Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Justification and Faith

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

October 25, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, October 27 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!
27 de octubre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Dia de los Muertos, an ancient tradition rooted in both Catholicism’s All Souls Day and indigenous practices of remembering the dead, is celebrated on November 2. In parts of Mexico and Central America, families place photos, sweets, fresh marigolds and other things personal to those who have died on an altar at home. Many people visit cemeteries to clean the tombs of their loved ones and sit and share with food with family. Sadly some people feel a need to suppress these ancient folk traditions rather than lift them up as legitimate expressions of faith.  Join Grupo Solidaridad this coming Saturday, November 2 at 10 am for the blessing of graves at Calvary Cemetery. Mass will follow at 11 am and a “convivencia” with members of Handicapables, a program for people with disabilities. Bring food and joy to share!

Gospel Reflection: Justification and Faith

Last week’s selection, Lk 18:1-9, was a parable about an indifferent judge being confronted by a widow demanding a favorable ruling against her opponent. Reading the parable in the context of the Empire’s judicial system, the widow searched for justice in an unjust system using the only resource she could rely on: her own voice. She refused to suffer silently as a victim of injustice nor was she willing to wait for someone else to advocate her own cause. The parable showed that by confronting the judge she chose RESISTANCE as a way to live out her faith/emunah. Today’s passage, Lk 18:9-14, addresses the question of faith/emunah from a different perspective. Whereas Lk18:1-9 looked at faith/emunah as an external manifestation of one’s resilience compelling the widow to rise up in resistance, Lk 19:9-14 looks at faith/emunah as an interior disposition which invites disciples to look inward.  Think of today’s parable an “ego-check” to those who might think to themselves, “Oh, now I get what faith/emunah is all about. I finally understand what living in the kingdom of God means. I am now a disciple of Jesus-as-the Christ and thanks be to God, I am not like those who are still ignorant of the Truth!”  (Note that the parable was addressed to those who were convinced of their own righteousness and despised everyone else.” (Lk 18:9). Before we proceed to the full text of the parable, we need to pause and revisit the character of the Pharisee referenced in the parable.

Many modern Christians misappropriate the Biblical reference of “Pharisee.” The source of this misappropriation comes from an uncritical reading of the gospels. When we ignore the socio-historical context of the gospel, we are left with the impression that Pharisees were rigid and consumed with the legal elements of Scripture and ignorant of the spirit of the Scripture and that they used “loopholes” in the law to justify hypocritical behavior. Generations of uncritical reading of the gospels has created a critical theological void in which Christians believed that their religion was a “corrective improvement” or a “replacement” of Judaism.  Over the centuries, the cumulative effect of Scriptural ignorance led to systemic anti-semitism, Pogroms and the Holocaust.  The weekly reflections of the Communique are intended to chip away at Christian ignorance by providing a Resistance lens to the reading of Scripture through lifting up the socio-economic and historical context in which the Scriptures were written and of the historical figures which are referenced in the text itself. Moving forward, we will place the character of the Pharisee within his proper historical context so that we can draw deeper insights from the passage based on an informed reading of the parable.

Pharisees were not an organized faction in an allegiance with the Priests of the Temple of Jerusalem and they were theologically and socially independent from the Sadducees. Pharisees were an independent movement rising primarily out of Galilee which was a hotbed of spiritual awakening and political unrest. The Pharisaic movement rose up in response to hostile foreign Empires that sought to dismantle the social and political bonds of the people by reducing Judaism into a religion of privatized piety, sacrificial ritual and a one-dimensional reading of the Torah.

Pharisees were non-clerical scholars who lived among the people. Some were wealthy, but most were like the majority of the population, poor. Pharisees rejected a literalist approach of reading of the Torah that had been adopted by the Sadducees. Because the Pharisees understood the Torah to be a living and breathing document, the study of the Torah required not only a knowledge of the body of centuries-old commentaries, but also critical thought. The truth of the Torah, therefore, cannot be captured in a single proclamation, but rather, is revealed in each generation with truth emerging from within the Sacred Text and the lived experiences of the people. Truth, then, was not a static “thing” or a proclamation, or a creed, but rather a sacred conversation that crossed centuries of commentaries that gave insight and wisdom to those who were seeking truth.  Faith/emunah was not about certainty or dogma, but about holding a particular stance of trust before God.

The Pharisaic movement was a movement that emphasized not only personal freedom, but a comprehensive freedom that included social, political and economic dimensions. Theologically grounded in the belief that the Jewish people would be freed from the bonds of oppression imposed on them by repressive Empires through greater knowledge and understanding of the Torah through Talmudic and Torah commentary, Pharisees were opposed by the Sadducees who took a literalist view of the Torah. Sadducees rejected the wisdom and insight that came from the oral tradition of trans-generational conversations and instead chose a path of rigorous literalism. The Sadducees’ literalist approach rejected critical thought making it was easy for the Empire to manipulate the literalist interpretation of the Torah. For example, Sadducees and the Romans promoted the Jewish liberation from Egypt as a historical event and were weary of any hint that liberation from Egypt might have something to say about longing for liberation from the Roman Empire. In short, Sadducees valued obedience, ritual observance, and memorization of passages. Critical thought and religious imagination, central to the Pharisees, were not values embraced by the Sadducees.

Let us now return to today’s parable and revisit our presumptions about who is justified and who is not justified. The parable opens with the Pharisee praying, “O God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity—greedy, dishonest, adulterous—or even like this tax collector.” (Lk 18:11)  Before jumping to judgment about how “bad” the Pharisee was, let us stay with the actual text. The parable gives the reader a glimpse of the Pharisee’s inner-life. The parable also gives us an understanding that the Pharisee is a man of prayer and that he gives by what is required by law. “I fast twice a week, and I pay tithes on my whole income.” (Lk 18:12). What readers are led to believe is that the Pharisee was doing all that was required by the law and that because he is standing in the Temple praying, he was also looking for reconciliation. (NB, The Temple was the place of reconciliation).  Now let us move to the second figure in the parable: the Publican. The Publican was also in need of reconciliation, but because his work required him to handle Roman currency, but he was not considered “pure” and therefore not permitted to enter into the Temple. This is why the Publican stood outside the Temple. Rather than ritual observance, he recited the prayer, “O God, be merciful to me a sinner,” and beat his chest — a typical penitential practice.

In Luke’s rendition of this parable, the Pharisee, (a man of the Resistance) and the Publican, (a man whose livelihood enabled the Empire to oppress the people) stood before God asking for reconciliation-justification. One would imagine that Luke’s audience would at first be surprised that the collaborator, not the resister, was justified.  One could also imagine that they would also be pleased that the Publican was the one justified because they too — as Gentile converts — were inextricably tied to the Empire (their livelihoods were most likely in service to the Empire) and if the Publican was justified — even as a collaborator — they too would be justified.  But we cannot get ahead of ourselves! The final “zing” of the parable is not actually in the text, but in the audience’s reaction.  Before we get to that, let’s review how the “zing” in a parable works.

Rabbis used (and still use) parables because parables draw the listener into the parable and encourage critical thinking. (Recall Mk 4:2, “He taught them in parables.”) Pharisees and itinerate preaches like Jesus, understood that the power of a parable is not in the text of the parable, but rather the reaction of the audience! Turning specifically to today’s parable: the parable text ended with the Publican being justified and the reaction of the audience might have been, “Thank God we are like the Publican and not like the Pharisee!” but because the parable does not end with the text, but ends with audience reaction, we have now begun to unpack the “zing” of the parable. Recall the words attributed to the Pharisee, “I thank you, God that I am not like the Publican…”  Bam!  By thinking that we are like the Publican and the Pharisee, we are in fact nothing like the Publican and we are everything like the Pharisee!  This reversal, reversal and reversal of roles, concepts and dialog force us to critically think through the parable and identify what the parable is trying to say.

The power of this parable forces us to struggle with the question of justification (reconciliation with God). The parable suggests that one is not justified by good works demanded by the law (fasting and tithing) but rather by having a posture of humility that does not end in thanking God for having been justified (as in the character of the Pharisee).  The parable leads us to understand that justification is not a reward, but grace! The Publican had no other option other than to remain open to God and hope for reconciliation. His openness was brought on by faith/emunah that placed him in a relationship of having forever to stand before the Divine in a posture of submission not presumption.  The parable invites us to also assume a posture of openness (meaning that we have no presumptions of justification nor presumptions of condemnation).  We simply open ourselves to Presence with  faith/emunah. When we open ourselves to Love, we assume the stance of faith/emunah. This stance (of faith/emunah) will ultimately free us to move mountains. 

Weekly Intercessions

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
as an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they are a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still, treat each guest honorably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,
meet them at the door laughing,
and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes,
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond.

– Rumi

 

Let us pray for those who are burdened by the injustices of our society, that they do not give up on themselves…. 

Let us pray for those who give their lives for social change, that their work be filed with joyful hope that the arc of history will indeed bend toward justice…

Let us pray for those whose fortunes and fame is built upon the sweat, blood and broken bodies of others, that they who eat well and laugh and hold power will one day walk away empty and be transformed by the experience of needing to work with others for the common good.

Let us pray for those who command the power of armies and hold the lives of millions in their hands, that they will be given the gift of falling from their thrones and be transformed by the Grace of God that comes from humility and asking for forgiveness.  

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 
Justificaci
ón y Fe

La selección de la semana pasada, Lc 18, 1-9, fue una parábola sobre un juez indiferente confrontado por una viuda que exige una decision favorable contra su adversario. Al leer la parábola en el contexto del sistema judicial del Imperio, la viuda buscó justicia en un sistema injusto utilizando el único recurso en el que podía confiar: su propia voz. Ella se negó a sufrir en silencio cómo víctima de la injusticia ni estaba dispuesta a esperar a que alguien más defendiera su propia causa. La parábola mostró que al confrontar al juez, ella eligió RESISTENCIA como una forma de vivir su fe/emuná. El pasaje de hoy, Lucas 18: 9-14, aborda la cuestión de la fe/emuná desde una perspectiva diferente. Mientras que Lucas 18: 1-9 consideraba la ffe/emuná como una manifestación externa de la Resistencia de uno que obligaba a la viuda a levantarse en la Resistencia, Lucas 19: 9-14 considera la fe/emuná como una disposición interior que invita a los discípulos a mirar hacia adentro. Considera en la parábola de hoy como un “control del ego” para aquellos que puedan pensar por sí mismos: “O, ahora entiendo de qué se trata la fe/emuná. Finalmente entiendo lo que significa vivir en el reino de Dios. ¡Ahora soy un discípulo de Jesús-como-el Cristo y gracias a Dios, no soy como aquellos que aún ignoran la Verdad!” (Tenga en cuenta que la parábola se dirigió “…a aquellos que estaban convencidos de su propia justicia y despreciados todos los demás.” (Lucas 18: 9). Antes de proceder con el texto completo de la parábola, necesitamos hacer una pausa y volver a visitar el personaje del fariseo al que se hace referencia en la parábola.

Muchos cristianos modernos se apropiaron mal de la referencia bíblica del “fariseo”. La fuente de esta apropiación indebida proviene de una lectura acrítica de los evangelios. Cuando ignoramos el contexto sociohistórico del evangelio, tendremos la impresión de que los fariseos eran rígidos y preocupados con los elementos legales de la Escritura e ignorantes del espíritu de la Escritura y que usaban “lagunas” en la ley para justificar comportamiento hipócrita. Generaciones de lectura no crítica de los evangelios ha creado un vacío teológico crítico en el que los cristianos creían que su religión era una “mejora correctiva” o un “reemplazo” del judaísmo. A lo largo de los siglos, el efecto acumulativo de la ignorancia de las Escrituras abrió la puerta por al antisemitismo sistémico, a los pogromos y al Holocausto. Las reflexiones semanales del Communique pretenden eliminar la ignorancia cristiana al proporcionar una lente de Resistencia a la lectura de las Escrituras al levantar el contexto socioeconómico e histórico en el que se escribieron las Escrituras y de las figuras históricas a las que se hace referencia en el texto en sí. En el siguiente párrafos, ubicaremos al personaje del fariseo dentro de su contexto histórico apropiado para que podamos extraer ideas más profundas del pasaje basadas en una lectura informada de la parábola.

Los fariseos no eran una facción organizada en una alianza con los sacerdotes del templo de Jerusalén y eran teológica y socialmente independientes de los saduceos. Los fariseos eran un movimiento independiente que surgía principalmente de Galilea, que era un hervidero de despertar espiritual e inquietud política. El movimiento farisaico surgió en respuesta a los imperios hostiles extranjeros que buscaban desmantelar los lazos sociales y políticos del pueblo al reducir el judaísmo a una religión de piedad privatizada, ritual de sacrificio y una lectura unidimensional de la Torá.

Los fariseos eran laicos eruditos no clericales que vivían entre la gente. Algunos eran ricos, pero la mayoría eran como la mayoría de la población, pobres. Los fariseos rechazaron un enfoque literalista de lectura de la Torá que había sido adoptado por los saduceos. Debido a que los fariseos entendieron que la Torá es un documento vivo y el estudio de la Torá requirió no solo un conocimiento de los comentarios de antigüedad, sino también un pensamiento crítico. La verdad de la Torá, por lo tanto, no puede ser capturada en una sola proclamación, sino que se revela en cada generación con la verdad que emerge del Texto Sagrado y las experiencias vividas de las personas. La verdad, entonces, no era una “cosa” estática o una proclamación, ni un credo, sino más bien una conversación sagrada que cruzó siglos de comentarios que dieron perspicacia y sabiduría a quienes buscaban la verdad. Fe/emuná no se trataba de certeza ni dogma, sino de mantener una postura particular de confianza ante Dios.

El movimiento farisaico era un movimiento que enfatizaba no solo la libertad personal, sino una libertad integral que incluía dimensiones sociales, políticas y económicas. Fundamentado teológicamente en la creencia de que el pueblo judío sería liberado de los lazos de opresión impuestos por los imperios represivos a través de un mayor conocimiento y comprensión de la Torá a través de comentarios talmúdicos y de la Torá, los fariseos se opusieron a los fariseos que adoptaron una visión literal de la Torá. Los saduceos rechazaron la sabiduría y la percepción que surgieron de la tradición oral de las conversaciones trans-generacionales y en su lugar eligieron un camino de literalismo riguroso. El enfoque literalista de los saduceos rechazó el pensamiento crítico, lo que facilitó al Imperio manipular la interpretación literal de la Torá. Por ejemplo, los saduceos y los romanos promovieron la liberación judía de Egipto como un evento histórico y estaban cansados ​​de cualquier conexión de que la liberación de Egipto podría tener algo que decir sobre el anhelo de la liberación del Imperio Romano. En resumen, los saduceos valoraban la obediencia, la observancia ritual y la memorización de pasajes en la Torá. El pensamiento crítico y la imaginación religiosa, centrales para los fariseos, no eran valores abrazados por los saduceos.

Volvamos ahora a la parábola de hoy y revisemos nuestras presunciones sobre quién está justificado y quién no está justificado. La parábola comienza con el fariseo orando: “Oh Dios, te agradezco que no soy como el resto de la humanidad: codicioso, deshonesto, adúltero, o incluso como este recaudador de impuestos” (Lc 18,11). cuán “malo” era el fariseo, quedémonos con el texto real. La parábola le da al lector un vistazo de la vida interior del fariseo. La parábola también nos da a entender que el fariseo es un hombre de oración y que da por lo que exige la ley. “Ayuno dos veces por semana y pago diezmos de todos mis ingresos” (Lc 18:12). Lo que los lectores deben creer es que el fariseo estaba haciendo todo lo que requería la ley y que debido a que estaba parado en el templo orando, también estaba buscando la reconciliación. (NB, el templo era el lugar de la reconciliación). Ahora pasemos a la segunda figura de la parábola: el Publicano. El publicano también necesitaba reconciliación, pero debido a que su trabajo requería que manejara la moneda romana, pero no se lo consideraba “puro” y, por lo tanto, no se le permitía entrar al Templo. Esta es la razón por la cual el Publicano estaba parado afuera del Templo. En lugar de la observancia ritual, recitó la oración: “O Dios, ten piedad de mí, pecador”, y se golpeó el pecho, una práctica penitencial típica.

En la versión de S Lucas de esta parábola, el fariseo (un hombre de la Resistencia) y el publicano (un hombre cuyo sustento permitió que el imperio oprimiera al pueblo) se paró ante Dios pidiendo la reconciliación-justificación. Uno podría imaginarse que la audiencia de S Lucas al principio se sorprendería de que el colaborador, no la Resistencia, estuviera justificado. También se podría imaginar que también estarían complacidos de que el Publicano fuera el justificado porque ellos también, como conversos gentiles, estaban inextricablemente vinculados al Imperio (sus medios de vida probablemente estaban al servicio del Imperio) y si el Publicano estaba justificado: incluso como colaborador, ellos también estarían justificados. ¡Pero no podemos adelantarnos a nosotros mismos! El “zing” final de la parábola no está realmente en el texto, sino en la reacción de la audiencia. Antes de llegar a eso, revisemos como funciona el “zing” en una parábola.

Los rabinos usaron (y aún usan) parábolas porque las parábolas atraen al oyente a la parábola y alientan el pensamiento crítico. (Recordemos Mc 4: 2, “Él les enseñó en parábolas”.) Los fariseos y los predicadores itinerantes como Jesús, entendieron que el poder de una parábola no está en el texto de la parábola, ¡sino en la reacción de la audiencia! Volviendo específicamente a la parábola de hoy: el texto de la parábola terminó con la justificación del publicano y la reacción de la audiencia podría haber sido: “¡Gracias a Dios que somos como el publicano y no como el fariseo!”, Sino porque la parábola no termina con el texto , pero termina con la reacción de la audiencia, ahora hemos comenzado a desentrañar el “zing” de la parábola. Recordemos las palabras atribuidas al fariseo: “Te agradezco, Dios, que no soy como el publicano …” ¡Bam! ¡Al pensar que somos como el Publicano y el Fariseo, en realidad no somos nada como el Publicano y somos como el Fariseo! Esta inversión, inversión e inversión de roles, conceptos y diálogo nos obliga a pensar críticamente a través de la parábola e identificar lo que la parábola está tratando de decir.

El poder de esta parábola nos obliga a luchar con la cuestión de la justificación (reconciliación con Dios). La parábola sugiere que uno no está justificado por las buenas obras exigidas por la ley (ayuno y diezmo), sino por tener una postura de humildad que no termina en agradecer a Dios por haber sido justificado (como en el carácter del fariseo). La parábola nos lleva a comprender que la justificación no es una recompensa, ¡sino gracia! El Publicano no tenía otra opción que permanecer abierta a Dios y esperar la reconciliación. Su apertura fue provocada por la fe/emuná que lo colocó en una relación de tener que estar siempre ante la Divinidad en una postura de sumisión, no de presunción. La parábola nos invita a asumir también una postura de apertura (lo que significa que no tenemos presunciones de justificación ni presunciones de condena). Simplemente nos abrimos a la Presencia con fe/emuná. Cuando nos abrimos al Amor Divino, asumimos la postura de fe/emuná. Esta postura (de fe/emuná) finalmente nos liberará para mover montañas.

Intercesiónes semanales

El ser humano es un casa de huéspedes.
Cada mañana un nuevo recién llegado.

Una alegría, una tristeza, una maldad,
cierta consciencia momentánea llega
como un visitante inesperado.

¡Dales la bienvenida y recíbelos a todos!
Incluso si fueran una muchedumbre de lamentos,
que vacían tu casa con violencia
aún así, trata a cada huésped con honor.
Puede estar creándote el espacio
Para un nuevo deleite.

Al pensamiento oscuro, a la vergüenza, a la malicia,
recíbelos en la puerta riendo,
e invítalos a entrar

Sé agradecido con quien quiera que venga,
porque cada uno ha sido enviado
como una guía del más allá.

– Rumi

 

Oremos por aquellos que están agobiados por las injusticias de nuestra sociedad, para que no se den por vencidos …

Oremos por aquellos que dan su vida por el cambio social, para que su trabajo sea llena con alegre esperanza de que el arco de la historia se doblegará hacia la justicia …

Oremos por aquellos cuyas fortunas y fama se basan en el sudor, la sangre y los cuerpos rotos de los demás, para que los que comen bien y se ríen y mantengan el poder algún día se vayan vacíos y se transformen por la experiencia de necesitar trabajar con otros por el bien común

Oremos por aquellos que tienen el poder de comandar a los ejércitos y tienen la vida de millones en sus manos, para que reciban el don de caer de sus tronos y sean transformados por la Gracia de Dios que viene de la humildad y pidiendo perdón por sus pecados.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

Need support for DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo will be the host of Handicapables members on November 2 at 11 am at Calvary Cemetery’s annual All Souls Day-Dia de los Muertos Mass.  Handicapables is a social support program in the Advocacy and Community Engagement Division. Members of Handicapables are persons living with disabilities who enjoy spiritual, social and educational activities. On November 2, Grupo will entertain them with altar building, face painting, and Lotería (the Mexican version of Bingo).  Come early for the blessing of graves at 10 am, mass at 11 and lunch and social at 12.  Please bring a favorite dish to share, lotería cards, and craft materials!  

Necesita ayuda para DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo será el anfitrión de los miembros de Handicapables el 2 de noviembre a las 11 a.m. Los miembros de Handicapables son personas con discapacidades que disfrutan de actividades espirituales, sociales y educativas. El 2 de noviembre, Grupo los entretendrá con la construcción de altar, pintura facial y Lotería (la versión mexicana de Bingo). Venga temprano para la bendición de las tumbas a las 10 am, misa a las 11 y almuerzo y social a las 12. ¡Por favor traiga un plato favorito para compartir, tarjetas de lotería y materiales para manualidades!

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un horno de microondas y un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. This week we are asking for a MICROWAVE oven and a television/screen with a DVR. The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

Read the Pastoral Letter to the People of God in El Paso
by the Most Reverend Mark J. Seitz, Bishop of El Paso.

Night Will Be No More

Lea la Carta Pastoral al Pueblo de Dios en El Paso
por el Reverendísimo Mark J. Seitz, Obispo de El Paso.

Noche ya no habrá
Fr. Jon receiving his copy of the pastoral letter at the closing mass of the Teach-In 2019: Jornada por la Justicia.
El P. Jon recibe su copia de la carta pastoral en la misa de clausura de Teach-In 2019: Jornada por la Justicia.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Widow and the Judge

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

October 18, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, October 20 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!
20 de octubre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Patti and dozens of other people on the pilgrimage walked through El Paso and placed hand made flowers on the border wall. Members of Grupo Solidaridad traveled to El Paso to attend a weekend TeachIn on asylum seekers, racism and immigration policy, and organizing our communities. Attendees came from all around the country.

Gospel Reflection: The Widow and the Judge

Last week’s selection, Lk 17:11-19 began with Jesus and his disciples in the borderlands of Samaria and Galilee.  Jesus and company encountered lepers crying out, “Jesus, Master! Have pity on us!” The narrative continued with Jesus curing all the lepers with only one leper, a foreigner, coming back acknowledging that Jesus-as-the Christ healed him. The reflection looked at faith/emunah and marginalization based on religion, race and whether one had leprosy or not. The marginalization of the lepers was not only because they were afflicted with leprosy, but because they themselves internalized the oppression. We discussed that unless we deal with the marginalization that we do unto ourselves, we cannot address the marginalization externally imposed on us by social, cultural and political systems. Freedom depends on having faith/emunah in ourselves so that we can ultimately overcome self-imposed marginalization. When we are truly free, we will live in a spirit of gratitude and love and we will not be fearful of what the future might hold for us.

Today’s gospel selection, Lk 18:1-9 begins with a parable about an indifferent judge being confronted by a violent-prone widow demanding a favorable ruling against her opponent. In the end, the judge decides to render a decision not based on the merits of the case, but rather on his own self-interest. He fears the widow’s wrath! Looking at the characters in the parable through the lens of Resistance, we will see that faith/emunah will ultimately lead us to re-examining our presumptions about justice and the judicial system. 

Luke frames parable in terms of praying always without becoming weary. A dive into the text will tell us that praying always without weariness is not about rattling off payers, rosaries and litanies without putting ourselves to sleep, but rather a stance of faith/emunah that will eventually give us the ability to see the world as it is: in its unfairness and broken systems, and yet find a way to move forward.

Let us turn to the character of the widow in the parable. In the parable, the widow initiated contact and demanded a just decision, leaving us with the impression that she is out for more than mere justice. The widow’s singular attention was to get the judge to rule in her favor. Not presenting new evidence or presenting a compelling case, we find the widow harassing the judge. Her perseverance suggests that revenge was her motive not justice, according to Dr. Amy-Jill Levine.

Let us now turn to the judge. The parable includes the judge’s inner thoughts, “…because this widow keeps bothering me I shall deliver a just decision for her lest she finally come and strike me.” (Lk 18:5).  The judge is not moved by precedent, empathy or morality: “….I neither fear God nor respect any human being…” (Lk 18:4), but the judge is moved by his self interest, i.e., he does not want to be assaulted. Dr. Levine criticized commentators who believe that the judge in the parable is God, thus casting God as an indifferent, corrupt figure. 

Luke sets up his community to see the futility of the Empire’s judicial system. (Recall that at this point in his gospel, Luke is showing his people how to live with faith/emunah and commit to living in the kingdom of God and renounce the Empire). Jesus-as-the Christ does not leave the reader wallowing in self-defeat. Jesus-as-the Christ said, “Will not God then secure the rights of his chosen ones who call out to him day and night? Will he be slow to answer them? I tell you, he will see to it that justice is done for them speedily…” Jesus-as-the Christ calls for faith/emunah in the kingdom of God. In the kingdom of God justice is not revenge but the restoration of relationships to their proper balance. Restoration does not require a court of law because when we “live” in the kingdom of God, we live in proper balance with others, that is to say, we live in a state of equity among all and we live in a society in which all are welcome. Justice, therefore, in the kingdom of God cannot be reduced to a court battle of a revenge-thirsty plaintiff and a corrupt judge.  Justice is right relationship and the question of praying without becoming weary is not about “saying” prayers, but “living” our prayers. 

Having said so much about the pitfalls of an Empire-run judicial system, the point of the reflection is not to invalidate our own judicial system, but rather to invite all of us to consider whether our persistence in seeking justice is rooted in exacting revenge, needing to be validated as being right, or if we are truly seeking the restoration of relationship. For example, we should ask whether the death penalty is rehabilitating anyone? Are we driven to impose death because we have a thirst for revenge? Lastly, at the time of the writing of this reflection, more witnesses have stepped forward to give testimony against Donald Trump. These testimonies are indeed moving toward impeachment, but are our feelings for impeachment directed by evidence or are we driven by a thirst for revenge and proving our selves right? Our persistence of wanting Trump’s removal must be rooted in the desire to truly establish a sense of right relationship in our communities that can only happen by having Trump removed from office. Our perseverance in this effort must focus on what we want for our community, not to punish Trump. Our ability to rise above our hatred truly is an exercise in living out of faith/emunah.

Weekly Intercessions

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,
there is a field. I’ll meet you there.
When the soul lies down in that grass,
the world is too full to talk about.
Ideas, language, even the phrase “each other”
doesn’t make any sense.
The breeze at dawn has secrets to tell you.
Don’t go back to sleep.

You must ask for what you really want.
Don’t go back to sleep.
People are going back and forth across the doorsill
where the two worlds touch.
The door is round and open.
Don’t go back to sleep.

                                                                                 – Rumi

 

Let us pray for the children living in concentration camps in our Southern Border…

For the migrants and asylum seekers who are living in tent cities under bridges and overpasses in Mexico waiting for their asylum cases to be heard…

For the poor men and women of color who could not afford adequate legal representation and are now among the millions of prisoners living in prisons in the United States…

For young people who suffer mental illness and addictions and are removed from their communities and families and are locked in juvenile detention facilities…

For all those who work in the judicial system: the judges, prosecutors, defense lawyers, court-appointed defense attorneys, court translators, police and guards…

For all those who work to reintegrate people returning to their communities from jail and prison…

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:
La viuda y el juez

La selección de la semana pasada, Lucas 17: 11-19 comenzó con Jesús y sus discípulos en las tierras fronterizas de Samaria y Galilea. Jesús y compañía encontraron leprosos que gritaban: “¡Jesús, Maestro! ¡Ten piedad de nosotros!” La narración continuó con Jesús curando a todos los leprosos con un solo leproso, un extranjero, regresando reconociendo que Jesús como el Cristo lo sanó. La reflexión examinó la fe/emuná y la marginalización basada en la religión, la raza y si uno tenía lepra o no. La marginalización de los leprosos no fue solo porque estaban afectados por la lepra, sino porque ellos mismos internalizaron la opresión. Dialogamos que a menos que tratemos con la marginalización que nos hacemos a nosotros mismos, no podemos abordar la marginalización que nos imponen externamente los sistemas sociales, culturales y políticos. La libertad depende de tener fe/emuná en nosotros mismos para que finalmente podamos superar la marginalización auto-impuesta. Cuando seamos verdaderamente libres, viviremos en un espíritu de gratitud y amor y no tendremos miedo de lo que el futuro nos depare.

La selección del evangelio de hoy, Lc 18, 1-9 comienza con una parábola sobre un juez indiferente confrontado por una viuda propensa a la violencia que exige un fallo favorable contra su oponente. Al final, el juez decide tomar una decisión no basada en los méritos del caso, sino más bien en su propio interés. ¡Teme la ira de la viuda! Al observar a los personajes de la parábola a través del lente de Resistance, veremos que la fe/emuná finalmente nos llevará a reexaminar nuestras presunciones sobre la justicia y el sistema judicial.

S Lucas enmarca la parábola en términos de orar siempre sin cansarse. Una inmersión en el texto nos dirá que rezar siempre sin cansancio no se trata de recitar pagadores, rosarios y letanías sin ponernos a dormir, sino más bien una postura de fe/emuná que eventualmente nos dará la capacidad de ver el mundo tal como es: en su injusticia y sistemas rotos, y aún así encontrar una manera de avanzar.

Pasemos al personaje de la viuda en la parábola. En la parábola, la viuda inició el contacto y exigió una decisión justa, dejándonos la impresión de que ella está buscando algo más que la simple justicia. La atención singular de la viuda fue lograr que el juez fallara a su favor. Sin presentar nuevas pruebas o presentar un caso convincente, encontramos a la viuda acosando al juez. Su perseverancia sugiere que la venganza era su motivo, no la justicia, según la Dra. Amy-Jill Levine.

Pasemos ahora al juez. La parábola incluye los pensamientos internos del juez, “… porque esta viuda sigue molestándome, tomaré una decisión justa por ella para que finalmente no venga y me golpee”. (Lucas 18: 5). El juez no se conmueve por precedentes, empatía o moralidad: “… no temo a Dios ni respeto a ningún ser humano …” (Lucas 18: 4), pero el juez se mueve por su propio interés, es decir, no quiere ser asaltado El Dra. Levine criticó a los comentaristas que creen que el juez en la parábola es Dios, por lo que presenta a Dios como una figura indiferente y corrupta.

S Lucas establece su comunidad para ver la futilidad del sistema judicial del Imperio. (Recuerde que en este punto de su evangelio, S Lucas le está mostrando a su pueblo cómo vivir con fe/emuná y comprometerse a vivir en el reino de Dios y renunciar al Imperio). Jesús-como-el Cristo no deja al lector revolcándose en su propia derrota. Jesús-como-el Cristo dijo: “¿Entonces Dios no asegurará los derechos de sus elegidos que lo llaman día y noche? ¿Tardará en responderlas? Les digo que él se encargará de que se les haga justicia rápidamente…” Jesús-como-el Cristo llama a la fe/emuná en el reino de Dios. En el reino de Dios, la justicia no es venganza sino la restauración de las relaciones a su equilibrio adecuado. La restauración no requiere un corte de justicia porque cuando “vivimos” en el reino de Dios, vivimos en un equilibrio adecuado con los demás, es decir, vivimos en un estado de equidad entre todos y vivimos en una sociedad en la que todos son bienvenidos. La justicia, por lo tanto, en el reino de Dios no puede reducirse a una batalla judicial de un demandante sediento de venganza y un juez corrupto. La justicia es una relación correcta y la cuestión de orar sin cansarse no se trata de “decir” oraciones, sino de “vivir” nuestras oraciones.

Habiendo dicho tanto sobre las trampas de un sistema judicial dirigido por el Imperio, el objetivo de la reflexión no es invalidar nuestro propio sistema judicial, sino más bien invitarnos a todos a considerar si nuestra persistencia en la búsqueda de justicia se basa en una venganza exigente, necesita ser validado como correcto, o si realmente estamos buscando la restauración de la relación. Por ejemplo, deberíamos preguntarnos si la pena de muerte está rehabilitando a alguien. ¿Estamos obligados a imponer la muerte porque tenemos sed de venganza? Por último, al momento de escribir esta reflexión, más testigos han dado un paso adelante para dar testimonio contra Donald Trump. De hecho, estos testimonios se están moviendo hacia la impeachment, pero ¿nuestros sentimientos de impeachment están dirigidos por la evidencia o estamos impulsados ​​por una sed de venganza y por demostrarnos a nosotros mismos? Nuestra persistencia de querer la destitución de Trump debe estar enraizada en el deseo de establecer verdaderamente un sentido de relación correcta en nuestras comunidades que solo puede suceder si Trump es destituido de su cargo. Nuestra perseverancia en este esfuerzo debe centrarse en lo que queremos para nuestra comunidad, no para castigar a Trump. Nuestra capacidad de elevarnos por encima de nuestro odio es realmente un ejercicio de vivir con fe/emuná.

Intercesiónes semanales

Mas alla de las ideas de las obras malas y las obras buenas,
hay un campo. Ahi nos vemos.
Cuando el alma se acuesta en ese pasto,
el mundo esta demasiado lleno como para hablar de el.
Ideas, lenguaje, aun la frase “el uno al otro”
no hace ninguna logica.
La brisa del amanecer tiene secretos que contarte.
No te vuelvas a dormir.
Pide lo que de verdad deseas.
No te vuelvas a dormir.
La gente se entre y sale a través del umbral
donde los dos mundos se tocan.
La puerta es redonda y esta abierta.
No te vuelvas a dormir.

                                                                                        – Rumi

 

Oremos por los niños que viven en campos de concentración en nuestra frontera sur …

Para los migrantes y solicitantes de asilo que viven en ciudades de tiendas bajo puentes y pasos elevados en México esperando que se escuchen sus casos de asilo …

Para los pobres hombres y mujeres de color que no podían pagar una representación legal adecuada y ahora se encuentran entre los millones de prisioneros que están encarcelados en los Estados Unidos …

Para los jóvenes que padecen enfermedades mentales y adicciones y que son retirados de sus comunidades y familias y están encerrados en centros de detención juvenil …

Para todos aquellos que trabajan en el sistema judicial: jueces, fiscales, abogados defensores, abogados defensores designados por la corte, traductores de la corte, policías y guardias …

Para todos aquellos que trabajan para reintegrar a las personas que regresan a sus comunidades desde la cárcel y la prisión …

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

FRIDAY, October 18, 6-8pm, Sunnyvale Community Services, 725 Kifer Rd, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Need support for DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo will be the host of Handicapables members on November 2 at 11 am at Calvary Cemetery’s annual All Souls Day-Dia de los Muertos Mass.  Handicapables is a social support program in the Advocacy and Community Engagement Division. Members of Handicapables are persons living with disabilities who enjoy spiritual, social and educational activities. On November 2, Grupo will entertain them with altar building, face painting, and Lotería (the Mexican version of Bingo).  Come early for the blessing of graves at 10 am, mass at 11 and lunch and social at 12.  Please bring a favorite dish to share, lotería cards, and craft materials!  

Necesita ayuda para DIA DE LOS MUERTOS

Grupo será el anfitrión de los miembros de Handicapables el 2 de noviembre a las 11 a.m. Los miembros de Handicapables son personas con discapacidades que disfrutan de actividades espirituales, sociales y educativas. El 2 de noviembre, Grupo los entretendrá con la construcción de altar, pintura facial y Lotería (la versión mexicana de Bingo). Venga temprano para la bendición de las tumbas a las 10 am, misa a las 11 y almuerzo y social a las 12. ¡Por favor traiga un plato favorito para compartir, tarjetas de lotería y materiales para manualidades!

<!–


–>

lista de deseos para nuestro trabajo …

¡El piloto de compromiso parroquial en Nuestra Señora del Refugio realmente está despegando! Cada día trabajamos con personas que buscan un hogar, reciben atención médica para ellos o sus familias, solucionamos problemas de inmigración e inseguridad alimentaria. Los martes por la noche ofrecemos productos frescos para cientos de familias y una comida caliente para decenas de personas. Estamos desarrollando una lista de deseos para nuestro programa a medida que avanzamos. Esta semana estamos pidiendo un horno de microondas y un TV/SCREEN con un DVR. El microondas ayudará a calentar los alimentos para las personas que no tienen cocina y la televisión es para nuestro programa semanal de servicio social donde esperamos proporcionar videos educativos para los niños que vienen a nuestra oficina mientras trabajamos con sus padres.

wish list for our work…

The Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge is really taking off! Each day we work with people seeking a home, getting health care for themselves or their family, resolving immigration issues and food insecurity. On Tuesday nights we provide fresh produce for hundreds of families and provide a hot meal for dozens of people. We are developing a wish list for our program as we go. This week we are asking for a MICROWAVE oven and a television/screen with a DVR. The microwave will help heat up food for folks who do not have a kitchen and the television is for our weekly social service program where we hope to provide educational videos for the children coming to our office as we work with their parents.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

Read the Pastoral Letter to the People of God in El Paso
by the Most Reverend Mark J. Seitz, Bishop of El Paso.

Night Will Be No More

Lea la Carta Pastoral al Pueblo de Dios en El Paso
por el Reverendísimo Mark J. Seitz, Obispo de El Paso.

Noche ya no habrá
Fr. Jon receiving his copy of the pastoral letter at the closing mass of the Teach-In 2019: Jornada por la Justicia.
El P. Jon recibe su copia de la carta pastoral en la misa de clausura de Teach-In 2019: Jornada por la Justicia.

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Faith and Gratitude

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

October 10, 2019

No MISA this Sunday at Newman Center!
NO MISA this Sunday. 
The next Misa will be Sunday, October 20
at SJSU Newman Center on 9 am
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.
This week Fr. Jon and members of Grupo will be attending a TeachIn and Action in El Paso.
Next mass: October 20

¡NO HAY MISA en Centro Newman!

NO MISA este domingo.
La próxima Misa será el domingo 20 de octubre
en SJSU Newman Center a las 9 am,
esquina de San Carlos y 10th Street
Esta semana el P Jon y los miembros del Grupo asistirán a TeachIn y Acción en El Paso.
La próxima sera 20 de octubre

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Joe Eckert our Jesuit Volunteer from Catholic Charities and Judah from Second Harvest are setting up the first free Community Farmers Market at Our Lady of Refuge.  Each Tuesday families can get a hot meal, pick up groceries, see social workers for a number of issues and be trained to be a volunteer to help others.

Gospel Reflection: Faith and Gratitude

Last week’s selection, Lk 17:5-10 demarcated the interiorization of faith (the process of integrating “faith” into one’s everyday life in attitude and action) from talking about the kingdom of God. The selected gospel passage began with the petition, “Increase our faith,” and concluded with an example of servanthood, “When you have done all you have been commanded, say, ‘We are unprofitable servants; we have done what we were obliged to do.’” (Lk 17:10).  The operational notion of faith is derived from the Jewish definition of emunah.  Last week’s reflection opened up the conversation that faith/emunah is not about the act of believing, but rather living with trust: a trust in God.  Keep in mind that trusting in God is not the same as trusting in what God can provide. Ultimately, faith/emunah is a trust in living in the question rather than having an answer to the question.  Today’s gospel selection is about faith/emnunah and the interior disposition of gratitude.

The gospel selection begins with a statement of geographical location: the borderlands between Samaria and Galilee. This detail is not inconsequential to the story precisely because the location of the action frames the story. In Luke’s version of the narrative of Jesus’ life, Jesus is depicted as a traveling narrative.  Not only is Jesus an itinerate preacher, but the locations chosen by the evangelist Luke provide a context for the dialog taking place along the way.  Today’s selection Lk 17:11-19 is situated through Samaria and Galilee en route to Jerusalem. The borderland between Samaria and Galilee was patchwork of people marginalized by religion (Samaria) and power (Galilee). Jesus-as-the Christ not only ministered to the marginalized, but he ministered to them in their actual location. In today’s selection the most marginalized of society, lepers, called out, “Jesus, Master! Have pity on us!” (Lk 17:13) The location of the action suggests that we pay attention to both the political and economic frameworks as we read the narrative about the lepers.

Galileans and Samaritans shared one thing in common: they were poor.  Samaritans were politically marginalized by religion (they were a religious minority) and Galileans were marginalized by opposition to the religious elite in Jerusalem. The political and economic marginalization of Galileans and Samaritans was not sustained by the Empire imposing its rule over them, but by their own marginalization of one other. In other words, the Empire was able to sustain its hold over populations by manipulating the cultural and religious tensions between groups. The late Brazilian philosopher and porto-liberation theologian, Paulo Freire, said that oppression was not only sustained by external unjust economic and political structures, but also by the interior attitudes acquired from living in an unjust social order.

Freire taught that “consientização” (known as “consientización” in our Resistance theology) is a critical step in achieving both internal and external liberation. He said that the pedagogy of liberation (the process of teaching liberation) is more important that teaching about the political and economic forces that create oppression. Friere taught that consientización, involves four fundamental steps:

  1. All people must come to believe that they are called to become “more human,” that is, to become more liberated in their love for themselves and others. People must know that they are not born to be oppressed, but are born to be loved (emotionally respected, and affirmed in who one is) and respected (to be treated economically and politically as an equal).
  2. That the humanity of the oppressed and the oppressor are inseparably linked to one another. Liberation therefore requires that the oppressed must see that their liberation is linked to their oppressor’s role in oppressing them.  
  3. Through the process of concientización, the oppressed and the oppressors will come to understand their own power and that the use of power does not require oppressing another person.
  4. That the oppressed will achieve true liberation (changing their circumstances of living in an oppressed conditions) when their intentions and actions are consistent with the mutual liberation of both the oppressor and the oppressed.

Lk 17:11-19 shows that marginalization by race, religion, culture and economics prior to leprosy affected the interior attitudes of the lepers. Freire said that the weight of oppressive systems is so heavy that it can penetrate our own way of thinking. We show that we have “internalized” our oppressor when we act unjustly and cruel just the same way as the oppressor acts on us.  In other words, internalizing the oppressor means that we behave the same way the oppressor would have us behave — even if the oppressor is not physically present. Resistance theology teaches us that empires thrive when people behaved in cruel ways toward each other and the Roman Empire, therefore, did not need to deploy an army to control the population because the Galileans and Samaritans oppressed each other.

Today’s gospel passage shows that being cured of leprosy did not cure the lepers from their pre-leprosy attitudes. After healing they merely returning to the unjust social order of racial and religious animosity. The Samaritan (a foreigner) was the only one who returned to express thanks to Jesus-as-the Christ — signaling that the Samaritan’s faith/emunah was interiorized. He went beyond what the Law required. (According to the Torah, those cured of leprosy must show themselves to the priests and be declared, “clean,” so that they could return to their former ways of life). By returning to Jesus-as-the Christ with gratitude,  his faith/emunah exceeded the requirements of the Law illustrating that faith/emunah is ultimately an interior change that ultimately liberates us from an old way of thinking, doing and being and opens us to a world of living in the possibility of change and transformation.

Through faith/emunah we take on the most basic and foundational attitudes: gratitude.  Through a sense graciousness, we stand before God as freed persons.  With gratitude in our hearts, we no longer are bound to the cruelty of the oppressor, we are bound to Graciousness itself. We are bound to God! Thus Jesus-as-the Christ said, “Stand up and go; your faith has saved you.”  Though not included in the Sunday gospel selection, Lk 17:20-21 provides the connection between this narrative of faith/emunah and the kingdom of God.  Recall the kingdom of God for Luke is a total and comprehensive reordering of society in which all are welcomed and power is not arranged hierarchically, but in a fashion that is shared among all, that people are fed, clothed and housed and widows and orphans are cared for. This massive social, economic and political reorganization is not done by fiat, but rather in the heart of each believer and manifested in the public action. Little by little the kingdom of God breaks through our unjust structures and in the Resurrection, the kingdom will be manifested fully among us.  “Asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God would come, he said in reply, ‘The coming of the kingdom of God cannot be observed, and no one will announce, “Look, here it is,” or, “There it is.” For behold, the kingdom of God is among you.’” (Lk 17:20-21) True acts of Resistance, therefore, cannot be born out of hatred of the oppressor, but must be born out of love and gratitude and open to the possibilities ahead.

Weekly Intercessions

This week Trump declared that he would pull American forces out of Syria. Speculations about the motive to withdraw troops included a personal financial/business arrangement between the autocratic president of Turkey Erdoğan and Trump; Trump is merely keeping his campaign promise to end foreign wars; and Trump wanted to promote Russian influence in the area by withdrawing American military influence in exchange for some unknown personal benefit. The decision, regardless of rationale, has left the Middle East in turmoil. US military command was not forewarned and within hours of Trump’s announcement, Turkish and Syrian forces began attacking Kurdish positions leaving Kurds vulnerable to attacks from ISIS fighters. At the moment of writing this Communique, there are reports of many civilian casualties. Seasoned military leaders and staff from diplomatic corps warned Trump of the humanitarian costs and the dangers posed by ISIS. Unfortunately, Trump brushed those concerns aside saying that American troops in Syria are not performing useful work. He said that they are “not fighting” and that they are “just there.” Despite the fact that Kurds fought along side American troops for generations and the decision to withdraw would lead to the annihilation of Kurdish people (including non-combatants), Trump remains unconvinced and unmoved. As invaders in a foreign land, Americans must bear the responsibility for the political and religious unrest caused by our presence based on the “Pottery Barn Rule,” “You broke it, you bought it”) (To be clear, Pottery Barn does not have that rule). The phrase first used by Thomas Friedman and later by Colin Powell to get President George W. Bush to act with more caution in the Iraq war, is still applicable today. US involvement in the Middle East — driven by our century long thirst for petroleum,“broke” the region. “Just War Theory,” used for centuries to measure whether it is justifiable to go to war or not (jus ad bellum), also says a lot about the conditions of when countries are at war (jus in bello). Whether we agree with the concept of a “just war” is not as important as having a conversation about war and a foreign policy that justifies the use of force to extract resources from other people’s land. Emerging political realties have led many ethicists to argue that a third category be included in the Just War Theory: post-war with withdrawal and reconstruction, (“Jus post bellum”). The current debacle and the lack of direction illustrate that we need to have a national conversation based on ethical concerns, not a private phone call.  Let us pray for our troops and the Kurds and all those whose lives they are called to protect.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La Fe y gratitud  

La selección de la semana pasada, Lc 17, 5-10 demarcó la interiorización de la fe (el proceso de integrar la “fe” en la vida cotidiana en actitud y acción) al hablar sobre el reino de Dios. El pasaje seleccionado comenzó con la petición, “Aumenta nuestra fe”, y concluyó con un ejemplo de servicio, “Cuando hayas hecho todo lo que se te ha ordenado, digan: “Somos servidores no rentables; hemos hecho lo que estábamos obligados a hacer “. (Lc 17:10). La idea operativa de fe se deriva de la definición judía de emuná. La reflexión de la semana pasada abrió la conversación de que la fe/emuná no se trata del acto de creer, sino de vivir con confianza: una confianza en Dios. Tenga en cuenta que confiar en Dios no es lo mismo que confiar en lo que Dios puede proporcionar. En última instancia, la fe/emuná es confiar en vivir en la pregunta en lugar de tener una respuesta a la pregunta. La selección del evangelio de hoy trata sobre la fe/emuná y la disposición interior de la gratitud.

La selección del evangelio comienza con una declaración de ubicación geográfica: las tierras fronterizas entre Samaria y Galilea. Este detalle no es intrascendente para la historia precisamente porque la ubicación de la acción enmarca la historia. En la versión de S Lucas de la narrativa de la vida de Jesús, Jesús es representado como una narración itinerante. Jesús no solo es un predicador itinerante, sino que los lugares elegidos por el evangelista S Lucas proporcionan un contexto para el diálogo que tiene lugar en el camino. La selección de hoy Lc 17: 11-19 está situada a través de Samaria y Galilea en el camino hacia a Jerusalén. La frontera entre Samaria y Galilea era un mosaico de personas marginadas por la religión (Samaria) y el poder (Galilea). Jesús-como-el Cristo no solo ministró a los marginados, sino que les ministró en su ubicación real. En la selección de hoy, los leprosos más marginados de la sociedad gritaron: “¡Jesús, Maestro! ¡Ten piedad de nosotros!” (Lucas 17:13) La ubicación de la acción sugiere que prestemos atención a los marcos político y económico al leer la narrativa sobre los leprosos.

Los galileos y los samaritanos tenían una cosa en común: eran pobres. Los samaritanos fueron marginados políticamente por la religión (eran una minoría religiosa) y los galileos fueron marginados por la oposición a la élite religiosa en Jerusalén. La marginación política y económica de los galileos y samaritanos no fue sostenida por el Imperio que les impuso su dominio, sino por su propia marginación mutua. En otras palabras, el Imperio pudo mantener su control sobre las poblaciones manipulando las tensiones culturales y religiosas entre los grupos. El fallecido filósofo brasileño y teólogo de la liberación de Portugal, Paulo Freire, dijo que la opresión no solo estaba sostenida por estructuras económicas y políticas externas injustas, sino también por las actitudes interiores adquiridas de vivir en un orden social injusto.

Freire enseñó que la “consientização” (conocida como “consientización” en nuestra teología de la resistencia) es un paso crítico para lograr la liberación tanto interna como externa. Dijo que la pedagogía de la liberación (el proceso de enseñar la liberación) es más importante que enseñar sobre las fuerzas políticas y económicas que crean la opresión. Friere enseñó que la consientización implica cuatro pasos fundamentales:

  1. Todas las personas deben llegar a creer que están llamadas a volverse “más humanas”, es decir, a liberarse más en su amor por sí mismas y por los demás. Las personas deben saber que no nacen para ser oprimidas, sino que nacen para ser amadas (emocionalmente respetadas y afirmadas en quién es) y respetadas (para ser tratadas económica y políticamente como iguales).
  2. Que la humanidad de los oprimidos y los opresores están inseparablemente unidos entre sí. Por lo tanto, la liberación requiere que los oprimidos vean que su liberación está vinculada al papel de su opresor en su opresión.
  3. A través del proceso de concientización, los oprimidos y los opresores llegarán a comprender su propio poder y que el uso del poder no requiere oprimir a otra persona.
  4. Que los oprimidos lograrán la verdadera liberación (cambiando sus circunstancias de vivir en condiciones oprimidas) cuando sus intenciones y acciones sean consistentes con la liberación mutua tanto del opresor como del oprimido.

Lc 17: 11-19 muestra que la marginación por raza, religión, cultura y economía antes de la lepra afectó las actitudes interiores de los leprosos. Freire dijo que el peso de los sistemas opresivos es tan pesado que puede penetrar nuestra propia forma de pensar. Demostramos que hemos “internalizado” (integrando) a nuestro opresor cuando actuamos injustamente y cruelmente de la misma manera que el opresor actúa sobre nosotros. En otras palabras, internalizar al opresor significa que nos comportamos de la misma manera que el opresor nos haría comportarnos, incluso si el opresor no está físicamente presente. La teología de la resistencia nos enseña que los imperios prosperan cuando las personas se comportan de manera cruel entre sí y el Imperio Romano, por lo tanto, no necesita desplegar un ejército para controlar a la población porque los galileos y los samaritanos se oprimían entre sí.

El pasaje del Evangelio de hoy muestra que ser curado de la lepra no curaba a los leprosos de sus actitudes previas a la lepra. Después de la curación, simplemente volvieron al orden social injusto de la animosidad racial y religiosa. El samaritano (un extranjero) fue el único que regresó para expresar su agradecimiento a Jesús-como-el Cristo, lo que indica que la fe/emuná del samaritano fue interiorizada. Él fue más allá de lo que la Ley requería. (Según la Torá, los curados de lepra deben mostrarse a los sacerdotes y ser declarados “limpios” para que puedan regresar a sus antiguas formas de vida). Al regresar a Jesús-como-el Cristo con gratitud, su fe/emuná excedió los requisitos de la Ley que ilustra que la fe/emuná es, en última instancia, un cambio interior que finalmente nos libera de una antigua forma de pensar, hacer y ser y nos abre a un mundo de vida en la posibilidad de cambio y transformación.

A través de la fe/emuná tomamos las actitudes más básicas y fundamentales: la gratitud. A través de la gracia de los sentidos, estamos ante Dios como personas liberadas. Con gratitud en nuestros corazones, ya no estamos atados a la crueldad del opresor, estamos atados a la gracia misma. Estamos atados a Dios! Así, Jesús-como-el Cristo dijo: “Levántate y vete; tu fe te ha salvado ”. Aunque no está incluido en la selección del evangelio dominical, Lc 17: 20-21 proporciona la conexión entre esta narración de fe/emuná y el reino de Dios. Recordemos que el reino de Dios para S Lucas es un reordenamiento total y completo de la sociedad en el que todos son bienvenidos y el poder no se organiza jerárquicamente, sino de una manera que se comparte y cooperan entre todos, que las personas son alimentadas, vestidas y alojadas y las viudas y los huérfanos reciban cuidado y cariño. Esta reorganización social, económica y política masiva no se realiza por mandato sino más bien en el corazón de cada creyente y se manifiesta en la acción pública. Poco a poco, el reino de Dios se abre paso a través de nuestras estructuras injustas y en la Resurrección, el reino se manifestará plenamente entre nosotros. “Cuando los fariseos le preguntaron cuándo vendría el reino de Dios, él respondió:” La venida del reino de Dios no se puede observar, y nadie anunciará: “Mira, aquí está” o “Ahí está”. . “Pues he aquí, el reino de Dios está entre ustedes”. (Lc 17: 20-21) Los verdaderos actos de resistencia, por lo tanto, no pueden nacer del odio al opresor, sino que deben nacer del amor, la gratitud y abierto a las posibilidades por el camino delante.

Intercesiónes semanales

Esta semana, Trump declaró que sacaría a las fuerzas estadounidenses de Siria. Las especulaciones sobre el motivo para retirar las tropas incluyeron un acuerdo financiero/comercial personal entre el presidente autocrático de Turquía, Erdogan y Trump; Trump simplemente está cumpliendo su promesa de campaña de poner fin a las guerras extranjeras; y Trump quería promover la influencia rusa en el área retirando la influencia militar estadounidense a cambio de algún beneficio personal desconocido. La decisión, independientemente de la justificación, ha dejado a Oriente Medio en crisis. El comando militar de EE. UU. No fue advertido y, a las pocas horas del anuncio de Trump, las fuerzas turcas y sirias comenzaron a atacar posiciones kurdas, dejando a los kurdos vulnerables a los ataques de los combatientes del ISIS. En el momento de escribir el Communique, hay informes de muchas víctimas civiles. Líderes militares experimentados y personal del cuerpo diplomático advirtieron a Trump sobre los costos humanitarios y los peligros que representa ISIS. Desafortunadamente, Trump dejó de lado esas preocupaciones y dijo que las tropas estadounidenses en Siria no están realizando un trabajo útil. Dijo que “no están luchando” y que están “allí” nada más. A pesar de que los kurdos lucharon junto a las tropas estadounidenses durante generaciones y la decisión de retirarse conduciría a la aniquilación de los kurdos (incluidos los no combatientes), Trump permanece poco convencido e impasible. Como invasores en una tierra extranjera, los estadounidenses deben asumir la responsabilidad de los disturbios políticos y religiosos causados ​​por nuestra presencia en base a la “Regla de Pottery Barn”, “Lo rompiste, lo compraste”) (Para ser claros, Pottery Barn no tiene esa regla). La frase utilizada por primera vez por Thomas Friedman y luego por Colin Powell para lograr que el presidente George W. Bush actúe con más precaución en la guerra de Irak, todavía es aplicable hoy. La participación de Estados Unidos en el Medio Oriente, impulsada por nuestra sed de petróleo durante un siglo, “rompió” la región. La “teoría de la guerra justa”, utilizada durante siglos para medir si es justificable ir a la guerra o no (jus ad bellum), también dice mucho sobre las condiciones de cuando los países están en guerra (jus in bello). Si estamos de acuerdo con el concepto de una “guerra justa” no es tan importante como tener una conversación sobre la guerra y una política exterior que justifique el uso de la fuerza para extraer recursos de la tierra de otras personas. Las realidades políticas emergentes han llevado a muchos especialistas en ética a argumentar que se incluya una tercera categoría en la teoría de la guerra justa: posguerra con retirada y reconstrucción (“Jus post bellum“). La debacle actual y la falta de un plan ilustran que necesitamos tener una conversación nacional basada en preocupaciones éticas, no una llamada telefónica privada. Oremos por nuestras tropas y los kurdos y todos aquellos cuyas vidas están llamadas a proteger.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

FRIDAY, October 18, 6-8pm, Sunnyvale Community Services, 725 Kifer Rd, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

El Grupo Solidaridad va a unirse para ofrecer apoyo a las personas con necesidades por servicios sociales y por la defensa de la justicia social en el 15 de octubre a las 7 pm en la Parroquia Nuestra Señora de Refugio.
¡Todos son bienvenidos!

Grupo Solidaridad Support Group for social service needs and social justice advocacy will hold their first meeting on October 15 at 7 pm at Our Lady of Refuge. All are welcome!

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

NO MISA on October 13

No habrá misa el 13 de octubre

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Faith

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

October 3, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, October 6 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.
Fr. Jon and members of Grupo will be attending a Teach-In and Action in El Paso on Oct 11-13.
There will not be a Misa that weekend.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!

6 de octubre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.
P. Jon y los miembros del Grupo asistirán a una Taller y Acción en El Paso del 11 al 13 de octubre.
No habrá una Misa ese fin de semana.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The second group training for accompaniment ministry with Catholic Charities “Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge.” Those who complete training will accompany those who come to the parish for assistance or will participate in Group Solidaridad’s support group at the parish.

Gospel Reflection: Faith
Last week’s parable, “Lazarus and the Rich Man,” (Lk 16:19-31) illustrated the point that we will be judged by how we choose to use our wealth. The parable juxtaposed the lived reality of the rich man and the poor beggar, Lazarus. The parable was recast from an ancient Jewish parable (which in turn was taken from an Egyptian parable) to address the Gentile converts whose attitudes about class distinction and social interaction with marginalized persons was conditioned by Greco-Roman ambivalence to the poor. Gentile candidates for discipleship needed to break from the Empire and embrace the kingdom of God. The ethics of social responsibility in that parable were indeed rooted in Jewish social and spiritual ethics. The Gospel of Luke portrays Jesus-as- the Christ as a fierce champion of social equity and radical inclusion. Today’s selection begins with a “saying of faith” (“…If you have faith the size of a mustard seed, you would say to [this] mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it would obey you.’” (Lk 17:6) and concludes with a commentary on the attitude a disciple must assume, “When you have done all you have been commanded, say, ‘We are unprofitable servants; we have done what we were obliged to do.’” (Lk 17:10). Today’s passage marks a shift from teaching about the kingdom of God (i.e., showing the difference between the Empire and Kingdom and the social dimensions of discipleship) to a series of sayings and parables that speak to the internalization of that teaching and the role that faith will play in that process.

In mainline Jewish thought, “faith” means “trust,” rather than subscribing to specific doctrinal propositions. The word, “emunah” is translated, “faith.” It means an innate conviction that transcends evidence and reason; however, understanding, wisdom and knowledge enhance emunah, but can never substitute for it. The first time emunah was used in the Torah was in connection to Abraham when God repeatedly promised Abraham land. For Abraham, emunah was not in the “belief” that God existed, that God made promises of land, that God has the power to deliver these promises, or that God can be relied on to keep those promises. Rather, emunah was the ACTION Abraham took in response to what God said. Emunah is the manifested the inner-reality of trusting God.

In Jewish theology emunah is embedded in our being; like a pre-conscious disposition that prompts us to say, “Yes!” without asking for the rationale behind the request. Let us turn to another to 20th Century Catholic theologian, Karl Rahner, to look at “faith” another way.

Rahner used the term, “supernatural existential” as a way to describe the disposition of “Yes!” He described an a priori element that is within all human beings that makes it possible for humans to reach out to the Infinite and receive Grace. This condition orients human beings — regardless of doctrinal affiliation/ideology or self-identification as a “believer,” — to experience ourselves as transcendent subjects, meaning that all human beings who are subject to socio-historical conditioning have the capacity to imagine themselves as being “free” from being non-existent upon our physical death. Whether we “believe” in what happens to us or to the universe after death is irrelevant. What is relevant is that constitutive to our being human is our ability to trust and act without having verifiable evidence.

Now, let us return to the opening line of the gospel passage with the apostles saying, “Increase our faith.” (Lk 17:5) and to Jesus’ response about faith the size of a mustard seed. The apostle’s emunah will not grow because they have secret knowledge because emunah cannot be possessed! Emunah can only be manifested in actions that correspond to trust. Using the example of servants who do what they are told and their masters who trust that when they snap their fingers, servants will obey them, Luke showed his audience that even the apostles — those charged with handing down the teachings of Jesus-as-the Christ — struggled with emunah. All those who wish to become disciples of Jesus-as-the Christ must internalize how they will act in the kingdom of God. Emunah requires that disciples must assume an attitude of humble service.

Within the context of Resistance theology, faith cannot be used as a doctrinal measuring stick to determine who is saved and who is condemned, a political mace to force others to bend to our will, or camouflage for hypocrisy that allows us to commit unspeakable acts under a thin veil of religiosity and condemn others while absolving ourselves of those same actions. Throughout history Christians have traded faith for power by trusting in the power of the Empire more than God and in each case Christians lost respect and relevancy not from others, but from members of their own churches. Today we see Church leaders including Cardinals and Archbishops and leading evangelical leaders who bilked billions from the faithful to build their own bank accounts and abused vulnerable persons. If Christians today relate to the masters, “Prepare something for me to eat. Put on your apron and wait on me while I eat and drink. You may eat and drink when I am finished…” and ignore our faith that calls us to identify as “…unprofitable servants…” (Lk 17:10) then it is just a matter of time that the Church will be relegated as a footnote in the annals of history as a experiment in faith that had a good run, but was not able to be sustain itself because it never increased faith.

Weekly Intercessions

Last week Fr. James Martin, SJ, met with Pope Francis to speak about his ministry to LGBTQ Catholics. Fr. Martin spoke with the Pope for 30 minutes in between meetings the Pope had with bishops who were in Rome for their ad liminal pilgrimage to Rome. Fr. Martin said that Pope Francis was an “incredibly attentive listener” who asked him many questions and he was left with the impression that the Pope clearly cares for LGBTQ people. Martin, author of “Building a Bridge: How the Catholic Church and the LGBT Community Can Enter into a Relationship of Respect, Compassion, and Sensitivity,” faced harsh criticism from some Church leaders and laity who claim that Fr. Martin was trying to change Church teaching on homosexuality. Fr. Martin vigorously denied those claims saying that his book was based on the Pope’s call that Catholics should be listening to LGBTQ folks rather than condemning them. Echoing the Pope’s teaching on listening, Fr. Martin says the Church is called to provide pastoral care, not a closed door. Following his meeting with the Pope, Fr. Martin said, “What I brought to him were the experiences of LGBT Catholics whom I’ve met, their joys and hopes, their struggles and challenges, their experiences as a way of giving them a voice with the pope.” Fr. Martin relayed the hopes and dreams of tens of thousands of pastoral leaders in the Catholic Church who want the Church to be a place that welcomes LGBTQ people as one would welcome every other Catholic. He says the Church should be “…a place where they don’t feel like they’re lepers… where they don’t have to wonder how they’re going to be treated when they come in, and a place where they are welcomed, because they are baptized Catholics and it’s their church, too.” Sadly, not every priest, chancery official, lay minister, or Bishop got the memo on the gospel call to welcome, love and embrace all people. Those who minister to the LGBTQ community report that they are harassed by “well-meaning” members of diocesan curia who caution pastors against using the phrase, “All are welcome” and who include LGBTQ persons as members of parish leadership. Fr. Martin’s visit to the Holy Father may not unwind the legacy of homo and transphobia in the Church, but it is a start to what hopefully will become a church-wide conversation. Let us pray for Fr. Martin and all those who courageously minister to the LGBTQ+ Catholics marginalized by ignorance, fear and hatred.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La Fe  
La parábola de la semana pasada, “Lázaro y el Hombre Rico” (Lucas 16: 19-31), ilustra el punto en que ser- emos juzgados por cómo elegimos usar nuestra riqueza. La parábola yuxtapuso la realidad vivida del hom- bre rico y el Lázaro. La parábola fue refundida de una antigua parábola judía (que a su vez fue tomada de una parábola egipcia) para abordar a los conversos gentiles cuyas actitudes sobre la distinción de clase y la interacción social con las personas marginadas estaban condicionadas por la ambivalencia grecorromana hacia los pobres. Los candidatos gentiles para el discipulado necesitaban separarse del Imperio y abrazar el reino de Dios. La ética de la responsabilidad social en esa parábola estaba enraizada en la ética social y espiritual judía. El Evangelio de Lucas retrata a Jesús-como-el Cristo como un campeón noble de equidad social e inclusión radical. La selección de hoy comienza con un “dicho de fe” (“… Si tienes fe del tamaño de una semilla de mostaza, le dirías a [este] árbol de morera: ‘Sé desarraigado d y plantado en el mar, ‘y te obedecería’”. (Lc 17: 6) y concluye con un comentario sobre la actitud que un discípulo debe asumir: “Cuando hayas hecho todo lo que se te ha mandado, di: ‘Nosotros son servidores no rentables; hemos hecho lo que estábamos obligados a hacer “. (Lc 17:10). El pasaje de hoy marca un cambio de la enseñanza sobre el reino de Dios (es decir, que muestra la diferencia entre el Imperio y el Reino y las dimensiones sociales del discipulado) a una serie de dichos y parábolas que hablan de la internalización de esa enseñanza y el papel que desempeña la fe tomará en ese proceso.

En el pensamiento judío principal, “fe” significa “confianza” y no de suscribirse a proposiciones doctrinales específicas. La palabra “emuná” se traduce como “fe”. Significa una convicción innata que trasciende la evidencia y la razón; sin embargo, la comprensión, la sabiduría y el conocimiento mejoran la emuná, pero nunca pueden sustituirla. La primera vez que se usó la emuná en la Torá fue en conexión con Abraham cuando Dios le prometió repetidamente la tierra a Abraham. Para Abraham, emuná no estaba en la “creencia” de que Dios existía, que Dios hizo promesas de tierra, que Dios tiene el poder de cumplir estas promesas, o que se puede confiar en Dios para cumplir esas promesas. Más bien, emuná fue la ACCIÓN que Abraham tomó en respuesta a lo que Dios dijo. Emuná es la realidad interna manifestada de confiar en Dios.

En la teología judía, la inmunidad está integrada totalmente en nuestro ser; como una disposición preconsciente que nos impulsa a decir: “¡Sí!” sin preguntar la razón detrás de la solicitud. Pasemos a otro teólogo católico del siglo XX, Karl Rahner, para ver la “fe” de otra manera.

Rahner usó el término “existencial sobrenatural” como una forma de describir la disposición de “¡Sí!” Describió un elemento a priori que está dentro de todos los seres humanos que hace posible que los humanos lleguen al Infinito y reciban la gracia de Dios. Esta condición orienta a los seres humanos, independientemente de su afiliación doctrinal / ideología o auto-identificación como un “creyente”, a experimentarnos como sujetos trascendentes, lo que significa que todos los seres humanos que están sujetos a condicionamientos socio-históricos tienen la capacidad de imaginarse a sí mismos como ser “libre” de no existir en nuestra muerte física. Si creemos en lo que nos sucede a nosotros o al universo después de la muerte es irrelevante. Lo relevante es que lo constitutivo de nuestro ser humano es nuestra capacidad de confiar y actuar sin tener evidencia verificable.

Ahora, regresemos a la línea de apertura del pasaje del evangelio con los apóstoles diciendo: “Aumenta nuestra fe” (Lc 17, 5) y a la respuesta de Jesús acerca de la fe del tamaño de una semilla de mostaza. ¡La emuná del apóstol no crecerá porque tienen conocimiento secreto porque la emuná no puede ser poseída! Emuná solo se puede manifestar en acciones que corresponden a la confianza. Utilizando el ejemplo de los sirvientes que hacen lo que se les dice y sus amos que confían en que cuando chasquean los dedos, los sirvientes los obedecerán, S Lucas mostró a su audiencia que incluso los apóstoles, los encargados de transmitir las enseñanzas de Jesús-como-el Cristo luchó con la emuná. Todos aquellos que deseen convertirse en discípulos de Jesús-como-el Cristo deben internalizar cómo actuarán en el reino de Dios. Emuná requiere que los discípulos asuman una actitud de servicio humilde.

Dentro del contexto de la teología de la Resistencia, la fe no puede usarse como un instrumento de medición doctrinal para determinar quién es salvo y quién es condenado, una maza política para obligar a otros a doblegarse a nuestra voluntad, o camuflarnos por la hipocresía que nos permite cometer actos indescriptibles bajo un delgado velo de religiosidad y condenar a otros mientras nos absolvemos de esas mismas acciones. A lo largo de la historia, los cristianos han cambiado la fe por el poder al confiar en el poder del Imperio más que en Dios y en cada caso los cristianos perdieron el respeto y la relevancia no de los demás, sino de los miembros de sus propias iglesias. Hoy vemos líderes de la Iglesia, incluidos cardenales y arzobispos, y líderes evangélicos protestantes líderes que saquearon miles de millones de los fieles para construir sus propias cuentas bancarias y abusaron de personas vulnerables. Si los cristianos de hoy se relacionan con los maestros, “…prepara algo para que yo coma. Ponte el delantal y espérame mientras como y bebo. Puedes comer y beber cuando haya terminado”… e ignorar nuestra fe que nos llama a identificarnos como “… siervos no rentables…” (Lc 17:10), entonces es solo cuestión de tiempo que la Iglesia sea relegada como una nota al pie en los anales de la historia como un experimento de fe que tuvo una buena racha, pero que no pudo sostenerse porque nunca aumentó la fe.

Intercesiónes semanales

La semana pasada el P. James Martin, SJ, se reunió con el Papa Francisco para hablar sobre su ministerio a los católi- cos LGBTQ. El P. Martin habló con el Papa durante 30 minutos entre reuniones que el Papa tuvo con obispos que estaban en Roma para su peregrinación ad limina a Roma. El P. Martin dijo que el Papa Francisco era un “oyente in- creíblemente atento” que le hizo muchas preguntas y se quedó con la impresión de que el Papa claramente se preocupa por las personas LGBTQ. Martin, autor de “Construyendo un puente: cómo la Iglesia católica y la comunidad LGBT pueden entrar en una relación de respeto, compasión y sensibilidad”, enfrentó duras críticas de algunos líderes y laicos de la Iglesia que afirman que el P. Martin estaba tratando de cambiar la enseñanza de la Iglesia sobre la homosexualidad. El P. Martin negó enérgicamente esas afirmaciones diciendo que su libro estaba basado en el llamado del Papa de que los católicos deberían escuchar a las personas LGBTQ en lugar de condenarlas. Haciéndose eco de la enseñanza del Papa sobre la importancia de escuchar, el P. Martin dice que la Iglesia está llamada a ofrecer cuidado pastoral, no una puerta cerrada. Después de su reunión con el Papa, el P. Martin dijo: “Lo que le traje fueron las experiencias de los católicos LGBT a quienes conocí, sus alegrías y esperanzas, sus luchas y desafíos, sus experiencias como una forma de darles una voz con el Papa”. Martin transmitió las esperanzas y los sueños de decenas de miles de líderes pastorales en la Iglesia Católica que desean que la Iglesia sea un lugar que acoja a las personas LGBTQ como uno recibiría a todos los demás católicos. Él dice que la Iglesia debería ser “… un lugar donde no se sientan leprosos … donde no tengan que preguntarse cómo van a ser tratados cuando entren, y un lugar donde sean recibidos , porque son católicos bautizados y también es su iglesia ”. Lamentablemente, no todos los sacerdotes, funcionarios de cancillería, ministros laicos u obispos recibieron el memorando sobre el llamado del evangelio para dar la bienvenida, amar y abrazar a todas las personas. Aquellos que ministran a la comunidad LGBTQ informan que son acosados por miembros “bien intencionados” de la curia diocesana que advierten a los pastores contra el uso de la frase, “Todos son bienvenidos” y que incluyen a personas LGBTQ como miembros del liderazgo de la parroquia. La visita de Martin al Santo Padre no puede deshacer el legado de homo y transfobia en la Iglesia, pero es un comienzo de lo que, con suerte, se convertirá en una conversación en toda la iglesia. Oremos por el P. Martin y todos aquellos que valientemente ministran a los católicos LGBTQ + marginados por la ignorancia, el miedo y el odio.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

MONDAY, October 7, 7:00pm in a private home in West San Jose, register for address and details

FRIDAY, October 18, 6-8pm, Sunnyvale Community Services, 725 Kifer Rd, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

El Grupo Solidaridad va a unirse para ofrecer apoyo a las personas con necesidades por servicios sociales y por la defensa de la justicia social en el 15 de octubre a las 7 pm en la Parroquia Nuestra Señora de Refugio.
¡Todos son bienvenidos!

Grupo Solidaridad Support Group for social service needs and social justice advocacy will hold their first meeting on October 15 at 7 pm at Our Lady of Refuge. All are welcome!

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

NO MISA on October 13

No habrá misa el 13 de octubre

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  The Abyss between the Rich and the Poor in the Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

September 26, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, September 29 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!

29 de septiembre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Fr. Pat Murphy, CS, from Casa del Migrante in Tijuana shared his experience and insight from woking with refugees and migrants speaks with staff of community agencies and the County at Catholic Charities. The US policy of staying in Mexico to process asylum claims has created social and economic chaos. For those already traumatized by having to flee from violence and certain death, Trump’s asylum policy is especially cruel.

Gospel Reflection: The Abyss between the Rich and the Poor in the Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man
Last week’s passage from Lk 16:1-13 that provided us with a way to see how Luke wanted his community to act ad extra (how members ought to relate to the world around them). The parable about the “Dishonest Steward” (Lk 16:1-8) began the passage and verses 9-13 provided an application of the parable concluding with the adage, “No servant can serve two masters. He will either hate one and love the other, or be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.” (Lk 16:13). Last week and this week’s passage underscore the gospel writer Luke’s critique about wealth: that wealth must always be placed at the service of the community — especially the marginalized and must vulnerable among us, rather than be at the disposal of one person’s self-interest. Today’s parable of “Lazarus and the Rich Man” is a wonderfully scripted exchange between Abraham and a dead rich man. The set up to the dialog illustrates the point that we will be judged by how we choose to use our wealth.

The parable juxtaposes the lived reality of the rich man (who was “…dressed in purple garments and fine linen and dined sumptuously each day…”) and Lazarus who was covered with sores and licked by dogs and who was so hungry he would have been happy to eat even the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table. The opening of parable touches on a common reality in the Greco-Roman world in which an uncrossable abyss existed between the elite and the teeming masses of the poor. Luke cast the parable in a Jewish setting (note the references to Torah and the Prophets) which confused those who heard parables with anti-Jewish ears. A superficial reading of the parable might lead the unsophisticated reader to believe that the parable was a critique against Jews rather than as a critique on economic inequality and the treatment of the poor.

Some older traditional commentators suggested that the target of the parable was the Pharisees.  The Pharisees did not care enough for the poor because they were more interested in money and thus, Pharisees who had access to Torah and the Prophets, did very little to alleviate human suffering. (c.f. the last 3 lines of the parable: “They have Moses and the prophets. Let them listen to them.’ He said, ‘Oh no, father Abraham, but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.’Then Abraham said, ‘If they will not listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded if someone should rise from the dead.’” Lk 16:29-31) Taking that position is highly problematic because it plays into anti-Semitic tropes that Jews are only interested in money and not the well-being of the poor.

If one ignores the social location of Luke’s audience and the economic realities at play in every day life, one can never fully grasp the power of the parable . Luke’s audience were Gentile converts who were not exposed to Pharisees. Secondly Pharisees like Jesus, associated with the underclass and they were hyper-critical of wealthy Jews who did not treat the poor with kindness and compassion. Luke’s task of converting his community required the gospel writer to break through the mindset of potential converts who had been conditioned by the Greco-Roman ambivalence to the poor. In short, Luke’s audience was inured to the care and concern of the poor and vulnerable precisely because of their social location and they had to understand that discipleship required a radical shift in the ethics of wealth.  The parable shows that the rich man’s proto-libertarian perspective of not having any obligation to care for Lazarus was not only wrong, but heretical. Disciples must not only be kind and compassionate to the poor, they must also work to liberate them from the darkness of an unjust economic system that has created the abyss between the elite and the teeming population of Lazarus.

Income inequality in the Bay Area is among the nation’s highest.  Families at the highest levels of income make 10 times the salaries of those on the bottom. According to a February 18, 2018 story in the Mercury News, families in the 95th percentile in Santa Clara County made $428,729 in 2016 whereas those in the 20th percentile made only $40,807.  Earnings in the top income bracket increased by $60,686 whereas income in the lower brackets saw an increase of $1,726. Note that the data is from the years PRIOR to the 2018 Trump tax bill that transferred an unprecedented amount of money toward the highest income earners fueling deeper deficits. Like the parable, we live in a “gaping gully” between the elite rich and the vast numbers of poor people in our Valley.   Nearly a third of households in the Valley have to rely on some form of assistance and more than 10% of Valley residents lack access to nutritionally adequate food. Today in the Valley, The 2019 Silicon Vally Index reports that home prices have soared even higher than before where the median home price is $1.8 million! Only 8% of newly approved residential units in the Valley are affordable to those who earn less than 80% of the area.  There are indeed many Lazarus’ in our midst…we have been silent during the rise of inequality saying, “The bubble will burst.” “I have my house, if they work hard enough, they too will have a house.”  “They must have done something to keep them homeless.” When we saw our neighbors leave because they could no longer afford to live here and when our children’s friends began to show up at dinner time because they had nothing to eat at home we said, “Let us pray for those less fortunate.”  “Something needs to be done, but I’m not an expert.”  “This is too complicated for me to get involved.”  When they tried to build affordable housing in our neighborhood we said, “Not in my backyard! They will bring down my property values!” When we couldn’t pay our property tax and were forced to sell our house and move out and when we had no food in the fridge, we said, “Who will help me now?” “What could I have done?”  In the Valley of the rich man and Lazarus we must speak up, speak out, show up and mobilize. 

Weekly Intercessions

As the Communique is going to distribution, we found out that Trump not only used his office and Congressional-approved funding to strong-arm another country to collaborate with him to get “political dirt” on one of his political rivals, he also tried to cover up his crimes. To date of writing the Communique, none of the members of the GOP caucus in the House or Senate have stood up to condemn these actions. Instead, they have questioned the integrity and patriotism of the whistleblower who brought the matter to Congressional attention and accused those pushing for investigations of lying and political grandstanding. The evidence of crimes and ethical breaches from the White House mounts each hour as more people are coming forward to offer evidence of malfeasance and the abuse of the office and as formerly classified reports become declassified. Congressional support for impeachment investigations reached a majority and thus we are going to be facing another impeachment process.  Many people say that impeachment will “divide the country.”  The reality is that we are already divided.  Trump’s rise to power came at a time of social, religious, spiritual and economic change.  These changes — good and bad, have bred resentment. Though Trump himself is very wealthy and spends his time his wealthy friends, he has learned to capture the resentment and unease of those who feel that they have been “left behind” by the national changes. Tapping into the resentment from those who do not like racial and ethnic presence in public life and for those who oppose linguistic accommodations and legalization of immigrant, Trump echoes anger over gender equality and the rise of women in public spaces. His “dog whistle” language” signals he supports those who are angry at the social advancement of LGBTQ and non-white people and his anti-immigrant rhetoric and cruel action at the border bolstered by unsubstantiated claims of national security and economic threats, lets people know he is all for  “white rule.” Trump takes all that resentment and wraps it in the flag. Words and actions over these past 2 years have shown that we are already divided. The impeachment process will merely expose the motive behind the division. Let us pray for our country as we begin the process of impeachment, that we will place the common good and the country above self-interest, political tribalism, and party.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:  El Abismo entre los Ricos y los Pobres en la Parábola de Lázaro y el Hombre Rico
El pasaje de la semana pasada de Lc 16: 1-13 que nos brindó una manera de ver cómo el evangelista S Lucas quería que su comunidad actuara de manera adicional (cómo los miembros deberían relacionarse con el mundo que los rodea). La parábola sobre el “Mayordomo Deshonesto” (Lc 16: 1-8) comenzó el pasaje y los versículos 9-13 proporcionaron una aplicación de la parábola que concluía con el adagio: “Ningún siervo puede servir a dos señores. Odiará a uno y amará al otro, o se dedicará a uno y despreciará al otro. No puedes servir a Dios y a Mamón.” (Lc 16:13). La semana pasada y el pasaje de esta semana subrayan la crítica del evangelista S Lucas sobre la riqueza: esa riqueza siempre debe ponerse al servicio de la comunidad, especialmente los marginados y vulnerables entre nosotros, en lugar de estar a disposición del interés personal de una persona. La parábola de hoy de “Lázaro y el hombre rico” es un intercambio maravillosamente escrito entre Abram y un hombre rico muerto. La configuración del diálogo ilustra el punto de que seremos juzgados por cómo elegimos usar nuestra riqueza.

La parábola yuxtapone la realidad vivida del hombre rico (que estaba “… vestido con prendas moradas y lino fino y cenó suntuosamente cada día …”) y Lázaro, que estaba cubierto de llagas y lamido por perros y que tenía tanta hambre que habría estado hambriento feliz de comer incluso las sobras que cayeron de la mesa del rico. La apertura de la parábola toca una realidad común en el mundo grecorromano en el que existía un abismo incontenible entre la élite y las inmensas masas de pobres. Lucas lanzó la parábola en un entorno judío (tenga en cuenta las referencias a la Torá y los Profetas) que confundió a aquellos que escucharon parábolas con oídos anti-judíos. Una interpretación superficial de la parábola podría llevar al lector poco sofisticado a creer que la parábola fue una crítica contra los judíos en lugar de una crítica sobre la desigualdad económica y el tratamiento de los pobres.

Algunos comentaristas tradicionales más antiguos sugirieron que el objetivo de la parábola eran de criticar a los fariseos. Los fariseos no se preocupaban lo suficiente por los pobres porque estaban más interesados ​​en el dinero y, por lo tanto, los fariseos que tenían acceso a la Torá y los profetas, hicieron muy poco para aliviar el sufrimiento humano. (cf las últimas 3 líneas de la parábola: “Tienen a Moisés y a los profetas. Déjelos escucharlos”. Él dijo: “Oh, no, padre Abraham, pero si alguien de entre los muertos va a ellos, se arrepentirán”. Entonces Abraham dijo: ‘Si no escucharán a Moisés y a los profetas, tampoco serán persuadidos si alguien resucita de entre los muertos'”. Lucas 16: 29-31) Tomar esa posición es muy problemático porque influye los prejuicios y tropes anti-semíticos de que los judíos solo están interesados ​​en el dinero y no en el bienestar de los pobres.

Si uno ignora la ubicación social de la audiencia de S Lucas y las realidades económicas en juego en la vida cotidiana, uno nunca puede comprender completamente el poder de la parábola. La audiencia de S Lucas eran conversos gentiles que no estaban expuestos a los fariseos. En segundo lugar, fariseos y Jesús, eran asociados con la clase baja y eran hipercríticos con los judíos ricos que no trataban a los pobres con amabilidad y compasión. La tarea de S Lucas de convertir a su comunidad requería que el escritor del evangelio rompiera la mentalidad de los potenciales conversos que habían sido condicionados por la ambivalencia grecorromana hacia los pobres. En resumen, la audiencia de S Lucas estaba acostumbrada al cuidado y la preocupación de los pobres y vulnerables precisamente por su ubicación social y tenían que entender que el discipulado requería un cambio radical en la ética de la riqueza. La parábola muestra que la perspectiva proto-libertaria del hombre rico de no tener ninguna obligación de cuidar a Lázaro no solo era errónea, sino herética. Los discípulos no solo deben ser amables y compasivos con los pobres, sino que también deben trabajar para liberarlos de la oscuridad de un sistema económico injusto que ha creado el abismo entre la élite y la población masiva de Lázaro.

La desigualdad de ingresos en el Área de la Bahía se encuentra entre las más altas del país. Las familias en los niveles más altos de ingresos ganan 10 veces los salarios de los de abajo. Según una historia del 18 de febrero de 2018 en Mercury News, las familias en el percentil 95 en el condado de Santa Clara ganaron $428,729 en 2016, mientras que las del percentil 20 ganaron solo $40,807. Las ganancias en el segmento de ingresos más altos aumentaron en $ 60,686, mientras que los ingresos en los niveles más bajos registraron un aumento de $ 1,726. Tenga en cuenta que los datos son de los años ANTES de la factura de impuestos de Trump de 2018 que transfirió una cantidad de dinero sin precedentes hacia las personas y corporaciones con mayores ingresos que alimentan déficits más profundos. Al igual que la parábola, vivimos en un “barranco abierto” entre los ricos de élite y la gran cantidad de personas pobres en nuestro Valle. Casi un tercio de los hogares en el Valle tienen que depender de algún tipo de asistencia y más del 10% de los residentes del Valle carecen de acceso a alimentos nutricionalmente adecuados. Hoy en el Valle, el Índice Silicon Vally 2019 informa que los precios de las viviendas se han disparado aún más que antes, donde el precio promedio de la vivienda es de $ 1.8 millones. Solo el 8% de las unidades residenciales recientemente aprobadas en el Valle son asequibles para aquellos que ganan menos del 80% del área. De hecho, hay muchos Lázaros entre nosotros … hemos estado en silencio durante el aumento de la desigualdad diciendo: “La burbuja estallará”. “Tengo mi casa, si trabajan lo suficiente, ellos también tendrán una casa” debe haber hecho algo para mantenerlos sin hogar”. Cuando vimos a nuestros vecinos salir por otros partes porque ya no podían permitirse el lujo de vivir aquí y cuando los amigos de nuestros hijos comenzaron a aparecer a la hora de la cena porque no tenían nada para comer en casa, dijimos: “Dejemos que oremos por los pobrecitos”. “Hay que hacer algo, pero no soy un experto”. “Esto es demasiado complicado para involucrarme”.  Cuando intentaron construir viviendas asequibles en nuestro vecindario, dijimos:” ¡No en mi vecindario! ¡Bajarán los valores de mi propiedad! “Cuando no pudimos pagar nuestro impuesto a la propiedad y nos vimos obligados a vender nuestra casa y mudarnos y cuando no teníamos comida en el refrigerador, dijimos:” ¿Quién me ayudará ahora?” “¿Qué podría haber hecho?” En el Valle del hombre rico y los Lázaros debemos hablar, comprometernos en acción y movilizarse.

Intercesiónes semanales

A medida que el Communique se distribuirá, descubrimos que Trump no solo usó su oficina y fondos aprobados por el Congreso para fortalecer a otro país para colaborar con él para obtener “suciedad política” en uno de sus rivales políticos, sino que también trató de encubrir sus crímenes. Hasta la fecha de redacción del Communique, ninguno de los miembros del grupo republicano en la Cámara de Representantes o el Senado se ha levantado para condenar estas acciones. En cambio, han cuestionado la integridad y el patriotismo del denunciante que trajo el asunto a la atención del Congreso y acusó a quienes presionan para que se investiguen las mentiras y la soberbia política. La evidencia de crímenes y violaciones éticas de la Casa Blanca aumenta cada hora a medida que más personas se presentan para ofrecer evidencia de malversación y abuso de la oficina y cuando los informes previamente clasificados se desclasifican. El apoyo del Congreso para las investigaciones de juicio político llegó a una mayoría y, por lo tanto, enfrentaremos otro proceso de juicio político. Mucha gente dice que el juicio político “dividirá al país”. La realidad es que ya estamos divididos. El ascenso de Trump al poder se produjo en un momento de cambio social, religioso, espiritual y económico. Estos cambios, buenos y malos, han generado resentimiento. Aunque Trump es muy rico y pasa su tiempo con sus amigos ricos, ha aprendido a capturar el resentimiento y la inquietud de aquellos que sienten que los cambios nacionales los han “dejado atrás”. Aprovechando el resentimiento de aquellos a quienes no les gusta la presencia racial y étnica en la vida pública y para aquellos que se oponen a las adaptaciones lingüísticas y la legalización de los inmigrantes, Trump se hace eco de la ira por la igualdad de género y el ascenso de las mujeres en los espacios públicos. Su lenguaje de “silbato de perro” indica que apoya a aquellos que están enojados por el avance social de las personas LGBTQ y no-blancas y su retórica anti-inmigrante y sus acciónes crueles en la frontera reforzada por reclamos no fundamentados de seguridad nacional y amenazas económicas, permite a las personas que él es un nacionalista blanca. Trump toma todo ese resentimiento y lo envuelve en la bandera de rojo, blanco y azul. Las palabras y acciones en los últimos 2 años han demostrado que ya estamos divididos. El proceso de juicio político simplemente expondrá el motivo detrás de la división. Oremos por nuestro país al comenzar el proceso de “impeachment”, para que coloquemos el bien común y el país por encima del interés propio, el tribalismo político y el partido.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

MONDAY, October 7, 7:00pm in a private home in West San Jose, register for address and details

FRIDAY, October 18, 6-8pm, Sunnyvale Community Services, 725 Kifer Rd, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

OPPORTUNITIES TO GET INVOLVED ABOUT THE CRISIS ON THE BORDER:

PILGRIMAGE TO EL PASO OCTOBER 11-13 and PRESENTATIONS FROM CASA DEL MIGRANTE, TIJUANA

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp