Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Faith and Gratitude

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

October 10, 2019

No MISA this Sunday at Newman Center!
NO MISA this Sunday. 
The next Misa will be Sunday, October 20
at SJSU Newman Center on 9 am
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.
This week Fr. Jon and members of Grupo will be attending a TeachIn and Action in El Paso.
Next mass: October 20

¡NO HAY MISA en Centro Newman!

NO MISA este domingo.
La próxima Misa será el domingo 20 de octubre
en SJSU Newman Center a las 9 am,
esquina de San Carlos y 10th Street
Esta semana el P Jon y los miembros del Grupo asistirán a TeachIn y Acción en El Paso.
La próxima sera 20 de octubre

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Joe Eckert our Jesuit Volunteer from Catholic Charities and Judah from Second Harvest are setting up the first free Community Farmers Market at Our Lady of Refuge.  Each Tuesday families can get a hot meal, pick up groceries, see social workers for a number of issues and be trained to be a volunteer to help others.

Gospel Reflection: Faith and Gratitude

Last week’s selection, Lk 17:5-10 demarcated the interiorization of faith (the process of integrating “faith” into one’s everyday life in attitude and action) from talking about the kingdom of God. The selected gospel passage began with the petition, “Increase our faith,” and concluded with an example of servanthood, “When you have done all you have been commanded, say, ‘We are unprofitable servants; we have done what we were obliged to do.’” (Lk 17:10).  The operational notion of faith is derived from the Jewish definition of emunah.  Last week’s reflection opened up the conversation that faith/emunah is not about the act of believing, but rather living with trust: a trust in God.  Keep in mind that trusting in God is not the same as trusting in what God can provide. Ultimately, faith/emunah is a trust in living in the question rather than having an answer to the question.  Today’s gospel selection is about faith/emnunah and the interior disposition of gratitude.

The gospel selection begins with a statement of geographical location: the borderlands between Samaria and Galilee. This detail is not inconsequential to the story precisely because the location of the action frames the story. In Luke’s version of the narrative of Jesus’ life, Jesus is depicted as a traveling narrative.  Not only is Jesus an itinerate preacher, but the locations chosen by the evangelist Luke provide a context for the dialog taking place along the way.  Today’s selection Lk 17:11-19 is situated through Samaria and Galilee en route to Jerusalem. The borderland between Samaria and Galilee was patchwork of people marginalized by religion (Samaria) and power (Galilee). Jesus-as-the Christ not only ministered to the marginalized, but he ministered to them in their actual location. In today’s selection the most marginalized of society, lepers, called out, “Jesus, Master! Have pity on us!” (Lk 17:13) The location of the action suggests that we pay attention to both the political and economic frameworks as we read the narrative about the lepers.

Galileans and Samaritans shared one thing in common: they were poor.  Samaritans were politically marginalized by religion (they were a religious minority) and Galileans were marginalized by opposition to the religious elite in Jerusalem. The political and economic marginalization of Galileans and Samaritans was not sustained by the Empire imposing its rule over them, but by their own marginalization of one other. In other words, the Empire was able to sustain its hold over populations by manipulating the cultural and religious tensions between groups. The late Brazilian philosopher and porto-liberation theologian, Paulo Freire, said that oppression was not only sustained by external unjust economic and political structures, but also by the interior attitudes acquired from living in an unjust social order.

Freire taught that “consientização” (known as “consientización” in our Resistance theology) is a critical step in achieving both internal and external liberation. He said that the pedagogy of liberation (the process of teaching liberation) is more important that teaching about the political and economic forces that create oppression. Friere taught that consientización, involves four fundamental steps:

  1. All people must come to believe that they are called to become “more human,” that is, to become more liberated in their love for themselves and others. People must know that they are not born to be oppressed, but are born to be loved (emotionally respected, and affirmed in who one is) and respected (to be treated economically and politically as an equal).
  2. That the humanity of the oppressed and the oppressor are inseparably linked to one another. Liberation therefore requires that the oppressed must see that their liberation is linked to their oppressor’s role in oppressing them.  
  3. Through the process of concientización, the oppressed and the oppressors will come to understand their own power and that the use of power does not require oppressing another person.
  4. That the oppressed will achieve true liberation (changing their circumstances of living in an oppressed conditions) when their intentions and actions are consistent with the mutual liberation of both the oppressor and the oppressed.

Lk 17:11-19 shows that marginalization by race, religion, culture and economics prior to leprosy affected the interior attitudes of the lepers. Freire said that the weight of oppressive systems is so heavy that it can penetrate our own way of thinking. We show that we have “internalized” our oppressor when we act unjustly and cruel just the same way as the oppressor acts on us.  In other words, internalizing the oppressor means that we behave the same way the oppressor would have us behave — even if the oppressor is not physically present. Resistance theology teaches us that empires thrive when people behaved in cruel ways toward each other and the Roman Empire, therefore, did not need to deploy an army to control the population because the Galileans and Samaritans oppressed each other.

Today’s gospel passage shows that being cured of leprosy did not cure the lepers from their pre-leprosy attitudes. After healing they merely returning to the unjust social order of racial and religious animosity. The Samaritan (a foreigner) was the only one who returned to express thanks to Jesus-as-the Christ — signaling that the Samaritan’s faith/emunah was interiorized. He went beyond what the Law required. (According to the Torah, those cured of leprosy must show themselves to the priests and be declared, “clean,” so that they could return to their former ways of life). By returning to Jesus-as-the Christ with gratitude,  his faith/emunah exceeded the requirements of the Law illustrating that faith/emunah is ultimately an interior change that ultimately liberates us from an old way of thinking, doing and being and opens us to a world of living in the possibility of change and transformation.

Through faith/emunah we take on the most basic and foundational attitudes: gratitude.  Through a sense graciousness, we stand before God as freed persons.  With gratitude in our hearts, we no longer are bound to the cruelty of the oppressor, we are bound to Graciousness itself. We are bound to God! Thus Jesus-as-the Christ said, “Stand up and go; your faith has saved you.”  Though not included in the Sunday gospel selection, Lk 17:20-21 provides the connection between this narrative of faith/emunah and the kingdom of God.  Recall the kingdom of God for Luke is a total and comprehensive reordering of society in which all are welcomed and power is not arranged hierarchically, but in a fashion that is shared among all, that people are fed, clothed and housed and widows and orphans are cared for. This massive social, economic and political reorganization is not done by fiat, but rather in the heart of each believer and manifested in the public action. Little by little the kingdom of God breaks through our unjust structures and in the Resurrection, the kingdom will be manifested fully among us.  “Asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God would come, he said in reply, ‘The coming of the kingdom of God cannot be observed, and no one will announce, “Look, here it is,” or, “There it is.” For behold, the kingdom of God is among you.’” (Lk 17:20-21) True acts of Resistance, therefore, cannot be born out of hatred of the oppressor, but must be born out of love and gratitude and open to the possibilities ahead.

Weekly Intercessions

This week Trump declared that he would pull American forces out of Syria. Speculations about the motive to withdraw troops included a personal financial/business arrangement between the autocratic president of Turkey Erdoğan and Trump; Trump is merely keeping his campaign promise to end foreign wars; and Trump wanted to promote Russian influence in the area by withdrawing American military influence in exchange for some unknown personal benefit. The decision, regardless of rationale, has left the Middle East in turmoil. US military command was not forewarned and within hours of Trump’s announcement, Turkish and Syrian forces began attacking Kurdish positions leaving Kurds vulnerable to attacks from ISIS fighters. At the moment of writing this Communique, there are reports of many civilian casualties. Seasoned military leaders and staff from diplomatic corps warned Trump of the humanitarian costs and the dangers posed by ISIS. Unfortunately, Trump brushed those concerns aside saying that American troops in Syria are not performing useful work. He said that they are “not fighting” and that they are “just there.” Despite the fact that Kurds fought along side American troops for generations and the decision to withdraw would lead to the annihilation of Kurdish people (including non-combatants), Trump remains unconvinced and unmoved. As invaders in a foreign land, Americans must bear the responsibility for the political and religious unrest caused by our presence based on the “Pottery Barn Rule,” “You broke it, you bought it”) (To be clear, Pottery Barn does not have that rule). The phrase first used by Thomas Friedman and later by Colin Powell to get President George W. Bush to act with more caution in the Iraq war, is still applicable today. US involvement in the Middle East — driven by our century long thirst for petroleum,“broke” the region. “Just War Theory,” used for centuries to measure whether it is justifiable to go to war or not (jus ad bellum), also says a lot about the conditions of when countries are at war (jus in bello). Whether we agree with the concept of a “just war” is not as important as having a conversation about war and a foreign policy that justifies the use of force to extract resources from other people’s land. Emerging political realties have led many ethicists to argue that a third category be included in the Just War Theory: post-war with withdrawal and reconstruction, (“Jus post bellum”). The current debacle and the lack of direction illustrate that we need to have a national conversation based on ethical concerns, not a private phone call.  Let us pray for our troops and the Kurds and all those whose lives they are called to protect.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La Fe y gratitud  

La selección de la semana pasada, Lc 17, 5-10 demarcó la interiorización de la fe (el proceso de integrar la “fe” en la vida cotidiana en actitud y acción) al hablar sobre el reino de Dios. El pasaje seleccionado comenzó con la petición, “Aumenta nuestra fe”, y concluyó con un ejemplo de servicio, “Cuando hayas hecho todo lo que se te ha ordenado, digan: “Somos servidores no rentables; hemos hecho lo que estábamos obligados a hacer “. (Lc 17:10). La idea operativa de fe se deriva de la definición judía de emuná. La reflexión de la semana pasada abrió la conversación de que la fe/emuná no se trata del acto de creer, sino de vivir con confianza: una confianza en Dios. Tenga en cuenta que confiar en Dios no es lo mismo que confiar en lo que Dios puede proporcionar. En última instancia, la fe/emuná es confiar en vivir en la pregunta en lugar de tener una respuesta a la pregunta. La selección del evangelio de hoy trata sobre la fe/emuná y la disposición interior de la gratitud.

La selección del evangelio comienza con una declaración de ubicación geográfica: las tierras fronterizas entre Samaria y Galilea. Este detalle no es intrascendente para la historia precisamente porque la ubicación de la acción enmarca la historia. En la versión de S Lucas de la narrativa de la vida de Jesús, Jesús es representado como una narración itinerante. Jesús no solo es un predicador itinerante, sino que los lugares elegidos por el evangelista S Lucas proporcionan un contexto para el diálogo que tiene lugar en el camino. La selección de hoy Lc 17: 11-19 está situada a través de Samaria y Galilea en el camino hacia a Jerusalén. La frontera entre Samaria y Galilea era un mosaico de personas marginadas por la religión (Samaria) y el poder (Galilea). Jesús-como-el Cristo no solo ministró a los marginados, sino que les ministró en su ubicación real. En la selección de hoy, los leprosos más marginados de la sociedad gritaron: “¡Jesús, Maestro! ¡Ten piedad de nosotros!” (Lucas 17:13) La ubicación de la acción sugiere que prestemos atención a los marcos político y económico al leer la narrativa sobre los leprosos.

Los galileos y los samaritanos tenían una cosa en común: eran pobres. Los samaritanos fueron marginados políticamente por la religión (eran una minoría religiosa) y los galileos fueron marginados por la oposición a la élite religiosa en Jerusalén. La marginación política y económica de los galileos y samaritanos no fue sostenida por el Imperio que les impuso su dominio, sino por su propia marginación mutua. En otras palabras, el Imperio pudo mantener su control sobre las poblaciones manipulando las tensiones culturales y religiosas entre los grupos. El fallecido filósofo brasileño y teólogo de la liberación de Portugal, Paulo Freire, dijo que la opresión no solo estaba sostenida por estructuras económicas y políticas externas injustas, sino también por las actitudes interiores adquiridas de vivir en un orden social injusto.

Freire enseñó que la “consientização” (conocida como “consientización” en nuestra teología de la resistencia) es un paso crítico para lograr la liberación tanto interna como externa. Dijo que la pedagogía de la liberación (el proceso de enseñar la liberación) es más importante que enseñar sobre las fuerzas políticas y económicas que crean la opresión. Friere enseñó que la consientización implica cuatro pasos fundamentales:

  1. Todas las personas deben llegar a creer que están llamadas a volverse “más humanas”, es decir, a liberarse más en su amor por sí mismas y por los demás. Las personas deben saber que no nacen para ser oprimidas, sino que nacen para ser amadas (emocionalmente respetadas y afirmadas en quién es) y respetadas (para ser tratadas económica y políticamente como iguales).
  2. Que la humanidad de los oprimidos y los opresores están inseparablemente unidos entre sí. Por lo tanto, la liberación requiere que los oprimidos vean que su liberación está vinculada al papel de su opresor en su opresión.
  3. A través del proceso de concientización, los oprimidos y los opresores llegarán a comprender su propio poder y que el uso del poder no requiere oprimir a otra persona.
  4. Que los oprimidos lograrán la verdadera liberación (cambiando sus circunstancias de vivir en condiciones oprimidas) cuando sus intenciones y acciones sean consistentes con la liberación mutua tanto del opresor como del oprimido.

Lc 17: 11-19 muestra que la marginación por raza, religión, cultura y economía antes de la lepra afectó las actitudes interiores de los leprosos. Freire dijo que el peso de los sistemas opresivos es tan pesado que puede penetrar nuestra propia forma de pensar. Demostramos que hemos “internalizado” (integrando) a nuestro opresor cuando actuamos injustamente y cruelmente de la misma manera que el opresor actúa sobre nosotros. En otras palabras, internalizar al opresor significa que nos comportamos de la misma manera que el opresor nos haría comportarnos, incluso si el opresor no está físicamente presente. La teología de la resistencia nos enseña que los imperios prosperan cuando las personas se comportan de manera cruel entre sí y el Imperio Romano, por lo tanto, no necesita desplegar un ejército para controlar a la población porque los galileos y los samaritanos se oprimían entre sí.

El pasaje del Evangelio de hoy muestra que ser curado de la lepra no curaba a los leprosos de sus actitudes previas a la lepra. Después de la curación, simplemente volvieron al orden social injusto de la animosidad racial y religiosa. El samaritano (un extranjero) fue el único que regresó para expresar su agradecimiento a Jesús-como-el Cristo, lo que indica que la fe/emuná del samaritano fue interiorizada. Él fue más allá de lo que la Ley requería. (Según la Torá, los curados de lepra deben mostrarse a los sacerdotes y ser declarados “limpios” para que puedan regresar a sus antiguas formas de vida). Al regresar a Jesús-como-el Cristo con gratitud, su fe/emuná excedió los requisitos de la Ley que ilustra que la fe/emuná es, en última instancia, un cambio interior que finalmente nos libera de una antigua forma de pensar, hacer y ser y nos abre a un mundo de vida en la posibilidad de cambio y transformación.

A través de la fe/emuná tomamos las actitudes más básicas y fundamentales: la gratitud. A través de la gracia de los sentidos, estamos ante Dios como personas liberadas. Con gratitud en nuestros corazones, ya no estamos atados a la crueldad del opresor, estamos atados a la gracia misma. Estamos atados a Dios! Así, Jesús-como-el Cristo dijo: “Levántate y vete; tu fe te ha salvado ”. Aunque no está incluido en la selección del evangelio dominical, Lc 17: 20-21 proporciona la conexión entre esta narración de fe/emuná y el reino de Dios. Recordemos que el reino de Dios para S Lucas es un reordenamiento total y completo de la sociedad en el que todos son bienvenidos y el poder no se organiza jerárquicamente, sino de una manera que se comparte y cooperan entre todos, que las personas son alimentadas, vestidas y alojadas y las viudas y los huérfanos reciban cuidado y cariño. Esta reorganización social, económica y política masiva no se realiza por mandato sino más bien en el corazón de cada creyente y se manifiesta en la acción pública. Poco a poco, el reino de Dios se abre paso a través de nuestras estructuras injustas y en la Resurrección, el reino se manifestará plenamente entre nosotros. “Cuando los fariseos le preguntaron cuándo vendría el reino de Dios, él respondió:” La venida del reino de Dios no se puede observar, y nadie anunciará: “Mira, aquí está” o “Ahí está”. . “Pues he aquí, el reino de Dios está entre ustedes”. (Lc 17: 20-21) Los verdaderos actos de resistencia, por lo tanto, no pueden nacer del odio al opresor, sino que deben nacer del amor, la gratitud y abierto a las posibilidades por el camino delante.

Intercesiónes semanales

Esta semana, Trump declaró que sacaría a las fuerzas estadounidenses de Siria. Las especulaciones sobre el motivo para retirar las tropas incluyeron un acuerdo financiero/comercial personal entre el presidente autocrático de Turquía, Erdogan y Trump; Trump simplemente está cumpliendo su promesa de campaña de poner fin a las guerras extranjeras; y Trump quería promover la influencia rusa en el área retirando la influencia militar estadounidense a cambio de algún beneficio personal desconocido. La decisión, independientemente de la justificación, ha dejado a Oriente Medio en crisis. El comando militar de EE. UU. No fue advertido y, a las pocas horas del anuncio de Trump, las fuerzas turcas y sirias comenzaron a atacar posiciones kurdas, dejando a los kurdos vulnerables a los ataques de los combatientes del ISIS. En el momento de escribir el Communique, hay informes de muchas víctimas civiles. Líderes militares experimentados y personal del cuerpo diplomático advirtieron a Trump sobre los costos humanitarios y los peligros que representa ISIS. Desafortunadamente, Trump dejó de lado esas preocupaciones y dijo que las tropas estadounidenses en Siria no están realizando un trabajo útil. Dijo que “no están luchando” y que están “allí” nada más. A pesar de que los kurdos lucharon junto a las tropas estadounidenses durante generaciones y la decisión de retirarse conduciría a la aniquilación de los kurdos (incluidos los no combatientes), Trump permanece poco convencido e impasible. Como invasores en una tierra extranjera, los estadounidenses deben asumir la responsabilidad de los disturbios políticos y religiosos causados ​​por nuestra presencia en base a la “Regla de Pottery Barn”, “Lo rompiste, lo compraste”) (Para ser claros, Pottery Barn no tiene esa regla). La frase utilizada por primera vez por Thomas Friedman y luego por Colin Powell para lograr que el presidente George W. Bush actúe con más precaución en la guerra de Irak, todavía es aplicable hoy. La participación de Estados Unidos en el Medio Oriente, impulsada por nuestra sed de petróleo durante un siglo, “rompió” la región. La “teoría de la guerra justa”, utilizada durante siglos para medir si es justificable ir a la guerra o no (jus ad bellum), también dice mucho sobre las condiciones de cuando los países están en guerra (jus in bello). Si estamos de acuerdo con el concepto de una “guerra justa” no es tan importante como tener una conversación sobre la guerra y una política exterior que justifique el uso de la fuerza para extraer recursos de la tierra de otras personas. Las realidades políticas emergentes han llevado a muchos especialistas en ética a argumentar que se incluya una tercera categoría en la teoría de la guerra justa: posguerra con retirada y reconstrucción (“Jus post bellum“). La debacle actual y la falta de un plan ilustran que necesitamos tener una conversación nacional basada en preocupaciones éticas, no una llamada telefónica privada. Oremos por nuestras tropas y los kurdos y todos aquellos cuyas vidas están llamadas a proteger.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

FRIDAY, October 18, 6-8pm, Sunnyvale Community Services, 725 Kifer Rd, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

<!–


–>

El Grupo Solidaridad va a unirse para ofrecer apoyo a las personas con necesidades por servicios sociales y por la defensa de la justicia social en el 15 de octubre a las 7 pm en la Parroquia Nuestra Señora de Refugio.
¡Todos son bienvenidos!

Grupo Solidaridad Support Group for social service needs and social justice advocacy will hold their first meeting on October 15 at 7 pm at Our Lady of Refuge. All are welcome!

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

NO MISA on October 13

No habrá misa el 13 de octubre

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Faith

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

October 3, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, October 6 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.
Fr. Jon and members of Grupo will be attending a Teach-In and Action in El Paso on Oct 11-13.
There will not be a Misa that weekend.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!

6 de octubre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.
P. Jon y los miembros del Grupo asistirán a una Taller y Acción en El Paso del 11 al 13 de octubre.
No habrá una Misa ese fin de semana.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The second group training for accompaniment ministry with Catholic Charities “Parish Engagement Pilot at Our Lady of Refuge.” Those who complete training will accompany those who come to the parish for assistance or will participate in Group Solidaridad’s support group at the parish.

Gospel Reflection: Faith
Last week’s parable, “Lazarus and the Rich Man,” (Lk 16:19-31) illustrated the point that we will be judged by how we choose to use our wealth. The parable juxtaposed the lived reality of the rich man and the poor beggar, Lazarus. The parable was recast from an ancient Jewish parable (which in turn was taken from an Egyptian parable) to address the Gentile converts whose attitudes about class distinction and social interaction with marginalized persons was conditioned by Greco-Roman ambivalence to the poor. Gentile candidates for discipleship needed to break from the Empire and embrace the kingdom of God. The ethics of social responsibility in that parable were indeed rooted in Jewish social and spiritual ethics. The Gospel of Luke portrays Jesus-as- the Christ as a fierce champion of social equity and radical inclusion. Today’s selection begins with a “saying of faith” (“…If you have faith the size of a mustard seed, you would say to [this] mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it would obey you.’” (Lk 17:6) and concludes with a commentary on the attitude a disciple must assume, “When you have done all you have been commanded, say, ‘We are unprofitable servants; we have done what we were obliged to do.’” (Lk 17:10). Today’s passage marks a shift from teaching about the kingdom of God (i.e., showing the difference between the Empire and Kingdom and the social dimensions of discipleship) to a series of sayings and parables that speak to the internalization of that teaching and the role that faith will play in that process.

In mainline Jewish thought, “faith” means “trust,” rather than subscribing to specific doctrinal propositions. The word, “emunah” is translated, “faith.” It means an innate conviction that transcends evidence and reason; however, understanding, wisdom and knowledge enhance emunah, but can never substitute for it. The first time emunah was used in the Torah was in connection to Abraham when God repeatedly promised Abraham land. For Abraham, emunah was not in the “belief” that God existed, that God made promises of land, that God has the power to deliver these promises, or that God can be relied on to keep those promises. Rather, emunah was the ACTION Abraham took in response to what God said. Emunah is the manifested the inner-reality of trusting God.

In Jewish theology emunah is embedded in our being; like a pre-conscious disposition that prompts us to say, “Yes!” without asking for the rationale behind the request. Let us turn to another to 20th Century Catholic theologian, Karl Rahner, to look at “faith” another way.

Rahner used the term, “supernatural existential” as a way to describe the disposition of “Yes!” He described an a priori element that is within all human beings that makes it possible for humans to reach out to the Infinite and receive Grace. This condition orients human beings — regardless of doctrinal affiliation/ideology or self-identification as a “believer,” — to experience ourselves as transcendent subjects, meaning that all human beings who are subject to socio-historical conditioning have the capacity to imagine themselves as being “free” from being non-existent upon our physical death. Whether we “believe” in what happens to us or to the universe after death is irrelevant. What is relevant is that constitutive to our being human is our ability to trust and act without having verifiable evidence.

Now, let us return to the opening line of the gospel passage with the apostles saying, “Increase our faith.” (Lk 17:5) and to Jesus’ response about faith the size of a mustard seed. The apostle’s emunah will not grow because they have secret knowledge because emunah cannot be possessed! Emunah can only be manifested in actions that correspond to trust. Using the example of servants who do what they are told and their masters who trust that when they snap their fingers, servants will obey them, Luke showed his audience that even the apostles — those charged with handing down the teachings of Jesus-as-the Christ — struggled with emunah. All those who wish to become disciples of Jesus-as-the Christ must internalize how they will act in the kingdom of God. Emunah requires that disciples must assume an attitude of humble service.

Within the context of Resistance theology, faith cannot be used as a doctrinal measuring stick to determine who is saved and who is condemned, a political mace to force others to bend to our will, or camouflage for hypocrisy that allows us to commit unspeakable acts under a thin veil of religiosity and condemn others while absolving ourselves of those same actions. Throughout history Christians have traded faith for power by trusting in the power of the Empire more than God and in each case Christians lost respect and relevancy not from others, but from members of their own churches. Today we see Church leaders including Cardinals and Archbishops and leading evangelical leaders who bilked billions from the faithful to build their own bank accounts and abused vulnerable persons. If Christians today relate to the masters, “Prepare something for me to eat. Put on your apron and wait on me while I eat and drink. You may eat and drink when I am finished…” and ignore our faith that calls us to identify as “…unprofitable servants…” (Lk 17:10) then it is just a matter of time that the Church will be relegated as a footnote in the annals of history as a experiment in faith that had a good run, but was not able to be sustain itself because it never increased faith.

Weekly Intercessions

Last week Fr. James Martin, SJ, met with Pope Francis to speak about his ministry to LGBTQ Catholics. Fr. Martin spoke with the Pope for 30 minutes in between meetings the Pope had with bishops who were in Rome for their ad liminal pilgrimage to Rome. Fr. Martin said that Pope Francis was an “incredibly attentive listener” who asked him many questions and he was left with the impression that the Pope clearly cares for LGBTQ people. Martin, author of “Building a Bridge: How the Catholic Church and the LGBT Community Can Enter into a Relationship of Respect, Compassion, and Sensitivity,” faced harsh criticism from some Church leaders and laity who claim that Fr. Martin was trying to change Church teaching on homosexuality. Fr. Martin vigorously denied those claims saying that his book was based on the Pope’s call that Catholics should be listening to LGBTQ folks rather than condemning them. Echoing the Pope’s teaching on listening, Fr. Martin says the Church is called to provide pastoral care, not a closed door. Following his meeting with the Pope, Fr. Martin said, “What I brought to him were the experiences of LGBT Catholics whom I’ve met, their joys and hopes, their struggles and challenges, their experiences as a way of giving them a voice with the pope.” Fr. Martin relayed the hopes and dreams of tens of thousands of pastoral leaders in the Catholic Church who want the Church to be a place that welcomes LGBTQ people as one would welcome every other Catholic. He says the Church should be “…a place where they don’t feel like they’re lepers… where they don’t have to wonder how they’re going to be treated when they come in, and a place where they are welcomed, because they are baptized Catholics and it’s their church, too.” Sadly, not every priest, chancery official, lay minister, or Bishop got the memo on the gospel call to welcome, love and embrace all people. Those who minister to the LGBTQ community report that they are harassed by “well-meaning” members of diocesan curia who caution pastors against using the phrase, “All are welcome” and who include LGBTQ persons as members of parish leadership. Fr. Martin’s visit to the Holy Father may not unwind the legacy of homo and transphobia in the Church, but it is a start to what hopefully will become a church-wide conversation. Let us pray for Fr. Martin and all those who courageously minister to the LGBTQ+ Catholics marginalized by ignorance, fear and hatred.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La Fe  
La parábola de la semana pasada, “Lázaro y el Hombre Rico” (Lucas 16: 19-31), ilustra el punto en que ser- emos juzgados por cómo elegimos usar nuestra riqueza. La parábola yuxtapuso la realidad vivida del hom- bre rico y el Lázaro. La parábola fue refundida de una antigua parábola judía (que a su vez fue tomada de una parábola egipcia) para abordar a los conversos gentiles cuyas actitudes sobre la distinción de clase y la interacción social con las personas marginadas estaban condicionadas por la ambivalencia grecorromana hacia los pobres. Los candidatos gentiles para el discipulado necesitaban separarse del Imperio y abrazar el reino de Dios. La ética de la responsabilidad social en esa parábola estaba enraizada en la ética social y espiritual judía. El Evangelio de Lucas retrata a Jesús-como-el Cristo como un campeón noble de equidad social e inclusión radical. La selección de hoy comienza con un “dicho de fe” (“… Si tienes fe del tamaño de una semilla de mostaza, le dirías a [este] árbol de morera: ‘Sé desarraigado d y plantado en el mar, ‘y te obedecería’”. (Lc 17: 6) y concluye con un comentario sobre la actitud que un discípulo debe asumir: “Cuando hayas hecho todo lo que se te ha mandado, di: ‘Nosotros son servidores no rentables; hemos hecho lo que estábamos obligados a hacer “. (Lc 17:10). El pasaje de hoy marca un cambio de la enseñanza sobre el reino de Dios (es decir, que muestra la diferencia entre el Imperio y el Reino y las dimensiones sociales del discipulado) a una serie de dichos y parábolas que hablan de la internalización de esa enseñanza y el papel que desempeña la fe tomará en ese proceso.

En el pensamiento judío principal, “fe” significa “confianza” y no de suscribirse a proposiciones doctrinales específicas. La palabra “emuná” se traduce como “fe”. Significa una convicción innata que trasciende la evidencia y la razón; sin embargo, la comprensión, la sabiduría y el conocimiento mejoran la emuná, pero nunca pueden sustituirla. La primera vez que se usó la emuná en la Torá fue en conexión con Abraham cuando Dios le prometió repetidamente la tierra a Abraham. Para Abraham, emuná no estaba en la “creencia” de que Dios existía, que Dios hizo promesas de tierra, que Dios tiene el poder de cumplir estas promesas, o que se puede confiar en Dios para cumplir esas promesas. Más bien, emuná fue la ACCIÓN que Abraham tomó en respuesta a lo que Dios dijo. Emuná es la realidad interna manifestada de confiar en Dios.

En la teología judía, la inmunidad está integrada totalmente en nuestro ser; como una disposición preconsciente que nos impulsa a decir: “¡Sí!” sin preguntar la razón detrás de la solicitud. Pasemos a otro teólogo católico del siglo XX, Karl Rahner, para ver la “fe” de otra manera.

Rahner usó el término “existencial sobrenatural” como una forma de describir la disposición de “¡Sí!” Describió un elemento a priori que está dentro de todos los seres humanos que hace posible que los humanos lleguen al Infinito y reciban la gracia de Dios. Esta condición orienta a los seres humanos, independientemente de su afiliación doctrinal / ideología o auto-identificación como un “creyente”, a experimentarnos como sujetos trascendentes, lo que significa que todos los seres humanos que están sujetos a condicionamientos socio-históricos tienen la capacidad de imaginarse a sí mismos como ser “libre” de no existir en nuestra muerte física. Si creemos en lo que nos sucede a nosotros o al universo después de la muerte es irrelevante. Lo relevante es que lo constitutivo de nuestro ser humano es nuestra capacidad de confiar y actuar sin tener evidencia verificable.

Ahora, regresemos a la línea de apertura del pasaje del evangelio con los apóstoles diciendo: “Aumenta nuestra fe” (Lc 17, 5) y a la respuesta de Jesús acerca de la fe del tamaño de una semilla de mostaza. ¡La emuná del apóstol no crecerá porque tienen conocimiento secreto porque la emuná no puede ser poseída! Emuná solo se puede manifestar en acciones que corresponden a la confianza. Utilizando el ejemplo de los sirvientes que hacen lo que se les dice y sus amos que confían en que cuando chasquean los dedos, los sirvientes los obedecerán, S Lucas mostró a su audiencia que incluso los apóstoles, los encargados de transmitir las enseñanzas de Jesús-como-el Cristo luchó con la emuná. Todos aquellos que deseen convertirse en discípulos de Jesús-como-el Cristo deben internalizar cómo actuarán en el reino de Dios. Emuná requiere que los discípulos asuman una actitud de servicio humilde.

Dentro del contexto de la teología de la Resistencia, la fe no puede usarse como un instrumento de medición doctrinal para determinar quién es salvo y quién es condenado, una maza política para obligar a otros a doblegarse a nuestra voluntad, o camuflarnos por la hipocresía que nos permite cometer actos indescriptibles bajo un delgado velo de religiosidad y condenar a otros mientras nos absolvemos de esas mismas acciones. A lo largo de la historia, los cristianos han cambiado la fe por el poder al confiar en el poder del Imperio más que en Dios y en cada caso los cristianos perdieron el respeto y la relevancia no de los demás, sino de los miembros de sus propias iglesias. Hoy vemos líderes de la Iglesia, incluidos cardenales y arzobispos, y líderes evangélicos protestantes líderes que saquearon miles de millones de los fieles para construir sus propias cuentas bancarias y abusaron de personas vulnerables. Si los cristianos de hoy se relacionan con los maestros, “…prepara algo para que yo coma. Ponte el delantal y espérame mientras como y bebo. Puedes comer y beber cuando haya terminado”… e ignorar nuestra fe que nos llama a identificarnos como “… siervos no rentables…” (Lc 17:10), entonces es solo cuestión de tiempo que la Iglesia sea relegada como una nota al pie en los anales de la historia como un experimento de fe que tuvo una buena racha, pero que no pudo sostenerse porque nunca aumentó la fe.

Intercesiónes semanales

La semana pasada el P. James Martin, SJ, se reunió con el Papa Francisco para hablar sobre su ministerio a los católi- cos LGBTQ. El P. Martin habló con el Papa durante 30 minutos entre reuniones que el Papa tuvo con obispos que estaban en Roma para su peregrinación ad limina a Roma. El P. Martin dijo que el Papa Francisco era un “oyente in- creíblemente atento” que le hizo muchas preguntas y se quedó con la impresión de que el Papa claramente se preocupa por las personas LGBTQ. Martin, autor de “Construyendo un puente: cómo la Iglesia católica y la comunidad LGBT pueden entrar en una relación de respeto, compasión y sensibilidad”, enfrentó duras críticas de algunos líderes y laicos de la Iglesia que afirman que el P. Martin estaba tratando de cambiar la enseñanza de la Iglesia sobre la homosexualidad. El P. Martin negó enérgicamente esas afirmaciones diciendo que su libro estaba basado en el llamado del Papa de que los católicos deberían escuchar a las personas LGBTQ en lugar de condenarlas. Haciéndose eco de la enseñanza del Papa sobre la importancia de escuchar, el P. Martin dice que la Iglesia está llamada a ofrecer cuidado pastoral, no una puerta cerrada. Después de su reunión con el Papa, el P. Martin dijo: “Lo que le traje fueron las experiencias de los católicos LGBT a quienes conocí, sus alegrías y esperanzas, sus luchas y desafíos, sus experiencias como una forma de darles una voz con el Papa”. Martin transmitió las esperanzas y los sueños de decenas de miles de líderes pastorales en la Iglesia Católica que desean que la Iglesia sea un lugar que acoja a las personas LGBTQ como uno recibiría a todos los demás católicos. Él dice que la Iglesia debería ser “… un lugar donde no se sientan leprosos … donde no tengan que preguntarse cómo van a ser tratados cuando entren, y un lugar donde sean recibidos , porque son católicos bautizados y también es su iglesia ”. Lamentablemente, no todos los sacerdotes, funcionarios de cancillería, ministros laicos u obispos recibieron el memorando sobre el llamado del evangelio para dar la bienvenida, amar y abrazar a todas las personas. Aquellos que ministran a la comunidad LGBTQ informan que son acosados por miembros “bien intencionados” de la curia diocesana que advierten a los pastores contra el uso de la frase, “Todos son bienvenidos” y que incluyen a personas LGBTQ como miembros del liderazgo de la parroquia. La visita de Martin al Santo Padre no puede deshacer el legado de homo y transfobia en la Iglesia, pero es un comienzo de lo que, con suerte, se convertirá en una conversación en toda la iglesia. Oremos por el P. Martin y todos aquellos que valientemente ministran a los católicos LGBTQ + marginados por la ignorancia, el miedo y el odio.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

MONDAY, October 7, 7:00pm in a private home in West San Jose, register for address and details

FRIDAY, October 18, 6-8pm, Sunnyvale Community Services, 725 Kifer Rd, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

El Grupo Solidaridad va a unirse para ofrecer apoyo a las personas con necesidades por servicios sociales y por la defensa de la justicia social en el 15 de octubre a las 7 pm en la Parroquia Nuestra Señora de Refugio.
¡Todos son bienvenidos!

Grupo Solidaridad Support Group for social service needs and social justice advocacy will hold their first meeting on October 15 at 7 pm at Our Lady of Refuge. All are welcome!

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

NO MISA on October 13

No habrá misa el 13 de octubre

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  The Abyss between the Rich and the Poor in the Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

September 26, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, September 29 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!

29 de septiembre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Fr. Pat Murphy, CS, from Casa del Migrante in Tijuana shared his experience and insight from woking with refugees and migrants speaks with staff of community agencies and the County at Catholic Charities. The US policy of staying in Mexico to process asylum claims has created social and economic chaos. For those already traumatized by having to flee from violence and certain death, Trump’s asylum policy is especially cruel.

Gospel Reflection: The Abyss between the Rich and the Poor in the Parable of Lazarus and the Rich Man
Last week’s passage from Lk 16:1-13 that provided us with a way to see how Luke wanted his community to act ad extra (how members ought to relate to the world around them). The parable about the “Dishonest Steward” (Lk 16:1-8) began the passage and verses 9-13 provided an application of the parable concluding with the adage, “No servant can serve two masters. He will either hate one and love the other, or be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.” (Lk 16:13). Last week and this week’s passage underscore the gospel writer Luke’s critique about wealth: that wealth must always be placed at the service of the community — especially the marginalized and must vulnerable among us, rather than be at the disposal of one person’s self-interest. Today’s parable of “Lazarus and the Rich Man” is a wonderfully scripted exchange between Abraham and a dead rich man. The set up to the dialog illustrates the point that we will be judged by how we choose to use our wealth.

The parable juxtaposes the lived reality of the rich man (who was “…dressed in purple garments and fine linen and dined sumptuously each day…”) and Lazarus who was covered with sores and licked by dogs and who was so hungry he would have been happy to eat even the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table. The opening of parable touches on a common reality in the Greco-Roman world in which an uncrossable abyss existed between the elite and the teeming masses of the poor. Luke cast the parable in a Jewish setting (note the references to Torah and the Prophets) which confused those who heard parables with anti-Jewish ears. A superficial reading of the parable might lead the unsophisticated reader to believe that the parable was a critique against Jews rather than as a critique on economic inequality and the treatment of the poor.

Some older traditional commentators suggested that the target of the parable was the Pharisees.  The Pharisees did not care enough for the poor because they were more interested in money and thus, Pharisees who had access to Torah and the Prophets, did very little to alleviate human suffering. (c.f. the last 3 lines of the parable: “They have Moses and the prophets. Let them listen to them.’ He said, ‘Oh no, father Abraham, but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.’Then Abraham said, ‘If they will not listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded if someone should rise from the dead.’” Lk 16:29-31) Taking that position is highly problematic because it plays into anti-Semitic tropes that Jews are only interested in money and not the well-being of the poor.

If one ignores the social location of Luke’s audience and the economic realities at play in every day life, one can never fully grasp the power of the parable . Luke’s audience were Gentile converts who were not exposed to Pharisees. Secondly Pharisees like Jesus, associated with the underclass and they were hyper-critical of wealthy Jews who did not treat the poor with kindness and compassion. Luke’s task of converting his community required the gospel writer to break through the mindset of potential converts who had been conditioned by the Greco-Roman ambivalence to the poor. In short, Luke’s audience was inured to the care and concern of the poor and vulnerable precisely because of their social location and they had to understand that discipleship required a radical shift in the ethics of wealth.  The parable shows that the rich man’s proto-libertarian perspective of not having any obligation to care for Lazarus was not only wrong, but heretical. Disciples must not only be kind and compassionate to the poor, they must also work to liberate them from the darkness of an unjust economic system that has created the abyss between the elite and the teeming population of Lazarus.

Income inequality in the Bay Area is among the nation’s highest.  Families at the highest levels of income make 10 times the salaries of those on the bottom. According to a February 18, 2018 story in the Mercury News, families in the 95th percentile in Santa Clara County made $428,729 in 2016 whereas those in the 20th percentile made only $40,807.  Earnings in the top income bracket increased by $60,686 whereas income in the lower brackets saw an increase of $1,726. Note that the data is from the years PRIOR to the 2018 Trump tax bill that transferred an unprecedented amount of money toward the highest income earners fueling deeper deficits. Like the parable, we live in a “gaping gully” between the elite rich and the vast numbers of poor people in our Valley.   Nearly a third of households in the Valley have to rely on some form of assistance and more than 10% of Valley residents lack access to nutritionally adequate food. Today in the Valley, The 2019 Silicon Vally Index reports that home prices have soared even higher than before where the median home price is $1.8 million! Only 8% of newly approved residential units in the Valley are affordable to those who earn less than 80% of the area.  There are indeed many Lazarus’ in our midst…we have been silent during the rise of inequality saying, “The bubble will burst.” “I have my house, if they work hard enough, they too will have a house.”  “They must have done something to keep them homeless.” When we saw our neighbors leave because they could no longer afford to live here and when our children’s friends began to show up at dinner time because they had nothing to eat at home we said, “Let us pray for those less fortunate.”  “Something needs to be done, but I’m not an expert.”  “This is too complicated for me to get involved.”  When they tried to build affordable housing in our neighborhood we said, “Not in my backyard! They will bring down my property values!” When we couldn’t pay our property tax and were forced to sell our house and move out and when we had no food in the fridge, we said, “Who will help me now?” “What could I have done?”  In the Valley of the rich man and Lazarus we must speak up, speak out, show up and mobilize. 

Weekly Intercessions

As the Communique is going to distribution, we found out that Trump not only used his office and Congressional-approved funding to strong-arm another country to collaborate with him to get “political dirt” on one of his political rivals, he also tried to cover up his crimes. To date of writing the Communique, none of the members of the GOP caucus in the House or Senate have stood up to condemn these actions. Instead, they have questioned the integrity and patriotism of the whistleblower who brought the matter to Congressional attention and accused those pushing for investigations of lying and political grandstanding. The evidence of crimes and ethical breaches from the White House mounts each hour as more people are coming forward to offer evidence of malfeasance and the abuse of the office and as formerly classified reports become declassified. Congressional support for impeachment investigations reached a majority and thus we are going to be facing another impeachment process.  Many people say that impeachment will “divide the country.”  The reality is that we are already divided.  Trump’s rise to power came at a time of social, religious, spiritual and economic change.  These changes — good and bad, have bred resentment. Though Trump himself is very wealthy and spends his time his wealthy friends, he has learned to capture the resentment and unease of those who feel that they have been “left behind” by the national changes. Tapping into the resentment from those who do not like racial and ethnic presence in public life and for those who oppose linguistic accommodations and legalization of immigrant, Trump echoes anger over gender equality and the rise of women in public spaces. His “dog whistle” language” signals he supports those who are angry at the social advancement of LGBTQ and non-white people and his anti-immigrant rhetoric and cruel action at the border bolstered by unsubstantiated claims of national security and economic threats, lets people know he is all for  “white rule.” Trump takes all that resentment and wraps it in the flag. Words and actions over these past 2 years have shown that we are already divided. The impeachment process will merely expose the motive behind the division. Let us pray for our country as we begin the process of impeachment, that we will place the common good and the country above self-interest, political tribalism, and party.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:  El Abismo entre los Ricos y los Pobres en la Parábola de Lázaro y el Hombre Rico
El pasaje de la semana pasada de Lc 16: 1-13 que nos brindó una manera de ver cómo el evangelista S Lucas quería que su comunidad actuara de manera adicional (cómo los miembros deberían relacionarse con el mundo que los rodea). La parábola sobre el “Mayordomo Deshonesto” (Lc 16: 1-8) comenzó el pasaje y los versículos 9-13 proporcionaron una aplicación de la parábola que concluía con el adagio: “Ningún siervo puede servir a dos señores. Odiará a uno y amará al otro, o se dedicará a uno y despreciará al otro. No puedes servir a Dios y a Mamón.” (Lc 16:13). La semana pasada y el pasaje de esta semana subrayan la crítica del evangelista S Lucas sobre la riqueza: esa riqueza siempre debe ponerse al servicio de la comunidad, especialmente los marginados y vulnerables entre nosotros, en lugar de estar a disposición del interés personal de una persona. La parábola de hoy de “Lázaro y el hombre rico” es un intercambio maravillosamente escrito entre Abram y un hombre rico muerto. La configuración del diálogo ilustra el punto de que seremos juzgados por cómo elegimos usar nuestra riqueza.

La parábola yuxtapone la realidad vivida del hombre rico (que estaba “… vestido con prendas moradas y lino fino y cenó suntuosamente cada día …”) y Lázaro, que estaba cubierto de llagas y lamido por perros y que tenía tanta hambre que habría estado hambriento feliz de comer incluso las sobras que cayeron de la mesa del rico. La apertura de la parábola toca una realidad común en el mundo grecorromano en el que existía un abismo incontenible entre la élite y las inmensas masas de pobres. Lucas lanzó la parábola en un entorno judío (tenga en cuenta las referencias a la Torá y los Profetas) que confundió a aquellos que escucharon parábolas con oídos anti-judíos. Una interpretación superficial de la parábola podría llevar al lector poco sofisticado a creer que la parábola fue una crítica contra los judíos en lugar de una crítica sobre la desigualdad económica y el tratamiento de los pobres.

Algunos comentaristas tradicionales más antiguos sugirieron que el objetivo de la parábola eran de criticar a los fariseos. Los fariseos no se preocupaban lo suficiente por los pobres porque estaban más interesados ​​en el dinero y, por lo tanto, los fariseos que tenían acceso a la Torá y los profetas, hicieron muy poco para aliviar el sufrimiento humano. (cf las últimas 3 líneas de la parábola: “Tienen a Moisés y a los profetas. Déjelos escucharlos”. Él dijo: “Oh, no, padre Abraham, pero si alguien de entre los muertos va a ellos, se arrepentirán”. Entonces Abraham dijo: ‘Si no escucharán a Moisés y a los profetas, tampoco serán persuadidos si alguien resucita de entre los muertos'”. Lucas 16: 29-31) Tomar esa posición es muy problemático porque influye los prejuicios y tropes anti-semíticos de que los judíos solo están interesados ​​en el dinero y no en el bienestar de los pobres.

Si uno ignora la ubicación social de la audiencia de S Lucas y las realidades económicas en juego en la vida cotidiana, uno nunca puede comprender completamente el poder de la parábola. La audiencia de S Lucas eran conversos gentiles que no estaban expuestos a los fariseos. En segundo lugar, fariseos y Jesús, eran asociados con la clase baja y eran hipercríticos con los judíos ricos que no trataban a los pobres con amabilidad y compasión. La tarea de S Lucas de convertir a su comunidad requería que el escritor del evangelio rompiera la mentalidad de los potenciales conversos que habían sido condicionados por la ambivalencia grecorromana hacia los pobres. En resumen, la audiencia de S Lucas estaba acostumbrada al cuidado y la preocupación de los pobres y vulnerables precisamente por su ubicación social y tenían que entender que el discipulado requería un cambio radical en la ética de la riqueza. La parábola muestra que la perspectiva proto-libertaria del hombre rico de no tener ninguna obligación de cuidar a Lázaro no solo era errónea, sino herética. Los discípulos no solo deben ser amables y compasivos con los pobres, sino que también deben trabajar para liberarlos de la oscuridad de un sistema económico injusto que ha creado el abismo entre la élite y la población masiva de Lázaro.

La desigualdad de ingresos en el Área de la Bahía se encuentra entre las más altas del país. Las familias en los niveles más altos de ingresos ganan 10 veces los salarios de los de abajo. Según una historia del 18 de febrero de 2018 en Mercury News, las familias en el percentil 95 en el condado de Santa Clara ganaron $428,729 en 2016, mientras que las del percentil 20 ganaron solo $40,807. Las ganancias en el segmento de ingresos más altos aumentaron en $ 60,686, mientras que los ingresos en los niveles más bajos registraron un aumento de $ 1,726. Tenga en cuenta que los datos son de los años ANTES de la factura de impuestos de Trump de 2018 que transfirió una cantidad de dinero sin precedentes hacia las personas y corporaciones con mayores ingresos que alimentan déficits más profundos. Al igual que la parábola, vivimos en un “barranco abierto” entre los ricos de élite y la gran cantidad de personas pobres en nuestro Valle. Casi un tercio de los hogares en el Valle tienen que depender de algún tipo de asistencia y más del 10% de los residentes del Valle carecen de acceso a alimentos nutricionalmente adecuados. Hoy en el Valle, el Índice Silicon Vally 2019 informa que los precios de las viviendas se han disparado aún más que antes, donde el precio promedio de la vivienda es de $ 1.8 millones. Solo el 8% de las unidades residenciales recientemente aprobadas en el Valle son asequibles para aquellos que ganan menos del 80% del área. De hecho, hay muchos Lázaros entre nosotros … hemos estado en silencio durante el aumento de la desigualdad diciendo: “La burbuja estallará”. “Tengo mi casa, si trabajan lo suficiente, ellos también tendrán una casa” debe haber hecho algo para mantenerlos sin hogar”. Cuando vimos a nuestros vecinos salir por otros partes porque ya no podían permitirse el lujo de vivir aquí y cuando los amigos de nuestros hijos comenzaron a aparecer a la hora de la cena porque no tenían nada para comer en casa, dijimos: “Dejemos que oremos por los pobrecitos”. “Hay que hacer algo, pero no soy un experto”. “Esto es demasiado complicado para involucrarme”.  Cuando intentaron construir viviendas asequibles en nuestro vecindario, dijimos:” ¡No en mi vecindario! ¡Bajarán los valores de mi propiedad! “Cuando no pudimos pagar nuestro impuesto a la propiedad y nos vimos obligados a vender nuestra casa y mudarnos y cuando no teníamos comida en el refrigerador, dijimos:” ¿Quién me ayudará ahora?” “¿Qué podría haber hecho?” En el Valle del hombre rico y los Lázaros debemos hablar, comprometernos en acción y movilizarse.

Intercesiónes semanales

A medida que el Communique se distribuirá, descubrimos que Trump no solo usó su oficina y fondos aprobados por el Congreso para fortalecer a otro país para colaborar con él para obtener “suciedad política” en uno de sus rivales políticos, sino que también trató de encubrir sus crímenes. Hasta la fecha de redacción del Communique, ninguno de los miembros del grupo republicano en la Cámara de Representantes o el Senado se ha levantado para condenar estas acciones. En cambio, han cuestionado la integridad y el patriotismo del denunciante que trajo el asunto a la atención del Congreso y acusó a quienes presionan para que se investiguen las mentiras y la soberbia política. La evidencia de crímenes y violaciones éticas de la Casa Blanca aumenta cada hora a medida que más personas se presentan para ofrecer evidencia de malversación y abuso de la oficina y cuando los informes previamente clasificados se desclasifican. El apoyo del Congreso para las investigaciones de juicio político llegó a una mayoría y, por lo tanto, enfrentaremos otro proceso de juicio político. Mucha gente dice que el juicio político “dividirá al país”. La realidad es que ya estamos divididos. El ascenso de Trump al poder se produjo en un momento de cambio social, religioso, espiritual y económico. Estos cambios, buenos y malos, han generado resentimiento. Aunque Trump es muy rico y pasa su tiempo con sus amigos ricos, ha aprendido a capturar el resentimiento y la inquietud de aquellos que sienten que los cambios nacionales los han “dejado atrás”. Aprovechando el resentimiento de aquellos a quienes no les gusta la presencia racial y étnica en la vida pública y para aquellos que se oponen a las adaptaciones lingüísticas y la legalización de los inmigrantes, Trump se hace eco de la ira por la igualdad de género y el ascenso de las mujeres en los espacios públicos. Su lenguaje de “silbato de perro” indica que apoya a aquellos que están enojados por el avance social de las personas LGBTQ y no-blancas y su retórica anti-inmigrante y sus acciónes crueles en la frontera reforzada por reclamos no fundamentados de seguridad nacional y amenazas económicas, permite a las personas que él es un nacionalista blanca. Trump toma todo ese resentimiento y lo envuelve en la bandera de rojo, blanco y azul. Las palabras y acciones en los últimos 2 años han demostrado que ya estamos divididos. El proceso de juicio político simplemente expondrá el motivo detrás de la división. Oremos por nuestro país al comenzar el proceso de “impeachment”, para que coloquemos el bien común y el país por encima del interés propio, el tribalismo político y el partido.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

MONDAY, October 7, 7:00pm in a private home in West San Jose, register for address and details

FRIDAY, October 18, 6-8pm, Sunnyvale Community Services, 725 Kifer Rd, Sunnyvale, CA 94086

SUNDAY, October 27, 2-4pm, Stone Church, 1108 Clark Way, San Jose, CA 95125

You must register to attend.  Click here:  https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform
 

OPPORTUNITIES TO GET INVOLVED ABOUT THE CRISIS ON THE BORDER:

PILGRIMAGE TO EL PASO OCTOBER 11-13 and PRESENTATIONS FROM CASA DEL MIGRANTE, TIJUANA

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Mammon and Emoluments

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

September 19, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, September 22 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!

22 de septiembre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Protesters prepare to greet Trump at his Silicon Valley with the infamous “Baby Trump” balloon. Protesters demanded the reunion of families separated at the border, an end to concentration camps and his impeachment.

Gospel Reflection: 
Mammon and Emoluments

Last week we read the 15th chapter of Luke, focusing mostly on the parable of the Prodigal Son. The parable, read through the socio-historical and critical lens of Resistance Theology, pointed toward the Church as a collective reality, rather than a pious reflection on an individual’s relationship to the merciful father. The parable recast the Jewish teaching of t’shuva, reconciliation. T’shuva is not a private process between an individual and God, but a communal process in which the community plays an active role in mending broken relationships. Luke’s gospel teaches that the community (circle of disciples) plays an active role in the process of reconciliation and therefore the community itself must be in a constant state of renewal and rebirth. A community that dies to the individualism and materialism of the Empire and is reborn in the generosity of  God’s love, will always welcome the sinner. A reborn community does not shun people or make people feel miserable about themselves. Taking the role of the father the Prodigal Son, the community runs with open arms to the lost son and covers his son with kisses before the son could even say, “I am sorry, I no longer deserve to be called your son. Treat me as a hired hand.” Whereas last week’s parable addressed how the community ought to behave an intra (how members relate to one another), today’s parable from Lk 16:1-8 and the application of the parable Lk 8-13 provides us with a way to see how Luke wanted his community to act ad extra (how members ought to relate to the world around them).  

The parable Lk 16:1-8  is based on an unsympathetic character. The steward has no moral compass other than his own self-interest and facing the mostly likely possibility of being fired and poor, the steward finds himself at wits end. The parable describes his solution: realizing his inevitable fall from the good graces of his boss, he pardoned the debt of his master’s debtors in the hopes that he would be rewarded with a place to stay. The master did not reprimand the steward, but applauded him for “acting prudently.” Such an ending to the parable is indeed unsettling.  Is the lesson to be learned that lying to one’s master and then gaming the system in order to gain personal benefit okay? No! We must read the parable alongside the explanation. Lk 16:9-13 (known as “The Application of the Parable.”) Verses 9-13 provide the context in which to properly understand the parable. Let us now unpack the application.

Neither the master nor his dishonest protégé cared about the fate of the debtors, they were only concerned about the money! The master benefited from the debt owed to him from his multiple debtors. The Empire is sustained by a system of debt (see Communiques 10ii2019, 25vii2019 for commentaries on the role that debt played in the life of the people) and the master’s steward capitalized on debt collection rather than opposing it because the steward found a way to work the system in his favor. The master, not motivated by justice, but by money, saw that his steward was prudent because the steward was motivated by the principle of the Empire that money can justify all actions, including embezzlement, settling debts below what is owed to the master, and ingratiating himself to those whose debts are owned to the master for his own benefit and not his master’s.

Jesus’ initial remarks lifted the difference between the community of disciples “children of light” and the Empire “children of the world” saying, “…the children of this world are more prudent in dealing with their own generation than are the children of light.” (Lk 16:8).  The saying, “…make friends for yourselves with dishonest wealth,” is not an invitation to become like the dishonest steward and act out of self-interest and material gain, but rather become intimately aware (friendship) that wealth acquired dishonestly will inevitably fail. The community of disciples will be rewarded with eternal “dwellings.”  (The term, “dwellings,” suggests a tent which suggests that the community should never aspire to earthly “castles,” that is permanent, luxurious living in the world. By embracing humble conditions associated with living in a tent, disciples learn that the most valuable commodity is not a thing of the world, but God. The explanation concludes, “No servant can serve two masters. He will either hate one and love the other, or be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.” (Lk 16:13)

Let us now re-read this parable in light of our socio-historical context. Today’s political arena surpasses even the corruption of the Harding administration’s Teapot Dome scandal of 1921 in which President Harding and secretary of the Interior Albert Bacon Fall leased Navy petroleum reserves at Teapot Dome in Wyoming and two locations in California to private oil companies without competitive bidding. (Harding’s corruption was so deep that Congress passed a law giving themselves subpoena power to review tax records of any US citizen without regard to elected or appointed position nor subject to presidential interference. In light of the brazen conflicts of interest with Trump (i.e., Military spending at Turnberry, stays at Trump-owned hotels by elected officials and foreign dignitaries, an Indonesian project, a project in Moscow, the exemption of tariffs on Ivanka’s products from China, the funding of Independence Day celebrations, the curious funding of the Inauguration Balls, and loans to Kushner companies), we recognize that the lure of mammon and ill-gotten wealth is indeed the thing that greases the levers, pulleys, and gears of the Empire. The children of the light do not operate in the same was as children of the world, yet the community of disciples cannot resort to the same tactics as those whom they investigate. May those who choose to resist the Empire become intimately familiar with dishonest wealth so that when wealth fails the Empire, Trump, and those who have placed their trust in mammon, the children of light will consoled by the memory that they were  motivated by doing the right thing and not because of revenge directed against a political enemy.

Weekly Intercessions

This past week Trump visited the Bay Area, a goldmine for politicians in one of the wealthiest enclaves in Silicon Valley. While on his fundraising tour, Trump made several comments about homelessness that were very troubling for those who work with the unhoused population.  Trump said that homelessness is destroying cities and have ruined the “prestige” of living in Los Angeles and San Francisco. The president ominously said, “We’re looking at it (the crisis of unhoused persons living in cities)…and we’ll be doing something about it.”  Administration officials, according to the New York Times, have proposed razing tent camps and putting people into temporary facilities and “refurbishing government facilities.”  Trump’s record of solving crisis situations, primarily how he dealt with the he border crisis by creating concentration camps has unhoused persons and their allies deeply worried.

Homelessness cannot be treated like a nuisance in which individuals are culpable for the lack of having a place to live.  Homelessness is a symptom of a deeply flawed economic system. Studies as far back as 2001 from the Public Policy Institute  indicated that California will experience a serious climb in homelessness because housing costs are too high.  A UCLA study in 2018 concurred the economic gap between household income and housing costs is, among other factors, the main reason why homelessness is such a problem in California. A recent study in Boston showed that homelessness among families rises when there is a drop in housing availability and a UCSF study says that mental health problems are often the consequence, not the cause of homelessness.  When cities in the Bay Area, including here in Santa Clara County, have approached homelessness as a “nuisance,” the problems get worse. Nuisance ordinances and policies make being homelessness unlawful and they give cities the ability to penalize those who feed unhoused persons in public areas. Some policies make it easy for landlords to evict tenants and allow them to refuse to renew leases which force more people onto the street.  Let us pray for unhoused leaders and their allies that they may find the strength to stand up against the ignorance and prejudice that have led to the proliferation of inhumane anti-homelessness laws that result in the deaths of many unhoused persons.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:
Mammon y el gaje

La semana pasada leímos el capítulo 15 de Lucas, enfocándonos principalmente en la parábola del Hijo Pródigo. La parábola, leída a través de la lente sociohistórica y crítica de la Teología de la Resistencia, señalaba a la Iglesia como una realidad colectiva, en lugar de una reflexión piadosa sobre la relación de un individuo con el padre misericordioso. La parábola reformula la enseñanza judía de t’shuva, la reconciliación. T’shuva no es un proceso privado entre un individuo y Dios, sino un proceso comunitario en el que la comunidad desempeña un papel activo en la reparación de las relaciones rotas. El evangelio de Lucas enseña que la comunidad (círculo de discípulos) desempeña un papel activo en el proceso de reconciliación y, por lo tanto, la comunidad misma debe estar en un estado constante de renovación y renacimiento. Una comunidad que muere por el individualismo y el materialismo del Imperio y renace en la generosidad del amor de Dios, siempre dará la bienvenida al pecador. Una comunidad renacida no evita a las personas ni las hace sentir miserables consigo mismas. Tomando el papel del padre, el hijo pródigo, la comunidad corre con los brazos abiertos hacia el hijo perdido y lo cubre con besos antes de que el hijo pudiera decir: “Lo siento, ya no merezco que me llamen hijo”. Tráteme como una mano contratada ”. Mientras que la parábola de la semana pasada abordó cómo la comunidad debería comportarse de manera intra (cómo los miembros se relacionan entre sí), la parábola de hoy de Lc 16: 1-8 y la aplicación de la parábola Lk 8-13 proporciona con una manera de ver cómo Luke quería que su comunidad actuara de manera adicional (cómo los miembros deberían relacionarse con el mundo que los rodea).

La parábola Lc 16: 1-8 se basa en un carácter antipático. El mayordomo no tiene otra brújula moral que no sea su propio interés personal y ante la posibilidad más probable de ser despedido y pobre, el mayordomo se encuentra en el extremo del ingenio. La parábola describe su solución: al darse cuenta de su inevitable caída de las buenas gracias de su jefe, perdonó la deuda de los deudores de su amo con la esperanza de ser recompensado con un lugar para quedarse. El maestro no reprendió al mayordomo, pero lo aplaudió por “actuar con prudencia”. Tal final de la parábola es realmente inquietante. ¿Se puede aprender la lección de que mentirle al maestro y luego jugar con el sistema para obtener un beneficio personal está bien? ¡No! Debemos leer la parábola junto con la explicación. Lc 16: 9-13 (conocido como “La aplicación de la parábola”). Los versículos 9-13 proporcionan el contexto en el que se debe entender la parábola de manera adecuada. Vamos a descomprimir ahora la aplicación.

Ni el maestro ni su deshonesto protegido se preocuparon por el destino de los deudores, ¡solo les preocupaba el dinero! El maestro se benefició de la deuda que le tenían sus múltiples deudores. El Imperio está sostenido por un sistema de deuda (ver Comunicados 10ii2019, 25vii2019 para comentarios sobre el papel que jugó la deuda en la vida de las personas) y el administrador del maestro capitalizó el cobro de deudas en lugar de oponerse a él porque el administrador encontró una manera de trabajar El sistema a su favor. El maestro, no motivado por la justicia, sino por el dinero, vio que su mayordomo era prudente porque el mayordomo estaba motivado por el principio del Imperio de que el dinero puede justificar todas las acciones, incluida la malversación de fondos, la liquidación de deudas por debajo de lo que se le debe al maestro, y felicitándose a quienes tienen deudas con el maestro para su propio beneficio y no para el de él.

Los comentarios iniciales de Jesús levantaron la diferencia entre la comunidad de discípulos “hijos de la luz” y los “hijos del mundo” del Imperio, diciendo: “… los niños de este mundo son más prudentes al tratar con su propia generación que los hijos de la luz”. . ”(Lc 16: 8). El dicho, “… hazte amigos con una riqueza deshonesta”, no es una invitación a ser como el mayordomo deshonesto y actuar por interés propio y ganancia material, sino más bien tomar conciencia íntima (amistad) de que la riqueza adquirida deshonestamente inevitablemente fracasará . La comunidad de discípulos será recompensada con “viviendas” eternas. (El término “viviendas” sugiere una tienda de campaña que sugiere que la comunidad nunca debe aspirar a “castillos” terrenales, que es una vida permanente y lujosa en el mundo. En condiciones humildes asociadas con vivir en una tienda de campaña, los discípulos aprenden que el bien más valioso no es una cosa del mundo, sino Dios. La explicación concluye: “Ningún siervo puede servir a dos señores. Odiará a uno y amará al otro, o dedicarse a uno y despreciar al otro. No puedes servir a Dios y a Mamón. ”(Lc 16:13)

Volvamos a leer esta parábola a la luz de nuestro contexto sociohistórico. La arena política de hoy supera incluso la corrupción del escándalo Teapot Dome de la administración Harding de 1921 en el que el presidente Harding y el secretario del Interior Albert Bacon Fall alquilaron reservas de petróleo de la Armada en Teapot Dome en Wyoming y dos ubicaciones en California a compañías petroleras privadas sin licitación competitiva. (La corrupción de Harding fue tan profunda que el Congreso aprobó una ley que se otorga a sí misma el poder de citación para revisar los registros de impuestos de cualquier ciudadano estadounidense sin tener en cuenta el cargo elegido o designado ni sujeto a interferencia presidencial. A la luz de los descarados conflictos de intereses con Trump gasto en Turnberry, estadías en hoteles propiedad de Trump por funcionarios electos y dignatarios extranjeros, un proyecto indonesio, un proyecto en Moscú, la exención de aranceles sobre los productos de Ivanka desde China, la financiación de las celebraciones del Día de la Independencia, la curiosa financiación de las Bolas de Inauguración y préstamos a las compañías Kushner), reconocemos que el atractivo de Mammon y la riqueza maltratada es lo que engrasa las palancas, poleas y engranajes del Imperio. Los hijos de la luz no operan de la misma manera. niños del mundo, sin embargo, la comunidad de discípulos no puede recurrir a las mismas tácticas que aquellos a quienes investigan. Muy familiarizado con la riqueza deshonesta, de modo que cuando la riqueza falla el Imperio, Trump y aquellos que han depositado su confianza en Mammon, los hijos de la luz se sentirán consolados por el recuerdo de que estaban motivados por hacer lo correcto y no por la venganza dirigida contra Un enemigo político.

Intercesiónes semanales

La semana pasada, Trump visitó el Área de la Bahía, una “mina de oro” para los políticos en uno de los vencendarios más ricos de Silicon Valley. Durante su tour a recordar fondos, Trump comento sobre la falta de vivienda que asusto los que trabajan con la población sin hogares. Trump dijo que la falta de vivienda está destruyendo ciudades y ha arruinado el “prestigio” de vivir en Los Ángeles y San Francisco. Trump dijo siniestramente: “Lo estamos viendo (la crisis de las personas sin hogar que viven en las ciudades) … y haremos algo al respecto”. La administración, según el New York Times, han propuesto arrasar campamentos y tiendas de campaña y poner a las personas en instalaciones temporales y “renovar las instalaciones del gobierno”. Trump demostró su incapacidad a resolver situaciones de crisis, principalmente cuando el construyó campos de concentración. Con razón muchas personas tiene duda que Trump puede resolver la situación justamente.

La falta de vivienda no puede tratarse como una molestia publica en la que las personas son culpables por la falta de un lugar para vivir. La falta de vivienda es un síntoma de un sistema económico profundamente defectuoso. Estudios desde 2001 del Public Policy Institute indicaron que California experimentará una escalada grave en la falta de vivienda porque los costos de la vivienda son demasiado altos. Un estudio de la UCLA en 2018 coincidió en que la brecha económica entre los ingresos del hogar y los costos de la vivienda es, entre otros factores, la razón principal por la cual la falta de vivienda es un problema en California. Un estudio reciente en Boston mostró que la falta de vivienda entre las familias aumenta cuando hay una disminución en la disponibilidad de viviendas y un estudio de UCSF dice que los problemas de salud mental son a menudo la consecuencia, no la causa de la falta de vivienda. Cuando las ciudades en el Área de la Bahía, incluso aquí en el Condado de Santa Clara, han abordado la falta de vivienda como una “molestia”, los problemas empeoran. Las políticas hacen ilegal la falta de vivienda y les dan a las ciudades la posibilidad de castigar a quienes alimentan a personas sin vivienda en áreas públicas. Algunas políticas facilitan que los propietarios desalojen a los inquilinos y les permiten negarse a renovar los contratos de arrendamiento que obligan a más personas a salir a la calle. Oremos por los líderes sin hogares y sus aliados para que puedan encontrar la fuerza para resistir la ignorancia y los prejuicios que han llevado a la proliferación de leyes inhumanas contra las personas sin hogar que resultan en la muerte de muchas personas sin vivienda.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SABADO SATURDAY, September 21, 10am-12pm 2665 Marine Way #1120 Mountain View (Unite Here office)

You must register to attend. Click here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd_TBGuV7PEA_VQUi9wc8O7aSK9O6Bw29MIS-LEA5gy-8MuVA/viewform?c=0&w=1

OPPORTUNITIES TO GET INVOLVED ABOUT THE CRISIS ON THE BORDER:

PILGRIMAGE TO EL PASO OCTOBER 11-13 and PRESENTATIONS FROM CASA DEL MIGRANTE, TIJUANA

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Prodigal Parable

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

September 13, 2019

YES! MISA at Newman Center!
Sunday, September 15 at 9 am,
corner of San Carlos and 10th Street.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman!

15 de septiembre a las 9 am
en la esquina de S Carlos y calle 10.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The Fiesta of the “Despedida de San Jeronimo y Padre Jesús” in a small ranch in Milpitas wove together religious images, ritual, processions and music with the Eucharist last weekend. These fiestas reaffirm our cultural and religious roots and identities and sustain us in difficult times.

Gospel Reflection:  The Prodigal Parable

Last week we read Lk 14:25-33 which made that point that discipleship required the complete and total renunciation to family and even one’s self: “…if anyone comes to me without hating his father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters, and even his own life, he (sic) cannot be my disciple.” (Lk 14:26)  The term, “hating” was a literary strategy that Luke used to criticize the heart of the organizing structure of the Roman Empire, the paterfamilias.

Before we begin our reflection, let us address Lk 15:1 and ask: Is this verse in the narrative intended as a critique of Pharisees and Scribes? The answer is an unequivocal, NO. Why? Because Luke’s audience did not live among Jews and thus had minimal interaction with Pharisees. Also, Scribes had basically been dissipated 15-20 years prior to the writing of Luke’s gospel.  Gentile converts probably had few, if any, questions about Pharisees and Scribes.

A literary critical analysis of the gospel would suggest that Luke included Pharisees and Scribes in the prelude to the parables in order to develop the theme of reconciliation and inclusion of sinners into the community. In other words, Luke was not taking a detour from the thematic development of discipleship and its relationship to the kingdom of God so that Luke could make the case for “super-secessionism” (the heretical belief that Christianity supplanted Judaism). We believe that the trajectory of the narrative is just an amplification of the familiar theme of previous chapters: disciples must cast off the Empire and “embrace the cross.”  (N.B., “embracing the cross” is a loaded and complicated reference that includes the renunciation of paterfamilias and the class-conscious social order of the Empire). 

Luke’s narrative is moving us toward living in the kingdom of God. (“Living in” the kingdom of God is not a geographical relocation of one’s residence, but rather a new way of living in the world). Living in the kingdom of God meant living in a radically inclusive community. Recall the Communique 5ix2019’s discussion about Gentile culture. Greco-Roman society was keenly attentive to one’s social connections: one was identified as belonging to a particular class of persons by where one sat at table. Jews too had their prejudices and a class consciousness but as Jews they were subject to a higher authority: the Torah. The Torah dictated kindness, respect and compassion toward the poor and disenfranchised of society and the Torah was magnified through the writings of the prophets and ancient commentators who warned people against mistreating the poor.  While wealthy Jews did not like to eat with the poor, they would not have seen eating with the poor as a curse as would Greco-Romans. Luke emphasizes the radicalization of the Jewish ideal of inclusion: All Are Welcome, including sinners. Radical inclusion of sinners was not particularly new to Judaism.

Jews in the First Century understood that through atonement and pardon, sinners would return to God and that God would embrace them. (See Lk 15:10: “…there will be rejoicing among the angels of God over one sinner who repents.”)  Many ancient rabbinical commentators believed that t’shuva — the restoration of our humanity and redemption, existed before the world began. In other words, the tendency to be forgiving and be restored to God, to others, and to the world we live in is constitutive to our very nature. T’shuva is constitutive to our being and from many Jewish theological perspectives, the t’shuva we have within us shapes how we respond to our failures. The task of the community, from the Jewish perspective, is therefore, to help shape that response.

Luke’s narrative weaves t’shuva into the Prodigal Son.  Note that the celebration of the restoration of the son to the father in the parable suggests that the emerging Christian religion practiced some degree of radical forgiveness and inclusion — certainly up until the practice of Penitents in the Second Century and standardization of dogma in the Third Century. (Sadly, as Christianity drifted further away from Judaism, the practice of radical inclusion of sinner became increasingly restricted). From a Resistance perspective we would read the parables of the Lost Sheep, The Lost Coin and Prodigal Son as literary artifacts of radical inclusion that stand as warnings to the institutionalized Church. The Church should not assume the role of the older son in the parable who refused to join the father in embracing the younger son.

Drawing our reflection to a close, let us consider these questions: Have we become a club where we demand an exorbitant membership fee and impose impossibly high moral expectations? Have we as Church drifted so far away from our roots that all we can do is obsesses on an individual’s behavior and be selective of what sins we ignore and which one’s we punish? Have we reduced the sacred process of relational healing, personal rehabilitation, conversion and radical welcome back into the community into a privatized ritual of confessing sin and receiving absolution? How we respond to these questions will tell us much more about ourselves and our Church with what we may be comfortable.

Weekly Intercessions

This week’s intercession begins with an excerpt from Rumi’s poem, “The Alchemy of Love.”

 

You come to us from another world;

From beyond the stars and a void of space

Transcendent, pure – of unimaginable beauty.

Bringing with You the essence of Love.

You transform all who are touched by You –

Mundane concerns, troubles and sorrows dissolve in Your presence

Bringing joy to ruler & ruled, to peasants and kings.

You bewilder us with Your grace;

All evil is transformed into goodness.

You are the Master Alchemist!

You light the fire of Love in earth & sky,

In heart & soul of every being.

Through Your loving, existence & non-existence merge –

All opposites unite –

All that is profane becomes sacred again.

~Rumi

 

Let us pray for the Church that is the institutional manifestation of the collective experience of the faithful. 

For those who have been alienated and hurt by judgmental and cruel comments from the Church’s priests and nuns…and also from people in the congregation —including members of our families.

For those who have used and abused the Church and the names of Jesus and Mary to humiliate, scorn and condemn others.

For those who struggle with their own fragility or who cannot or even will not accept their own humanity. 

For those who choose to walk among the lost and broken and those who lost their spiritual homes.

Let us pray for the grace to become who we truly are: the manifiestion of the love of God and the gift to our neighbor.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La Parábola Pródigo

La semana pasada leímos Lc 14, 25-33 que señalaba que el discipulado requería la renuncia todo el mundo y todo a la familia e incluso a uno mismo: “… si alguien viene a mí sin odiar a su padre y madre, esposa e hijos, hermanos y hermanas , e incluso su propia vida, él  no puede ser mi discípulo”. (Lc 14:26) El término “odiar” fue una técnica literaria que S Lucas usó para criticar el corazón de la estructura organizativa del Imperio Romano, el paterfamilias.

Antes de comenzar nuestra reflexión, abordemos Lc 15: 1 y preguntemos: ¿Este versículo de la narración pretende ser una crítica de fariseos y escribas? La respuesta es inequívoca, NO. ¿Por qué? Porque la audiencia de Lucas no vivía entre judíos y, por lo tanto, tenía una interacción mínima con los fariseos. Además, los escribas básicamente se habían disipado 15-20 años antes de la escritura del evangelio de Lucas. Los conversos gentiles probablemente tenían pocas o ninguna pregunta sobre fariseos y escribas.

Un análisis crítico literario del evangelio sugeriría que Lucas incluyó a fariseos y escribas en el preludio de las parábolas para desarrollar el tema de la reconciliación y la inclusión de los pecadores en la comunidad. En otras palabras, Lucas no se estaba desviando del desarrollo temático del discipulado y su relación con el reino de Dios para que Lucas pudiera defender el “súper-secesionismo” (la creencia herética de que el cristianismo suplantó al judaísmo). Creemos que la trayectoria de la narrativa es solo una amplificación del tema familiar de los capítulos anteriores: los discípulos deben desechar el Imperio y “abrazar la cruz” (NB, “abrazar la cruz” es una referencia cargada y complicada que incluye el renuncia a las paterfamilias y al orden social de clase del Imperio).

La narrativa de Lucas nos está llevando a vivir en el reino de Dios. (“Vivir en” el reino de Dios no es una reubicación geográfica de la residencia, sino una nueva forma de vivir en el mundo). Vivir en el reino de Dios significaba vivir en una comunidad radicalmente inclusiva. Recordemos el debate del Comunicado 5ix2019 sobre la cultura gentil. La sociedad grecorromana estaba muy atenta a las conexiones sociales: se identificaba como perteneciente a una clase particular de personas por el lugar donde se sentaba a la mesa. Los judíos también tenían sus prejuicios y una conciencia de clase, pero como judíos estaban sujetos a una autoridad superior: la Torá. La Torá dictó la bondad, el respeto y la compasión hacia los pobres y los marginados de la sociedad y la Torá fue magnificada a través de los escritos de los profetas y comentaristas rabinos antiguos que advirtieron a las personas contra el maltrato a los pobres. Si bien a los judíos ricos no les gustaba comer con los pobres, no habrían visto comer con los pobres como una maldición como lo harían los grecorromanos. Lucas enfatiza la radicalización del ideal judío de inclusión: Todos son bienvenidos, incluidos los pecadores. La inclusión radical de los pecadores no era particularmente nueva para el judaísmo.

Los judíos en el primer siglo entendieron que a través de la expiación y el perdón, los pecadores regresarían a Dios y que Dios los abrazaría. (Ver Lucas 15:10: “… habrá regocijo entre los ángeles de Dios por un pecador que se arrepiente”). Muchos comentaristas rabínicos antiguos creían que t’shuva – la restauración de nuestra humanidad y la redención, existía antes de que el mundo comenzara. En otras palabras, la tendencia a perdonar y ser restaurados a Dios, a los demás y al mundo en que vivimos es constitutiva de nuestra propia naturaleza. T’shuva es constitutivo de nuestro ser y desde muchas perspectivas teológicas judías, el t’shuva que tenemos dentro de nosotros determina cómo respondemos a nuestros fracasos. La tarea de la comunidad, desde la perspectiva judía, es por lo tanto, ayudar a dar forma a esa respuesta.

La narrativa de S Lucas integre t’shuva en el Hijo Pródigo. Tenga en cuenta que la celebración de la restauración del hijo al padre en la parábola sugiere que la religión cristiana emergente practicó cierto grado de perdón radical e inclusión, ciertamente hasta la práctica de los penitentes en el siglo II y la estandarización del dogma en el siglo III. . (Lamentablemente, a medida que el cristianismo se alejó más del judaísmo, la práctica de la inclusión social radical del pecador se volvió cada vez más restringida). Desde la perspectiva de la Resistencia, leeríamos las parábolas de La Oveja Perdida, La Moneda Perdida y el Hijo Pródigo como artefactos literarios de inclusión radical que son advertencias para la Iglesia institucionalizada. La Iglesia no debe asumir el papel del hijo mayor en la parábola que se negó a unirse al padre para abrazar al hijo menor.

Al finalizar nuestra reflexión, consideremos estas preguntas: ¿Nos hemos convertido en un club donde exigimos una cuota de membresía exorbitante e imponemos expectativas morales imposiblemente altas? Como Iglesia, ¿nos hemos alejado tanto de nuestras raíces que todo lo que podemos hacer es obsesionarnos con el comportamiento de un individuo y ser selectivos de los pecados que ignoramos y cuáles castigamos? ¿Hemos reducido el proceso sagrado de curación relacional, rehabilitación personal, conversión y bienvenida radical a la comunidad en un ritual privatizado de confesar el pecado y recibir la absolución? La forma en que respondamos a estas preguntas nos dirá mucho más acerca de nosotros mismos y nuestra Iglesia con lo que podamos estar cómodos.

Intercesiónes semanales

La intercesión de esta semana comienza con un extracto del poema de Rumi, “La alquimia del amor”.

 

Vienes a nosotros desde otro mundo.

Desde más allá de las estrellas.

Vacío, trascendente, puro, de belleza inimaginable,

trayendo contigo la esencia del amor.

Transformas a todo aquel tocado por ti.

Preocupaciones mundanas, problemas y lamentos

desaparecen ante ti, trayendo regocijo

al gobernante y al gobernado al campesino y al rey.

Nos desconciertas con tu gracia.

Todas las maldades se transforman en bondades.

Eres el Alquimista Maestro.

Enciendes la llama del amor en la tierra y el cielo,

en el alma y corazón de cada ser.

A través de tu amor se funde la no-existencia y la existencia.

Los opuestos se unen.

Todo lo profano vuelve a ser sagrado.

 

Oremos por la Iglesia que es la manifestación institucional de la experiencia colectiva de los fieles.

Para aquellos que han sido alienados y heridos por comentarios críticos y crueles de los sacerdotes y monjas de la Iglesia … y también de personas de la congregación, incluidos miembros de nuestras familias.

Para aquellos que han usado y abusado de la Iglesia y los nombres de Jesús y María para humillar, despreciar y condenar a los demás.

Para aquellos que luchan con su propia fragilidad o que no pueden ni aceptarán su propia humanidad.

Para aquellos que eligen caminar entre los perdidos y los quebrantados y aquellos que perdieron sus raíces espirituales.

Oremos por la gracia de convertirnos en lo que realmente somos: la manifestación del amor de Dios y el don a nuestro prójimo.

News – Noticias

RAPID RESPONSE TRAINING: BE A PART OF THE RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK PRO- TECTING OUR IMMIGRANT SISTERS AND BROTHERS’ CIVIL RIGHTS AGAINST ICE!

ENTRENAMIENTO DE RESPUESTA RÁPIDA: ¡SEA PARTE DE LA RED DE RESPUESTA RÁP- IDA QUE PROTEGE A NUESTRAS HERMANAS Y HERMANOS INMIGRANTES DERECHOS CIVILES CONTRA ICE!

SABADO SATURDAY, September 14, 10am-12pm, Santa Clara University Law School, Charney Hall Rm 205, 500

MARTES TUESDAY, September 17, 6:30-8:30pm, private home in San Jose (Willow Glen) Register for details/registra for detalles

SABADO SATURDAY, September 21, 10am-12pm 2665 Marine Way #1120 Mountain View (Unite Here office)

You must register to attend. Click here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd_TBGuV7PEA_VQUi9wc8O7aSK9O6Bw29MIS-LEA5gy-8MuVA/viewform?c=0&w=1

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp