Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Reputation

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

February 14, 2020

YES! MISA  this Sunday!
The next Misa Solidaridad will be
February 16 at 9 am
at the Newman Center,
corner of S. Carlos and S. 10th Street.
There will not be misa on 2/23, join Fr. Jon guest speak at First Unitarian Church of San José at the 11 am service.

SI HAY MISA  este domingo!
La próxima misa sera
16 de febrero a las 9 am
en la capilla católica de SJSU,
la esquina de Sur 10 y S. Carlos.
No habrá misa el 2/23, únete al p. Jon invitado habla en la Primera Iglesia Unitaria de San José a las 11 am.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Two of the high school students that participated in the Latinos in Action 2020 Platform Launch offer inspirational speeches on engag- ing in this year’s elections. If all young voters participate in the elec- tions, they will be the biggest voting block.

Gospel Reflection: Reputation
This week’s reflection continues the ethical themes introduced in the beginning of Matthew 5. Today’s section covers the Torah as the ground of Jesus’ ethical position (Mt 5:17-20) and how grounding ethics in the Torah must guide the way that we check our passion to respect the reputation of our neighbor (Mt 5:21-26), our partner(Mt 5:27-32), and the wider community (Mt 5:33-37). The ethical content of Matthew’s gospel is grounded in the Jewish teaching about reputation.

Recall that Salt and Light refer to the disciple’s identity as one who will make concrete the berakhot (blessings) from (Mt 5:3-12). As “Salt and Light,” the disciple is one who was to be above reproach and that people would see the disciple’s good deeds and render praise to God. (Mt 5:16). As rabbi, Jesus applied the lofty concepts of praise of verses 3-10 and the idealistic and high expectations to which his followers would aspire in verse 16 to every day life. Matthew, as an evangelist writing to a community grounded in Jewish tradition, established that discipleship for those who sought to follow the rabbi from Nazareth were, at that point in Matthew’s narrative, derived from the fundamental Jewish principle of inter-personal conduct.

Recall Mt. 5: 16, “...your light must shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your heavenly Father.”) What we show forth and how we act is somewhat of a reflection of what is going on inside of us. And because others judge by what they see, they are judging not only the good needs, but that which inspired the good deeds: God. We must be concerned with how we come across to others and therefore reputation is important. In fact, the Talmud has two terms, “marit haayin” (“appearance to the eye”) and “chashad” (“suspicion”). These terms warn us that one’s intentions and actions cannot be misinterpreted leading others to think that certain prohibited actions are allowed and that certain actions must be avoided in order to protect one’s reputation so that others will not think of one as a sinner. Whereas traditional Jewish commentaries focused on the outward actions, Jesus lifted up the issue of that which motivates outward actions: the inward intention of the individual. For Jesus, one’s intention was formed from one’s experience with the inward dwelling of Spirit. Jesus taught his disciples to focus on the interior experience of the Divine rather than focus on exterior behaviors. The traditional Jewish emphasis on actions and Jesus’ focus on intention; however, are not competing ideas, but rather, complimentary ways that together lift up the importance of character ethics in both traditions.

Jewish and Christian tradition both share a belief that reputation is not about stroking our ego or seeking compliments but rather, making sure that what we do is in fact a reflection of what is deep within us. Jewish teaching on reputation is grounded in the idea that truly altruistic individuals’ actions shape the world around them, not by calling attention to themselves, but by humbly going about doing good things and pointing toward the Divine, not themselves. As rabbi, Jesus underscores traditional Jewish teaching that the way we are viewed is liable to shape the way others see God. In traditional Jewish teachings, the work of building one’s reputation is not about pointing to what we have accomplished, but rather, pointing out what God has accomplished through our obedience to Torah (c.f., Torah is known as “The Law” or more literally, “The Instruction”).

In Jewish and Christian ethical systems, the practice of ad hominem attacks (attacking the person and their reputation) is forbidden. To attack a person’s reputation through ridicule, slander and lying is tantamount to slandering God. We see the Jewish influence echoed in Mt 5: 22, “...whoever says to his brother, ‘Raqa,’ will be answerable to the Sanhedrin, and whoever says, ‘You fool,’ will be liable to fiery Gehenna….” These insults would seem rather innocuous in today’s context; however, the teaching hints that we must take on the characteristics of the indwelling of the Divine. That means that our disposition must be kind and merciful, not vengeful and spiteful. We must be ready to make peace, c.f., “...if you bring your gift to the altar, and there recall that your brother has anything against you, leave your gift there at the altar, go first and be recon- ciled with your brother, and then come and offer your gift.” (Mt 5:23-24).

The teaching on the interior disposition is certainly ex- tended toward relations between husband and wife (see Mt.27-32). This section, misused by misogynists for thousands of years, is not about staying in a bad marriage nor is it about remarriage. In these verses Jesus is applying the principle that our exterior actions must conform to our interior experience of the Divine. Take the verse, “...Everyone who looks at a woman with lust has already committed adultery with her in his heart.” (Mt 5:28). Here we see the importance of one’s interior disposition underscored. The verse presupposes that one’s love for one’s partner is no self-referential, meaning that the love for our partners is not transactional. Our love for our partner is shaped by God and thus, one does not dump one’s partner in the hopes of finding a better partner. The encounter of the Divine leads us to deepen the experience of one’s partner, not rejecting our partner because our partner no longer suits us.

Later in Matthew’s gospel, the teaching on adultery is applied in the narrative of Mt 14, (the narrative of the death of John the Baptist). In Mt 14:3-10 King Herod beheads John the Baptist because John challenged the unlawful marriage between Herod and his sister-in-law. Outraged that John had ques- tioned Herod’s morality in public, Herod wanted to kill John, but did not want his reputation to suffer due to John’s high popularity among the people. Sometime later, Herod’s wife’s daughter beguiled her step-father/uncle Herod at his birthday party, and Herod agreed to pay his step-daughter/niece with whatever she wanted. Herodias, whose reputation was sullied by John’s earlier commentary, prompted her daughter to ask for John’s head in a platter. Herod, fearful of losing his reputation among the rich and powerful, agreed to the “payment” and beheaded John. Here we see the consequences when we ignore the inner-experience of the Divine and let our ego and lust drive our actions. Herod’s center was dark, it was not filled with the Divine.

Our inner-experience of the Divine will drive us to do the right thing. Therefore, there is no need to use public oaths to manufacture one’s reputation. For those who take public oaths with no intention of keeping those oaths will be held accountable by God and will be exposed by the people. “Let your ‘Yes’ mean ‘Yes,’ and your ‘No’ mean ‘No.’ Anything more is from the evil one.” (Mt 5:37). The lessons from today’s gospel, though written thousands of years ago, are clearly topical today. We have seen the rise of Trump’s authoritarian leadership through 15,413 lies (Washington Post, December 16, 2019) and then sustaining popularity among his base by ridiculing disabled persons, immi- grants, and poor countries; deriding women and people with non-European accents; humiliating those who disagree with him; and exacting revenge on those who offer testimony against him. These actions reveal a dark center, not the Divine. Will people of faith be willing to be modern-day John the Baptists and tell the truth, or will we allow our reputations to be soiled by our silence?

<!–


–>

Weekly Intercessions

Fall In Love
Fr. Pedro Arrupe, SJ (1907-1991)

Nothing is more practical than
finding God, than
falling in Love
in a quite absolute, final way.

What you are in love with,
what seizes your imagination,
will affect everything.

It will decide
what will get you out of bed in the morning,
what you do with your evenings,
how you spend your weekends,
what you read, 
whom you know,
what breaks your heart,
and what amazes you with joy and gratitude.

Fall in Love, 
stay in love,
and it will decide everything.

May our attention toward others focus on the inner-love of God rather than condemning others for whom they choose to love.

May our deeds be grounded in service to others and not in building our own power.

May our relationships be filled with patience, kindness, forgiveness, tenderness, understanding, acceptance, humility, and love.

Reflexión del Evangelio: Reputación 
La reflexión de esta semana continúa los temas éticos introducidos al comienzo de Mateo 5. La sección de hoy cubre la Torá como el fundamento de la ética de Jesús (Mt 5: 17-20) y cómo la ética de la Torá debe guiar la forma en que verificamos nuestra pasión por respetar la reputación de nuestro prójimo (Mt 5: 21-26), nuestro socio (Mt 5: 27-32) y la comunidad en general (Mt 5: 33-37). El contenido ético del evangelio de S Mateo se basa en la enseñanza judía sobre la reputación.

Recuerde que Sal y Luz se refieren a la identidad del discípulo como alguien que concretará las berekhot (bendiciones) de (Mt 5: 3-12). Como “Sal y Luz”, el discípulo debe ser irreprochable y que las personas vean las buenas obras del discípulo y alaben a Dios. (Mt 5:16). Como rabino, Jesús aplicó los nobles conceptos de alabanza de los versículos 3-10 y las altas expectativas idealistas a las que sus seguidores aspirarían en el versículo 16 a la vida cotidiana. Mateo, como evangelista que escribe a una comunidad basada en la tradición judía, estableció que el discipulado para aquellos que buscaban seguir al rabino de Nazaret se derivaba, en ese momento de la narrativa de Mateo, del principio judío fundamental de la conducta interpersonal.

Recordemos Mt 5: 16, “… tu luz debe brillar ante los demás, para que puedan ver tus buenas obras y glorificar a tu Padre celestial“.) Lo que mostramos y cómo actuamos es un reflejo de lo que está sucediendo dentro de nosotros. Y debido a que otros juzgan por lo que ven, están juzgando no solo las buenas necesidades, sino lo que inspiró las buenas acciones: Dios. Debemos preocuparnos por cómo nos encontramos con los demás y, por lo tanto, la reputación es importante. De hecho, el Talmud tiene dos términos, “marit ha-ayin” (“apariencia a los ojos”) y “chashad” (“sospecha”). Estos términos nos advierten que las intenciones y acciones de uno no pueden malinterpretarse, lo que lleva a otros a pensar que ciertas acciones prohibidas están permitidas y que ciertas acciones deben evitarse para proteger la reputación de uno para que otros no piensen en uno como un pecador. Mientras que los comentarios judíos tradicionales se centraron en las acciones externas, Jesús planteó el tema de lo que motiva las acciones externas: la intención interna del individuo. Para Jesús, la intención de uno se formó a partir de la experiencia de uno con la morada interior del Espíritu. Jesús enseñó a sus discípulos a centrarse en la experiencia interior de lo Divino en lugar de centrarse en los comportamientos exteriores. El énfasis tradicional judío en las acciones y el enfoque de Jesús en la intención; sin embargo, no son ideas competitivas, sino formas complementarias que juntas elevan la importancia de la ética del carácter en ambas tradiciones.

Tanto la tradición judía como la cristiana comparten la creencia de que la reputación no se trata de acariciar nuestro ego o buscar elogios, sino de asegurarse de que lo que hacemos sea un reflejo de lo que está dentro de nosotros. La enseñanza judía sobre la reputación se basa en la idea de que las acciones de individuos verdaderamente altruistas dan forma al mundo que los rodea, no llamando la atención sobre sí mismos, sino humildemente haciendo cosas buenas y señalando a lo Divino, no a ellos mismos. Como rabino, Jesús subraya la enseñanza tradicional judía de que la forma en que somos vistos puede dar forma a la forma en que otros ven a Dios. En las enseñanzas judías tradicionales, el trabajo de construir la reputación de uno no se trata de señalar lo que hemos logrado, sino de señalar lo que Dios ha logrado a través de nuestra obediencia a la Torá.

En los sistemas éticos judíos y cristianos, la práctica de ataques ad hominem (atacar a la persona y su reputación) está prohibida. Atacar la reputación de una persona a través del ridículo, la calumnia y la mentira equivalen a calumniar a Dios. Vemos que la influencia judía se hizo eco en Mt 5: 22, “… quien diga a su hermano,‘ Raqa “, responderá ante el Sanedrín, y quien diga:” Tú tonto “, será responsable ante el ardiente Gehenna …“. Estos insultos parecerían bastante inocuos en el contexto moderno; sin embargo, la enseñanza sugiere que debemos asumir las características de la morada de lo Divino. Eso significa que nuestra disposición debe ser amable y misericordiosa, no vengativa y rencorosa. Debemos estar listos para hacer las paces, cf: “... si traes tu regalo al altar y recuerdas que tu hermano tiene algo en tu contra, deja tu re- galo allí en el altar, ve primero y reconcíliate con tu hermano, y enton- ces ven y ofrece tu regalo “. (Mt 5: 23-24).

La enseñanza sobre la disposición interior ciertamente se ex- tiende hacia las relaciones entre marido y mujer (ver Mt.27-32). Esta sección, mal utilizada por misóginos durante miles de años, no se trata de permanecer en un mal matrimonio ni de volverse a casar. En estos versículos, Jesús aplica el principio de que nuestras acciones exteriores deben ajustarse a nuestra ex- periencia interior de lo Divino. Tome el versículo: “… Todos los que miran a una mujer con lujuria ya han cometido adulterio con ella en su corazón“. (Mt 5:28). Aquí vemos la importancia de la disposición interior de uno subrayado. El versículo presupone que el amor por la pareja no es auto-referencial, lo que significa que el amor por nuestra pareja no es transaccional. Nuestro amor por nuestra pareja está formado por Dios y, por lo tanto, uno no abandona a su pareja con la esperanza de encontrar una mejor pareja. El encuentro de lo Divino nos lleva a profundizar la experiencia de la pareja, no rechazar a nuestra pareja porque nuestra pareja ya no nos conviene.

Más adelante en el evangelio de S Mateo, la enseñanza sobre el adulterio se aplica en la narración de Mt 14 (la narración de la muerte de Juan el Bautista). En Mt 14: 3-10, el rey Herodes decapita a Juan el Bautista porque Juan desafió el matrimonio ilegal entre Herodes y su cuñada. Indignado porque Juan había cuestionado la moralidad de Herodes en público, Herodes quería matar a Juan, pero no quería que su reputación sufriera debido a la gran popularidad de Juan entre la gente. Algún tiempo después, la hija de la esposa de Herodes engañó a su padrastro / tío Herodes en su fiesta de cumpleaños, y Herodes aceptó pagarle a su hijastra / sobrina lo que quisiera. Herodias, cuya reputación fue manchada por el comentario ante- rior de Juan, llevó a su hija a pedir la cabeza de Juan en un plato. Herodes, temeroso de perder su reputación entre los ricos y poderosos, aceptó el “pago” y decapitó a Juan. Aquí vemos las consecuencias cuan- do ignoramos la experiencia interna de lo Divino y dejamos que nuestro ego y la lujuria dirijan nuestras acciones. El centro de Herodes estaba oscuro, no estaba lleno de lo Divino.

Nuestra experiencia interna de lo Divino nos llevará a hacer lo correcto. Por lo tanto, no hay necesidad de usar juramentos públicos para crecer la reputación de uno. Para aquellos que toman juramentos públicos sin intención de mantener esos juramentos, Dios tendrá que rendir cuentas y la gente los expondrá. “Deje que su” Sí “signifique” Sí “y su” No “signifique” No “. Cualquier otra cosa es del maligno“. (Mt 5:37). Las lecciones del evangelio de hoy, aunque escritas hace miles de años, son claramente actuales en nuestro contexto de hoy. Hemos visto el ascenso del liderazgo autoritario de Trump a través de 15,413 mentiras (Washington Post, 16 de diciembre de 2019) y luego manteniendo la popularidad entre su base al ridiculizar a las perso- nas discapacitadas, inmigrantes y países pobres; burlarse de las mujeres y las personas con acentos no eu- ropeos; humillar a los que no están de acuerdo con él; y exigiendo venganza contra aquellos que ofrecen testimonio contra él. Estas acciones revelan un centro oscuro, no lo Divino. ¿Las personas de fe estarán dispuestas a ser los modernos Juan el Bautista y a decir la verdad, o permitiremos que nuestra reputación se vea manchada por nuestro silencio?

Intercesiónes semanales

¡Enamórate!
P. Pedro Arrupe, SJ, (1907-1991)

Nada puede importar más que encontrar a Dios.
Es decir, enamorarse de Él
de una manera definitiva y absoluta.
Aquello de lo que te enamoras atrapa tu imaginación,
y acaba por ir dejando su huella en todo.
Será lo que decida qué es
lo que te saca de la cama en la mañana,
qué haces con tus atardeceres,
en qué empleas tus fines de semana,
lo que lees, lo que conoces,
lo que rompe tu corazón,
y lo que te sobrecoge de alegría y gratitud.
¡Enamórate! ¡Permanece en el amor!
Todo será de otra manera.

Que nuestra atención hacia los demás se centre en el amor interior de Dios en lugar de condenar a otros por quienes eligen amar.

Que nuestras obras se basen en el servicio a los demás y no en la construcción de nuestro propio poder.

Que nuestras relaciones se llenen de paciencia, amabilidad, perdón, ternura, comprensión, aceptación, humildad y amor.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, February 15, 10am-12pm The Tech Interactive 201 S. Market St. San Jose 95113

TUESDAY, February 18, 6:30-8:30pm, Oddfellows Lodge, 823 Villa St. Mountain View, 94041

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2020 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Salt and Light

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

February 7, 2020

NO MISA  this Sunday!

NO HAY MISA  este domingo!

LATINOS IN ACTION 2020
COMMUNITY ACTION
ACCIÓN COMUNITARIA 

February 8 – 8 de febrero
9 am – 12 pm
14271 Story Rd, San Jose, CA 95127

Register here
Regístrese aquí

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Patty and Miguel share song and witness at the Jerusalem Youth Chorus event at Sacred Heart Parish.  Story, music and poetry bring us together by connecting us to our common humanity — Jew, Palestinian Muslim, Palestinian Christian, Mexican, Chicanx, Black, White, rich, and poor.

Gospel Reflection: Salt and Light

This week’s reflection resumes cycle of Matthew from last week’s departure to Luke’s gospel commemorating the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord. Today’s Gospel reflection, Mt 5:13-16 is the familiar passage naming disciples as salt and light.

Today’s passage is the continuation of the Beatitudes in which Jesus-as-Messiah/Lord imparts the barakot (blessings) upon the people who are living in conditions of emotional distress (c.f., Mt 5:3-4).  The blessing (the entire passage of the Beatitudes) are rooted in the lived condition of the people: that they live in a collective sense of aveilut, meaning “mourning. The community, once a free people, are bound in a system that divides the people from among each other and perpetuates inequity and the loss of religious and political freedom.  The blessing continues calling out the blessing upon those who are meek and who hunger for justice/righteousness (c.f., Mt 5:5-6). These lines thematically connect through the concept of deror, which means free flowing as in the struggle for freedom from Egypt and the Roman Empire and the concept of tzedakah which connects the literal meaning of “freedom” to being charitable to the poor. This would suggest that Jesus acting in the role as a rabbi is declaring that there is blessing (mitzvah) when there is an effort to bring about real freedom through elevating the situation of those who are in economically depressed. The blessing on those of clean heart and who identify as peacemakers serve as a “caution” to those who might escalate “deror” to a level of violence. Change happens because the intentions of our heart is not to elevate ourselves, but rather that we work to be compassionate toward those who suffer, pursue justice (address the causes of suffering), establish equity (establish a just social order) and secure the well-being of the poor (c.f. 5:7-9) Mt. We do this not from any kind of political or spiritual agenda (that our good works are done with the motive to free others, not to gain “points” and enter into heaven). 

Jesus’ commentary on the consequence of selfless mitzvot follows, “Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness…Blessed are you when they insult you and persecute you and utter every kind of evil against you [falsely] because of me….” In short when we work with no other intention than to establish justice/equity and to bring charity (relief) for the poor, the Empire and its surrogates will not only stand in the way, they will focus their opposition on anyone who dares to stand up to the oppressive system. This work, solidly grounded in Jewish ethics, will be met with opposition in every generation.

This brings us now to today’s excerpt of Salt and Light.  This section would make no sense without having the context of the prior verses that establish the “project” of being followers of the rabbi from Nazarene. Those who do this work will be called “salt of the earth.” Most commentators believe that the term refers to the preservative elements of salt. Salt in antiquities was highly prized and was seen as a significant contributing factor for social advancement because of its preservative faculties, it was even used to supplement soldiers’ salaries.  Salted foods sustained communities long after the crop had been harvested and during times of famine. Because salt was such an expensive commodity, salt containers at banquets was a not-so-subtle way to let guests know that the host was wealthy.  Salt was also used by the Empire to “salt the earth” of one’s enemies, that is, by pouring salt into the earth, one renders the soil infertile, making it impossible for the enemy to occupy the land.  The phrase, “salt of the earth” would therefore conjure many of the images afore mentioned in the minds of First Century Common Era people. The following verse that calls upon “light,” gives a proper context to salt.

The phrase, “Light of the World,” would be a reference to Isaiah in which the collective people Israel become a “light” to Gentiles, meaning, God has privileged Israel to lead the world to redemption. By using the phrase of “light,” Jesus-as-Messiah/Lord teaches that through the mitzvot of unselfishly transforming society through alleviating the suffering of marginalized people (mercy) and undoing that which causes suffering while simultaneously creating a system of social and economic equity that secures the well-being of the poor and marginalized (justice), we are leading world to God. Our mitzvot (acts of mercy and justice) are LIGHT itself. Now let us return to the multivalent use of “salt.”  Those who follow Jesus’ way become salt of the earth in that their lives will become extremely valuable in God’s plan when putting this plan put into action. Over time, the territory of the Empire will give way to a new order of mercy and justice and all nations will be transformed. Note that “transformed” does not in any way shape or form mean “converted.”  The theology of “converting” people to a specific denomination cannot be supported by this passage. If anything, this passage challenges the very notion of denominational conversion!  This passage refers to transformation: the transformation of persons from bystanders and victims into pro-active change-agents of justice.

A note on transformation v.s. conversion: Matthew’s gospel ends with the admonition of the Risen Christ saying, “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.” (Mt 28:19-20). A gross misreading of this verse would be to assume that Jesus-as-Messiah/Lord is calling for mass conversions. Popular preachers such as the Reverend Paula White, Donald Trump’s “personal pastor,” (White officially works in the White House in the Office of Public Liaison as a religious adviser) interprets the passage as a call for mass denominational conversion.  She does not see this call as a call for social and economic conversion. White and others who support a narrow, “supercessionist” reading of Christianity, believe that disciples being salt and light refer to the superiority of Christianity over other religions and the unique role that Christianity plays in “making America — and by extension the world — Christian.” White and her followers’ uncritical, literal reading of Sacred Texts has created deep rifts in the faith community.  “Prosperity gospel” and supercessionist preachers have literally demonized faith leaders who minister and advocate for LGBTQ people’s rights in religious expression, work with asylum seekers on the southern border and advocate for just treatment of undocumented immigrants, support low wage workers to secure their rights, march with Black Lives Matters and racial justice activists, and champion climate justice. Such a manipulation of Scripture, whether in ignorance or deliberate misappropriation with the intention of supporting the Empire is antithetical to both Jewish and Christian theologies. In the context of today’s America, we must apply critical thinking with even greater academic rigor and theological scrutiny. How we answer this closing question will tell us who we are as a people of faith and how we see our role in moving forward as a free (or not so free) society.  Who is Salt and Light for you?

<!–


–>
Faith communities are called to be salt and light to a world broken by disparities due to unfair distribution of wealth sustained by economic systems that block the path toward equity and opportunity for the poorest of the poor; forceful acquisition of land and the limited movement of people sustained by inflexible ideologies masquerading as religion and national interest and security; and privilege bestowed upon the ruling caste sustained by ancient racial hatred and religious prejudice. Grupo Solidaridad becomes Salt and Light through inter-religious dialog, accompaniment and political action.

Weekly Intercessions

Let America be America Again, Langston Hughes, 1902-1967

Let America be America again.
Let it be the dream it used to be.
Let it be the pioneer on the plain
Seeking a home where he himself is free.

(America never was America to me.)

Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed—
Let it be that great strong land of love
Where never kings connive nor tyrants scheme
That any man be crushed by one above.

(It never was America to me.)

O, let my land be a land where Liberty
Is crowned with no false patriotic wreath,
But opportunity is real, and life is free,
Equality is in the air we breathe.

(There’s never been equality for me,
Nor freedom in this “homeland of the free.”)

Say, who are you that mumbles in the dark?
And who are you that draws your veil across the stars?

I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart,
I am the Negro bearing slavery’s scars.
I am the red man driven from the land,
I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek—
And finding only the same old stupid plan
Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak.

I am the young man, full of strength and hope,
Tangled in that ancient endless chain
Of profit, power, gain, of grab the land!
Of grab the gold! Of grab the ways of satisfying need!
Of work the men! Of take the pay!
Of owning everything for one’s own greed!

I am the farmer, bondsman to the soil.
I am the worker sold to the machine.
I am the Negro, servant to you all.
I am the people, humble, hungry, mean—
Hungry yet today despite the dream.
Beaten yet today—O, Pioneers!
I am the man who never got ahead,
The poorest worker bartered through the years.

Yet I’m the one who dreamt our basic dream
In the Old World while still a serf of kings,
Who dreamt a dream so strong, so brave, so true,
That even yet its mighty daring sings
In every brick and stone, in every furrow turned
That’s made America the land it has become.
O, I’m the man who sailed those early seas
In search of what I meant to be my home—
For I’m the one who left dark Ireland’s shore,
And Poland’s plain, and England’s grassy lea,
And torn from Black Africa’s strand I came
To build a “homeland of the free.”

The free?

Who said the free? Not me?
Surely not me? The millions on relief today?
The millions shot down when we strike?
The millions who have nothing for our pay?
For all the dreams we’ve dreamed
And all the songs we’ve sung
And all the hopes we’ve held
And all the flags we’ve hung,
The millions who have nothing for our pay—
Except the dream that’s almost dead today.

O, let America be America again—
The land that never has been yet—
And yet must be—the land where every man is free.
The land that’s mine—the poor man’s, Indian’s, Negro’s, ME—
Who made America,
Whose sweat and blood, whose faith and pain,
Whose hand at the foundry, whose plow in the rain,
Must bring back our mighty dream again.

Sure, call me any ugly name you choose—
The steel of freedom does not stain.
From those who live like leeches on the people’s lives,
We must take back our land again,
America!

O, yes,
I say it plain,
America never was America to me,
And yet I swear this oath—
America will be!

Out of the rack and ruin of our gangster death,
The rape and rot of graft, and stealth, and lies,
We, the people, must redeem
The land, the mines, the plants, the rivers.
The mountains and the endless plain—
All, all the stretch of these great green states—
And make America again!

Reflexión del Evangelio: Sal y luz 

La reflexión de esta semana reanuda el ciclo de S Mateo desde la partida de la semana pasada al evangelio de S Lucas que conmemora la Fiesta de la Presentación del Señor. La reflexión del Evangelio de hoy, Mt 5: 13-16 es el pasaje familiar que nombra a los discípulos como Sal y Luz.

El pasaje de hoy es la continuación de las Bienaventuranzas en las cuales Jesús como Mesías / Señor imparte los barakot (las bendiciones) a las personas que viven en condiciones de angustia emocional (cf., Mt 5: 3-4). Las Bienaventuranzas están enraizadas en la condición vivida de las personas: que viven en un sentido colectivo de aveilut, que significa “los dolores”. La comunidad, que una vez fue un pueblo libre, está vinculada a un sistema que divide a las personas entre sí y perpetúa la inequidad y la pérdida de la libertad religiosa y política. La bendición continúa llamando a quienes son mansos y tienen hambre de justicia (cf., Mt 5, 5-6). Estas líneas se conectan temáticamente a través del concepto de “deror” que significa flujo libre como en la lucha por la libertad de Egipto y el Imperio Romano y el concepto de el “tzedaká que conecta el significado literal de “la libertad” a ser caritativo con los pobres. Esto sugeriría que Jesús actuando en el papel de un rabino está declarando que hay una bendición (mitzvá) cuando hay un esfuerzo por lograr una verdadera libertad elevando la situación de aquellos que están económicamente deprimidos. La bendición para aquellos de corazón limpio y que se identifican como violencia. El cambio ocurre porque las intenciones de nuestro corazón no son elevarnos a nosotros mismos, sino que trabajamos para ser compasivos con los que sufren, perseguir la justicia (abordar las causas del sufrimiento), establecer la equidad (establecer un orden social justo) y asegurar el bienestar siendo de los pobres (cf Mt 5: 7-9). No hacemos esto desde ningún tipo de agenda política o espiritual (que nuestras buenas obras se realicen con el motivo de liberar a otros, no de ganar “puntos” y entrar al cielo).

El comentario de Jesús sobre la consecuencia de las mitzvot desinteresadas sigue: “Bienaventurados los que son perseguidos por causa de la justicia … Bienaventurados eres cuando te insultan y te persiguen y pronuncian todo tipo de maldad contra ti [falsamente] por mí …”. En resumen, cuando trabajamos con la única intención de establecer justicia / equidad y brindar caridad (alivio) para los pobres, el Imperio y sus líderes titules no solo se interpondrán en el camino, sino que enfocarán su oposición en cualquiera que se atreva a hacer frente al sistema opresivo. Este trabajo, sólidamente basado en la ética judía, se encontrará con oposición en cada generación.

Esto nos lleva ahora al extracto de Sal y Luz de hoy. Esta sección no tendría sentido sin tener el contexto de los versos anteriores que establecen el “proyecto” de ser seguidores del rabino Nazareno. Los que hacen este trabajo se llamarán “Sal de la Tierra”. La mayoría de los comentaristas creen que el término se refiere a los elementos conservantes de la sal. La sal en las antigüedades era muy apreciada y se consideraba un factor importante para el avance social debido a sus facultades conservar alimentos, incluso se utilizó para complementar los salarios de los soldados. Los alimentos salados mantuvieron a las comunidades con comida después de que cosecha y en tiempos de hambruna. Porque sal era muy caro, los recipientes de sal en los banquetes eran una forma no tan sutil de informar a los invitados que el anfitrión era rico. El Imperio también utilizó la sal para “salar la tierra” de los enemigos, es decir, al verter sal en la tierra, uno vuelve el suelo estéril, haciendo imposible que el enemigo ocupe la tierra. Por lo tanto, la frase “sal de la tierra” conjuraría muchas de las imágenes antes mencionadas en las mentes de las personas de la Era Común del Primer Siglo. El siguiente verso que llama a la “luz”, le da un contexto apropiado a la sal.

La frase, “Luz del Mundo”, sería una referencia a Isaías en la cual el pueblo colectivo Israel se convierte en una “luz” para los gentiles, lo que significa que Dios ha privilegiado a Israel para guiar al mundo a la redención. Al usar la frase de “luz”, Jesús-como-Mesías/Señor enseña eso a través de las mitzvot de transformar desinteresadamente la sociedad aliviando el sufrimiento de las personas marginadas (que es misericordia) y deshaciendo lo que causa sufrimiento mientras simultáneamente crea un sistema social y económico inequidad que asegura el bienestar de los pobres y marginados (que es justicia), estamos guiando al mundo a Dios. Nuestras mitzvot (actos de misericordia y justicia) son la LUZ misma. Ahora volvamos al uso de la “sal”.  Aquellos que siguen el camino de Jesús se convierten en sal de la tierra ya que sus vidas se volverán extremadamente valiosas en el plan de Dios al poner este plan en acción. Con el tiempo, el territorio del Imperio dará paso a un nuevo orden de misericordia y justicia y todas las naciones se transformarán. Tenga en cuenta que “transformado” de ninguna manera significa “convertido”. La teología de “convertir” a las personas a una denominación específica no puede ser justificada por este pasaje. ¡En todo caso, este pasaje desafía la noción misma de conversión denominacional! Este pasaje se refiere a la transformación: la transformación de personas de espectadores y víctimas en agentes de cambio proactivos de la justicia.

Una nota sobre transformación v.s. conversión: el evangelio de S Mateo termina con la amonestación de Cristo resucitado que dice: “Id, por tanto, y haced discípulos a todas las naciones, bautizándolos en el nombre del Padre, y del Hijo, y del Espíritu Santo, enseñándoles a observar todo lo que te he mandado. Y he aquí, yo estoy contigo siempre, hasta el fin de los tiempos. ” (Mt 28: 19-20). Una lectura errónea de este versículo sería suponer que Jesús-como-Mesías/Señor está llamando a conversiones masivas. Predicadores populares como la Reverenda Paula White, el “pastor personal” de Donald Trump (White trabaja oficialmente en la Casa Blanca en la Oficina de Enlace Público como asesor religioso) interpreta el pasaje como un llamado a la conversión denominacional masiva. Ella no ve este llamado como un llamado a la conversión social y económica. White y otros que apoyan una lectura estrecha y “supercesionismo” del cristianismo (que el cristianismo supera o replace al judaísmo), creen que los discípulos son sal y luz se refieren a la superioridad del cristianismo sobre otras religiones y al papel único que desempeña el cristianismo en “hacer de Estados Unidos, y por extensión el mundo, cristiano”. . ” La lectura literal y no crítica de Textos Sagrados de White y sus seguidores ha creado profundas grietas en la comunidad de fe. El “evangelio de la prosperidad” y los predicadores supercesionistas literalmente han demonizado a los líderes religiosos que ministran y abogan por los derechos de las personas LGBTQ en la expresión religiosa, trabajan con los solicitantes de asilo en la frontera sur y abogan por el tratamiento justo de los inmigrantes indocumentados, apoyan a los trabajadores de bajos salarios para garantizar sus derechos, marche con Black Lives Matters y activistas de justicia racial, y defienda la justicia climática. Tal manipulación de la Escritura, ya sea por ignorancia o apropiación indebida deliberada con la intención de promover la agenda imperial, es antitética tanto para las teologías judías como cristianas. En el contexto de la América de hoy, debemos aplicar el pensamiento crítico con un mayor rigor académico y escrutinio teológico. La forma en que respondamos a esta pregunta final nos dirá quiénes somos como personas de fe y cómo vemos nuestro papel en avanzar como una sociedad libre (o no tan libre). ¿Quién es sal y luz para ti?

Intercesiónes semanales

PAZ DESAPARECIDA

Mientras la tierra aún yacía tranquila como en el pecho de su madre,
Y en los ríos corría leche todavía;
Mientras las paredes se agrietaban todavía, incapaces de sostener la
abundancia,
Y había comida que salía de las cuevas en el suelo;
Mientras los manantiales burbujeaban todavía con vino de guayaba
silvestre,
La vida era dulce al paladar.

En aquellos días pacíficos, mientras los muertos aún regresaban,
Y el cielo era tan alto como los tejados;
Mientras el desprecio y el robo eran tan raros como serpiente de la verruga,
Niños feos y groseros, como abortos, aún un presagio;
Mientras serpientes se entregaban para cinturones y cuerdas de abalorios,
La tierra estaba en paz.

No había peleas en los umbrales,
Los pechos de las doncellas eran firmes como espinas,
Sin necesidad de simulación o soporte.
Los jóvenes cazaban leones aún
Con flechas, agudas y romas, y bastones
Para obtener sus recuerdos de amor.

Los piojos pululaban, aun lavando, evento anual
Con las lluvias;
Enclenques y lisiados que difícilmente verías en la tierra.
Hortalizas secas y nueces fritas
Y estofado de fríjoles eran el deleite común.
En casa dormir era tranquilo,
Paz por todas partes.

Los espíritus de los padres fundadores y antepasados aún
salían a la luz;
El adulterio era delito todavía,
Y a los hechiceros los exterminaban aún como alimañas,
Los ladrones podían aún ser atrapados por encantos,
Los hacedores de lluvia podían todavía traer la lluvia y domesticar el rayo,
Duendes y búhos podían enviarse todavía a buscar comida,
Había paz y alegría.

Eddison J. Zvobgo (Zimbabwe, 1935-2004)

Traducción de León Blanco

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

THURSDAY, February 13, 6:30-8:30pm, Sacred Heart Community Service 1381 South First St 95110

SATURDAY, February 15, 10am-12pm The Tech Interactive 201 S. Market St. San Jose 95113

TUESDAY, February 18, 6:30-8:30pm, Oddfellows Lodge, 823 Villa St. Mountain View, 94041

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2020 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: And you yourself a sword will pierce

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

February 1, 2020

MISA del Barrio this Sunday!
February 2
10 am

Come celebrate the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord
2944 Sherbrooke Way, San José, CA 95127

MISA del Barrio este domingo!
2 de febrero
10 am

Ven y celebrar la Fiesta de la Presentación del Señor (Calendária)
2944 Sherbrooke Way, San José, CA 95127

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Gospel Reflection: And you yourself a sword will pierce
This week’s reflection takes a quick departure from the cycle of Matthew because we have the Feast of the Presentation of the Lord. Our Gospel reflection comes from Lk 2:22-40. Next week we will continue our journey with Matthew.

Today’s passage begins with Mary entering the temple after she had been purified according to Jewish law. In the First Century CE commonly interpreted Leviticus 12 to require that Jewish mothers after giving birth, were to observe a a period of “cleansing” which culminated in immersion in a body of water for ritual cleansing. Many focus on the presentation of Jesus in the Temple, but today we will hone in on Mary’s part in the narrative and the issue of her own purification period in which she was, by religious practice, required to be separated from the community. Today’s selection picks up after her return to the community.

As Gentile Christians, we have lost the theological nuance and appreciation of blood. In order for us to better understand the exchange between Mary and the two prophets, Simeon and Anna, we need to understand the importance of blood in Jewish practice and theology.

For Semitic peoples, blood is life. Rooted in Lev. 17:11, 14 and Deut. 12:23, Jews believe that blood means that all life belongs to God and, therefore, humans are forbidden to consume blood and even handle blood itself. A deliberate act of taking another person’s life is one of the gravest of sins because God literally “owns” the blood because blood is the Life Force of God. Just as blood permeates all living beings, so too does God’s own Life Force. To kill another human being is tantamount to taking away something that belonged to God.

Those unfamiliar with this theological sensitivity to blood might ask, “What business is it of the Divine, if all I did was to harm my neighbor?” Such a person does not see the connection that blood is the Life Force of God. People who do not believe that blood belongs to God will be freed to take blood for themselves. Such a person may profess to a religious, pro-life zealot, and have no problem killing another human person. Those who fail to see that God alone “owns” the blood and that God alone reserves the right to demand the prohibition to take life for one’s own benefit, deny God’s what is God’s alone: Life.

History and current events are filled with examples of those who take another’s life to advance their own political, social or economic agendas. Through the course of history, the sovereignty of God in respect to blood gave way to the dominance of men and the justification for spilling blood of others. We therefore are left with Prime Ministers, Saudi princes, American Presidents, pardoned military criminals, ICE officials on the border, and governors and prosecutors in states that issue the death penalty who spill blood for the interest of political gain. Their power and stay in office is tied to “tough on terrorists” “tough on criminals” “tough on our enemies.”

Take a moment to consider what might have been possible in theological development of Jewish thought and subsequent Christian theologians considered the question of blood from the perspective and life experience of women. What insights might we have received were we to have considered blood as life and that women, who are intimately familiar with blood, controlled the conversation? Would our religious narratives be less violent? Would our political ambitions be more tempered? Before we answer these questions, let us look at the development of religious thought in the absence of women’s voices.

In Jewish thought pre-dating the Common Era, menstrual blood of women was linked to the failure of fertility and was interpreted by the ancients as liked with death and sin and some rabbinical commentaries say that menstruation (niddatah)is a punishment for human mortality. The concept of prohibitions against physical contact with menstruating woman were recorded in Leviticus 15:19, 20, 24, and 33. Note that niddatah is etymologically tied to the concept of separation linked to a state of ritual impurity and only later passages (see Lamentations 1:8 and Ezra 9:11 and Chronicles 29:5) it became linked to the concept of sin. Keep in mind that these horrific interpretations surrounding menstruating women, were conditioned by a culture dominated by warrior men and male Torah commentators who themselves were conditioned theologically through a male optic and therefore could not appreciate a female perspective on the sanctity of blood naturally occurring in menstruation and childbirth. It would be difficult to simply dismiss out of hand written Torah and commentaries, but we must recognize the benefit of historical, societal development and theological reflection over time ( “distanciation”) that would render a very different perspective. Many of today’s non-Orthodox Jewish theologians would not necessarily agree with commentators. Judith Antonelli and some women rabbis and women theologians are revisiting the concept of niddatah and raising it up as a positive thing, rather than a shameful separation that it had become under male-dominated religious discourse. Antonelli and other women scholars see bleeding not is not a curse, but rather, as an affirmation of being a part of the natural cycle of life.

Using the lens of these theologians, let us now revisit today’s gospel reading. Today’s reading in which Mary goes to the temple to present her child after she herself has been ritually cleansed occurs within this rather controversial conversation on blood. Joseph and Mary are prescribed to offer a blood sacrifice (to atone for the blood lost at childbirth) of two turtle doves. The elderly Simeon recognized Jesus-as-the Christ and proclaimed that finally after many years of waiting to see the Messiah arrive, he could finally take his eternal rest. Simeon’s ultimate reaction was directed at Mary, “Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted (and you yourself a sword will pierce) so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed.” (Lk2: 34-35) Note the reference to the “rise and fall of many in Israel” and the reference to to the piercing sword. In that verse, Luke hinted at the struggle for Jewish independence. During the time of the composition of Luke’s gospel, the violent destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem had already happened with the forced expulsion of Jewish politicians and cultural figures from the city.

Luke’s Gentile audience may have had some vague appreciation for these historical occurrences, but would not have fully appreciated the nuance of blood references. Simeon’s proclamation hints that for Luke, the rise of Jesus-as-the Christ would not be disconnected from these bloody events and that Mary — as one who stood as a witness to the crucifixion and the Descent of Holy Spirit on the community — was somehow a key player in salvation history.

Recall that Luke’s pre-Nativity narrative included the revolutionary call of Mary (the Magnificat) in which he placed on Mary’s own lips, “He has shown might with his arm, dispersed the arrogant of mind and heart. He has thrown down the rulers from their thrones but lifted up the lowly. The hungry he has filled with good things; the rich he has sent away empty.” (Lk 1:51-53) Luke’s depiction of Mary suggests a rather strong, brilliant, articulate and fierce woman. Luke does not tell us of her interior attitude regarding how she felt about isolation and shame and having to undergo a ritual purity bath. What we can ascertain is that Simeon saw Mary as a fighter, not a submissive figure.

Millenia of poor theology bathed in a male-dominated notion of blood and violence and shaming and controlling women, today’s gospel selection serves as a somber reminder that our religious identity needs a fundamental and foundational balance. Our politics is likewise bathed in violence, blood dust and vengeance. The voice of women must rise above the din and provide leadership in faith and public life.

Weekly Intercessions

“Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou
You may write me down in history
With your bitter, twisted lies,
You may trod me in the very dirt
But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

Does my sassiness upset you?
Why are you beset with gloom?
’Cause I walk like I’ve got oil wells
Pumping in my living room.

Just like moons and like suns,
With the certainty of tides,
Just like hopes springing high,
Still I’ll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?
Bowed head and lowered eyes?
Shoulders falling down like teardrops,
Weakened by my soulful cries?

Does my haughtiness offend you?
Don’t you take it awful hard
’Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines
Diggin’ in my own backyard.

You may shoot me with your words,
You may cut me with your eyes,
You may kill me with your hatefulness,
But still, like air, I’ll rise.

Does my sexiness upset you?
Does it come as a surprise
That I dance like I’ve got diamonds
At the meeting of my thighs?

Out of the huts of history’s shame
I rise
Up from a past that’s rooted in pain
I rise
I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,
Welling and swelling I bear in the tide.

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
I rise
Into a daybreak that’s wondrously clear
I rise
Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
I am the dream and the hope of the slave.
I rise
I rise
I rise.

Reflexión del Evangelio: Y a ti, una espada atravesará el alma
La reflexión de esta semana se aleja del ciclo de S Mateo porque tenemos la Fiesta de la Presentación del Señor. Nuestra reflexión del Evangelio proviene de Lc 2: 22-40. La próxima semana continuaremos nuestro viaje con Mateo.

El pasaje de hoy comienza con María entrando al templo después de haber sido purificada de acuerdo con la ley judía. En el primer siglo EC comúnmente se interpreta que Levítico 12 requiere que las madres judías después de dar a luz, observen un período de “limpieza” que culminó en la inmersión en su cuerpo de agua para la limpieza ritual. Muchos se centran en la presentación de Jesús en el Templo, pero hoy vamos a centrarnos en la parte de María en la narración y el tema de su propio período de purificación en el que, por práctica religiosa, debía separarse de la comunidad. La selección de hoy comienza después de su regreso a la comunidad.

Como cristianos gentiles, hemos perdido los matices teológicos y la apreciación de la sangre. Para que podamos entender mejor el intercambio entre María y los dos profetas, Simeón y Anna, necesitamos comprender la importancia de la sangre en la práctica y la teología judía.

Para los pueblos semíticos, la sangre es vida realmente. Arraigado en Lev. 17:11, 14 y Deut. 12:23, los judíos creen que la sangre significa que toda la vida pertenece a Dios y, por lo tanto, los humanos tienen prohibido consumir sangre e incluso manipularla. Un acto deliberado de quitarle la vida a otra persona es uno de los pecados más graves porque Dios literalmente “posee” la sangre porque la sangre es la Fuerza de la Vida de Dios. Así como la sangre impregna a todos los seres vivos, también lo hace la Fuerza Vital de Dios. Matar a otro ser humano equivale a quitarle algo que perteneció a Dios.

Quienes no estén familiarizados con esta sensibilidad teológica a la sangre podrían preguntarse: “¿Qué asunto tiene la Divinidad, si todo lo que hice fue dañar a mi prójimo?” Las personas que no creen que la sangre pertenece a Dios serán liberadas para tomar sangre por sí mismas. Tal persona puede profesar a un fanático religioso provida, y no tiene problemas para matar a otra persona humana. Aquellos que no ven que solo Dios “posee” la sangre y que solo Dios se reserva el derecho de exigir la prohibición de quitar la vida en beneficio propio, niegan a Dios lo que es solo Dios: la vida.

La historia y los acontecimientos actuales están llenos de ejemplos de quienes se quitan la vida a otros para avanzar en sus propias agendas políticas, sociales o económicas. A lo largo de la historia, la soberanía de Dios con respecto a la sangre dio paso al dominio de los hombres y la justificación para derramar sangre de otros. Por lo tanto, nos quedan los primeros ministros, los príncipes saudíes, los presidentes estadounidenses, los criminales militares indultadas , los funcionarios de ICE en la frontera y los gobernadores y fiscales en los estados que emiten la pena de muerte y derraman sangre por el interés de obtener ganancias políticas. Su poder y permanencia en el cargo está vinculado a “duro con los terroristas” “duro con los delincuentes” “duro con nuestros enemigos”.

Tómese un momento para considerar lo que podría haber sido posible en el desarrollo teológico del pensamiento judío y los subsiguientes teólogos cristianos consideraron la cuestión de la sangre desde la perspectiva y la experiencia de vida de las mujeres. ¿Qué ideas podríamos haber recibido si hubiéramos considerado la sangre como vida yque las mujeres, que están íntimamente familiarizadas con la sangre, controlaran la conversación? ¿Serían nuestras narraciones religiosas menos violentas? ¿Serían nuestras ambiciones políticas más moderadas? Antes de responder a estas preguntas, echemos un vistazo al desarrollo de los religiosos, aunque en ausencia de las voces de las mujeres.

En el pensamiento judío anterior a la Era Común, la sangre menstrual de las mujeres estaba relacionada con el fracaso de la fertilidad y era interpretada por los antiguos como a la que le gustaba la muerte y el pecado, y algunos comentarios rabínicos dicen que la menstruación (niddatah) es un castigo por la mortalidad humana. El concepto de prohibiciones contra el contacto físico con la mujer que menstrúa se registró en Levítico 15:19, 20, 24 y 33. Tenga en cuenta que niddatah está etimológicamente vinculado al concepto de separación vinculado a un estado de impureza ritual y solo pasajes posteriores (ver Lamentaciones 1: 8 y Esdras 9:11 y Crónicas 29: 5) se vinculó con el concepto de pecado. Tenga en cuenta que estas horribles interpretaciones que rodean a las mujeres que menstrúan, estaban condicionadas por una cultura dominada por hombres guerreros y comentaristas masculinos de la Torá, quienes a su vez estaban condicionados teológicamente a través de una óptica masculina y, por lo tanto, no podían apreciar una perspectiva femenina sobre la santidad de la sangre que ocurre naturalmente en la menstruación. y parto. Sería difícil simplemente descartar la Torá y los comentarios escritos a mano, pero también debemos reconocer el beneficio del desarrollo histórico, social y la reflexión teológica a lo largo del tiempo (“distanciamiento”) que brindaría una perspectiva muy diferente. Muchos de los teólogos judíos no ortodoxos de hoy no necesariamente estarían de acuerdo con los comentaristas. Judith Antonelli y algunas mujeres rabinas y teólogas están revisando el concepto de niddatah y planteándolo como algo positivo, en lugar de una vergonzosa separación que se había convertido en un discurso religioso dominado por hombres. Antonelli y otras mujeres estudiosas ven que el sangrado no es una maldición, sino una afirmación de ser parte del ciclo natural de la vida.

Usando la lente de estos teólogos, volvamos ahora a la lectura del evangelio de hoy. La lectura de hoy en la que Maria va al templo para presentar a su hijo después de que ella misma ha sido limpiada ritualmente ocurre dentro de esta conversación sobre sangre bastante controvertida. José y Maria son prescritos para ofrecer un sacrificio de sangre (para expiar la sangre perdida en el parto) de dos tórtolas. El anciano Simeón reconoció a Jesús-como-el Cristo y proclamó que finalmente, después de muchos años de esperar para ver llegar al Mesías, finalmente podría tomar su descanso eterno. La reacción final de Simeón se dirigió a María: “He aquí, este niño está destinado a la caída y el surgimiento de muchos en Israel, y a ser una señal que será contradicho (y tú mismo una espada perforará) para que los pensamientos de muchos corazones puede ser revelado “. (Lc 2: 34-35) Tenga en cuenta la referencia al “ascenso y caída de muchos en Israel” y la referencia a la espada pene- trante. En ese verso, Lucas insinuó la lucha por la independencia judía. Durante el tiempo de la composición del evangelio de Lucas, la destrucción violenta del Templo de Jerusalén ya había sucedido con la ex-pulsión forzada de políticos y figuras culturales judías de la ciudad.

El público gentil de Lucas pudo haber tenido una vaga apreciación por estos acontecimientos históricos, pero no habría apreciado completamente el matiz de las referencias de sangre. La proclamación de Si- meón insinúa que para Lucas, el surgimiento de Jesús-como-el Cristo no se desconectaría de estos eventos sangrientos y que María, como una de las testigos de la crucifixión y el Descenso del Espíritu Santo en la comunidad, fue de alguna manera en la historia de la salvación.

Recordemos que la narración previa a la Natividad incluyó el llamado revolucionario de María (el Magnificat) en el que colocó en los propios labios de María: “Ha demostrado poder con su brazo, dispersó a los arrogantes de mente y corazón. Él ha arrojado a los gobernantes desde sus tronos, pero alzó a los humildes. El hambriento lo ha llenado de cosas buenas; a los ricos los ha enviado vacíos” (Lucas 1: 51-53). La descripción de Lucas de María sugiere una mujer bastante fuerte, brillante, articulada y feroz. Lucas no nos cuenta su actitud interior con respecto a cómo se sentía con respecto al aislamiento y la vergüenza y a tener que someterse a un baño ritual de pureza. Lo que podemos determinar es que Simeón vio a Maria como una luchadora, no una figura sumisa.
Milenios de teología pobre, bañados en una noción de sangre y violencia dominada por los hombres y de avergonzar y controlar a las mujeres, la selección del evangelio de hoy sirve como un sombrío recordatorio de que nuestra identidad religiosa necesita un equilibrio fundamental. Nuestra política también está bañada en violencia, polvo de sangre y venganza. La voz de las mujeres debe elevarse por encima del estruendo y proporcionar liderazgo en la fe y la vida pública.

Intercesiónes semanales
“Y aún así, me levanto,” de Maya Angelou

Tú puedes escribirme en la historia
con tus amargas, torcidas mentiras,
puedes aventarme al fango
y aún así, como el polvo… me levanto.

¿Mi descaro te molesta?
¿Porqué estás ahí quieto, apesadumbrado?
Porque camino
como si fuera dueña de pozos petroleros
bombeando en la sala de mi casa…

Como lunas y como soles,
con la certeza de las mareas,
como las esperanzas brincando alto,
así… yo me levanto.

¿Me quieres ver destrozada?
cabeza agachada y ojos bajos,
hombros caídos como lágrimas,
debilitados por mi llanto desconsolado.

¿Mi arrogancia te ofende?
No lo tomes tan a pecho,
Porque yo río como si tuviera minas de oro excavándose en el mismo patio de mi casa.

Puedes dispararme con tus palabras,
puedes herirme con tus ojos,
puedes matarme con tu odio,
y aún así, como el aire, me levanto.

¿Mi sensualidad te molesta?
¿Surge como una sorpresa
que yo baile como si tuviera diamantes
ahí, donde se encuentran mis muslos?

De las barracas de vergüenza de la historia
yo me levanto
desde el pasado enraizado en dolor
yo me levanto
soy un negro océano, amplio e inquieto,
manando
me extiendo, sobre la marea,
dejando atrás noches de temor, de terror,
me levanto,
a un amanecer maravillosamente claro,
me levanto,
brindado los regalos legados por mis ancestros.
Yo soy el sueño y la esperanza del esclavo.

Me levanto.
Me levanto.
Me levanto.

Traductora desconocida

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

THURSDAY, February 13, 6:30-8:30pm, Sacred Heart Community Service 1381 South First St 95110

SATURDAY, February 15, 10am-12pm The Tech Interactive 201 S. Market St. San Jose 95113

TUESDAY, February 18, 6:30-8:30pm, Oddfellows Lodge, 823 Villa St. Mountain View, 94041

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

LATINOS IN ACTION 2020
COMMUNITY ACTION
ACCIÓN COMUNITARIA 

February 8 – 8 de febrero
9 am – 12 pm
14271 Story Rd, San Jose, CA 95127

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2020 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Jesus Movement and Liberation

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

January 24, 2020

YES MISA at Newman Center
This Sunday!

MISA this Sunday will be
January 26 at 9 am
at the Newman Chapel
on the corner of South 10th and San Carlos

SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman
este domingo!

MISA este domingo
26 de enero a las 9 am
estaré en la capilla de SJSU
la esquina de Calle Sur 10 y S. Carlos

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

A fern frond from Fr. Jon’s garden represents the gradual unfolding of our spiritual life. In this week’s gospel, Jesus calls the first of his disciples together. Living in the present moment rather than perseverating about what that might mean, obsessing about things they need to let go of before following Jesus or fearing what the future might hold, Simon Peter, Andrew, James and John said, “Yes!” to the invitation immediately because they lived in the moment. They did not live in the past, nor were they living for the future. What might our lives become if we were to live our lives as a fern frond: a life that is constantly opening up to the presence of the sun.

Gospel Reflection: The Jesus Movement and Liberation
This week’s reflection on the beginning of the Galilean ministry (Mt. 4:12-22) will provide a socio-historical context for Jesus’ ethics and teachings. Sakari Häkkinen, a South African scholar’s article, “Poverty in the first-century Galilee,” (www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php? script=sci_arttext&pid=S0259-94222016000400046) wrote that most of the population of the Empire lived in extreme poverty in sparsely populated rural areas. 

Sakari Häkkinen, says that most of the population of the empire lived in subsistence conditions in rural areas and small towns. Cities were socially and economically parasitic: they imported all agricultural goods from surrounding villages and imposed taxes and extracted high rents on the people. In return, the poor received religious services and administration.

Wealth in rural areas was based on land ownership in which 1%-3% of the population controlled the land and possessed the wealth. Gentiles directed generosity to the community (buildings and art), not to individuals who needed support. In short, history shows that the trickle-down theory that lauds the good intentions and generosity of the upper class, is nothing but a fairy tale and ruse intended to paint the elite in favorable terms and veil their greed and selfishness.

Rather than helping the poor, the elite urban dwellers who controlled the land, increased the value of land and imposed higher taxes driving many rural inhabitants into debt. Debtors became tenants, were sent into debtors’ prison, and in some cases sold their families into slavery as a way to pay off debts. As rural poor families grew larger, they fell into greater debt because their ancestral land normally reserved for their children, had already been confiscated by the Empire.

The conditions of poverty in the ancient Mediterranean applied also to Galilee. Archeological digs have not surfaced stores or storage buildings for grain, suggest- ing that all products were immediately consumed and not sold. The lack of cash on hand because of rent, taxes, loan remissions with interest left the people with nothing to trade. While poverty was wide spread, poverty was not as important as the public reputation of the family. Worse than losing their money, people lost their honor, and under the Empire’s economic system, it would be impossible to regain what was lost: honor.

People were conditioned to believe that the only way one could get more wealth was to deprive others of their wealth. To become wealthy, then, was seen as sin and greed. The Empire conditioned people to believe that one’s status in life was fixed from birth and that there was no way out of their condition. Given what seems to be a no-win situation it would not be hard to imagine that the socio-historical conditioning of the people had created a collective anxiety. The Jesus movement was born in this context of economic and social oppression.

Galilee, already a hot bed of Jewish Resistance, was ripe for change. The invitation to be “Come after men, and I will make you fishers of men and women,” (see Mt 4:19) is more than merely asking Simon, Andrew, James and John to follow him, he is asking them to renounce the old system run by the elite few at the expense of the rest of humanity and to build a movement of Resistance. The “Jesus Movement” was one of several liberation movements in Galilee. The Jesus Movement was grounded in a Jewish understanding of liberation which was radically different from a Gentile understanding. In Rhetoric 1367:a32 Aristotle said that the “condition of the free man (sic) is that he not live under the constraint of another.”

Drawing from Gentile philosophy, freedom is being free from being indebted to another person whereas liberation and freedom in the Jewish tradition is far more extensive. Rooted in the Exodus narrative, liberation is far more than being freed from their Egyptian oppressors. Liberation is also the interior freedom expressed in joy, serenity and social harmony. As we go forward in our study of Matthew’s gospel we will see that the Jesus Movement is at once grounded in resistance to political and economic oppression as well as social and spiritual oppression.

As we begin to organize our selves and our community politically, we cannot ignore the underlying human emotions of those whom we organize. Like the Jesus Movement, we must pay attention to the spiritual and psychological pains of those who believe that they are in a fixed, no-win situation. We have to make space to hear the narratives of those directly affected by displacement and economic loss. Like Jesus, we are facing the Empire and we must call people forth to be fishers of humanity. Our organizing must integrate creating capacity within the community for their self-determination.

We, therefore, cannot be short sighted about our work. While it is paramount that what happens between now and November 3 is important, we must also prepare our communities to be strong, re- silient, and utterly compassionate for the long run. Our work will not be over in November. Our will indeed continue far into the future.

Weekly Intercessions

“Be Lost in the Call,” Rumi

Lord, said David, since you do not need us, why did you create these two worlds?

Reality replied: O prisoner of time,
I was a secret treasure of kindness and generosity,
and I wished this treasure to be known,
so I created a mirror: its shining face, the heart;
its darkened back, the world;
The back would please you if you’ve never seen the face.

Has anyone ever produced a mirror out of mud and straw?
Yet clean away the mud and straw,
and a mirror might be revealed.

Until the juice ferments a while in the cask,
it isn’t wine. If you wish your heart to be bright, you must do a little work.

My King addressed the soul of my flesh: You return just as you left.
Where are the traces of my gifts?

We know that alchemy transforms copper into gold. This Sun doesn’t want a crown or robe from God’s grace. He is a hat to a hundred bald men,
a covering for ten who were naked.

Jesus sat humbly on the back of an ass, my child! How could a zephyr ride an ass?
Spirit, find your way, in seeking lowness like a stream. Reason, tread the path of selflessness into eternity.

Remember God so much that you are forgotten. Let the caller and the called disappear;
be lost in the Call.

Let us pray for all who dare to take the steps to walk the spiritual path of service, building community, joy, harmony with others, and self sacrifice.

Reflexión del Evangelio: El movimiento de Jesús y la liberación 

La reflexión de esta semana sobre el comienzo del ministerio de Galilea (Mt. 4: 12-22) proporcionará un contexto socio-histórico para la ética y las enseñanzas de Jesús. Sakari Häkkinen, un artículo de un erudi- to sudafricano, “Pobreza en la Galilea del primer siglo” (www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_art- text&pid=S0259-94222016000400046) escribió que la mayoría de la población del Imperio vivía en extrema pobreza en áreas rurales escasamente pobladas.

Sakari Häkkinen dice: La mayoría de la población del imperio vivía en condiciones de subsistencia en áreas rurales y pueblos pequeños. Las ciudades eran social y económicamente parásitas: importaban todos los productos agrícolas de las aldeas vecinas e imponían impuestos y obtenían altas rentas a la gente. A cambio, los pobres recibieron servicios religiosos y administración.

La riqueza en las zonas rurales se basaba en la propiedad de la tierra en la que 1% -3% de la población con- trolaba la tierra y poseía la riqueza. Los gentiles dirigieron la generosidad a la comunidad (edificios y arte), no a las personas que necesitaban apoyo. En resumen, la historia muestra que la teoría de “trickle down” que alaba las buenas intenciones y la generosidad de la clase alta, no es más que un cuento de hadas y un truco destinado a pintar a la élite en términos favorables y velar su codicia y egoísmo.

En lugar de ayudar a los pobres, los habitantes urbanos de élite que controlaban la tierra, aumentaron el valor de la tierra e impusieron impuestos más altos que endeudaron a muchos habitantes rurales. Los deudores se convirtieron en inquilinos, fueron enviados a la prisión de deudores y, en algunos casos, vendieron a sus familias a la esclavitud como una forma de pagar las deudas. A medida que las familias pobres rurales crecieron, se endeudaron más porque sus tierras ancestrales normalmente reservadas para sus hijos, ya habían sido confiscadas por el Imperio.

Las condiciones de pobreza en el antiguo Mediterráneo se aplicaron también a Galilea. Las excavaciones arqueológicas no han aparecido en tiendas o edificios de almacenamiento de granos, lo que sugiere que todos los productos se consumieron inmediatamente y no se vendieron. La falta de efectivo disponible debido a rentas, impuestos, remisiones de préstamos con intereses dejó a las personas sin nada para comerciar. Si bien la pobreza estaba muy extendida, la pobreza no era tan importante como la reputación pública de la familia. Peor que perder su dinero, la gente perdió su honor, y bajo el sistema económico del Imperio, sería imposible recuperar lo que se perdió: el honor.

La gente estaba condicionada a creer que la única forma de obtener más riqueza era privar a otros de su riqueza. Llegar a ser rico, entonces, fue visto como pecado y avaricia. El Imperio condicionó a la gente a creer que el estado de uno en la vida estaba fijado desde el nacimiento y que no había forma de salir de su condición. Dado lo que parece ser una situación de no ganar, no sería difícil imaginar que el condicionamiento socio-histórico de las personas hubiera creado una ansiedad colectiva. El movimiento de Jesús nació en el contexto de esta opresión económica y social.

Galilea, que ya era una cama caliente de resistencia judía, estaba lista para el cambio. La invitación a ser “Vengan tras los hombres, y los haré pescadores de hombres y mujeres” (ver Mt 4:19) es más que simplemente pedirle a Simón, Andrés, Santiago y Juan que lo sigan, les está pidiendo que renuncien. El antiguo sistema dirigido por la élite pocos a expensas del resto de la humanidad y para construir un movimiento de resistencia. El Movimiento de Jesús fue uno de varios movimientos de liberación en Galilea. El Movimiento de Jesús se basó en una comprensión judía de la liberación que era radicalmente diferente de una comprensión gentil. En Retórica 1367: a32 Aristóteles dijo que la “condición del hombre libre es que no viva bajo la restricción de otro”. A partir de la filosofía gentil, la libertad es liberarse de estar en deuda con otra persona, mientras que la libertad en la tradición judía es mucho más extensa.

Arraigado en la narrativa del Éxodo, la liberación es mucho más que liberarse de sus opresores egipcios. La liberación es también la libertad interior expresada en alegría, serenidad y armonía social. A medida que avancemos en nuestro estudio del evangelio de Mateo, veremos que el Movimiento de Jesús se basa a la vez en la resistencia a la opresión política y económica, así como a la opresión social y espiritual.

A medida que comenzamos a organizarnos a nosotros mismos y a nuestra comunidad políticamente, no podemos ignorar las emociones humanas subyacentes de aquellos a quienes organizamos. Al igual que el Movimiento de Jesús, debemos prestar atención a los dolores espirituales y psicológicos de aquellos que creen que están en una situación fija, sin ganar. Tenemos que hacer espacio para escuchar las narraciones de las personas directamente afectadas por el desplazamiento y la pérdida económica. Al igual que Jesús, estamos frente al Imperio y debemos convocar a las personas para que sean pescadores de la humanidad. Nuestra organización debe integrar la creación de capacidad dentro de la comunidad para su autodeterminación. Por lo tanto, no podemos ser miopes sobre nuestro trabajo. Si bien es esencial que lo que ocurra entre ahora y el 3 de noviembre sea importante, también debemos preparar a nuestras comunidades para que sean fuertes, resistentes y completamente compasivas por el plazo largo. Nuestro trabajo no terminará en noviembre. Nuestra voluntad continuará lejos en el futuro.

Intercesiónes semanales
LA PALOMA LIBRE PATROCINIO NAVARRO

Violeta y dorada, en el alba Danza la paloma blanca. Remando va cielo arriba Buscando en su navegar
La fuente de la mañana. Libre, la paloma olvida
Que la tierra es verde y parda En la orilla del juncal
Donde dos ojos aguardan. De plomo son sus entrañas

Sin el alma en el mirar…
Y la sombra verdiparda
Escupe fuego fatal.
La paloma blanca al aire
Tiñó de rojo en su volar,
Y entregó su cuerpo a la sombra De la muerte en el juncal
Con ojos de gris y plomo Y entrañas de mineral.

Y volvió a remar cielo arriba
Sin equipaje mortal.
(Por el aire de otro cielo La palo-
maVivaVa)

Oremos por todos los que se animen a dar los pasos para caminar por el sendero espiritual del servicio, construir comunidad, alegría, armonía con los demás y sacrificio personal.

 

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SATURDAY, January 25, 10am-12pm Casa de Clara 318 N. 6th St. San Jose 95112

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

Marvelyn needs your help!

Marvelyn Maldonado is a beloved member of her community and Grupo Solidaridad. She has devoted her life to service:  as a principal and educator, PACT leader, eucharistic minister and leader at her parish Our Lady of Guadalupe, and social activist. She now needs your help as she is in desperate need of a liver transplant. She is on the wait list, but the list is very long, and she cannot wait much longer. Her doctors have advised her it would be best to find a living donor. This is where you can help:  If you know someone who is age 18 to 55, with a BMI less than 35, and in good health, they may be able to save Marvelyn’s life. Did you know the liver regenerates? Which means you can donate a portion of your healthy liver and it will grow back!  Please consider donating the gift of life to Marvelyn.  Take the first step by following this link: ucliverdonor.org 
 

¡Marvelyn necesita su ayuda!
Marvelyn Maldonado es un miembro querido de su comunidad y del Grupo Solidaridad. Ella ha dedicado su vida al servicio: como directora y educadora, líder de PACT, ministra de eucarística y líder de su parroquia Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe y activista social. Ahora necesita su ayuda ya que necesita desesperadamente un trasplante de hígado. Ella está en la lista de espera, pero la lista es muy larga y no puede esperar mucho más. Sus médicos le han aconsejado que sería mejor encontrar un donante vivo. Aquí es donde puede ayudar: si conoce a alguien de los años18 a 55, con un IMC inferior a 35 y con buena salud, puede salvar la vida de Marvelyn. ¿Sabías que el hígado se regenera? ¡Lo que significa que puede donar una porción de su hígado sano y volverá a crecer! Por favor considere donar el regalo de la vida a Marvelyn. Dé el primer paso siguiendo este enlace: ucliverdonor.org

<!–


–>

Upcoming Events
Próximos Eventos

<!–


–>

LATINOS IN ACTION 2020
COMMUNITY ACTION
ACCION COMUNITARIA

HOLD THE DATE! — Guarda esta fecha
February 8 – 8 de febrero
9 am – 12 pm

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2020 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp