora te elevamos los nombres de aquellos que han reflejado tu espíritu maternal, Santo Dios. (Se invita a la congregación a decir los nombres en voz alta). . .

Dales tu gracia y bendícelos en sus vidas. Escúchanos, Dios Madre.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

¿Por quién más ora la iglesia hoy? . . . Por todos aquellos a quienes nombramos, y por aquellos que no tienen a nadie que los nombre, escúchanos, oh Dios.

Todos:  Tu misericordia es grande.

P Santo Dios, elevamos nuestras oraciones hacia ti a través del Espíritu Santo con esperanza, confiando a todos por quienes oramos a tu gran bondad y misericordia, que se nos dio a conocer en Jesucristo, nuestro Salvador.

Todos:  Amén.

 
 

Faith does not need to push the river because faith is able to trust that there is a river. The river is flowing. We are in it.

La fe no necesita empujar el río porque la fe puede confiar en que hay un río. El rio esta fluyendo Estamos en ello.

― Richard Rohr

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Sessions: May 21st and June 4th.
7 pm – 9:00 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español : 14 y 28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9:00 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Love is Faith in Action

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 3, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD 
THIS SUNDAY May 5!

This week’s Misa de Solidaridad
May 5 at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts. 

¡MISA SOLIDARIDAD
5 de Mayo!

La próxima Misa de Solidaridad 
5 de mayo a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Parishioners at Our Lady of Refuge participate in our “Poverty Simulation” as part of Accompaniment Training. Participants learn about the various challenges people face each day. Many participants themselves live these challenges in their own lives.

Reflection: Love is Faith in Action 
Last week we covered Jn 20: 19-31. In that selection the disciples locked themselves in a room hoping that the authorities would pass over them but in spite of all the precautions they took to keep themselves safe, Jesus-as-the Risen Christ appeared to them proclaiming peace.  In short, Jesus-as-the Risen Christ imposed himself on his fearful disciples and challenged them to try on shalom as a way to break themselves out of their fear. Recall the passage from the Ta’anit (from ancient Rabbinic literature) that taught, ““By three things the world is preserved, by justice, by truth, and by peace, and these three are one: if justice has been accomplished, so has truth, and so has peace.” Jesus-as-the Risen Christ was calling his disciples to rise up and become the shalom to others. Today’s passage, Jn 21:1-19, serves as a kind of “epilogue” to the gospel. A minority opinion from scholars assert that Chapter 21 was written by someone other than the evangelist John; however, there is no evidence that would show that the gospel ended with Chapter 20.  It would appear that Chapter 21 was always included as a part of the body of the gospel, but perhaps the chapter is set at a much later date, indicating that some time has passed between the appearance to the apostles and the encounter with Jesus-as-the Risen Christ on the beach.

The gospel text indicates that the disciples were fishing which suggests that the disciples had gotten over their fear of being identified as disciples of Jesus and that they had returned to their former way of life. In the narrative Jesus-as-the Risen Christ appeared to the disciples yet no one recognized him until he told them to cast their nets to the “other side” of the boat. The disciples went along with the suggestion and they were overwhelmed with what they caught. At that moment the unnamed disciple whom Jesus loved (the identity of the unnamed disciple is associated with the evangelist himself), declared, “It is the Lord!”  (Jn 21:7) The inclusion of the unnamed disciple’s gut reaction to knowing Jesus’ identity in these verses further underscores the idea that knowing that Jesus-as-the Risen Christ is in our midst is accessed through a relational intimacy with the Christ himself. 

The reaction of Simon Peter further underscores the concept of the power of relationship. Peter held some kind of leadership over the other disciples. (see Jn 21:3.  “Simon Peter said to them, ‘I am going fishing.’ They said to him, ‘We also will come with you.’”). This leadership; however, took a back seat to the insight of the unnamed disciple. Note that in Jn 21:7 Simon Peter heard that the person who directed the men to cast their nets to the right side of the boat was Jesus-as-the Risen Christ, he jumped into the water and hauled the boat of fish to the shore.  The curious inclusion of the specific number of fish is interesting. The evangelist John seems to have more than a mere casual acquaintance with Jewish mysticism.  Throughout John’s gospel, certain phrases and vocabulary suggest that the evangelist was using common language and concepts familiar to the Essences. (The Essenes were an important Jewish mystical sect that were numerous throughout Judaea and had lived in communal groups practicing poverty, daily immersion and asceticism and some of them even practiced celibacy.  Some contemporary scholars have made the case that one can see the fingerprint of Essene thought and practice in John’s gospel and the Book of Revelation and the three letters of John.) One example of this possible influence is the specific reference to the 153 fish in Jn 21: 11: “So Simon Peter went over and dragged the net ashore full of one hundred fifty-three* large fish. Even though there were so many, the net was not torn.” 

Understanding the meaning of numbers was and is an important feature of Jewish life. Gematria, the art of understanding numbers, is a way to understand God for each number is assigned a particular meaning or holds a special symbolism for a greater mystery. If we accept that the Essenes yielded influence over the evangelist John and that the evangelist was specific about the number of fish caught and brought to shore, then we might ask, “What might be the evangelist’s intent?  What was the evangelist trying to communicate?”  Early scripture scholars like St. Jerome, believed that the great number of fish was linked to Ezekiel’s prophecy (Ez 47:10, “And it will come about that fishermen will stand beside it; from Engedi to Eneglaim there will be a place for the spreading of nets. Their fish will be according to their kinds, like the fish of the Great Sea, very many…” ) Most Christian scholars have accepted St. Jerome’s interpretation that the number of fish that the disciples caught represents the apostles gathering all the nations together.  St. Augustine made note that 153 is a “triangle” of 17, meaning that the sum of all natural numbers from one to the triangle of the number:1+2+3+4+5+6+7+8+9+10+11+12+13+14+15+16+17=153.  (Some scholars have applied Jewish numerology methods to texts as a way to see the deeper meaning.  For example, in Jn 21: 11 one looks at the root word, “gedi,” from engedi and Eglaim, (see Ezekial 47:10) one finds that gedi is the 153rd word in Ezekiel 47 and that the numerical value for gedi in the name “Engedi” adds up to 17 and that the numerical value for the word, eglaim in the name, “Eneglaim” adds up to 153. While this would seem coincidental, note that the image of flowing waters in Ezekiel 47 is also found in Jn 7:38, “From his innermost being will flow rivers of living water….” and Jn 19:34, “One of the soldiers pierced His side with a spear, and immediately blood and water came out.”) 

The study of the number 153 when connected to the narrative of the unnamed disciple suggests that if there is an intimate connection to Jesus-as-the Risen Christ there will be a large return. In verses 15-19 Jesus-as-the Risen Christ interrogated Simon Peter: Did Simon Peter love Christ? What Christ’s intent in asking Simon Peter again and again the same question? In Jewish teaching “love” is not understood as having emotional attachment toward a person, but rather doing the right thing for the person.  To “love” the immigrant does not mean I eat taco salads, but rather, to not exploit and profit from the blood of the immigrant. (See Dt 6).  Rabbinic literature teaches that love is a series of mandated behaviors from the Torah that require us to not merely refrain from mistreating others, but to proactively do things that would protect the life of others and to welcome others into the community.  The culture of the Empire did not codify ethical behavior in the same way as the Jewish custom. Judaism, unlike the Empire, was focused on personal integrity and the civil rights, especially the effect on how public decisions make an impact on those who were marginalized. Jesus-as-the Risen Christ responded when Peter responded, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.”  The Christ amplified Simon Peter’s response in a manner consistent with Jewish teaching, “Feed my lambs.” “Tend my sheep.” “Feed my sheep.” It was not enough to have emotional attachment to the Risen Christ, one had to have commitment to others, even to the point of surrendering one’s life in the face of possible death.  (c.f., Jn 21:18).  Only after Jesus explained the true meaning of “love,” did Simon Peter say, “Follow me.”  One cannot follow Christ unless one is fully engaged in the well-being of others.

As Christians we should be careful about our use of language around “love,” especially when Christians are quick to condemn, excommunicate or belittle others for their theology, life choices in partnership and family, and manner of worship. When Christians speak of love in terms of personal fondness and emotional attachment rather than in terms of how we actually speak about and treat others, it allows Christians to say and do horrible things to others while maintaining that they “love” Christ. For example, recall  Franklin Graham, a strong Trump supporter and public religious figure, criticizing Mayor Pete Buttigieg and calling Buttigieg’s faith into question because Mayor Pete is gay. Franklin’s remarks caught many people’s attention because he remained silent when Donald Trump separated families at the border and neglected the well being of children at the border by putting toddlers and teens into cages and placing minors into the custody of sadists who raped and tortured the children while they were in immigrant detention. Like Peter, it is not enough to say “Jesus, I love you.”  We must show that love in the way we tend and feed others around us. 

Weekly Intercessions
A couple of weeks ago a man plowed into a group of people in Sunnyvale because he thought that those people were Mus- lim. Last week a man entered into a synagogue in Poway and opened fire on worshippers. The Sunnyvale man suffered PTSD and was highly susceptible to suggestions from people in authority. A 2017 study published in the Association for Psychological Science showed that PTSD victims are at risk of producing false memories and acting on those memories when exposed to information that is related to their own ex- perience. In this man’s case, public statements and speeches that categorize Muslims as enemies of the people somehow triggered within him a reaction to act on an inner impulse of hatred toward people who were Muslim. The man who ente- red Chabad Synagogue with the intent to kill the congregants was inspired by the shooter at the ChristChurch Mosque. The Poway killer was a member of an evangelical church whe- re his father served as a leader in the congregation. The Sout- hern Poverty Law Center said that the increased profile of hate groups on social media is a significant factor in the in- crease of Islamophobia and Anti-Semitism. Online sites like Info-Wars and television personalities like Tucker Carlson, raise the alarm that the nation is under attack from immi- grants, LGBTQ, refugees, Muslims, Jews, etc… Facebook has finally responded to the calls from millions of users to take down those who promote hate: accounts from Louis Farrak- han, Alex Jones. Milo Yiannopoulos, and other extremists have been permanently closed as a way to curtain the influen- ce of hate groups in the public square. Our society is already permeated by racism and xenophobia. Social media merely amplifies that what people already believe. While there is no quick or easy fix to the sorry state of civil discourse, we should nonetheless support Facebook’s initial measures to reduce the hate speech on its own platform. Our role as members of the faith community is to patrol our own langua- ge and actions within our communities. Our preachers must choose their words carefully, our religious education teachers must look at content more closely, and our parish communi- ties must be places of unconditional welcome and support of all people. Let us pray for those caught up in a cycle of hate and intolerance and for those who work to bring healing to the victims of hate crimes.​

Intercesiónes semanales
Hace dos semanas, un hombre se lanzó contra un grupo de personas en Sunnyvale porque pensaba que esas personas eran musulmanas. La semana pasada, un hombre entró en una sinagoga en Poway y trato a matar la gente adentro. El hombre de Sunnyvale sufrió TEPT y fue altamente susceptible a las sugerencias de personas con autoridad. Un estudio de 2017 publicado en la Asociación para la Ciencia Psicológica mostró que las víctimas de TEPT corren el riesgo de producir memorias falsos y actuar sobre esos recuerdos cuando están expuestos a información relacionada con su propia experiencia. En el caso de este hombre, las declaraciones y discursos públicos que categorizan a los musulmanes como enemigos de la gente de alguna manera desencadenaron en su interior una reacción para actuar en un impulso interno de odio hacia las personas que eran musulmanes. El hombre que entró en la Sinagoga de Jabad con la intención de matar a los feligreses se inspiró en el tirador de la Mezquita de Christchurch, NZ. El asesino de Poway era miembro de una iglesia evangélica donde su padre servía como líder en la congregación. El Southern Poverty Law Center dijo que el mayor perfil de los grupos de odio en las redes sociales es un factor importante en el aumento de la islamofobia y el antisemitismo. Sitios en línea como Info- Wars y personalidades de la televisión como Tucker Carlson, dan la alarma de que la nación está siendo atacada por inmigrantes, LGBTQ, refugiados, musulmanes, judíos, etc. Facebook finalmente ha respondido a las llamadas de millones de usuarios para eliminarlos que promueven el odio: relatos de Louis Farrakhan, Alex Jones. Milo Yiannopoulos y otros extremistas han sido cerrados permanentemente como una forma de ocultar la influencia de grupos de odio en el zocalo. Nuestra sociedad ya está permeada por el racismo y la xenofobia. Las redes sociales simplemente amplifican lo que la gente ya cree. Si bien no existe una solución rápida o fácil para el lamentable estado del discurso civil, todavía debemos respaldar las medidas iniciales de Facebook para reducir el discurso de odio en su propia plataforma. Nuestro papel como miembros de la comunidad de fe es patrullar nuestro propio lenguaje y acciones dentro de nuestras comunidades. Nuestros predicadores deben elegir sus palabras con cuidado, nuestras catequistas deben analizar el contenido más detenidamente y nuestras comunidades parroquiales deben ser lugares de bienvenida y apoyo incondicionales para todas las personas. Oremos por aquellos atrapados en un ciclo de odio e intolerancia y por aquellos que trabajan para llevar la sanación a las víctimas de los delitos de odio.​

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Amor es Fe en Acción

La semana pasada cubrimos Jn 20: 19-31. En esa selección, los discípulos se encerraron en una habitación con la esperanza de que las autoridades los pasaran por alto, pero a pesar de todas las precauciones que tomaron para mantenerse a salvo, Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado, se les apareció proclamando la paz. En resumen, Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado se impuso a sus temerosos discípulos y los desafió a probar shalom como una manera de librarse de su miedo. Recuerde el pasaje de la Ta’anit (de la antigua literatura rabínica) que enseñó: “Por tres cosas, el mundo se preserva, por la justicia, por la verdad y por la paz, y estas tres son una: si se ha hecho justicia, así tiene verdad, y también la paz ”.Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado estaba llamando a sus discípulos a levantarse y convertirse en shalom para los demás. El pasaje de hoy, Jn 21: 1-19, sirve como una especie de “epílogo” al evangelio. Una opinión minoritaria de los estudiosos afirma que el Capítulo 21 fue escrito por alguien que no es el evangelista Juan; sin embargo, no hay evidencia que muestre que el evangelio terminó con el Capítulo 20. Parece que el Capítulo 21 siempre se incluyó como parte del cuerpo del Evangelio, pero tal vez el capítulo se establezca en una fecha muy posterior, lo que indica que Ha pasado algún tiempo entre la aparición de los apóstoles y el encuentro con Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado en la playa.

El texto del evangelio indica que los discípulos estaban pescando, lo que sugiere que los discípulos habían superado su temor de ser identificados como discípulos de Jesús y que habían regresado a su forma de vida anterior. En la narración Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado se apareció a los discípulos, pero nadie lo reconoció hasta que les dijo que arrojaran sus redes al “otro lado” de la barca. Los discípulos aceptaron la sugerencia y quedaron abrumados con lo que capturaron. En ese momento, el discípulo anónimo a quien Jesús amaba (la identidad del discípulo anónimo se asocia con el evangelista mismo), declaró: “¡Es el Señor!” (Jn 21, 7) La inclusión de la reacción de los discípulos anónimos al conocer la identidad de Jesus en estos versículos subraya aún más la idea de que el acceso a Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado está en nuestro medio a través de una intimidad relacional con el mismo Cristo.

El estudio del número 153 cuando está conectado a la narrativa del discípulo anónimo sugiere que si hay una conexión íntima con Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado, habrá un gran retorno. En los versículos 15-19, Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado interrogó a Simón Pedro: ¿Me Amó Pedro?” Me quieres, Pedro?  ¿Cuál fue la intención de Cristo al preguntarle a Simón Pedro una y otra vez la misma pregunta? En la enseñanza judía, el “amor” no se entiende como tener un vínculo emocional con una persona, sino hacer lo correcto para la persona. “Amar” al inmigrante no significa que yo coma ensaladas de tacos, sino más bien, no explotar y sacar provecho de la sangre del inmigrante. (Ver Dt 6). La literatura rabínica enseña que el amor es una serie de comportamientos obligatorios de la Torá que requieren que no nos limitemos a no maltratar a los demás, sino a hacer cosas de manera pro-activa que protejan la vida de los demás y que recibamos a otros en la comunidad. La cultura del Imperio no codificaba el comportamiento ético de la misma manera que la costumbre judía. El judaísmo, a diferencia del Imperio, estaba centrado en la integridad personal y los derechos civiles, especialmente el efecto sobre cómo las decisiones públicas tienen un impacto en los marginados. Jesús-como-el-Cristo Resucitado respondió cuando Pedro respondió: “Sí, Señor, tú sabes que te amo”. El Cristo amplificó la respuesta de Simón Pedro de una manera consistente con la enseñanza judía: “Alimenta a mis corderos”. “Alimentar a mis ovejas”. No era suficiente tener un vínculo emocional con el Cristo resucitado, uno tenía que comprometerse con los demás, incluso hasta el punto de entregar la propia vida ante la posible muerte. (c.f., Jn 21:18). Solo después de que Jesús explicó el verdadero significado de “amor”, dijo Simón Pedro: “Sígueme”. Uno no puede seguir a Cristo a menos que esté completamente comprometido con el bienestar de los demás.

Como cristianos, debemos tener cuidado con nuestro uso del lenguaje en torno al “amor”, especialmente cuando los cristianos son rápidos para condenar, excomulgar o menospreciar a los demás por su teología, opciones de vida en sociedad y familia, y la liturgia. Cuando los cristianos hablan de amor en términos de afecto personal y apego emocional en lugar de en términos de cómo realmente hablamos y tratamos a los demás, les permite a los cristianos decir y hacer cosas horribles a los demás mientras mantienen que “aman” a Cristo. Por ejemplo, recuerde a Franklin Graham, un fuerte partidario de Trump y una figura religiosa pública, que critica al alcalde Pete Buttigieg y cuestiona la fe de Buttigieg porque el alcalde Pete es gay. Las declaraciones de Franklin atrajeron la atención de muchas personas porque permaneció en silencio cuando Donald Trump separó a las familias en la frontera y descuidó el bienestar de los niños en la frontera al poner a los niños pequeños y adolescentes en jaulas y poner a los menores bajo la custodia de sádicos que violaron y torturaron a los niños mientras Estaban en detención de inmigrantes. Al igual que Pedro, no es suficiente decir “Jesús, te amo”. Debemos mostrar ese amor en la forma en que cuidamos y alimentamos a los demás a nuestro alrededor.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Sessions: May 7th and 21st, and June 4th.
7 pm – 9:00 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español : 14 y 28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9:00 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Images from May Day 2019. Grupo Solidaridad and dozens of other organizations and people from Labor, Students, Mayfair Collective, LUNA, Sacred Heart Community Service, PACT and educators participated in the march.

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Unity and Solidarity Vigil this Thursday!

Please share this invitation from our our friends at Multifaith Voices for Peace & Justice:

Unity and Solidarity Vigil
Thursday, May 2, 5:30-6:30pm
El Camino Real and Sunnyvale-Saratoga Road
In light of attacks at this corner in Sunnyvale and in the Poway Synagogue
Please join us!

Marking the April 23 terrifying attack on pedestrians
because the driver believed some to be Muslim, and
the April 27 horrific shooting at the synagogue in Poway,
let us gather in
Unity and Solidarity with prayers
for healing, compassion and peace.

The vigil will be a quiet, positive presence to
acknowledge the pain and suffering of all people targeted
by violence and hate, and
to declare unequivocally that all lives are precious and
we are all part of the same human family.

Hosted by Multifaith Voices for Peace and Justice.
More information on our website, and forthcoming.
Please help spread the word.

Multifaith Voices for Peace & Justice
www.multifaithpeace.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp