Blog

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  The Inevitable Collapse of Empires

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

November 15, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday

The next Misa will be 
Sunday, November 17 at 9 am
at SJSU Newman Center 
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.   

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo!

La proxima misa solidaridad sera
el 17 de noviembre a las 9 am
SJSU Newman Center
esquina de San Carlos y Calle 10. 

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Members of Grupo Solidaridad joined dozens of other organizations and individuals at the Latinos in Action 2020 (LIA 2020) caucus meeting last Saturday. Participants drafted up positions on 8 areas identified by LIA 2020 as essential areas that affect Latino families: Immigration, Judicial System, Political Engagement, Health, Education, Cultural Assets, Economic Development, and Housing. LIA 2020 is completely volunteer led, representing 1,000’s of Families in the Valley.

Gospel Reflection: The Inevitable Collapse of Empires

In last week’s selection, Lk 20:27-38, Jesus-as-the Christ offered an explanation of Resurrection to the Sadducees, Torah literalists, who did not believe in the Resurrection. The Sadducees proposed to Jesus an absurd story about a childless widow who was obligated to marry the brother of her dead husband. Her late husband had six other brothers who died after marrying the woman. Each brother was, by law, obligated to marry the childless sister-in-law widow upon the death of the previous brother. At the end of the absurd case the Sadducee asked, “Upon the Resurrection (which they did not believe), who is the “real” husband to this woman?” The question was based on a fundamental misunderstanding about Resurrection. The Sadducees mistakenly believed that Resurrection meant bringing one back to one’s previous life where the risen go back to the roles of their lives.  Jesus’ teaching on Resurrection is quite different. Resurrection was not a return to an old system of repression and unjust social obligations, but rather an entirely new state of being in which the old rules and obligations that led to suffering and death are obliterated. Resurrection is NEW LIFE! As Messiah and Lord, Jesus-as-the Christ tied Resurrection to the promise of a new world order of righteousness, that is, the reign of God in which all death and oppression will be wiped away and in which all people will truly be free from under the boot of the Empire. Today’s gospel passage speaks to the tumult that will precede the coming of the Messianic Age that will usher in the reign of God.

The passage begins with people admiring the adornments on the Temple of Jerusalem. (Keep in mind that this gospel was written well after the destruction of the Temple and all adornments had been hauled to Rome and the Temple was in ruins). Jesus in response says, “All that you see here—the days will come when there will not be left a stone upon another stone that will not be thrown down.” (Lk. 21:6). Jesus’ statement in the narrative cast an ominous theme of doom. Today’s passage is a crucial part of the arc of faith/emunah in which Jesus teaches that faith/emunah is not a faith in things or beliefs, but rather a stance of trust.  Faith/emunah does not need adornments on a building. Faith/emunah simply requires trust that the moral arc of the universe will — over time — bow toward justice.

The Empire will implode: nations built upon a system that rewards immediate gratification, depends on the exploitation of laborers for economic growth, and military might for expansion will rise against other nations.  “Nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom.” (Lk 21:10) The systems of the Empire will fall under their own weight. The Empire will try to stave off the inevitable to hold onto power for as long as possible so that those who pull the levers of power can siphon off as much life and treasure until the last possible minute. The Empire will even use “fake news” and “fake prophets” to fool people that the Empire is strong and not believe what they see and read. “See that you not be deceived, for many will come in my name, saying, ‘I am he,’ and ‘The time has come.’ Do not follow them! When you hear of wars and insurrections, do not be terrified…” (Lk 21:8-9)  Luke’s Gentile audience was well integrated into the life of the Empire and they did not suffer in the same way that converts from Judaism and Jewish the Jewish community in Jerusalem at the Fall of Jerusalem in 70 CE; however, the persecution of Christians was not unknown to them. In 64 CE, Emperor Nero blamed Christians for the Great Fire of Rome and persecuted Christians. Attacks against Christians were not widespread at the time. Persecutions targeting Christians came about by local politics. Some historians believe that conflicts between Christians and their non-Christian, Gentile neighbors was based on religious illiteracy. Non-Christians did not understand the concept of communion, non-participation of Christians in processions and ceremonies venerating the Emperor, and the egalitarian and inclusive attitude of Christians. When Christians and Jews formally separated as two distinct religions, Christians, unlike Jews, were considered superstitious and potentially corrosive to the Empire but Empire-wide persecutions against Christians did not happen until around 250 CE.

Luke’s audience was most likely not a target for anti-Christian attacks, but were no doubt aware that their beliefs and practices were not accepted by their non-Christian Gentile neighbors. The passage on the coming persecution, Lk 21:12-19, addresses the challenges that Christian believers will have: seizure of possessions and arrest and abandonment by friends and relatives. Christians will be forced to take a stand on what they believe: will they align themselves with the Empire or the reign of God. Jesus-as-the Christ tells them not to worry, but to trust (have fe/emunah). They are not to prepare their defense beforehand, but to trust in Spirit, “…not a hair on your head will be destroyed. By your perseverance you will secure your lives.” (Lk 21:18-19).

The signs of the end times was a uniquely Jewish literary form that used the language of cosmic cataclysms as a way to allude to the political repression affecting the Jewish people. Luke the evangelist uses this Jewish literary form in his narrative (literary examples include The Book of Daniel, The Apocalypse of Ezra (aka, 2 Esdras) Baruch (aka, the Syriac Apocalypse of Baruch, The Book of Jubilees, and the Book of Enoch). Those narratives describe the inevitable collapse of various foreign empires that occupy Jewish land and repress the people.  Using this literary form suggests that even though Luke’s audience may not be intimately aware of this format, Luke in the capacity of evangelist, was quite familiar with the evocative power of allusion. The language describing the collapse of the cosmos (c.f., Lk 21:11: “There will be powerful earthquakes, famines, and plagues from place to place; and awesome sights and mighty signs will come from the sky…” and Lk 21:25-28, “There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on earth nations will be in dismay, perplexed by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will die of fright in anticipation of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. And then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. But when these signs begin to happen, stand erect and raise your heads because your redemption is at hand.”) alludes to the inevitable collapse of the Roman Empire and all other structures of power and governance that support the Empire in the advent of the arrival of the Messiah (Hebrew, mashiach-מָשִׁיחַ).  The collapse of the Empire was indeed hoped for by Jews of ancient times and anticipated by the Prophets, the Jewish Resistance, and the emerging Christian religion.

Empires have risen and fallen in the span of Christian and Jewish development over these past 2000 years showing no sign of collapse. What then are we to make of our sacred texts that allude to the destruction of the Empire?  Let us return to Lk 21:8-9, “See that you not be deceived, for many will come in my name, saying, ‘I am he,’ and ‘The time has come.’ Do not follow them! When you hear of wars and insurrections, do not be terrified; for such things must happen first, but it will not immediately be the end.” The Resistance is not against a particular Empire, but rather a Resistance against Empire. Each generation will face a Pharaoh or a Caesar and each generation must take it upon themselves to rise up.  There will always be a coming persecution for those who live in faith/emunah.  Let us rise up and Resist the Empire that seeks to suppress the voices of inconvenient truth and the cry of the poor. Let us create that space where the voice of the prisoner, the refugee and the humble worker be heard. Those voices will usher in the reign of God.

Weekly Intercessions
 

OPPRESSION

Now dreams

Are not available

To the dreamers,

Nor songs

To the singers.

In some lands

Dark night

And cold steel

Prevail

But the dream

Will come back,

And the song

Break

Its jail.

– Langston Hughes

 

Let us pray for those who live in the dark valley of unjust incarceration, especially for Rodney Reed, a proven innocent man who still sits on death row in Texas and is scheduled for execution on November 20. May the powers of the Resistance be successful in saving his life and holding those who created the circumstances for his incarceration and sentence be held accountable.

Let us pray for the Santa Clarita community recovering from a school shooting earlier this week. That families who have lost their children to this latest tragedy of gun violence find consolation in their faith and community and those who have the legislative power to protect communities from gun violence reform but refuse to do anything, be voted out of office.

Let us pray for the people of Palestine, Hong Kong, Chile, Bolivia, Venezuela, Somalia and all areas suffering political violence directed toward non-combatants, that they be protected from harm and find the strength to one day rise up and be free from the chains of their oppressors.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:  El inevitable colapso de los imperios 

En la selección de la semana pasada, Lucas 20: 27-38, Jesús como-el-Cristo ofreció una explicación de la Resurrección a los saduceos, literalistas de la Torá, que no creían en la resurrección. Los saduceos le propusieron a Jesús un caso absurdo sobre una viuda sin hijos que estaba obligada a casarse con el hermano de su esposo muerto. Su difunto esposo tuvo otros seis hermanos que murieron después de casarse con la mujer. Cada hermano estaba, por ley, obligado a casarse con la viuda de la cuñada sin hijos a la muerte del hermano anterior. Al final del absurdo caso, el saduceo preguntó: “Sobre la resurrección (que no creyeron), ¿quién es el esposo “real”de esta mujer?” La pregunta se basó en un malentendido fundamental sobre la resurrección. Los saduceos creyeron erróneamente que Resurrection significaba volver a la vida anterior donde los resucitados vuelven a los papeles sociales de sus vidas anteriores. La enseñanza de Jesús sobre la Resurrección es muy diferente. La Resurrección no fue un regreso a un viejo sistema de represión y obligaciones sociales injustas, sino más bien un estado completamente nuevo del ser en el que las previas reglas y obligaciones anteriores que llevaron al sufrimiento y la muerte son borradas. ¡La Resurrección es NUEVA VIDA! Como el Mesías y Señor, Jesús-como-el Cristo ató la Resurrección a la promesa de un nuevo orden mundial de justicia, es decir, el reino de Dios en el que toda la muerte y la opresión serán borradas y en el que todas las personas serán verdaderamente libres de debajo de la bota del imperio. El pasaje del evangelio de hoy habla del tumulto que precederá a la llegada de la Era Mesiánica que marcará el comienzo del reino de Dios.

El pasaje comienza con personas admirando los adornos en el Templo de Jerusalén. (Tenga en cuenta que este evangelio fue escrito mucho después de la destrucción del Templo y que todos los adornos habían sido transportados a Roma y el Templo estaba en ruinas). En respuesta, Jesús dice: “Todo lo que ves aquí, vendrán días en que no quedará piedra sobre piedra que no sea derribada” (Lucas 21: 6). La declaración de Jesús en la narración arroja un tema siniestro de fatalidad. El pasaje de hoy es una parte crucial del arco de fe/emuná en el que Jesús enseña que la fe/emuná no es una fe en las cosas o creencias, sino más bien una postura de confianza. Fe/emuná no necesita adornos en un edificio. fe/emuná simplemente requiere confiar en que el arco moral del universo, con el tiempo, se inclinará hacia la justicia.

El Imperio implosionará: las naciones construidas sobre un sistema que recompensa la gratificación inmediata, depende de la explotación de los trabajadores para el crecimiento económico, y el poder militar para la expansión se levantará contra otras naciones. “Se levantará nación contra nación, y reino contra reino”. (Lc 21:10) Los sistemas del Imperio caerán bajo su propio peso. El Imperio tratará de evitar lo inevitable para mantener el poder el mayor tiempo posible para que aquellos que tiran de las palancas del poder puedan desviar tanta vida y tesoros hasta el último minuto posible. El Imperio incluso usará “noticias falsas” y “profetas falsos” para engañar a la gente de que el Imperio es fuerte y no cree lo que ven y leen. “Mira que no te engañen, porque muchos vendrán en mi nombre, diciendo:” Yo soy él “y” Ha llegado el momento “. ¡No los sigas! Cuando escuches sobre guerras e insurrecciones, no te asustes … ” (Lc 21: 8-9) La audiencia de los gentiles de Lucas estaba bien integrada en la vida del Imperio y no sufrieron de la misma manera que los conversos del judaísmo y la comunidad judía en Jerusalén en La Caída de Jerusalén en el 70 EC; Sin embargo, la persecución de los cristianos no era desconocida para ellos.  En el 64 EC, el emperador Nerón culpó a los cristianos por el Gran Incendio de Roma y persiguió a los cristianos. Los ataques contra cristianos no estaban muy extendidos en ese momento. Las persecuciones contra los cristianos se produjeron por la política local. Algunos historiadores creen que los conflictos entre cristianos y sus vecinos gentiles no cristianos se basaron en el analfabetismo religioso. Los no cristianos no entendían el concepto de comunión, la no participación de los cristianos en procesiones y ceremonias que veneraban al Emperador, y la actitud igualitaria e inclusiva de los cristianos. Cuando los cristianos y los judíos se separaron formalmente como dos religiones distintas, los cristianos, a diferencia de los judíos, fueron considerados supersticiosos y potencialmente corrosivos para el Imperio, pero las persecuciones de todo el Imperio contra los cristianos no ocurrieron hasta alrededor del año 250 EC.

La audiencia de Lucas probablemente no fue víctima de ataques anticristianos, pero sin duda sabían que sus creencias y prácticas no eran aceptadas por sus vecinos gentiles no cristianos. El pasaje sobre la próxima persecución, Lucas 21: 12-19, aborda los desafíos que tendrán los creyentes cristianos: la toma de posesiones y el arresto y abandono de amigos y familiares. Los cristianos se verán obligados a adoptar una postura sobre lo que creen: ¿se alinearán con el Imperio o el reino de Dios? Jesús-como-el Cristo les dice que no se preocupen, sino que confíen (tengan fe/emuná). No son para preparar su defensa de antemano, sino para confiar en el Espíritu, “… ni un pelo en tu cabeza será destruido. Por su perseverancia asegurará sus vidas. ” (Lc 21: 18-19).

Los signos del fin de los tiempos eran una forma literaria exclusivamente judía que usaba el lenguaje de los cataclismos cósmicos como una forma de aludir a la represión política que afectaba al pueblo judío. Lucas el evangelista usa esta forma literaria judía en su narrativa (ejemplos literarios incluyen El libro de Daniel, El Apocalipsis de Ezra (alias, 2 Esdras) Baruch (alias, el Apocalipsis siríaco de Baruch, El libro de los Jubileos y el Libro de Enoc. Esas narrativas describen el colapso inevitable de varios imperios extranjeros que ocupan tierras judías y reprimen a la gente. El uso de esta forma literaria sugiere que, aunque la audiencia de Lucas puede no ser íntimamente consciente de este formato literario, Lucas, como el evangelista, era bastante familiar con el poder evocador de la alusión. El lenguaje que describe el colapso del cosmos (cf. Lc 21,11: “Habrá poderosos terremotos, hambrunas y plagas de un lugar a otro, y asombrosas vistas y poderosos signos vendrán del cielo …”  y Lc 21: 25-28, “Habrá señales en el sol, la luna y las estrellas, y en la tierra las naciones estarán consternadas, perplejas por el rugido del mar y las olas. La gente morirá de susto en anticipación n de lo que viene sobre el mundo, porque los poderes de los cielos serán sacudidos. Y luego verán al Hijo del Hombre venir en una nube con poder y gran gloria. Pero cuando estos signos comiencen a suceder, manténgase erguido y levante la cabeza porque su redención está cerca ”.) Alude al colapso inevitable del Imperio Romano y todas las demás estructuras de poder y gobierno que apoyan al Imperio en el advenimiento de la llegada del Mesías (hebreo, mashiaj– מָשִׁיחַ). El colapso del Imperio fue de hecho esperado por los judíos de la antigüedad y anticipado por los Profetas, la Resistencia judía y la religión cristiana emergente.

Los imperios han aumentado y disminuido en el lapso del desarrollo cristiano y judío en los últimos 2000 años sin mostrar signos de colapso. ¿Qué debemos hacer con nuestros textos sagrados que aluden a la destrucción del Imperio? Volvamos a Lc 21: 8-9, “Mira que no te engañen, porque muchos vendrán en mi nombre, diciendo:” Yo soy él “y” Ha llegado el momento “. ¡No los sigas! Cuando escuche de guerras e insurrecciones, no se aterrorice; porque tales cosas deben suceder primero, pero no será el final de inmediato ”. La Resistencia no es contra un Imperio en particular, sino más bien un movimiento de la Resistencia contra el Imperio. Cada generación se enfrentará a un “faraón” o un “César” y cada generación debe asumir la responsabilidad de levantarse. Siempre habrá una persecución próxima para aquellos que viven en fe/emuná. Levantémonos y Resistamos al Imperio que busca suprimir las voces de la verdad incómoda y el grito de los pobres. Creemos ese espacio donde se escuche la voz del prisionero, el refugiado y el humilde campesino. Esas voces marcarán el comienzo del reino de Dios.

Intercesiónes semanales

Opresión 

Ahora los sueños

Ya no están disponibles

Para los soñadores,

Ni las canciones

Para los cantantes.

 En algunas tierras

La noche oscura

Y el acero frío

Prevalecen

Pero el sueño

Regresará

Y la canción

Romperá

Su cárcel.

 

– Langston Hughes
Traducido por Juan Romero Vinueza, Ecuador

 

Oremos por aquellos que viven en el la valle del sombre de muerte encarcelamiento injusto, especialmente por Rodney Reed, un hombre inocente comprobado que todavía se encuentra en el corredor de la muerte en Texas y está programado para su ejecución el 20 de noviembre. Que los poderes de la Resistencia tengan éxito en salvando su vida y responsabilizando a quienes crearon las circunstancias para su encarcelamiento y sentencia.

Oremos por la comunidad de Santa Clarita que se recupera de un tiroteo en una escuela a principios de esta semana. Que las familias que han perdido a sus hijos en esta última tragedia de la violencia armada encuentren consuelo en su fe y comunidad y aquellos que tienen el poder legislativo para proteger a las comunidades de la reforma de la violencia armada pero se niegan a hacer nada, pierden sus re-eleciones.

Oremos por la gente de Palestina, Hong Kong, Chile, Bolivia, Venezuela, Somalia y todas las áreas que sufren violencia política dirigida hacia los no combatientes, para que estén protegidos del daño y encuentren la fuerza para algún día levantarse y estar libres de las cadenas de sus opresores.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, January 11, 10am-12pm Sacred Heart Community Service 1381 South First St, Sa Jose 95110

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

November/noviembre 16 12 pm 
Misa de Sta Gerturdes 625 Wool Creek Dr., SJ

November/noviembre 22
Misa de Sta. Cecilia

December/diciembre 7
Congreso del Pueblo with Latinos in Action 2020

December/diciember 11
Poor People’s Campaign/Campaña de la gente pobre

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un horno de microondas y un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. This week we are asking for a MICROWAVE oven and a television/screen with a DVR. The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  God of the Living

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

November 8, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday

The next Misa will be 
Sunday, November 10 at 9 am
at SJSU Newman Center 
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.   

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo!

La proxima misa solidaridad sera
el 10 de noviembre a las 9 am
SJSU Newman Center
esquina de San Carlos y Calle 10. 

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Last Saturday at our Dia de los Muertos celebration several members of Grupo Solidaridad accompanied members of Catholic Charities’ Handicapables group whose members live with multiple disabilities. Young members of Grupo helped Handicapables members play Loteria. The meal and Loteria were preceded by the blessing of graves and a multi-lingual mass. Pictured are Members of both groups and Marcos Herrerra and Saida Nagpurwala.

Gospel Reflection: God of the Living

Last week’s selection, Lk 19:1-10, was the familiar narrative of the Publican (tax-collector), Zacchaeus and Jesus.  In the story Zacchaeus, the presumably wealthy Publican, climbed a sycamore tree just to catch a glimpse of Jesus-as-the Christ passing by. Jesus saw him and in front of the entire crowd made a point of saying, “I must stay at your house.”  Objecting to Jesus’ gesture of outreach to a collaborator and presumed sinner, the crowd remarked, “He has gone to stay at the house of a sinner.” Zacchaeus was equally surprised at Jesus’ statement and he justified his righteousness in a seemingly apologetic manner, “I fast twice a week, and I pay tithes on my whole income….Behold, half of my possessions, Lord, I shall give to the poor, and if I have extorted anything from anyone I shall repay it four times over.”  The story falls within the arc of the thematic narrative on faith/emunah and righteousness. Jesus-as-the Christ taught that God alone is righteous and our righteousness flows from God to us, not from us to God. In other words, GRACE! Today’s selection (Lk 20:27-38) is a part of Luke’s narrative that begins with Jesus entering into Jerusalem. The geographical location of the narrative frames the themes of faith/emunah and righteousness literally in the shadow of the cross.

By entering Jerusalem, (Lk 19:28), Jesus-as-the Christ set the stage for a confrontation with the Empire. His triumphal entry (Lk. 19:36-38) quickly turned dark. He lamented Jerusalem, with one of the most poetic and political verses. Paraphrasing Isaiah 6:9-13, Jesus said, “If this day you only knew what makes for peace—but now it is hidden from your eyes. For the days are coming upon you when your enemies will raise a palisade against you; they will encircle you and hem you in on all sides. They will smash you to the ground and your children within you, and they will not leave one stone upon another within you because you did not recognize the time of your visitation.” (Lk 19:42-44)

The infamous cleansing of the Temple (Lk 19:45-48) followed the lamentation. In the cleansing narrative, Jesus-as-the Christ caught the attention of the Temple authorities and the apologists for the Herodians (the supporters of the puppet King Herod). The Herodians were supported by the Sadducees, Scribes and Pharisees who were theologically and politically tied to each another and they in effect provided “religious cover” for King Herod and the Roman occupation.  Keep in mind that Luke’s narrative has Jesus still preaching from the thematic frame of faith/emunah and righteousness. Note the tone of his words: they seem to reflect an urgency for the conversion of the corrupt system of collaboration and cultural colonialism of the Empire on the spiritual sovereignty of the Jewish people. Luke’s narrative shows that Jesus’s remarks were taken as a political critique by those invested in maintaining the corrupt order of the Empire. (cf Lk 20:1-8 where the chief priests and scribes questioned Jesus’ authority in disrupting the Imperial system of colonization and enabling collaboration and Lk 20:20-26 where Jesus is questioned to clarify his opinion about the relationship of the Jewish civil authority and the supremacy of Caesar.)

Note that Sadducees rejected the more ancient tradition of an “oral Torah” in which rabbis would consult ancient rabbinical commentaries for a contextual reading of the Torah in contemporary matters. The idea of an “oral Torah” understood that the words of the Torah are ever-ancient and ever-new and thus required the participation in a conversation bridging across centuries of rabbinical commentary and discourse. By participating in this conversation, rabbis and their congregants gain wisdom and understanding not only of the Torah, but of themselves and the world in which they live. The literalist position adopted by the Sadducees rejected these conversation.  The scribes and Sadducees rejected this conversation and, by extension, all those who participated in the conversation, including the Pharisees and itinerate rabbis like Jesus of Nazareth.

Unlike the Sadducees, Pharisees and Jesus’ disciples were taught to think critically and apply the teachings of the Torah to their contemporary situation. Luke (and the other evangelists) captured multiple instances when Jesus taught with parables and used phrases and comments that are traced to ancient rabbinical sources. The question of Resurrection (like the question of “rebirth”) could not be answered in literalist and material categories. Note that rabbinical sources at the time of Jesus were not uniform in the precise interpretation of Resurrection, but were more or less in consensus that Resurrection was God’s vindication over the struggle of evil. Some ancient commentators taught that Resurrection meant that during the Messianic Age that Jews from all over the world — including those who died —would be brought back to life and reunited to their souls.  In other words, there was no unanimity about Resurrection, the afterlife or whether the Resurrection applied to all humankind or was reserved for the Jews alone. Returning to the issue of faith/emunah and righteousness in the context of Pharisees and Jesus, what is clear is this: the Resurrection was tied to righteousness and the promise of a new world order.

Sadducees were not only theologically opposed to Resurrection, but they were politically critical of the implication that the age of the Messiah would usher in the destruction of their world.  Jesus’ revolutionary speech and civic disobedience in front of the Temple (overturning the money changers’ carts and public denunciation of the money changers) inspired the Sadducees to go on the attack. They proposed a case in which a widow, by Torah law, would marry the surviving brother. The Sadducees attempted to show the preposterous claim of Resurrection by implying that upon rising from the dead the widow would be married to a bunch of brothers — because the widow was obligated to marry her dead husband’s brother, each of whom had died leaving the widow with several dead husbands who were all brothers. The Sadducees’ attempt at ridiculing the Resurrection betrayed their fundamental misunderstanding of Resurrection. Sadducees understood Resurrection as a return to one’s former life and thus in their view, the three-time widow would come back to life and live as a wife to all the brothers.  

Jesus responded to their insult by exposing the limitations of their own belief system. Jesus compared the children of “this age” (referring to the material world, Lk 20:34) who were marrying and being “given” in marriage to the children of God (literally meaning “the risen ones”) who did not marry nor be given in marriage (Lk 20:35). The comparison was a way of stating that the children of “this age” are the those who are good to conduct business in the status quo: the Imperial occupation. Disciples of Jesus-as-the Christ do not accept the status quo and refuse to be confined to the social expectations of the Empire because they belong to the kingdom of God. Jesus showed that the Resurrection was not merely a theological abstraction, but rather a line that defined how one would participate in the Empire: would one act as an enable or as a Resister. Sadducees were exposed as theological enablers of a corrupt system.

Resurrection was not only an ideological marker defining Resistance, but it was also an expression that God has the final word meaning that death is not the final chapter in human existence.  God is the final chapter! The righteous are those who have faith/emunah that the struggle will not end in defeat, but rather, in God’s victory in which the righteous would emerge as victorious. Jesus, speaking from a rabbinical perspective referred to the burning bush from Exodus (Ex 3:1-4:17). In that passage a thorn bush on Mount Horeb was on fire, but not consumed. Having fled Egypt and settling into his “new” life in the land of his ancestors, Moses was not looking to get back to Egypt. God; however, had different plans! These plans were set at the burning bush.

From the fire, God told Moses to back to Egypt to lead his people to freedom by connecting Moses back to the roots of his ancestors, Abraham, Isaac and  Jacob and to the task of liberating his people.  Just as liberation was not about returning the Israelites back into slaves, but making them a freed people in the Promised Land, so too Resurrection is not about returning a woman back into a wife, but liberating her and her husbands from roles requiring subservience and obligation.  In the Resurrection we are truly free to live as co-equals! 

In short, Resurrection is not about re-animating people in which they merely re-integrate themselves back to their old lives. Resurrection defies the old system that demands obedience to illegitimate authority by raising all the righteous — including those who have already passed — together in a new reign of God. “…he is not God of the dead, but of the living, for to him all are alive.” (Lk 20:38) Did Jesus define Resurrection? No. What he offered was a vision of Resurrection by rooting that vision in the task of liberation and Resistance. 

Resurrection is not the reward of the righteous, but rather, it is the struggle itself! Like the eternal fire that consumes — but does not destroy — the thorn bush, Resurrection is the impulse that sends us back into the place of oppression. The Resurrection makes us look at doing the right thing and not just doing the most expedient or the most “winnable” thing. Resurrection calls us to break the chains that bind people in servitude! It does not tell us to make the slaves more comfortable. Resurrection is freedom. It is Resistance. It is the power that will ultimately propel Jesus-as-the Christ to confront the Empire.  May Resurrection propel new generations of disciples to dismantle the system that builds concentration camps for families and cages for children, incarcerates children of color, and houses people in broken down tents along rivers and freeways.

Weekly Intercessions
From Madeleine L’Engle: 
One of the hardest lessons I have to learn is how not to be judgmental about people who are judgmental. When I see how wrong somebody is—how shallow it is to look at the Resurrection as a mere, explainable fact—when I see only the mistakenness of others, then I am blinded to their being children of God, who are just as valued and treasured as are those who more nearly agree with me.

From St. Oscar Romero:
I have frequently been threatened with death. I must say that, as a Christian, I do not believe in death but in resurrection. If they kill me, I shall rise in the Salvadoran people. I am not boasting; I say it with the greatest humility. As a pastor I am bound by divine command to give my life for those whom I love, and that includes all Salvadorans, even those who are going to kill me. If they manage to carry out their threats, I shall be offering my blood for the redemption and resurrection of El Salvador.

Let us pray for those who have given up on resisting repression. For those who accept the disfigurement of their humanity as their fate and destiny. For those who feel that they themselves are not worth fighting for. For those who have been traumatized so severely that they are paralyzed and cannot crawl out of the hole themselves. That through the work of people committed to the task of healing those who are burdened by the sins of others and the indifference of their neighbors will find hope and from their darkness may see a Great Light. May all those who are in need of Resurrection and those who accompany them in the powerful journey of recovery find new life.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 
Dios de los vivos

La selección de la semana pasada, Lc 19, 1-10, fue la narración familiar del publicano Zaqueo y Jesús. En la narrativa, Zaqueo, el presumiblemente publicano rico, trepó a un sicómoro solo para echar un vistazo a Jesús-como-el Cristo que pasaba. Jesús lo vio y, frente a toda la multitud, dijo: “Debo quedarme en tu casa”. Contra la idea de Jesús de acercarse a un colaborador y presunto pecador, la multitud comentó: “Se ha ido a quedarse a la casa de un pecador “. Zaqueo estaba igualmente sorprendido por la declaración de Jesús y justificó su justicia de una manera aparentemente disculpa: “Ayuno dos veces por semana y pago diezmos de todos mis ingresos … He aquí la mitad de mis posesiones, Señor, se lo daré a los pobres, y si le he extorsionado a alguien, se lo devolveré cuatro veces ”.  La narrativa es en el arco de la narración temática sobre fe/emuná y justicia. Jesús-como-el Cristo enseñó que solo Dios es justo y que nuestra justicia fluye de Dios a nosotros, no de nosotros a Dios. En otras palabras, GRACIA! La selección de hoy (Lucas 20: 27-38) es parte de la narrativa de Lucas que comienza con Jesús entrando en Jerusalén. La ubicación geográfica de la narración enmarca los temas de fe/emuná y justicia literalmente a la sombra de la cruz.

Al entrar en Jerusalén, (Lucas 19:28), Jesús-como-el Cristo preparó el escenario para enfrentar al Imperio. Su entrada triunfal (Lucas 19: 36-38) rápidamente se oscureció. Lamentó Jerusalén, con uno de los versos más poéticos y políticos. Parafraseando a Isaías 6: 9-13, Jesús dijo: “Si hoy supieras lo que hace la paz, pero ahora está oculto a tus ojos. Porque vendrán días en que tus enemigos levantarán una empalizada contra ti; te rodearán y te encerrarán por todos lados. Te aplastarán en el suelo y a tus hijos dentro de ti, y no dejarán una piedra sobre otra dentro de ti porque no reconociste el momento de tu visita.” (Lc 19: 42-44)

La infame limpieza del Templo (Lucas 19: 45-48) siguió a la lamentación. En la narrativa de limpieza, Jesús-como-el Cristo llamó la atención de las autoridades del Templo y los apologistas de los herodianos (los partidarios del títere Rey Herodes). Los herodianos fueron apoyados por los saduceos, los escribas y los fariseos que estaban teológicamente y políticamente vinculados entre sí y en efecto proporcionaron “cobertura religiosa” para el rey Herodes y la ocupación romana. Tenga en cuenta que la narrativa de Lucas tiene a Jesús todavía predicando desde el marco temático de fe/emuná y justicia. Tenga en la manera de hablar: parecen reflejar una urgencia por la conversión del sistema corrupto de colaboración y colonialismo cultural del Imperio en la soberanía espiritual del pueblo judío. La narrativa de Lucas muestra que los comentarios de Jesús fueron tomados como una crítica política por aquellos invertidos en mantener el orden corrupto del Imperio. (cf Lc 20: 1-8 donde los principales sacerdotes y los escribas cuestionaron la autoridad de Jesús para interrumpir el sistema imperial de colonización y permitir la colaboración y Lc 20: 20-26 donde se interroga a Jesús para aclarar su opinión sobre la relación de la autoridad civil judía y la supremacía de César.)

Los saduceos rechazaron la tradición más antigua de una “Torá oral” en la que los rabinos consultarían comentarios rabínicos antiguos para una lectura contextual de la Torá en asuntos contemporáneos. La idea de una “Torá oral” entendió que las palabras de la Torá son siempre antiguas y siempre nuevas y, por lo tanto, requiere la participación en una conversación que abarca siglos de comentarios y discursos rabínicos. En esta conversación, los rabinos y sus congregantes obtienen sabiduría y comprensión no solo de la Torá, sino de sí mismos y del mundo en el que viven. La posición literalista adoptada por los saduceos rechazó esta conversación. Los escribas y saduceos rechazaron esta conversación y, por extensión, todos los que participaron en la conversación, incluidos los fariseos y los rabinos itinerantes como Jesús de Nazaret.

A diferencia de los saduceos, a los fariseos y a los discípulos de Jesús se les enseñó a pensar críticamente y aplicar las enseñanzas de la Torá a su situación contemporánea. Lucas (y los otros evangelistas) capturaron múltiples instancias cuando Jesús enseñó con parábolas y usó frases y comentarios que se remontan a antiguas fuentes rabínicas. La cuestión de la resurrección (como la cuestión del “renacimiento”) no se pudo responder en categorías literales y materiales. Tenga en cuenta que las fuentes rabínicas en la época de Jesús no eran uniformes en la interpretación precisa de la resurrección, sino que estaban más o menos de acuerdo en que la resurrección era la reivindicación de Dios sobre la lucha del mal. Algunos comentaristas antiguos enseñaron que Resurrección significaba que durante la Era Mesiánica los judíos de todo el mundo, incluidos los que murieron, serían devueltos a la vida y reunidos en sus almas. En otras palabras, no hubo unanimidad acerca de la Resurrección, la vida futura o si la Resurrección se aplicó a toda la humanidad o se reservó solo para los judíos. Volviendo al tema de la fe/emuná y la justicia en el contexto de los fariseos y Jesús, lo que está claro es esto: la resurrección estaba ligada a la justicia y la promesa de un nuevo orden mundial.

Los saduceos no solo se oponían teológicamente a la Resurrección, sino que también eran políticamente críticos de la implicación de que la era del Mesías marcaría el comienzo de la destrucción de su mundo. El discurso revolucionario de Jesús y la desobediencia cívica frente al Templo (volcando los carros de los cambistas y la denuncia pública de los cambistas) inspiraron a los saduceos a atacar. Propusieron un caso en el que una viuda, según la ley de la Torá, se casaría con el hermano sobreviviente. Los saduceos intentaron mostrar la afirmación absurda de la resurrección al implicar que al resucitar de la muerte la viuda se casaría con un grupo de hermanos, porque la viuda estaba obligada a casarse con el hermano de su marido muerto, cada uno de los cuales había muerto dejando a la viuda con varios maridos muertos que eran todos hermanos. El intento de los saduceos de ridiculizar la resurrección traicionó su malentendido fundamental de la resurrección. Los saduceos entendieron la resurrección como un regreso a la vida anterior y, por lo tanto, en su opinión, la viuda tres veces volvería a la vida y viviría como esposa para todos los hermanos.

Jesús respondió a su insulto exponiendo las limitaciones de su propio sistema de creencias. Jesús comparó a los hijos de “esta edad” (refiriéndose al mundo material, Lc 20:34) que se casaban y se “daban” en matrimonio con los hijos de Dios (que literalmente significa “los resucitados”) que no se casaron ni ser dado en matrimonio (Lc 20:35). La comparación fue una forma de afirmar que los niños de “esta edad” son los que son buenos para hacer negocios en el status quo: la ocupación imperial. Los discípulos de Jesús-como-el Cristo no aceptan el status quo y se niegan a limitarse a las expectativas sociales del Imperio porque pertenecen al reino de Dios. Jesús mostró que la Resurrección no era simplemente una abstracción teológica, sino más bien una línea que definía como uno participaría en el Imperio: actuaría como un habilitador o como un Resistente. Los saduceos fueron expuestos como habilitadores teológicos de un sistema corrupto.

La resurrección no solo fue un marcador ideológico que definió la resistencia, sino que también fue una expresión de que Dios tiene la última palabra que significa que la muerte no es el capítulo final de la existencia humana. Dios es el capítulo final! Los justos son aquellos que tienen fe/emuná de que la lucha no terminará en una derrota, sino en la victoria de Dios en la cual los justos emergerán como victoriosos. Jesús, hablando desde una perspectiva rabínica, se refirió a la zarza ardiente de Éxodo (Ex 3: 1-4: 17). En ese pasaje, un arbusto espinoso en el monte Horeb estaba ardiendo, pero no consumido. Tras huir de Egipto y establecerse en su “nueva” vida en la tierra de sus antepasados, Moisés no buscaba regresar a Egipto. Dios; sin embargo, ¡tenía planes diferentes! Estos planes se establecieron en la zarza ardiente.

Desde el incendio, Dios le dijo a Moisés que volviera a Egipto para guiar a su pueblo a la libertad conectando a Moisés con las raíces de sus antepasados, Abraham, Isaac y Jacob, y con la tarea de liberar a su pueblo. Del mismo modo que la liberación no se trataba de devolver a los israelitas a los esclavos, sino de convertirlos en un pueblo liberado en la Tierra Prometida, la resurrección no se trata de devolver a una mujer a una esposa, sino de liberarla a ella y a sus maridos de los papeles que requieren servilismo y obligación.  ¡En la resurrección somos verdaderamente libres para vivir como co-iguales!

En resumen, la Resurrección no se trata de volver a animar a las personas en las que simplemente se reintegran a sus vidas anteriores. La Resurrección desafía el sistema antiguo que exige obediencia a la autoridad ilegítima al criar a todos los justos, incluidos los que ya pasaron, en un nuevo reinado de Dios. “… él no es Dios de los muertos, sino de los vivos, porque para él todos están vivos” (Lucas 20:38). ¿Definió Jesús la Resurrección? No. Lo que ofreció fue una visión de Resurrección al enraizar esa visión en la misión de liberación y Resistencia.

¡La Resurrección no es la recompensa de los justos, sino la lucha misma! Al igual que el fuego eterno que consume, pero no destruye, la zarza, la Resurrección es el impulso que nos envía de vuelta al lugar de la opresión. La Resurrección nos hace ver hacer lo correcto y no solo hacer lo más oportuno o lo más “ganable”. ¡La Resurrección nos llama a romper las cadenas que atan a las personas en servidumbre! No nos dice que hagamos a los esclavos más cómodos. La Resurrección es libertad. Es Resistencia. Es el poder que en última instancia impulsará a Jesús-como-el Cristo a enfrentar al Imperio. Que la Resurrección impulse a las nuevas generaciones de discípulos a desmantelar el sistema que construye campos de concentración para familias y jaulas para niños, encarcela a niños de color y alberga a personas en tiendas de campaña a lo largo de ríos y autopistas.

Intercesiónes semanales

De Madeleine L’Engle:
Una de las cosas más difíciles que tengo que aprender es cómo no juzgar a las personas que juzgan. Cuando veo como equivocado está alguien, como superficial es mirar la Resurrección como un mero hecho explicable, cuando veo solo el error de los demás, entonces estoy cegado a que sean hijos de Dios, que son tan valorados y atesorado como los que están más de acuerdo conmigo.

De San Oscar Romero:
Con frecuencia he sido amenazado de muerte. Debo decir que, como cristiano, no creo en la muerte sino en la resurrección. Si me matan, me levantaré en el pueblo salvadoreño. No me estoy jactando; Lo digo con la mayor humildad. Como pastor, estoy obligado por el mandato divino de dar mi vida por aquellos a quienes amo, y eso incluye a todos los salvadoreños, incluso a los que me van a matar. Si logran llevar a cabo sus amenazas, ofreceré mi sangre por la redención y la resurrección de El Salvador.

Oremos por aquellos que han renunciado a resistir la represión. Para aquellos que aceptan la desfiguración de su humanidad como su destino. Para aquellos que sienten que no vale la pena luchar por ellos mismos. Para aquellos que han sido traumatizados tan severamente que están paralizados y no pueden salir del agujero ellos mismos. Que a través del trabajo de personas comprometidas con la misión de sanar a quienes están agobiados por los pecados de otros y la indiferencia de sus vecinos encontrarán esperanza y desde su oscuridad podrán ver una Gran Luz. Que todos aquellos que necesitan Resurrección y aquellos que los acompañan en el poderoso camino de recuperación encuentren una nueva vida.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, November 9, 11am-1pm San Jose Museum of Art, 110 S. Market St, San Jose 95113

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Contact Fr. Jon for more information. 

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un horno de microondas y un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. This week we are asking for a MICROWAVE oven and a television/screen with a DVR. The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  What Makes Us Righteous?

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

November 1, 2019

NO MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday

The next Misa Solidaridad will be November 10

¡NO HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo!

La proxima misa solidaridad sera el 10 de noviembre

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Every Tuesday evening at Our Lady of Refuge, the “Tuesday Night Market” offers fresh food, immigration consultation, a hot meal, support group, and a medical clinic. Through the work of Catholic Charities’ Advocacy and Community Engagement, the parishioners of Our Lady of Refuge are hosting multiple service agencies that offer crucial social services to all people.  Free hot meals are served from 5-6:30 pm and the market is open 6-8 pm.  Social services can be accessed from 5-8. Tuesday Night Market is open to all people. Participating agencies include: Catholic Charities Immigration Legal Services, Second Harvest, Martha’s Kitchen, Gardner Health Service, and Grupo Solidaridad.

Gospel Reflection: 
What Makes Us Righteous?

Last week’s selection, Lk 18:9-14, addressed the question of faith/emunah as an interior disposition which invites disciples to look inward.  The Parable of the Pharisee and the Publican, was tricky because we were pulled into identifying with the Publican, not the Pharisee. The moment that we chose one over the other, we fell into the trap of the Parable: we are simultaneously self-righteous and self-effacing. The parable, like all parables, forces us to struggle with a particular concept, in this case, the concept of justification (being pardoned of our sins and reconciled to God). The parable made us realize that one is not justified by good works demanded by the law (fasting and tithing) nor by having a posture of humility.  We are righteous because God is righteous. When we are one with God — that is, when we let turn off our the “monkey brain” of useless chatter and put our ego in check, we recognize that the Divine has always been there. Recognizing the Holy is recognizing that we are caught up in swept up in the love of God (Grace!) and through this love, we become more open (through faith/emunah) to what we are called to do: participate in the kingdom of God.  Today’s familiar narrative of the Publican, Zacchaeus, develops the them of righteousness and grace.

The name, Zacchaeus, comes from the Hebrew word for “righteous” or “upright.” In the story Jesus and his disciples arrive to Jericho, an ancient, wealthy customs center. In wealthy towns such as Jericho, tax collectors and prostitutes were not uncommon and those who had access to money had a lot of power, specifically power over others. Recall that the Empire was socially organized around status of family name and wealth; however, those with wealth, but no family name, were never truly accepted by the politically connected people. Zacchaeus, the chief tax collector, would have access to money, but would never be accepted by the Gentile ruling elite whom he served because he was not born in a Gentile family. Zacchaeus was also socially isolated from his fellow Jews because he would be considered a collaborator with the Romans. In short, Zacchaeus was an outsider.

In the story Zacchaeus could not draw close to Jesus as he passed by so he climbed up a sycamore tree above the crowd in anticipation of Jesus’ passing by.  The details included in the story might suggest that Zacchaeus’ initiative caught the attention of Jesus. The crowd did not react with joy when Jesus said, “I must stay at your (Zacchaeus’) house.”  They remarked, “He has gone to stay at the house of a sinner.” The elements of the story thus far are consistent with last week’s parable. Recall the Publican’s righteousness in last week’s parable and compare his statement with Zacchaeus’ statement.  The Pharisee said, “I fast twice a week, and I pay tithes on my whole income.” (Lk 18:12) and Zacchaeus said, “Behold, half of my possessions, Lord, I shall give to the poor, and if I have extorted anything from anyone I shall repay it four times over.” (Lk 19:8). Zacchaeus, like the Pharisee, justified himself. Neither said, “Forgive me.” What then is the lesson? Does doing good things absolve us from all sin?  If obedience to the rules does not guarantee salvation, should we then ignore the rules?

Luke’s narrative calls into question the underlying presumption that doing good things will make us righteous.      Zacchaeus righteous was God.  God elected the people of Israel as his chosen people. Jesus said, Zacchaeus was justified because he was “…also a descendant of Abraham….” (Lk 19:9)  Righteousness, then, is not a prize given to us because of our initiative. Righteousness is given by God. Jump back to Lk 18:19. Jesus said, “Why do you call me good? No one is good but God alone.” Indeed, salvation is not given because we have earned it, but precisely because we are unworthy. Jesus taught that the only appropriate response is to give everything up, renounce the Empire, and participate in the kingdom of God. (See the exchange between Jesus and the rich young man who could not renounce the Empire. Lk 18:18-25).

Luke’s audience had to come to understand that salvation was not contingent upon their good works. They had to come to understand that salvation — righteousness — came from Jesus-as-the Christ. “The Son of Man has come to seek and to save what was lost.” (Lk 19:10).  Disciples had to learn to embrace the teaching that their interior disposition had to be a steady faith/emunah that they were loved and accepted and that they did not have to climb a tree for justification. If parishes and clergy were to put this teaching in operation, what might we hope to see in parish life? With greater emphasis upon faith/emunah rather than on scrupulosity, might we see greater a broader diversity of thought in our congregations? Would our conversations about people’s “choices” and “lifestyles” be more nuanced? Would we see more young people in the pew and more progressive voices in leadership?

Weekly Intercessions
Excerpt from Alice Walker’s, “Forgiveness”

Looking down into my father’s
dead face
for the last time,
my mother said without
tears, without smiles,
without regrets,
but with civility
“Goodnight, Willie Lee, I’ll see you
in the morning.”

And it was then I knew that the healing
of all our wounds
is forgiveness
that permits a promise of our return
at the end.

Let us pray for those who are broken down by shame and guilt; that they will overcome their self-doubt and learn to accept the things that they cannot change and commit themselves to focus on the things that they can change…

 Let us pray for those who take it upon themselves not only to be the “moral voice” and champion the cause of righteousness, but who impose their views on others without regard to feelings or the desire for reconciliation…

Let us pray for those who have been emotionally scared and turned off by hypocrisy in our parish communities, scandals in clergy, and declarations of partisan motivated excommunications; that those harmed by Church, may find healing from God…

Let us pray for pastoral ministers who promote understanding and dialog and for those who work with marginalized communities; that they will not give up hope on the possibility of a Church that is open and welcoming of all people….

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 
¿Qué nos hace justos?

La selección de la semana pasada, Lucas 18: 9-14, abordó la cuestión de la fe/emuná como una disposición interior que invita a los discípulos a mirar hacia adentro. La parábola del fariseo y el publicano fue complicada porque fuimos empujados a identificarnos con el publicano, no con el fariseo. En el momento en que elegimos uno sobre el otro, caímos en la trampa de la parábola: somos simultáneamente el Fariseo (presumido) y el Publicano (humilde). La parábola, como todas las parábolas, nos obliga a luchar con un concepto particular, en este caso, el concepto de justificación (ser perdonados de nuestros pecados y reconciliados con Dios). La parábola nos hizo darnos cuenta de que uno no está justificado por las buenas obras exigidas por la ley (ayuno y diezmo) ni por tener una postura de humildad. Somos justificados porque Dios es justo. Cuando somos uno con Dios, es decir, cuando dejamos de lado nuestro locura (de la charla inútil en la cabeza)  y ponemos a un lado el egoismo, reconocemos que lo Divino siempre ha estado allí. Reconocer lo Santo es reconocer que estamos atrapados en el amor de Dios (¡Gracia!) Y a través de este amor, nos volvemos más abiertos (a través de la fe/emuná) a lo que estamos llamados a hacer: participar en el reino de Dios. La narrativa familiar de hoy del Publicano, Zaqueo, los desarrolla de la justicia y la gracia.

El nombre, Zaqueo, proviene de la palabra hebrea para “justo” o “recto”. En la historia, Jesús y sus discípulos llegan a Jericó, un antiguo y rico centro aduanero. En ciudades ricas como Jericó, los Publicanos y las prostitutas no eran infrecuentes y quienes tenían acceso al dinero tenían mucho poder, específicamente poder sobre los demás. Recordemos que el Imperio estaba socialmente organizado en torno al estatus del apellido y la riqueza; sin embargo, aquellos con riqueza, pero sin apellido, nunca fueron realmente aceptados por las personas políticamente conectadas. Zaqueo, el Publicano principal, tendría acceso al dinero, pero nunca sería aceptado por la élite gobernante gentil a quien sirvió porque no nació en una familia gentil. Zaqueo también estaba rechazado socialmente de sus compañeros judíos porque sería considerado un colaborador con los romanos. En resumen, Zaqueo era un extraño en su propio país.

En la historia, Zaqueo no podía acercarse a Jesús cuando pasaba, por lo que trepó a un sicómoro sobre la multitud en anticipación del paso de Jesús. Los detalles incluidos en la historia pueden sugerir que la iniciativa de Zaqueo llamó la atención de Jesús. La multitud no reaccionó con alegría cuando Jesús dijo: “Debo quedarme en tu casa (de Zaqueo)”. Ellos comentaron: “Se ha ido a quedar en la casa de un pecador”. Los elementos de la historia hasta ahora son consistentes con la parábola de la semana pasada. Recuerde la justicia del publicano en la parábola de la semana pasada y compare su declaración con la declaración de Zaqueo. El fariseo dijo: “Ayuno dos veces por semana, y pago diezmos de todos mis ingresos” (Lucas 18:12) y Zaqueo dijo: “He aquí, la mitad de mis posesiones, Señor, daré a los pobres, y si He extorsionado cualquier cosa a cualquiera, se lo devolveré cuatro veces ” (Lc 19, 8). Zaqueo, como el fariseo, se justificó. Ninguno de los dos dijo: “Perdóname”. ¿Cuál es entonces la clave? ¿Hacer cosas buenas nos absuelve de todo pecado? Si la obediencia a las reglas no garantiza la salvación, ¿deberíamos ignorar las reglas?

La narrativa de S Lucas cuestiona la presunción subyacente de que hacer cosas buenas nos hará justos. Zaqueo justo era Dios. Dios eligió al pueblo de Israel como su pueblo elegido. Jesús dijo: Zaqueo fue justificado porque él era “… también descendiente de Abraham …” (Lucas 19: 9). La justicia, entonces, no es un premio que se nos da por nuestra iniciativa. La justicia es dada por Dios. Vuelve a Lc 18:19. Jesús dijo: “¿Por qué me llamas bueno? Nadie es bueno sino Dios solo ”. De hecho, la salvación no se da porque la hemos ganado, sino precisamente porque no somos dignos. Jesús enseñó que la única respuesta apropiada es renunciar a todo, renunciar al Imperio y participar en el reino de Dios. (Vea el intercambio entre Jesús y el joven rico que no podía renunciar al Imperio. Lc 18: 18-25).

La comunidad de S Lucas tuvo que entender que la salvación no dependía de sus buenas obras. Tenían que llegar a comprender que la salvación, la justicia, vino de Jesús como el Cristo. “El Hijo del Hombre ha venido a buscar y salvar lo que se perdió” (Lc 19, 10). Los discípulos tenían que aprender a aceptar la enseñanza de que su disposición interior tenía que ser una fe/emuná constante que fueran amados y aceptados y que no tuvieran que trepar a un árbol para justificarse. Si las parroquias y el clero pusieran en práctica esta enseñanza, ¿qué esperaríamos ver en la vida parroquial? Con mayor énfasis en la fe/emuná que en la escrupulosidad, ¿podríamos ver una mayor diversidad de pensamiento en nuestras congregaciones? ¿Serían más matizadas nuestras conversaciones sobre las “elecciones” y los “estilos de vida” de las personas? ¿Veríamos más jóvenes en el banco y voces más progresistas en el liderazgo?

Intercesiónes semanales

Del poema “Forgiveness” de Alice Walker

Mirando la cara muerta
de mi padre
por última vez,
mi madre dijo
sin lágrimas, sin sonrisas,
sin arrepentimientos,
pero con cortesía
“Buenas noches, Willie Lee, te veré
en la mañana”.

Y fue entonces cuando supe que la sanación
de todas nuestras heridas
es perdón
eso permite una promesa de nuestro regreso
al final.
 

Oremos por aquellos que están averiados por la vergüenza y la culpa; que superarán sus dudas y aprenderán a aceptar las cosas que no pueden cambiar y se comprometerán a enfocarse en las cosas que pueden cambiar … 

Oremos por aquellos que se encargan no solo de ser la “voz moral” y defender la causa de la santidad Cristiana, sino que imponen sus puntos de vista a los demás sin tener en cuenta los sentimientos o el deseo de reconciliación …

Oremos por aquellos que han estado emocionalmente traumatizados y apagados por la hipocresía en nuestras comunidades parroquiales, escándalos en el clero y declaraciones de excomuniones motivadas por la política; para que los perjudicados por la Iglesia puedan encontrar la sanación de Dios …

Oremos por los ministros pastorales que promueven el entendimiento y el diálogo y por aquellos que trabajan con comunidades marginadas; que no perderán la esperanza sobre la posibilidad de una Iglesia abierta y acogedora para todas las personas …

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, November 9, 11am-1pm San Jose Museum of Art, 110 S. Market St, San Jose 95113

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Need support for DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo will be the host of Handicapables members on November 2 at 11 am at Calvary Cemetery’s annual All Souls Day-Dia de los Muertos Mass.  Handicapables is a social support program in the Advocacy and Community Engagement Division. Members of Handicapables are persons living with disabilities who enjoy spiritual, social and educational activities. On November 2, Grupo will entertain them with altar building, face painting, and Lotería (the Mexican version of Bingo).  Come early for the blessing of graves at 10 am, mass at 11 and lunch and social at 12.  Please bring a favorite dish to share, lotería cards, and craft materials!  

Necesita ayuda para DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo será el anfitrión de los miembros de Handicapables el 2 de noviembre a las 11 a.m. Los miembros de Handicapables son personas con discapacidades que disfrutan de actividades espirituales, sociales y educativas. El 2 de noviembre, Grupo los entretendrá con la construcción de altar, pintura facial y Lotería (la versión mexicana de Bingo). Venga temprano para la bendición de las tumbas a las 10 am, misa a las 11 y almuerzo y social a las 12. ¡Por favor traiga un plato favorito para compartir, tarjetas de lotería y materiales para manualidades!

<!–


–>

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un horno de microondas y un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. This week we are asking for a MICROWAVE oven and a television/screen with a DVR. The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Justification and Faith

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

October 25, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, October 27 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!
27 de octubre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Dia de los Muertos, an ancient tradition rooted in both Catholicism’s All Souls Day and indigenous practices of remembering the dead, is celebrated on November 2. In parts of Mexico and Central America, families place photos, sweets, fresh marigolds and other things personal to those who have died on an altar at home. Many people visit cemeteries to clean the tombs of their loved ones and sit and share with food with family. Sadly some people feel a need to suppress these ancient folk traditions rather than lift them up as legitimate expressions of faith.  Join Grupo Solidaridad this coming Saturday, November 2 at 10 am for the blessing of graves at Calvary Cemetery. Mass will follow at 11 am and a “convivencia” with members of Handicapables, a program for people with disabilities. Bring food and joy to share!

Gospel Reflection: Justification and Faith

Last week’s selection, Lk 18:1-9, was a parable about an indifferent judge being confronted by a widow demanding a favorable ruling against her opponent. Reading the parable in the context of the Empire’s judicial system, the widow searched for justice in an unjust system using the only resource she could rely on: her own voice. She refused to suffer silently as a victim of injustice nor was she willing to wait for someone else to advocate her own cause. The parable showed that by confronting the judge she chose RESISTANCE as a way to live out her faith/emunah. Today’s passage, Lk 18:9-14, addresses the question of faith/emunah from a different perspective. Whereas Lk18:1-9 looked at faith/emunah as an external manifestation of one’s resilience compelling the widow to rise up in resistance, Lk 19:9-14 looks at faith/emunah as an interior disposition which invites disciples to look inward.  Think of today’s parable an “ego-check” to those who might think to themselves, “Oh, now I get what faith/emunah is all about. I finally understand what living in the kingdom of God means. I am now a disciple of Jesus-as-the Christ and thanks be to God, I am not like those who are still ignorant of the Truth!”  (Note that the parable was addressed to those who were convinced of their own righteousness and despised everyone else.” (Lk 18:9). Before we proceed to the full text of the parable, we need to pause and revisit the character of the Pharisee referenced in the parable.

Many modern Christians misappropriate the Biblical reference of “Pharisee.” The source of this misappropriation comes from an uncritical reading of the gospels. When we ignore the socio-historical context of the gospel, we are left with the impression that Pharisees were rigid and consumed with the legal elements of Scripture and ignorant of the spirit of the Scripture and that they used “loopholes” in the law to justify hypocritical behavior. Generations of uncritical reading of the gospels has created a critical theological void in which Christians believed that their religion was a “corrective improvement” or a “replacement” of Judaism.  Over the centuries, the cumulative effect of Scriptural ignorance led to systemic anti-semitism, Pogroms and the Holocaust.  The weekly reflections of the Communique are intended to chip away at Christian ignorance by providing a Resistance lens to the reading of Scripture through lifting up the socio-economic and historical context in which the Scriptures were written and of the historical figures which are referenced in the text itself. Moving forward, we will place the character of the Pharisee within his proper historical context so that we can draw deeper insights from the passage based on an informed reading of the parable.

Pharisees were not an organized faction in an allegiance with the Priests of the Temple of Jerusalem and they were theologically and socially independent from the Sadducees. Pharisees were an independent movement rising primarily out of Galilee which was a hotbed of spiritual awakening and political unrest. The Pharisaic movement rose up in response to hostile foreign Empires that sought to dismantle the social and political bonds of the people by reducing Judaism into a religion of privatized piety, sacrificial ritual and a one-dimensional reading of the Torah.

Pharisees were non-clerical scholars who lived among the people. Some were wealthy, but most were like the majority of the population, poor. Pharisees rejected a literalist approach of reading of the Torah that had been adopted by the Sadducees. Because the Pharisees understood the Torah to be a living and breathing document, the study of the Torah required not only a knowledge of the body of centuries-old commentaries, but also critical thought. The truth of the Torah, therefore, cannot be captured in a single proclamation, but rather, is revealed in each generation with truth emerging from within the Sacred Text and the lived experiences of the people. Truth, then, was not a static “thing” or a proclamation, or a creed, but rather a sacred conversation that crossed centuries of commentaries that gave insight and wisdom to those who were seeking truth.  Faith/emunah was not about certainty or dogma, but about holding a particular stance of trust before God.

The Pharisaic movement was a movement that emphasized not only personal freedom, but a comprehensive freedom that included social, political and economic dimensions. Theologically grounded in the belief that the Jewish people would be freed from the bonds of oppression imposed on them by repressive Empires through greater knowledge and understanding of the Torah through Talmudic and Torah commentary, Pharisees were opposed by the Sadducees who took a literalist view of the Torah. Sadducees rejected the wisdom and insight that came from the oral tradition of trans-generational conversations and instead chose a path of rigorous literalism. The Sadducees’ literalist approach rejected critical thought making it was easy for the Empire to manipulate the literalist interpretation of the Torah. For example, Sadducees and the Romans promoted the Jewish liberation from Egypt as a historical event and were weary of any hint that liberation from Egypt might have something to say about longing for liberation from the Roman Empire. In short, Sadducees valued obedience, ritual observance, and memorization of passages. Critical thought and religious imagination, central to the Pharisees, were not values embraced by the Sadducees.

Let us now return to today’s parable and revisit our presumptions about who is justified and who is not justified. The parable opens with the Pharisee praying, “O God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity—greedy, dishonest, adulterous—or even like this tax collector.” (Lk 18:11)  Before jumping to judgment about how “bad” the Pharisee was, let us stay with the actual text. The parable gives the reader a glimpse of the Pharisee’s inner-life. The parable also gives us an understanding that the Pharisee is a man of prayer and that he gives by what is required by law. “I fast twice a week, and I pay tithes on my whole income.” (Lk 18:12). What readers are led to believe is that the Pharisee was doing all that was required by the law and that because he is standing in the Temple praying, he was also looking for reconciliation. (NB, The Temple was the place of reconciliation).  Now let us move to the second figure in the parable: the Publican. The Publican was also in need of reconciliation, but because his work required him to handle Roman currency, but he was not considered “pure” and therefore not permitted to enter into the Temple. This is why the Publican stood outside the Temple. Rather than ritual observance, he recited the prayer, “O God, be merciful to me a sinner,” and beat his chest — a typical penitential practice.

In Luke’s rendition of this parable, the Pharisee, (a man of the Resistance) and the Publican, (a man whose livelihood enabled the Empire to oppress the people) stood before God asking for reconciliation-justification. One would imagine that Luke’s audience would at first be surprised that the collaborator, not the resister, was justified.  One could also imagine that they would also be pleased that the Publican was the one justified because they too — as Gentile converts — were inextricably tied to the Empire (their livelihoods were most likely in service to the Empire) and if the Publican was justified — even as a collaborator — they too would be justified.  But we cannot get ahead of ourselves! The final “zing” of the parable is not actually in the text, but in the audience’s reaction.  Before we get to that, let’s review how the “zing” in a parable works.

Rabbis used (and still use) parables because parables draw the listener into the parable and encourage critical thinking. (Recall Mk 4:2, “He taught them in parables.”) Pharisees and itinerate preaches like Jesus, understood that the power of a parable is not in the text of the parable, but rather the reaction of the audience! Turning specifically to today’s parable: the parable text ended with the Publican being justified and the reaction of the audience might have been, “Thank God we are like the Publican and not like the Pharisee!” but because the parable does not end with the text, but ends with audience reaction, we have now begun to unpack the “zing” of the parable. Recall the words attributed to the Pharisee, “I thank you, God that I am not like the Publican…”  Bam!  By thinking that we are like the Publican and the Pharisee, we are in fact nothing like the Publican and we are everything like the Pharisee!  This reversal, reversal and reversal of roles, concepts and dialog force us to critically think through the parable and identify what the parable is trying to say.

The power of this parable forces us to struggle with the question of justification (reconciliation with God). The parable suggests that one is not justified by good works demanded by the law (fasting and tithing) but rather by having a posture of humility that does not end in thanking God for having been justified (as in the character of the Pharisee).  The parable leads us to understand that justification is not a reward, but grace! The Publican had no other option other than to remain open to God and hope for reconciliation. His openness was brought on by faith/emunah that placed him in a relationship of having forever to stand before the Divine in a posture of submission not presumption.  The parable invites us to also assume a posture of openness (meaning that we have no presumptions of justification nor presumptions of condemnation).  We simply open ourselves to Presence with  faith/emunah. When we open ourselves to Love, we assume the stance of faith/emunah. This stance (of faith/emunah) will ultimately free us to move mountains. 

Weekly Intercessions

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
as an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they are a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still, treat each guest honorably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,
meet them at the door laughing,
and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes,
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond.

– Rumi

 

Let us pray for those who are burdened by the injustices of our society, that they do not give up on themselves…. 

Let us pray for those who give their lives for social change, that their work be filed with joyful hope that the arc of history will indeed bend toward justice…

Let us pray for those whose fortunes and fame is built upon the sweat, blood and broken bodies of others, that they who eat well and laugh and hold power will one day walk away empty and be transformed by the experience of needing to work with others for the common good.

Let us pray for those who command the power of armies and hold the lives of millions in their hands, that they will be given the gift of falling from their thrones and be transformed by the Grace of God that comes from humility and asking for forgiveness.  

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 
Justificaci
ón y Fe

La selección de la semana pasada, Lc 18, 1-9, fue una parábola sobre un juez indiferente confrontado por una viuda que exige una decision favorable contra su adversario. Al leer la parábola en el contexto del sistema judicial del Imperio, la viuda buscó justicia en un sistema injusto utilizando el único recurso en el que podía confiar: su propia voz. Ella se negó a sufrir en silencio cómo víctima de la injusticia ni estaba dispuesta a esperar a que alguien más defendiera su propia causa. La parábola mostró que al confrontar al juez, ella eligió RESISTENCIA como una forma de vivir su fe/emuná. El pasaje de hoy, Lucas 18: 9-14, aborda la cuestión de la fe/emuná desde una perspectiva diferente. Mientras que Lucas 18: 1-9 consideraba la ffe/emuná como una manifestación externa de la Resistencia de uno que obligaba a la viuda a levantarse en la Resistencia, Lucas 19: 9-14 considera la fe/emuná como una disposición interior que invita a los discípulos a mirar hacia adentro. Considera en la parábola de hoy como un “control del ego” para aquellos que puedan pensar por sí mismos: “O, ahora entiendo de qué se trata la fe/emuná. Finalmente entiendo lo que significa vivir en el reino de Dios. ¡Ahora soy un discípulo de Jesús-como-el Cristo y gracias a Dios, no soy como aquellos que aún ignoran la Verdad!” (Tenga en cuenta que la parábola se dirigió “…a aquellos que estaban convencidos de su propia justicia y despreciados todos los demás.” (Lucas 18: 9). Antes de proceder con el texto completo de la parábola, necesitamos hacer una pausa y volver a visitar el personaje del fariseo al que se hace referencia en la parábola.

Muchos cristianos modernos se apropiaron mal de la referencia bíblica del “fariseo”. La fuente de esta apropiación indebida proviene de una lectura acrítica de los evangelios. Cuando ignoramos el contexto sociohistórico del evangelio, tendremos la impresión de que los fariseos eran rígidos y preocupados con los elementos legales de la Escritura e ignorantes del espíritu de la Escritura y que usaban “lagunas” en la ley para justificar comportamiento hipócrita. Generaciones de lectura no crítica de los evangelios ha creado un vacío teológico crítico en el que los cristianos creían que su religión era una “mejora correctiva” o un “reemplazo” del judaísmo. A lo largo de los siglos, el efecto acumulativo de la ignorancia de las Escrituras abrió la puerta por al antisemitismo sistémico, a los pogromos y al Holocausto. Las reflexiones semanales del Communique pretenden eliminar la ignorancia cristiana al proporcionar una lente de Resistencia a la lectura de las Escrituras al levantar el contexto socioeconómico e histórico en el que se escribieron las Escrituras y de las figuras históricas a las que se hace referencia en el texto en sí. En el siguiente párrafos, ubicaremos al personaje del fariseo dentro de su contexto histórico apropiado para que podamos extraer ideas más profundas del pasaje basadas en una lectura informada de la parábola.

Los fariseos no eran una facción organizada en una alianza con los sacerdotes del templo de Jerusalén y eran teológica y socialmente independientes de los saduceos. Los fariseos eran un movimiento independiente que surgía principalmente de Galilea, que era un hervidero de despertar espiritual e inquietud política. El movimiento farisaico surgió en respuesta a los imperios hostiles extranjeros que buscaban desmantelar los lazos sociales y políticos del pueblo al reducir el judaísmo a una religión de piedad privatizada, ritual de sacrificio y una lectura unidimensional de la Torá.

Los fariseos eran laicos eruditos no clericales que vivían entre la gente. Algunos eran ricos, pero la mayoría eran como la mayoría de la población, pobres. Los fariseos rechazaron un enfoque literalista de lectura de la Torá que había sido adoptado por los saduceos. Debido a que los fariseos entendieron que la Torá es un documento vivo y el estudio de la Torá requirió no solo un conocimiento de los comentarios de antigüedad, sino también un pensamiento crítico. La verdad de la Torá, por lo tanto, no puede ser capturada en una sola proclamación, sino que se revela en cada generación con la verdad que emerge del Texto Sagrado y las experiencias vividas de las personas. La verdad, entonces, no era una “cosa” estática o una proclamación, ni un credo, sino más bien una conversación sagrada que cruzó siglos de comentarios que dieron perspicacia y sabiduría a quienes buscaban la verdad. Fe/emuná no se trataba de certeza ni dogma, sino de mantener una postura particular de confianza ante Dios.

El movimiento farisaico era un movimiento que enfatizaba no solo la libertad personal, sino una libertad integral que incluía dimensiones sociales, políticas y económicas. Fundamentado teológicamente en la creencia de que el pueblo judío sería liberado de los lazos de opresión impuestos por los imperios represivos a través de un mayor conocimiento y comprensión de la Torá a través de comentarios talmúdicos y de la Torá, los fariseos se opusieron a los fariseos que adoptaron una visión literal de la Torá. Los saduceos rechazaron la sabiduría y la percepción que surgieron de la tradición oral de las conversaciones trans-generacionales y en su lugar eligieron un camino de literalismo riguroso. El enfoque literalista de los saduceos rechazó el pensamiento crítico, lo que facilitó al Imperio manipular la interpretación literal de la Torá. Por ejemplo, los saduceos y los romanos promovieron la liberación judía de Egipto como un evento histórico y estaban cansados ​​de cualquier conexión de que la liberación de Egipto podría tener algo que decir sobre el anhelo de la liberación del Imperio Romano. En resumen, los saduceos valoraban la obediencia, la observancia ritual y la memorización de pasajes en la Torá. El pensamiento crítico y la imaginación religiosa, centrales para los fariseos, no eran valores abrazados por los saduceos.

Volvamos ahora a la parábola de hoy y revisemos nuestras presunciones sobre quién está justificado y quién no está justificado. La parábola comienza con el fariseo orando: “Oh Dios, te agradezco que no soy como el resto de la humanidad: codicioso, deshonesto, adúltero, o incluso como este recaudador de impuestos” (Lc 18,11). cuán “malo” era el fariseo, quedémonos con el texto real. La parábola le da al lector un vistazo de la vida interior del fariseo. La parábola también nos da a entender que el fariseo es un hombre de oración y que da por lo que exige la ley. “Ayuno dos veces por semana y pago diezmos de todos mis ingresos” (Lc 18:12). Lo que los lectores deben creer es que el fariseo estaba haciendo todo lo que requería la ley y que debido a que estaba parado en el templo orando, también estaba buscando la reconciliación. (NB, el templo era el lugar de la reconciliación). Ahora pasemos a la segunda figura de la parábola: el Publicano. El publicano también necesitaba reconciliación, pero debido a que su trabajo requería que manejara la moneda romana, pero no se lo consideraba “puro” y, por lo tanto, no se le permitía entrar al Templo. Esta es la razón por la cual el Publicano estaba parado afuera del Templo. En lugar de la observancia ritual, recitó la oración: “O Dios, ten piedad de mí, pecador”, y se golpeó el pecho, una práctica penitencial típica.

En la versión de S Lucas de esta parábola, el fariseo (un hombre de la Resistencia) y el publicano (un hombre cuyo sustento permitió que el imperio oprimiera al pueblo) se paró ante Dios pidiendo la reconciliación-justificación. Uno podría imaginarse que la audiencia de S Lucas al principio se sorprendería de que el colaborador, no la Resistencia, estuviera justificado. También se podría imaginar que también estarían complacidos de que el Publicano fuera el justificado porque ellos también, como conversos gentiles, estaban inextricablemente vinculados al Imperio (sus medios de vida probablemente estaban al servicio del Imperio) y si el Publicano estaba justificado: incluso como colaborador, ellos también estarían justificados. ¡Pero no podemos adelantarnos a nosotros mismos! El “zing” final de la parábola no está realmente en el texto, sino en la reacción de la audiencia. Antes de llegar a eso, revisemos como funciona el “zing” en una parábola.

Los rabinos usaron (y aún usan) parábolas porque las parábolas atraen al oyente a la parábola y alientan el pensamiento crítico. (Recordemos Mc 4: 2, “Él les enseñó en parábolas”.) Los fariseos y los predicadores itinerantes como Jesús, entendieron que el poder de una parábola no está en el texto de la parábola, ¡sino en la reacción de la audiencia! Volviendo específicamente a la parábola de hoy: el texto de la parábola terminó con la justificación del publicano y la reacción de la audiencia podría haber sido: “¡Gracias a Dios que somos como el publicano y no como el fariseo!”, Sino porque la parábola no termina con el texto , pero termina con la reacción de la audiencia, ahora hemos comenzado a desentrañar el “zing” de la parábola. Recordemos las palabras atribuidas al fariseo: “Te agradezco, Dios, que no soy como el publicano …” ¡Bam! ¡Al pensar que somos como el Publicano y el Fariseo, en realidad no somos nada como el Publicano y somos como el Fariseo! Esta inversión, inversión e inversión de roles, conceptos y diálogo nos obliga a pensar críticamente a través de la parábola e identificar lo que la parábola está tratando de decir.

El poder de esta parábola nos obliga a luchar con la cuestión de la justificación (reconciliación con Dios). La parábola sugiere que uno no está justificado por las buenas obras exigidas por la ley (ayuno y diezmo), sino por tener una postura de humildad que no termina en agradecer a Dios por haber sido justificado (como en el carácter del fariseo). La parábola nos lleva a comprender que la justificación no es una recompensa, ¡sino gracia! El Publicano no tenía otra opción que permanecer abierta a Dios y esperar la reconciliación. Su apertura fue provocada por la fe/emuná que lo colocó en una relación de tener que estar siempre ante la Divinidad en una postura de sumisión, no de presunción. La parábola nos invita a asumir también una postura de apertura (lo que significa que no tenemos presunciones de justificación ni presunciones de condena). Simplemente nos abrimos a la Presencia con fe/emuná. Cuando nos abrimos al Amor Divino, asumimos la postura de fe/emuná. Esta postura (de fe/emuná) finalmente nos liberará para mover montañas.

Intercesiónes semanales

El ser humano es un casa de huéspedes.
Cada mañana un nuevo recién llegado.

Una alegría, una tristeza, una maldad,
cierta consciencia momentánea llega
como un visitante inesperado.

¡Dales la bienvenida y recíbelos a todos!
Incluso si fueran una muchedumbre de lamentos,
que vacían tu casa con violencia
aún así, trata a cada huésped con honor.
Puede estar creándote el espacio
Para un nuevo deleite.

Al pensamiento oscuro, a la vergüenza, a la malicia,
recíbelos en la puerta riendo,
e invítalos a entrar

Sé agradecido con quien quiera que venga,
porque cada uno ha sido enviado
como una guía del más allá.

– Rumi

 

Oremos por aquellos que están agobiados por las injusticias de nuestra sociedad, para que no se den por vencidos …

Oremos por aquellos que dan su vida por el cambio social, para que su trabajo sea llena con alegre esperanza de que el arco de la historia se doblegará hacia la justicia …

Oremos por aquellos cuyas fortunas y fama se basan en el sudor, la sangre y los cuerpos rotos de los demás, para que los que comen bien y se ríen y mantengan el poder algún día se vayan vacíos y se transformen por la experiencia de necesitar trabajar con otros por el bien común

Oremos por aquellos que tienen el poder de comandar a los ejércitos y tienen la vida de millones en sus manos, para que reciban el don de caer de sus tronos y sean transformados por la Gracia de Dios que viene de la humildad y pidiendo perdón por sus pecados.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

Need support for DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo will be the host of Handicapables members on November 2 at 11 am at Calvary Cemetery’s annual All Souls Day-Dia de los Muertos Mass.  Handicapables is a social support program in the Advocacy and Community Engagement Division. Members of Handicapables are persons living with disabilities who enjoy spiritual, social and educational activities. On November 2, Grupo will entertain them with altar building, face painting, and Lotería (the Mexican version of Bingo).  Come early for the blessing of graves at 10 am, mass at 11 and lunch and social at 12.  Please bring a favorite dish to share, lotería cards, and craft materials!  

Necesita ayuda para DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo será el anfitrión de los miembros de Handicapables el 2 de noviembre a las 11 a.m. Los miembros de Handicapables son personas con discapacidades que disfrutan de actividades espirituales, sociales y educativas. El 2 de noviembre, Grupo los entretendrá con la construcción de altar, pintura facial y Lotería (la versión mexicana de Bingo). Venga temprano para la bendición de las tumbas a las 10 am, misa a las 11 y almuerzo y social a las 12. ¡Por favor traiga un plato favorito para compartir, tarjetas de lotería y materiales para manualidades!

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un horno de microondas y un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. This week we are asking for a MICROWAVE oven and a television/screen with a DVR. The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

Read the Pastoral Letter to the People of God in El Paso
by the Most Reverend Mark J. Seitz, Bishop of El Paso.

Night Will Be No More

Lea la Carta Pastoral al Pueblo de Dios en El Paso
por el Reverendísimo Mark J. Seitz, Obispo de El Paso.

Noche ya no habrá
Fr. Jon receiving his copy of the pastoral letter at the closing mass of the Teach-In 2019: Jornada por la Justicia.
El P. Jon recibe su copia de la carta pastoral en la misa de clausura de Teach-In 2019: Jornada por la Justicia.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Widow and the Judge

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

October 18, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, October 20 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!
20 de octubre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Patti and dozens of other people on the pilgrimage walked through El Paso and placed hand made flowers on the border wall. Members of Grupo Solidaridad traveled to El Paso to attend a weekend TeachIn on asylum seekers, racism and immigration policy, and organizing our communities. Attendees came from all around the country.

Gospel Reflection: The Widow and the Judge

Last week’s selection, Lk 17:11-19 began with Jesus and his disciples in the borderlands of Samaria and Galilee.  Jesus and company encountered lepers crying out, “Jesus, Master! Have pity on us!” The narrative continued with Jesus curing all the lepers with only one leper, a foreigner, coming back acknowledging that Jesus-as-the Christ healed him. The reflection looked at faith/emunah and marginalization based on religion, race and whether one had leprosy or not. The marginalization of the lepers was not only because they were afflicted with leprosy, but because they themselves internalized the oppression. We discussed that unless we deal with the marginalization that we do unto ourselves, we cannot address the marginalization externally imposed on us by social, cultural and political systems. Freedom depends on having faith/emunah in ourselves so that we can ultimately overcome self-imposed marginalization. When we are truly free, we will live in a spirit of gratitude and love and we will not be fearful of what the future might hold for us.

Today’s gospel selection, Lk 18:1-9 begins with a parable about an indifferent judge being confronted by a violent-prone widow demanding a favorable ruling against her opponent. In the end, the judge decides to render a decision not based on the merits of the case, but rather on his own self-interest. He fears the widow’s wrath! Looking at the characters in the parable through the lens of Resistance, we will see that faith/emunah will ultimately lead us to re-examining our presumptions about justice and the judicial system. 

Luke frames parable in terms of praying always without becoming weary. A dive into the text will tell us that praying always without weariness is not about rattling off payers, rosaries and litanies without putting ourselves to sleep, but rather a stance of faith/emunah that will eventually give us the ability to see the world as it is: in its unfairness and broken systems, and yet find a way to move forward.

Let us turn to the character of the widow in the parable. In the parable, the widow initiated contact and demanded a just decision, leaving us with the impression that she is out for more than mere justice. The widow’s singular attention was to get the judge to rule in her favor. Not presenting new evidence or presenting a compelling case, we find the widow harassing the judge. Her perseverance suggests that revenge was her motive not justice, according to Dr. Amy-Jill Levine.

Let us now turn to the judge. The parable includes the judge’s inner thoughts, “…because this widow keeps bothering me I shall deliver a just decision for her lest she finally come and strike me.” (Lk 18:5).  The judge is not moved by precedent, empathy or morality: “….I neither fear God nor respect any human being…” (Lk 18:4), but the judge is moved by his self interest, i.e., he does not want to be assaulted. Dr. Levine criticized commentators who believe that the judge in the parable is God, thus casting God as an indifferent, corrupt figure. 

Luke sets up his community to see the futility of the Empire’s judicial system. (Recall that at this point in his gospel, Luke is showing his people how to live with faith/emunah and commit to living in the kingdom of God and renounce the Empire). Jesus-as-the Christ does not leave the reader wallowing in self-defeat. Jesus-as-the Christ said, “Will not God then secure the rights of his chosen ones who call out to him day and night? Will he be slow to answer them? I tell you, he will see to it that justice is done for them speedily…” Jesus-as-the Christ calls for faith/emunah in the kingdom of God. In the kingdom of God justice is not revenge but the restoration of relationships to their proper balance. Restoration does not require a court of law because when we “live” in the kingdom of God, we live in proper balance with others, that is to say, we live in a state of equity among all and we live in a society in which all are welcome. Justice, therefore, in the kingdom of God cannot be reduced to a court battle of a revenge-thirsty plaintiff and a corrupt judge.  Justice is right relationship and the question of praying without becoming weary is not about “saying” prayers, but “living” our prayers. 

Having said so much about the pitfalls of an Empire-run judicial system, the point of the reflection is not to invalidate our own judicial system, but rather to invite all of us to consider whether our persistence in seeking justice is rooted in exacting revenge, needing to be validated as being right, or if we are truly seeking the restoration of relationship. For example, we should ask whether the death penalty is rehabilitating anyone? Are we driven to impose death because we have a thirst for revenge? Lastly, at the time of the writing of this reflection, more witnesses have stepped forward to give testimony against Donald Trump. These testimonies are indeed moving toward impeachment, but are our feelings for impeachment directed by evidence or are we driven by a thirst for revenge and proving our selves right? Our persistence of wanting Trump’s removal must be rooted in the desire to truly establish a sense of right relationship in our communities that can only happen by having Trump removed from office. Our perseverance in this effort must focus on what we want for our community, not to punish Trump. Our ability to rise above our hatred truly is an exercise in living out of faith/emunah.

Weekly Intercessions

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,
there is a field. I’ll meet you there.
When the soul lies down in that grass,
the world is too full to talk about.
Ideas, language, even the phrase “each other”
doesn’t make any sense.
The breeze at dawn has secrets to tell you.
Don’t go back to sleep.

You must ask for what you really want.
Don’t go back to sleep.
People are going back and forth across the doorsill
where the two worlds touch.
The door is round and open.
Don’t go back to sleep.

                                                                                 – Rumi

 

Let us pray for the children living in concentration camps in our Southern Border…

For the migrants and asylum seekers who are living in tent cities under bridges and overpasses in Mexico waiting for their asylum cases to be heard…

For the poor men and women of color who could not afford adequate legal representation and are now among the millions of prisoners living in prisons in the United States…

For young people who suffer mental illness and addictions and are removed from their communities and families and are locked in juvenile detention facilities…

For all those who work in the judicial system: the judges, prosecutors, defense lawyers, court-appointed defense attorneys, court translators, police and guards…

For all those who work to reintegrate people returning to their communities from jail and prison…

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:
La viuda y el juez

La selección de la semana pasada, Lucas 17: 11-19 comenzó con Jesús y sus discípulos en las tierras fronterizas de Samaria y Galilea. Jesús y compañía encontraron leprosos que gritaban: “¡Jesús, Maestro! ¡Ten piedad de nosotros!” La narración continuó con Jesús curando a todos los leprosos con un solo leproso, un extranjero, regresando reconociendo que Jesús como el Cristo lo sanó. La reflexión examinó la fe/emuná y la marginalización basada en la religión, la raza y si uno tenía lepra o no. La marginalización de los leprosos no fue solo porque estaban afectados por la lepra, sino porque ellos mismos internalizaron la opresión. Dialogamos que a menos que tratemos con la marginalización que nos hacemos a nosotros mismos, no podemos abordar la marginalización que nos imponen externamente los sistemas sociales, culturales y políticos. La libertad depende de tener fe/emuná en nosotros mismos para que finalmente podamos superar la marginalización auto-impuesta. Cuando seamos verdaderamente libres, viviremos en un espíritu de gratitud y amor y no tendremos miedo de lo que el futuro nos depare.

La selección del evangelio de hoy, Lc 18, 1-9 comienza con una parábola sobre un juez indiferente confrontado por una viuda propensa a la violencia que exige un fallo favorable contra su oponente. Al final, el juez decide tomar una decisión no basada en los méritos del caso, sino más bien en su propio interés. ¡Teme la ira de la viuda! Al observar a los personajes de la parábola a través del lente de Resistance, veremos que la fe/emuná finalmente nos llevará a reexaminar nuestras presunciones sobre la justicia y el sistema judicial.

S Lucas enmarca la parábola en términos de orar siempre sin cansarse. Una inmersión en el texto nos dirá que rezar siempre sin cansancio no se trata de recitar pagadores, rosarios y letanías sin ponernos a dormir, sino más bien una postura de fe/emuná que eventualmente nos dará la capacidad de ver el mundo tal como es: en su injusticia y sistemas rotos, y aún así encontrar una manera de avanzar.

Pasemos al personaje de la viuda en la parábola. En la parábola, la viuda inició el contacto y exigió una decisión justa, dejándonos la impresión de que ella está buscando algo más que la simple justicia. La atención singular de la viuda fue lograr que el juez fallara a su favor. Sin presentar nuevas pruebas o presentar un caso convincente, encontramos a la viuda acosando al juez. Su perseverancia sugiere que la venganza era su motivo, no la justicia, según la Dra. Amy-Jill Levine.

Pasemos ahora al juez. La parábola incluye los pensamientos internos del juez, “… porque esta viuda sigue molestándome, tomaré una decisión justa por ella para que finalmente no venga y me golpee”. (Lucas 18: 5). El juez no se conmueve por precedentes, empatía o moralidad: “… no temo a Dios ni respeto a ningún ser humano …” (Lucas 18: 4), pero el juez se mueve por su propio interés, es decir, no quiere ser asaltado El Dra. Levine criticó a los comentaristas que creen que el juez en la parábola es Dios, por lo que presenta a Dios como una figura indiferente y corrupta.

S Lucas establece su comunidad para ver la futilidad del sistema judicial del Imperio. (Recuerde que en este punto de su evangelio, S Lucas le está mostrando a su pueblo cómo vivir con fe/emuná y comprometerse a vivir en el reino de Dios y renunciar al Imperio). Jesús-como-el Cristo no deja al lector revolcándose en su propia derrota. Jesús-como-el Cristo dijo: “¿Entonces Dios no asegurará los derechos de sus elegidos que lo llaman día y noche? ¿Tardará en responderlas? Les digo que él se encargará de que se les haga justicia rápidamente…” Jesús-como-el Cristo llama a la fe/emuná en el reino de Dios. En el reino de Dios, la justicia no es venganza sino la restauración de las relaciones a su equilibrio adecuado. La restauración no requiere un corte de justicia porque cuando “vivimos” en el reino de Dios, vivimos en un equilibrio adecuado con los demás, es decir, vivimos en un estado de equidad entre todos y vivimos en una sociedad en la que todos son bienvenidos. La justicia, por lo tanto, en el reino de Dios no puede reducirse a una batalla judicial de un demandante sediento de venganza y un juez corrupto. La justicia es una relación correcta y la cuestión de orar sin cansarse no se trata de “decir” oraciones, sino de “vivir” nuestras oraciones.

Habiendo dicho tanto sobre las trampas de un sistema judicial dirigido por el Imperio, el objetivo de la reflexión no es invalidar nuestro propio sistema judicial, sino más bien invitarnos a todos a considerar si nuestra persistencia en la búsqueda de justicia se basa en una venganza exigente, necesita ser validado como correcto, o si realmente estamos buscando la restauración de la relación. Por ejemplo, deberíamos preguntarnos si la pena de muerte está rehabilitando a alguien. ¿Estamos obligados a imponer la muerte porque tenemos sed de venganza? Por último, al momento de escribir esta reflexión, más testigos han dado un paso adelante para dar testimonio contra Donald Trump. De hecho, estos testimonios se están moviendo hacia la impeachment, pero ¿nuestros sentimientos de impeachment están dirigidos por la evidencia o estamos impulsados ​​por una sed de venganza y por demostrarnos a nosotros mismos? Nuestra persistencia de querer la destitución de Trump debe estar enraizada en el deseo de establecer verdaderamente un sentido de relación correcta en nuestras comunidades que solo puede suceder si Trump es destituido de su cargo. Nuestra perseverancia en este esfuerzo debe centrarse en lo que queremos para nuestra comunidad, no para castigar a Trump. Nuestra capacidad de elevarnos por encima de nuestro odio es realmente un ejercicio de vivir con fe/emuná.

Intercesiónes semanales

Mas alla de las ideas de las obras malas y las obras buenas,
hay un campo. Ahi nos vemos.
Cuando el alma se acuesta en ese pasto,
el mundo esta demasiado lleno como para hablar de el.
Ideas, lenguaje, aun la frase “el uno al otro”
no hace ninguna logica.
La brisa del amanecer tiene secretos que contarte.
No te vuelvas a dormir.
Pide lo que de verdad deseas.
No te vuelvas a dormir.
La gente se entre y sale a través del umbral
donde los dos mundos se tocan.
La puerta es redonda y esta abierta.
No te vuelvas a dormir.

                                                                                        – Rumi

 

Oremos por los niños que viven en campos de concentración en nuestra frontera sur …

Para los migrantes y solicitantes de asilo que viven en ciudades de tiendas bajo puentes y pasos elevados en México esperando que se escuchen sus casos de asilo …

Para los pobres hombres y mujeres de color que no podían pagar una representación legal adecuada y ahora se encuentran entre los millones de prisioneros que están encarcelados en los Estados Unidos …

Para los jóvenes que padecen enfermedades mentales y adicciones y que son retirados de sus comunidades y familias y están encerrados en centros de detención juvenil …

Para todos aquellos que trabajan en el sistema judicial: jueces, fiscales, abogados defensores, abogados defensores designados por la corte, traductores de la corte, policías y guardias …

Para todos aquellos que trabajan para reintegrar a las personas que regresan a sus comunidades desde la cárcel y la prisión …

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

FRIDAY, October 18, 6-8pm, Sunnyvale Community Services, 725 Kifer Rd, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Need support for DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo will be the host of Handicapables members on November 2 at 11 am at Calvary Cemetery’s annual All Souls Day-Dia de los Muertos Mass.  Handicapables is a social support program in the Advocacy and Community Engagement Division. Members of Handicapables are persons living with disabilities who enjoy spiritual, social and educational activities. On November 2, Grupo will entertain them with altar building, face painting, and Lotería (the Mexican version of Bingo).  Come early for the blessing of graves at 10 am, mass at 11 and lunch and social at 12.  Please bring a favorite dish to share, lotería cards, and craft materials!  

Necesita ayuda para DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo será el anfitrión de los miembros de Handicapables el 2 de noviembre a las 11 a.m. Los miembros de Handicapables son personas con discapacidades que disfrutan de actividades espirituales, sociales y educativas. El 2 de noviembre, Grupo los entretendrá con la construcción de altar, pintura facial y Lotería (la versión mexicana de Bingo). Venga temprano para la bendición de las tumbas a las 10 am, misa a las 11 y almuerzo y social a las 12. ¡Por favor traiga un plato favorito para compartir, tarjetas de lotería y materiales para manualidades!

<!–


–>

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un horno de microondas y un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. This week we are asking for a MICROWAVE oven and a television/screen with a DVR. The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

Read the Pastoral Letter to the People of God in El Paso
by the Most Reverend Mark J. Seitz, Bishop of El Paso.

Night Will Be No More

Lea la Carta Pastoral al Pueblo de Dios en El Paso
por el Reverendísimo Mark J. Seitz, Obispo de El Paso.

Noche ya no habrá
Fr. Jon receiving his copy of the pastoral letter at the closing mass of the Teach-In 2019: Jornada por la Justicia.
El P. Jon recibe su copia de la carta pastoral en la misa de clausura de Teach-In 2019: Jornada por la Justicia.

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp