Newsletter

URGENT! We NEED your help at the border:  Jeans for the Journey

View this email in your browser

Jeans for the Journey

Families arrive to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, TX with only the clothes on their backs. Clothes that they’ve worn day after day as they walked, waited, slept, been detained, survived. Some families travel close to a month before we meet them at the Respite Center. When they arrive, we greet them with cheers and clapping, smiles and warm welcomes. Some have said this is the first time in over a month they’ve felt welcomed. A part of that welcome process is receiving a new backpack, a warm meal, and a place to rest. They are also gifted new clothes; clothes that fit and are chosen by them. Nothing tattered or full of holes but clean, well fitted clothing. They take a shower and come out clean. They throw their old clothes away and you can almost see a physical change in their persona. The newness in their journey and a step in this new chapter. We get to help them by physically walking alongside them. It may seem simple and unnecessary, but the sure fact they get a new pair of pants—one that fits them, one that has not been trudged along with them…but one that represents their new direction. It is a small thing that empowers them and restores a piece of dignity.

Today we completely ran out of men’s pants. We are in DESPERATE need of MEN’S and BOYS JEANS! Waist 32, any length. Any size Boys jeans. Men’s shoes sizes 6-9. Please send your donations directly to 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501 or you can Venmo @Francis-Bencik.

Thank you so much for your continued prayers and support.

In Christ,

Fr. Jon

 

Jeans para el viaje

Las familias llegan al Centro de Respiro Humanitario en McAllen, TX con solo la ropa en que han viajado. La ropa que han usado día tras día mientras caminaban, esperaban, dormían, han sido detenidas y han sobrevivido. Algunas familias viajan cerca de un mes antes de que nos encontremos con ellas en el Centro de Respiro. Cuando llegan, los saludamos con aplausos, sonrisas y cálidas bienvenidas. Algunos han dicho que esta es la primera vez en más de un mes que se sienten bienvenidos. Una parte de ese proceso de bienvenida es recibir una nueva mochila, comida caliente y un lugar para descansar. También son nuevas prendas dotadas; ropa que se ajusta y es elegida por ellos. Nada desgarrado, pero ropa limpia y bien equipada. Se bañan y salen limpios. Se tiran la ropa vieja y casi se puede ver un cambio físico en su persona. La novedad en su viaje y un paso en este nuevo capítulo. Podemos ayudarlos caminando físicamente junto a ellos. Puede parecer simple e innecesario, pero el hecho seguro de que tienen un nuevo par de pantalones, uno que les quede bien, uno que no haya sido caminado con ellos … pero que representa su nueva dirección. Es algo pequeño que los empodera y restaura una pieza de dignidad.

¡Estamos en DESESPERADA necesidad de JEANS PARA HOMBRES y NIÑOS! Cintura 32, cualquier longitud. Cualquier talla jeans de niños. Zapatos para hombres, tallas 6-9. Envíe sus donaciones directamente a 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501 o puede Venmo @Francis-Bencik.

Muchas gracias por sus continuadas oraciones y apoyo.

En Cristo,

P. Jon

Copyright © 2018 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Our mailing address is:

Friends of Jon Pedigo

2164 Cottle Avenue

San Jose, CA 95125

Add us to your address book

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  We are the Manna that is Meant to Be

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

August 10, 2018

NO MISA SOLIDARIDAD
 THIS SUNDAY
The next misa will be
August 19 at 9 AM
Newman Chapel
Corner of 10th and San Carlos Sts.

Included in this week’s Communique:
PHOTO ESSAY

NO HAY MISA SOLIDARIDAD
ESTE DOMINGO

La próxima misa sera
el 19 de agosto a las 9 AM

Capilla Newman
Esquina de las Calles 10 y San Carlos

Incluido en el Communique de esta semana:
ENSAYO FOTOGRÁFICO

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The Humanitarian Respite Center’s warehouses store clothes, baby formula, diapers, shoes, clothes, first aid supplies, and children’s games. I found it ironic that the Game of Life among those in the warehouse.
The tragic separation of children fom their parents and the obstacles that the administration places put before asylum seekers makes it seem as if seeking asylum are playing a cruel version of the Game of Life.

Sunday Reflection:
We are the Manna that is Meant to Be

The gospel text for this and the following weeks of August are taken from the sixth chapter of John’s gospel. Last week’s selection, unpacked the meaning and role of manna and how Jesus as the Christ uses manna as metaphor for the work that needs to be accomplished through himself (that is to say, his renewal/Resistance movement). Keep in mind that Jesus initiated this discourse as a commentary on Exodus. This week’s gospel selection focuses on the reaction of those who found Jesus’ commentary as fantastical.

Recall that in John 6:32 Jesus said, “Amen, amen, I say to you, it was not Moses who gave the bread fom heaven; my Father gives you the true bread fom heaven.” This verse clarified that manna came from God, not Moses. This underscored Jesus teaching that God’s intention is that people will receive what they need to survive because God will apportion to them what they justly need. Their portion of what they will receive will not leave them hungry nor will the portion given them exceed their need leaving the people tempted to hoard and resell manna for profit. God’s intent is to create a “manna economy” in which one receives is not based on merit, but on need. Think of it this way,: what is fair and just is not dependent upon the largess of the powerful, but on the needs of those who are hungry!

Before we transition to examine verses 41-51, look at 6:35, “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me wil never hunger, and whoever believes in me wil never thirst…” and verse 38, “I came down fom heaven”. Today’s gospel selection must be read within the context of both verse 35 and 38. By stating that he is the “Bread of Life,” and that he, “…came down fom heaven,” Jesus-as-the-Christ identified himself as manna, the living bread from heaven. Verses 41-51 reflect the growing dissent among those who initially shared in the great feast (John 6:1-15). By identifying himself as manna, Jesus took the Torah commentary on Exodus 16 to a new level, possibly beyond a level that would certainly be considered an over-reach by other rabbis and religious authorities. Jesus was going way beyond a commentary about the people in the desert and their reaction to God’s gift of manna.

The reaction of those who were gathered is interesting because they could not accept that one who was from within the poor Jewish community of Galilee would be so bold as to proclaim himself as manna. “Is this not Jesus, the son of Joseph? Do we not know his father and mother? Then how can he say, ‘I have come down fom heaven’?” John6:42. Recall that Jesus had already laid out an argument that God’s intent is for God’s people to resist the Empire by living a “Manna Economy” of radical egalitarianism and collective support from John 6:26-35. Jesus’ commentary was not simply a nostalgic reflection on the fierce nobility of Jewish resisters who struggled with their faith as they wandered in the desert, but rather a contemporary commentary on the need for a new resistance to a new imperial menace: the Roman Empire. He was not simply saying “accept me as manna,” but rather, “accept me as one who will inspire you to be manna.”

As a marginalized people, Galileans did not see themselves as capable of rising up against the Empire. (At the time of Jesus, Galileans were not quite ready to step up and be a part of the resistance; however, by the time that John’s gospel was written, [circa, 95 CE], Galilean rabbis and activists were at the forefront of the political resistance against the Empire and they were the ones who led the effort to preserve Jewish life and religion even as the Temple of Jerusalem was dismantled and burnt to the ground). Jesus’ preaching, captured in John 6, gives us an opportunity to understand the progress of thought regarding the unique perspective (and ultimately, the trajectory) of the resistance movement initiated by Jesus-as the-Christ.

By identifying himself as manna, the bread (come down) from heaven, Jesus offered himself as the manna for the economically, socially and culturally marginalized persons of his society and by extension all those that the Empire deemed as valueless people. Jesus offered himself to the poor young man born blind begging at the edge of the road and to the wealthy single woman fetching water from a well. As manna Jesus gave people the option of claiming their own power! In that same line he also recognized that people must make the decision to be free in order to be free. In other words, if one wants justice, one must engage in the struggle for justice! Jesus-as-the-Christ’s self-identification as manna and “Bread of Life,”concluded with the implication that his work would not be limited to Israel, but that his work would “feed” the entire world. We will pick this question of “feeding” others beyond Israel up in the next week’s reflection.

Weekly Intercessions
This past week, a nationally recognized figure, Laura Ingraham commented, “This is a national emergency and we must demand that Congress act now.” She was referring to the demographic changes brought about by immigration. She said, “Massive demographic changes have been foisted upon the American people, and they are changes that none of us ever voted for, and most of us don’t like. From Virginia to California, we see stark examples of how radically in some ways the country has changed.” Ingraham, a controversial personality, has a long history of making insensitive statements; however, this recent commentary, was over-the-top racist and xenophobic. In an era when the president of the nation calls Mexican immigrants criminals and rapists and orders the Department of Homeland Security to separate children and babies from their parents and places these same children in inadequate facilities that are under-staffed by unqualified personnel and the attorney general blatantly defies orders not to deport people without a fair hearing, it is not a surprise that such a commentary was written, produced and aired on national television. Ingraham’s vile commentary is but a symptom of a national disease of scapegoating immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers. When our national leaders regularly use “dog whistle” language and engage in a politics of resentment and hate and when a a major network (Fox) allows hateful commentary to run in prime time, it is not surprise that the rate of hate crimes has risen dramatically. New data show that hate crimes against immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers, Latinos, African Americans, Muslims, Jews, and LGBTQ has risen sharply since this present administration has taken office. There is a real atmosphere of fear and intimidation. What we hear on the radio and see on television matters. The hate that comes from public personalities and amplified on television, radio and social media is not just about name-calling, it is about inciting actual acts of violence. Let us pray for greater accountability for those who espouse hateful language and that more courageous people will step up to challenge ignorance.

Intercesiónes semanales
La semana pasada, una figura reconocida a nivel nacional, Laura Ingraham comentó: “Esta es una emergencia nacional y debemos exigir que el Congreso actúe ahora”. Se refería a los cambios demográficos provocados por la inmigración. Ella dijo: “Se han impuesto enormes cambios demográficos al pueblo estadounidense, y son cambios por los que ninguno de nosotros votó, y a la mayoría de nosotros no nos gusta. Desde Virginia hasta California, vemos claros ejemplos de cuán radicalmente ha cambiado el país en algunos aspectos”. Ingraham, una personalidad controvertida, tiene una larga historia de hacer declaraciones insensibles; sin embargo, este comentario reciente fue exagerado, racista y xenófobo. En una época en que el presidente de la nación llama inmigrantes mexicanos delincuentes y violadores y ordena al DHS que separe a los niños y bebés de sus padres y coloca a estos mismos niños en instalaciones inadecuadas que no cuentan con el personal calificado y el fiscal general descaradamente desafía las órdenes de no deportar personas sin una audiencia justa, no es una sorpresa que dicho comentario fue escrito, producido y transmitido en la televisión nacional. Los viles comentarios de Ingraham no son más que un síntoma de una enfermedad nacional de inmigrantes, refugiados y solicitantes de asilo que buscan el chivo expiatorio. Cuando nuestros líderes nacionales usan regularmente el lenguaje del “dog whistle” y se involucran en una política de resentimiento y odio y cuando una red importante (Fox) permite que los comentarios de odio se publiquen en el horario estelar, no es sorprendente que la tasa de crímenes de odio haya aumentado dramáticamente. Nuevos datos muestran que los crímenes de odio contra inmigrantes, refugiados y solicitantes de asilo, latinos, afroamericanos, musulmanes, judíos y LGBTQ han aumentado considerablemente desde que esta administración actual asumió el cargo. Hay una atmósfera real de miedo e intimidación. Lo que escuchamos en la radio y vemos en televisión importa. El odio que proviene de las personalidades públicas y se amplifica en la televisión, la radio y las redes sociales no se trata solo de insultos, sino de incitar a actos reales de violencia. Oremos por una mayor rendición de cuentas para aquellos que propugnan un lenguaje odioso y que personas más valientes darán un paso adelante para desafiar la ignorancia.

“Yo soy el pan vivo, que ha bajado del cielo; el que coma de este pan vivirá para siempre. Y el pan que yo les voy a dar es mi carne, para que el mundo tenga vida”.       
Juan 6:51

Reflexión del domingo: 
Somos el Maná que Significa Ser

El texto del evangelio para esta y las siguientes semanas de agosto están tomadas del sexto capítulo del evangelio de Juan. La selección de la semana pasada, desempaquetó el significado y el papel del maná y cómo Jesús-como-el-Cristo usa el maná como metáfora del trabajo que necesita realizarse a través de él mismo (es decir, su movimiento de renovación / resistencia). Tenga en cuenta que Jesús inició este discurso como un comentario sobre Éxodo. La selección del evangelio de esta semana se enfoca en la reacción de aquellos que encontraron los comentarios de Jesús como fantásticos.

Recordemos que en Juan 6:32 Jesús dijo: “En verdad, en verdad os digo, que no fue Moisés quien dio el pan del cielo; mi Padre te da el pan verdadero del cielo”. Este versículo aclaró que el maná vino de Dios, no de Moisés. Esto subrayaba a Jesús enseñando que la intención de Dios es que las personas reciban lo que necesitan para sobrevivir porque Dios les dará lo que justamente necesitan. Su porción de lo que recibirán no los dejará con hambre ni la porción que les da excederá su necesidad, dejando a la gente tentada de atesorar y revender maná con fines de lucro. La intención de Dios es crear una “economía maná” en la que uno recibe no se basa en el mérito, sino en la necesidad. Piénselo de esta manera: lo que es justo y justo no depende de la generosidad de los poderosos, sino de las necesidades de los que tienen hambre.

Antes de hacer la transición para examinar los versículos 41-51, mira 6:35, “Yo soy el pan de la vida; el que viene a mí nunca tendrá hambre, y el que cree en mí nunca tendrá sed…” y el versículo 38, “descendí del cielo”. La selección del evangelio de hoy debe leerse en el contexto de los versículos 35 y 38. Al afirmar que él es el “Pan de vida” y que él “descendió del cielo”, Jesús como el Cristo se identificó como maná, el pan vivo del cielo. Los versículos 41-51 reflejan la creciente disensión entre aquellos que inicialmente compartieron la gran fiesta (Juan 6: 1-15). Al identificarse a sí mismo como maná, Jesús llevó el comentario de la Torá sobre Éxodo 16 a un nuevo nivel, posiblemente más allá de un nivel que ciertamente sería considerado como un alcance excesivo por parte de otros rabinos y autoridades religiosas. Jesús iba más allá de un comentario sobre la gente en el desierto y su reacción al don de Dios del maná.

La reacción de los que estaban reunidos es interesante porque no podían aceptar que alguien que pertenecía a la pobre comunidad judía de Galilea fuera tan osado como para proclamarse a sí mismo como maná. “¿No es esto Jesús, el hijo de José? ¿No conocemos a su padre y a su madre? Entonces, ¿cómo puede decir: “He descendido del cielo”? Juan 6: 42. Recuerde que Jesús ya había presentado un argumento de que la intención de Dios es que el pueblo de Dios resista al Imperio viviendo una “economía maná” de igualitarismo radical y apoyo colectivo de Juan 6: 26-35. El comentario de Jesús no fue simplemente una reflexión nostálgica sobre la feroz nobleza de los resistentes judíos que lucharon con su fe mientras vagaban por el desierto, sino más bien un comentario contemporáneo sobre la necesidad de una nueva resistencia a una nueva amenaza imperial: el Imperio Romano. Él no estaba simplemente diciendo “acéptame como maná”, sino más bien, “acéptame como alguien que te inspire a ser maná”.

Como un pueblo marginado, los galileos no se veían a sí mismos como capaces de levantarse contra el Imperio. (En el tiempo de Jesús, los galileos no estaban listos para tomar parte y ser parte de la resistencia, sin embargo, para cuando se escribió el evangelio de Juan, [circa, 95 EC], los rabinos y activistas galileos estaban a la vanguardia de la resistencia política contra el Imperio y ellos fueron los que lideraron el esfuerzo para preservar la vida y la religión judía, incluso cuando el Templo de Jerusalén fue desmantelado y quemado hasta los cimientos). La predicación de Jesús, captada en Juan 6, nos da la oportunidad de comprender el progreso del pensamiento con respecto a la perspectiva única (y en última instancia, la trayectoria) del movimiento de resistencia iniciado por Jesús como el Cristo.

Al identificarse a sí mismo como maná, el pan (bajado) del cielo, Jesús se ofreció a sí mismo como maná para las personas económica, social y culturalmente marginadas de su sociedad y, por extensión, todas aquellas que el Imperio consideraba como personas sin valor. Jesús se ofreció al pobre joven ciego que pedía limosna al borde del camino y a la acaudalada mujer soltera que sacaba agua de un pozo. Como maná, ¡Jesús le dio a la gente la opción de reclamar su propio poder! En esa misma línea, también reconoció que las personas deben tomar la decisión de ser libres para ser libres. En otras palabras, si uno quiere justicia, ¡uno debe participar en la lucha por la justicia!

La auto-identificación de Jesús como el Cristo como maná y “Pan de vida” concluyó con la implicación de que su trabajo no se limitaría a Israel, sino que su trabajo “alimentaría” al mundo entero. Tomaremos esta pregunta de “alimentar” a otros más allá de Israel en la reflexión de la próxima semana.

IMPORTANT FAQ LINK FROM ILRC REGARDING DACA

https://www.ilrc.org/sites/default/files/resources/daca_faq-20180430.pdf

Catholic Charities Zanker Road office offers Free DACA Clinics every Monday and Wednesday, from 9 am – 12:00 pm until further notice.  Space is limited. For more information call (408) 944-0691.  2625 Zanker Road, San Jose, CA 95134

Free DACA renewals at Most Holy Trinity Parish
every Friday
9:30am to 12:30 pm       
              
Renovación de DACA en la Parroquia de Santisima Trinidad
cada viernes  
9:30am hasta 12:30 pm

2040 Nassau Drive, San José

Simple immigration consults are also free.

Family Separation

Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:

Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen:

From the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, Texas.
These photos were taken during the first few days of working in Catholic Charities of Brownsville Texas’ Humanitarian Respite Center. The Center serves asylum seekers who have legally presented themselves to US Officials and are awaiting an asylum hearing. This present administration’s “zero tolerance” policy resulted in the separation of children from parents and a massive incarceration of children. The Center saw their numbers increase massively since that time. The Center has served over 100,000 persons since Catholic Charities opened their doors four years ago.

Estas fotos fueron tomadas durante los primeros días de trabajo en el Centro de Respiro Humanitario de Caridades Católicas de Brownsville Texas. El Centro sirve a los solicitantes de asilo que se han presentado legalmente a los funcionarios estadounidenses y están esperando un corte de asilo. La política de “tolerancia cero” de esta administración actual dio como resultado la separación de los niños de los padres y una encarcelación masiva de niños. El Centro vio que sus números aumentaron masivamente desde ese momento. El Centro ha prestado servicios a más de 100,000 personas desde que Caridades Católicas abrió sus puertas hace cuatro años.

Through the praise of children and infants you have established a stronghold against your enemies, to silence the foe and the avenger.

Psalm 8: 2

God is love.

1 John 4:16

Continue to ask, and God will give to you. Continue to search, and you will find. Continue to knock, and the door will open for you.
 

Matthew 7:7

For we walk by faith, not by sight.

2 Corinthians 5:7

Copyright © 2018 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  Manna Economy vs. the Economy of the Empire

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

August 3, 2018

MISA SOLIDARIDAD
 THIS SUNDAY

This week’s misa will be
August 5 at 9 AM
Newman Chapel
Corner of 10th and San Carlos Sts.

Included in this week’s Communique:
End of Year Report

MISA SOLIDARIDAD
La próxima misa sera
el 5 de agosto a las 9 AM

Capilla Newman
Esquina de las Calles 10 y San Carlos

Incluido en el Communique de esta semana:
Informe de Fin de Año

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

We see more and more people living along our streets and freeway entrances. When we speak in terms of a “strong economy” we speak about money, but we do not speak about the economy in terms of people.  In terms of capital, the economy in Silicon Valley is booming; however, the population of unhoused persons is also booming. How is the economy working for you?

Sunday Reflection: Manna Economy vs. the Economy of the Empire
The gospel text for this and the following weeks of August are taken from the sixth chapter of John’s gospel. Last week’s selection, the Multiplication of the Loaves, and using the lens of Resistance, we understood that the miracle of the multiplication of the loaves was not limited to bread, but was inclusive of multiplying and thus, amplifying, our participation in the Resistance. The context of the sixth chapter of John is the issue of faith: people expressed a longing to return to Egypt rather than struggle in the desert. In response to the people’s complaint about hunger, God sent down manna to satiate their hunger; however, the people were not satisfied. They wanted more. The sixth chapter of John is a response to this conflict and this week we will focus on unpacking the meaning and role of manna and how Jesus as the Christ uses manna as metaphor for the work that needs to be accomplished through himself (that is to say, his renewal/Resistance movement).  

In John 6:1-15 the type of bread, barley, was key to understanding  the Resistance dimension of the Multiplication of the Loaves. In John 6:24-35, the type of bread that Jesus as the Christ to which refers is manna. Manna, the word, is derived from the Egyptian word, “mon,” meaning “what” and the Hebrew word, “mon,” meaning “portion.”  Thus when manna came down from the sky the people were literally saying, “What is this portion of food we are eating?”  (Exodus 16:15) The following verses of Exodus; however, provide the fuller context to understand what Jesus as the Christ is preaching. Exodus reads,

“‘Now, this is what the LORD has commanded. Gather as much of it as each needs to eat, an omer (a measure or a portion) for each person for as many of you as there are, each of you providing for those in your own tent.’ The Israelites did so. Some gathered a large and some a small amount. But when they measured it out by the omer, the one who had gathered a large amount did not have too much, and the one who had gathered a small amount did not have too little. They gathered as much as each needed to eat.  Moses said to them, “Let no one leave any of it over until morning.”

In this passage of Exodus, manna is tied to the portioning food according to one’s needs. This “manna economy” is not built on what one “merits,” but rather by what one “needs.” In their former slave economy of the Empire, the Israelites were given food by how they useful they were to their owners. Historians surfaced documents that show evidence that ancient Egyptians were frequently call for just treatment of their slaves which would indicate that there was widespread mistreatment of slaves. Thus, one might reasonably presume that the fate of a slave who did not measure up or could not work and thus, no longer  viable, was not a kind fate.  The Empire was indeed built and sustained by a slave economy, but the manna economy is built upon the right and dignity of each person receiving what he or she needs.  In versus 19-20 of the same chapter, it is apparent that some people tried to gather more than what they needed, by hoarding the manna. 

Moses said to them, “Let no one leave any of it over until morning.” But they did not listen to Moses, and some kept a part of it (the manna) over until morning, and it became wormy and stank. Therefore Moses was angry with them.

The manna economy, unlike the economy of the Empire, does not allow for the mass acquisition of manna which would allow some people to monetize it, that is, possess and resell the manna for profit.  Manna is a basic resource that should be available to all people unconditionally. In the manna economy God is in charge, not human beings who want to control the manna. In the Empire, resources are possessed by force, assigned private ownership, guarded by threats of violence, and sold only to those who can afford to pay. The cycle of possession, protection and sale of a commodity essential for human development will inevitably end result in gross misdistribution of wealth. Empires, whether headed by a pharaoh, a caesar, a king, or a president, are sustained by a system of possession (most often by force and a policy of colonization  ), protection (most often political repression and suppression of internal dissent) and sale. 

Jesus’ teaching on manna in John’s gospel is multi-faceted and multivalent, meaning that there are many aspects to what the John the Evangelist has Jesus saying in John’s gospel. These verses from today’s gospel reading provide the foundation or frame on which successive layers of interpretation are laid. In verses 30-33 Jesus provides Torah commentary saying, “Our ancestors ate manna in the desert, as it is written: ‘He gave them bread from heaven to eat.’”  Jesus identifies manna with bread.  Keep in mind that bread is produced by cooperation between God and human beings. Bread, therefore, does not occur naturally; however, in the case of manna, God produces manna (which has by other Scripture citations, rabbis and sages identified as bread) without human cooperation suggesting that manna is the divinely revealed way in which the community must develop its economy. Jesus said, “Amen, amen, I say to you, it was not Moses who gave the bread from heaven; my Father gives you the true bread from heaven. For the bread of God is that which comes down from heaven and gives life to the world.”  The disciples assented to this teaching saying, “Give us this bread always.” In saying, “give us this bread always,” the disciples committed themselves to the vision of a manna economy in which all persons should have fee and equal access to the resources essential to human existence. Jesus responds not only reaffirming that commitment to the manna economy, but going one step farther, that he himself (his teachings, life, ministry and preaching) will embody the very manna economy. “I am the bread of life; whoever comes to me will never hunger, and whoever believes in me will never thirst.” 

The application of the manna economy provides a compelling critique to our own economy. For example, on August 2 it was reported that there was an increase in jobs last quarter, but the report also saw no increase in wages. This report indicates that the economy is producing jobs and generating greater wealth, but that those jobs are not paying adequate wages and the wealth is not being reinvested in the community, but reinvested in greater automation in manufacturing or invested in personal wealth of those who own stock.  According to NPR, “Nearly all of the stock ownership in the U.S. is concentrated among the richest. According to Wolff’s data, the top 20 percent of Americans owned 92 percent of the stocks in 2013. Put another way: Eighty percent of Americans together owned just 8 percent of all stocks.” We must ask ourselves are we really doing well under the economy of the Empire? How’s it working for us?  Might we also ask, “What if we tried the Manna Economy? Would a distribution of resources based upon need work out better for us?” Next week we will continue with Jesus’ commentary on the Torah and the reaction that others had as a result of his commentary.

When you are weary of praying and do not receive, consider how often you have heard a poor man calling, and have not listened to him.

 

John Chrysostom,

347-407

Weekly Intercessions
There was a significant development in Catholic teaching this week that may have been lost in the swirling vortex of the news cycle: Pope Francis developed the teaching on the use of the death penalty by stating that the death penalty cannot be administrated because it attacks the dignity of people.  Vatican communications said there is an “…increasing awareness that the dignity of the person is not lost even after the commission of very serious crimes,” and that “…more effective systems of detention have been developed, which ensure the due protection of citizens but, at the same time, do not definitively deprive the guilty of the possibility of redemption.” The teaching essentially changes the teaching that administration of the death penalty is permitted under very narrow circumstances. The new teaching frames the argument around the question of the dignity of life and the lived context of one’s life. The previous teaching allowed an unintentional separation of the dignity of life and the lived context of one’s life. Thus, self-proclaimed pro-life people would expend a lot of energy, time and funding to protect life in the womb, but would be silent or equivocate on the social conditions that diminished the dignity of living.  Pro-lifers, for instance, were conspicuously prevaricate on the effect of poverty on a child’s development, halting the access to guns, nuclear disarmament and the death penalty. Pope Francis’ teaching on the death penalty is a large shift because it repositions the question of being “pro-life” as being more than the protection of life in the womb. This teaching; however, will have a much larger shift in the public arena.  Politicians will no longer be able to define themselves as “pro-life” by single-issue politics and pro-life advocates can no longer declare themselves “pro-life” without including ending the death penalty, promoting greater social equality and working to end war as a part of their “pro-life” activities. Let us pray for all those who seek to protect the dignity of living from the point of conception to death.

Intercesiónes semanales
Hubo un desarrollo significativo en la enseñanza católica esta semana que puede haberse perdido en el remolino del ciclo de noticias: el Papa Francisco desarrolló la enseñanza sobre el uso de la pena de muerte al afirmar que la pena de muerte no puede ser administrada porque ataca la dignidad humana. Comunicaciones del Vaticano dijeron que hay una “… creciente conciencia de que la dignidad de la persona no se pierde incluso después de la comisión de delitos muy graves”, y que “… se han desarrollado sistemas de detención más efectivos que garantizan la debida protección de los ciudadanos, pero, al mismo tiempo, no prive definitivamente a los culpables de la posibilidad de la redención”. La enseñanza esencialmente cambia la enseñanza de que la administración de la pena de muerte está permitida en circunstancias muy limitadas. La nueva enseñanza enmarca el argumento en torno a la cuestión de la dignidad de la vida y el contexto vivido de la propia vida. La enseñanza anterior permitió una separación involuntaria de la dignidad de la vida y el contexto vivido de la propia vida. Por lo tanto, las personas que identifican pro-vida gastarían una gran cantidad de energía, tiempo y fondos para proteger la vida en el útero, pero guardarían silencio o se equivocarían sobre las condiciones sociales que disminuían la dignidad de la vida. Los politicos pro-vida, por ejemplo, fueron notoriamente engañados sobre el efecto de la pobreza en el desarrollo de un niño, deteniendo el acceso a armas de fuego, el desarme nuclear y la pena de muerte. La enseñanza del Papa Francisco sobre la pena de muerte es un gran cambio porque vuelve a colocar la cuestión de ser “pro-vida” como algo más que la protección de la vida en el útero. Esta enseñanza; sin embargo, tendrá un cambio mucho más grande en el ámbito público. Los políticos ya no podrán definirse a sí mismos como “pro-vida” por una sola cuestión política y los defensores pro-vida ya no pueden declararse “pro-vida” sin incluir la finalización de la pena de muerte, promover una mayor igualdad social y trabajar para terminar la guerra como parte de sus actividades “pro-vida”. Oremos por todos aquellos que buscan proteger la dignidad de la vida desde el momento de la concepción hasta la muerte.

Cuando esté cansado de orar y no lo reciba, piense en la frecuencia con que ha escuchado a un hombre pobre y no lo ha escuchado.

 

Juan Crisólogo,

347-407

Reflexión del domingo: Economía de Manea frente a la Economía del Imperio
El texto del evangelio para esta y las siguientes semanas de agosto están tomadas del sexto capítulo del evangelio de Juan. La selección de la semana pasada, la multiplicación de los panes, y utilizando el lente de la resistencia, entendimos que el milagro de la multiplicación de los panes no es un enfoque solamente el milagro de la  multiplicación de pan, pero incluye la amplificación de nuestra participación en la Resistencia. El contexto del sexto capítulo de Juan es el tema de la fe: las personas expresaron su deseo de regresar a Egipto en lugar de luchar en el desierto. En respuesta a la queja del pueblo sobre el hambre, Dios envió maná para saciar su hambre; sin embargo, las personas no estaban satisfechas. Ellos querían más. El sexto capítulo de Juan es una respuesta a este conflicto y esta semana nos enfocaremos en desempacar el significado y el papel del maná y cómo Jesús como el Cristo usa el maná como metáfora del trabajo que debe realizarse a través de él (es decir , su movimiento de renovación / resistencia).

En Juan 6: 1-15, el tipo de pan, la cebada, era clave para entender la dimensión de Resistencia de la Multiplicación de los Panes. En Juan 6: 24-35, el tipo de pan que Jesús como el Cristo al que se refiere es el maná. Maná, la palabra, se deriva de la palabra egipcia, “mon”, que significa “qué” y la palabra hebrea, “mon”, que significa “porción”. Así, cuando el maná descendió del cielo, la gente decía literalmente: “¿Qué? ¿Esta porción de comida estamos comiendo?” (Éxodo 16:15) Los siguientes versículos de Éxodo; sin embargo, proporcione el contexto más completo para comprender lo que Jesús, como el Cristo, está predicando. Éxodo lee,

“‘Ahora, esto es lo que el SEÑOR ha ordenado. Reúna todo lo que cada uno necesite para comer, un omer (una medida o una porción) para cada persona para tantos de ustedes como haya, cada uno de ustedes proveyendo para aquellos en su propia tienda.’ Los israelitas lo hicieron. Algunos reunieron una cantidad grande y otra pequeña. Pero cuando lo midieron por el omer, el que había reunido una gran cantidad no tenía demasiado, y el que había reunido una pequeña cantidad no tenía demasiado poco. Reunieron todo lo que necesitaban para comer. Moisés les dijo: ‘Que nadie deje nada de eso hasta la mañana’”.

En este pasaje de Éxodo, el maná está ligado a la porción de alimentos según las necesidades de cada uno. Esta “economía del maná” no se basa en lo que uno “merece”, sino en lo que uno “necesita”. En su antigua economía de esclavos del Imperio, a los israelitas se les dio comida por la utilidad que tenían para sus dueños. Los historiadores dieron a conocer documentos que muestran evidencia de que los antiguos egipcios solían exigir un trato justo a sus esclavos, lo que indicaría que había un maltrato generalizado de los esclavos. Por lo tanto, uno podría razonablemente suponer que el destino de un esclavo que no se puso a la altura o no pudo trabajar y, por lo tanto, ya no es viable, no fue un destino amable. El Imperio fue construido y sostenido por una economía de esclavos, pero la economía del maná se basa en el derecho y la dignidad de cada persona que recibe lo que necesita. En comparación con 19-20 del mismo capítulo, es evidente que algunas personas trataron de reunir más de lo que necesitaban, acaparando el maná.

Moisés les dijo: “Que nadie deje nada de eso hasta la mañana”. Pero ellos no escucharon a Moisés, y algunos mantuvieron una parte de él (el maná) hasta la mañana, y se hizo tétrico y apestaba. Por lo tanto, Moisés estaba enojado con ellos.

La economía del maná, a diferencia de la economía del Imperio, no permite la adquisición masiva de maná que permitiría a algunas personas monetizarlo, es decir, poseer y revender el maná por entre Dios y los seres humanos. El pan, por lo tanto, no ocurre naturalmente; sin embargo, en el caso del maná, Dios produce el maná (que según otras citas de las Escrituras, rabinos y sabios de antigüedad identificados como pan) sin la cooperación humana sugiere que el maná es la forma divinamente revelada en la cual la comunidad debe desarrollar su economía. Jesús dijo, “Amén, amén, te digo que no fue Moisés quien dio el pan del cielo; mi Padre te da el verdadero pan del cielo. Porque el pan de Dios es el que desciende del cielo y da vida al mundo “. Los discípulos aceptaron esta enseñanza y dijeron: “Danos siempre este pan”. Al decir: “Danos siempre este pan”, los discípulos se comprometieron a hacerlo. ellos mismos a la visión de una economía manna en la que todas las personas deberían tener honorarios y acceso equitativo a los recursos esenciales para la existencia humana. Jesús responde no solo reafirmando ese compromiso con la economía del maná, sino que va un paso más allá, que él mismo (sus enseñanzas, vida, ministerio y predicación) encarnarán la misma economía maná. “Yo soy el pan de la vida; el que viene a mí nunca tendrá hambre, y el que cree en mí nunca tendrá sed “.

La aplicación de la economía del maná proporciona una crítica convincente a nuestra propia economía. Por ejemplo, el 2 de agosto se informó que hubo un aumento en los empleos el último trimestre, pero el informe tampoco vio un aumento en los salarios. Este informe indica que la economía está generando empleos y generando mayor riqueza, pero que esos empleos no pagan salarios adecuados y que la riqueza no se reinvierte en la comunidad, sino que se reinvierte en una mayor automatización manufacturera o se invierte en la riqueza personal de quienes poseen valores. Según NPR, “casi toda la propiedad de acciones en los EE. UU. Se concentra entre las más ricas. Según los datos de Wolff, el 20 por ciento superior de los estadounidenses poseía el 92 por ciento de las acciones en 2013. Dicho de otra manera: el ochenta por ciento de los estadounidenses poseía en conjunto solo el 8 por ciento de todas las acciones”.  Debemos preguntarnos ¿estamos realmente bien en la economía del Imperio? ¿Cómo nos está funcionando? ¿Podríamos preguntarnos también, “¿Qué pasaría si probamos la economía maná? ¿La distribución de recursos basada en la necesidad sería mejor para nosotros?”. La próxima semana continuaremos con el comentario de Jesús sobre la Torá y la reacción que otros tuvieron como resultado de su comentario.

No Misa de Solidaridad August 12
No hay misa de solidaridad 12 de agosto

IMPORTANT FAQ LINK FROM ILRC REGARDING DACA

https://www.ilrc.org/sites/default/files/resources/daca_faq-20180430.pdf

Catholic Charities Zanker Road office offers Free DACA Clinics every Monday and Wednesday, from 9 am – 12:00 pm until further notice.  Space is limited. For more information call (408) 944-0691.  2625 Zanker Road, San Jose, CA 95134

Free DACA renewals at Most Holy Trinity Parish
every Friday
9:30am to 12:30 pm       
              
Renovación de DACA en la Parroquia de Santisima Trinidad
cada viernes  
9:30am hasta 12:30 pm

2040 Nassau Drive, San José
Simple immigration consults are also free.

Family Separation

Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:

Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen:

RAPID RESPONSE NETWORK IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY

The Rapid Response Network (RRN) in Santa Clara County is a community defense project developed to protect immigrant families from the federal administration’s deportation threats and to provide accompaniment support during and after enforcement activities in our community. It relies on a 24/7 hotline that anyone can call to report ICE activity in our county and receive help in real time!

Who Can Call the Hotline:
Any concerned community member in Santa Clara County that (a) suspects immigration enforcement activity in their neighborhood; (b) is the target of an enforcement activity; or (c) has had a loved one detained by ICE can call the hotline.

Please note: this is not a general information hotline.  If you are seeking general immigration services, please contact a community-based organization in your area. 

When You Call the Rapid Response Network:

  •  An experienced dispatcher will support members of our community in asserting their rights and will dispatch trained rapid responders to the impacted site.
  • If enforcement activity is confirmed, rapid responders will conduct legal observation and collect evidence that may be used to support the immigration case of the impacted community member.
  • If a community member is detained, we will connect them to immigration attorneys for legal counsel and activate accompaniment teams to provide moral support to the impacted family.

No families in our community will have to go through this painful process alone!

 

GET TRAINED TO BE A RAPID RESPONDER!

Wed, Aug 8, 2:30-4:30pm, Evergreen Valley College, 3095 Yerba Buena Rd, San Jose 95135

Click here to register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScwI9Ynik6UQzKb02TL5puNxjLvGd2gmXXVq-nbNjRPSkIoLg/viewform 
 

Thurs, Aug 9, 7:00-9:00pm, Diocese of San Jose, St. Claire Conference Room, 1150 N. 1st Street, #100, San Jose, CA 95112

Click here to register: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd_TBGuV7PEA_VQUi9wc8O7aSK9O6Bw29MIS-LEA5gy-8MuVA/viewform?c=0&w=1

 

The Rapid Response Network is a collaborative project led by Sacred Heart Community Service, PACT, Pangea Legal Services, LUNA, SIREN, SOMOS Mayfair, Amigos de Guadalupe, Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County, the South Bay Labor Council, the City of San Jose Office of Immigrant Affairs, and the Santa Clara County Office of Immigrant Relations.

End of Year Report

Grupo Solidaridad

Members come from throughout the Diocese from all walks of life.  Professionals (professors, teachers, medical professionals, business persons, executive directors of agencies), social service professionals, community organizers, students, construction workers, and stay at home parents. Sessions are bilingual Spanish/English.  The group supports cultural activities and social justice events.

Achievements

  • Grupo Solidaridad incubated the idea for the Rapid Response Network and participate as members of the rapid response team.
  • Grupo Solidaridad initiated and supported efforts to registers voters in District 10 to increase civic participation of the Latinx community
  • Hosted several cultural activities in the community, including several “Misas del Barrio”
  • Participated in civic engagement events and led several vigils in support of immigrants and low wage workers; were featured in rallies supporting families separated by the Trump anti-refugee policy; supported Muslims in prayer vigils; participated in housing campaigns and the SAAG (Station Area Advisory Group) process on the Diridon Station and Google Expansion; and supported Catholic Charities events.

Financial Support

  • FY 2017-2018 (July 1 2017-June 30 2018)
  • Collections from community gatherings to support Advocacy and Community Engagement: $7,473. 
  • Contributions to Good Samaritan Fund: $979.14
  • Earmarked contribution for Advocacy and Community Engagement: $13,600.

 

Informe de Fin de Año Fiscal

Grupo Solidaridad

Los miembros provienen de toda la Diócesis de todos los ámbitos de la vida. Profesionales (profesores, profesores, profesionales médicos, personas de negocios, directores ejecutivos de agencias), profesionales de servicios sociales, organizadores comunitarios, estudiantes, trabajadores de la construcción y padres que se quedan en casa. Las sesiones son bilingües español / inglés. El grupo apoya actividades culturales y eventos de justicia social.

Logros

  • Grupo Solidaridad incubó la idea de la Red de Respuesta Rápida y participó como miembros del equipo de respuesta rápida.
  • Grupo Solidaridad inició y apoyó los esfuerzos para registrar a los votantes en el Distrito 10 para aumentar la participación cívica de la comunidad Latinx
  • Organizó varias actividades culturales en la comunidad, incluyendo varias “Misas del Barrio”
  • Participó en eventos de participación cívica y dirigió varias vigilias en apoyo de inmigrantes y trabajadores de bajos salarios; fueron presentados en mítines apoyando a familias separadas por la política de Trump contra los refugiados; apoyó a los musulmanes en vigilias de oración; participó en campañas de vivienda y en el proceso SAAG (Station Advisory Group) en Diridon Station y Google Expansion; y apoyó eventos de Caridades Católicas.

Soporte financiero

  • FY 2017/2018 (1 de julio 2017-30 de junio 2018)
  • Colecciones de reuniones comunitarias para apoyar Advocacy y Community Engagement: $ 7,473.
  • Contribuciones al Fondo Good Samaritan: $ 979.14
  • Contribución para Advocacy y Community Engagement: $ 13,600

Copyright © 2018 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Prophetic Bread

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

July 27, 2018

MISA DEL BARRIO
SPECIAL TIME AND PLACE
 THIS SUNDAY

This week’s misa will be
July 29 at 10 AM
10331 Broadview Dr. San Jose, CA 95127

MISA DEL BARRIO
HORA Y LUGAR DIFERENTE

La próxima misa sera
el 29 de julio a las 10 AM

10331 Broadview Dr. San Jose, CA 95127

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

A member from the Oaxacan community brings an image of Our Lady of Juquila to an altar at the parish hall in Most Holy Trinity Parish. Images and articles of faith remind many immigrants of their homeland and bring comfort to many who suffer from much anxiety and fear from the cruel immigration policies of the Trump administration.

Sunday Reflection: Prophetic Bread
The gospel texts for the next few weeks will be taken from the sixth chapter of John’s gospel. This first week of the five week series sets the frame and context for the following weeks. The context for the discourse on the Multiplication of Loaves and the Bread of Life Discourse; however, begins with this exchange at the end of the previous chapter:

“I do not accept human praise; moreover, I know that you do not have the love of God in you. I came in the name of my Father, but you do not accept me; yet if another comes in his own name, you will accept him. How can you believe, when you accept praise from one another and do not seek the praise that comes from the only God? Do not think that I will accuse you before the Father: the one who will accuse you is Moses, in whom you have placed your hope. For if you had believed Moses, you would have believed me, because he wrote about me. But if you do not believe his writings, how will you believe my words?” (Jn 5:45-47)

Today’s gospel, The Multiplication of the Loaves, is a commentary on the question of belief that is rooted in the narrative of the Israelites’ struggle with Moses as they fought to survive in the wilderness and Jesus’ struggle with feeding the multitude in a remote area: Do we believe that God will provide what is needed or do we need to make other arrangements?  The Israelites in the desert were at first “on board” with God who led them in the night as a pillar of fire and a column of smoke in the day, yet once they felt hunger, they became combative. Similarly,  people were attracted by Jesus’ mighty miraculous deeds, exorcisms and prophetic preaching, (“adorers”) but once they became hungry and were asked to “take up their cross,” their enthusiasm quickly diminished. Thus, in John 5:45 Jesus does not want adorers who would heap praise upon Jesus; rather, he wants disciples who are ready to embrace the cross and participate in the Resistance.      

Turning now to the sixth chapter, Jesus, the disciples, and “adorers” went to the other side of the Sea of Galilee, that is, to a new territory where they were presumably joined by local residents.  The evangelist underscores the context writing, “The Jewish feast of Passover was near.”  Passover refers to Moses who led the people of Israel out of bondage and into the wilderness toward the Promised Land and to the people’s struggle for freedom after they had thrown off the chains of slavery.  This struggle for freedom is expressed in the text by people’s longing to return to eat the tasty food of Egypt rather than eat the relatively bland food of manna.  To understand the Exodus reference, one must read John 6 in parallel with Numbers 11 and Deuteronomy 9. In Number 11:5 the people said, “We remember the fish we used to eat without cost in Egypt, and the cucumbers, the melons, the leeks, the onions, and the garlic. But now we are famished; we have nothing to look forward to but this manna.”  In Deuteronomy the people had just made an idol of a golden calf in a defiant act against God who they felt abandoned them to die in the wilderness.  The people did not have faith that the God of Abraham, Issac and Jacob would provide food and guidance. Rather than eat the manna, the people hungered for the meals they enjoyed as slaves in Egypt and fashioned an idol of one of deities of their Egyptian overlords.  Moses in turn made it clear to God that he could no longer carry the burden of leadership and direction alone. In response to Moses’ mounting pressure, God commanded Moses to assemble 70 elders of the people so that God would give his spirit to the elders so that Moses would no longer have to bear the burden of hearing these complaints by himself.  (The assembly of 70 elders had become the source for establishing the Sanhedrin, the binding court of Jewish leaders in Jerusalem).  God multiplied Moses’ efforts by giving the Spirit to the elders…but, there was the practical question of how those gathered at one spot would actually be fed. 

Moses was practical in what God was asking of him, he pointed out to God that aside from the elders, there would be hundreds of thousands of soldiers gathered together in one spot. So Moses asked, “Can enough sheep and cattle be slaughtered for them? If all the fish of the sea were caught for them, would they have enough?” (Num 11:22).  Again we see the question of whether one has faith that God will provide  “enough” for what is needed.  This same question is mirrored in the John 6: 5-7.  “Where can we buy enough food for them to eat? He said this to test him, because he himself knew what he was going to do. Philip answered him, “Two hundred days’ wages worth of food would not be enough for each of them to have a little [bit].”  The way that Jesus deals with the question of “enough” is by having the people gather together and then call upon a boy who has five barley loaves and two fish. 

While many Christian readers would at this point in the narrative jump directly to the multiplication of loaves and its sacramental implications, a deeper reading of the barley reference would render a deeper, fuller understanding of the entire passage. There are several references to barley in the First Testament. Specifically, in 2 Kings 4:42 the prophet Elisha said, “Give it (the 20 barley loaves) to the people to eat.”  In that account Elisha also multiplied loaves and provided food for over 100 men with enough left over.  Ancient rabbinic sources associate barley with the prophet Ezekiel who fed barley cakes to the people. Barley baked under repulsive conditions (See Ezekiel 4:12) was normally be reserved for animal consumption or for very poor people.  In Ezekiel 4 God commanded the people not only to watch how barley was baked using human excrement as fuel, but that the people would have to eat the very same barley cakes.

Rabbis also associated barley with the symbolic meaning of “toughness,” restraint, and holding boundaries/identities. These symbolic meanings were taken from barley’s physical characteristics: barley is enclosed in a strong hull which corresponds to strong “boundaries” that remain intact even during the threshing process. Barley was also used as a measurement (an omer) that was used to calculate the days before the wheat harvest at Shavuo’t. In the days between the Second Day of Passover until Shavuo’t, the barley harvest was also understood symbolically as a 49 day process of “winnowing the chaff” from our souls and refining our intentions and character.  These symbolic references about barley would be familiar to Jesus and his Jewish disciples. They would see the symbolic implications between the barley and the multiplication of loaves as a reference to the growing Resistance among the Jewish people: that despite harsh conditions imposed on the people by the Roman Empire, the power of the Resistance will multiply until the Empire is finally defeated.  

The second detail that is most often lost by Christian readers is the position of eating. Jesus commanded the people to recline. This command is an intentional reference to the Passover in which those who eat the Passover are to eat as free persons — (even one would say to eat as nobles!) not as slaves.  Those who would join the Resistance would have to see themselves as free people, not victims!  Those who fight for freedom would have to forge their future based a new social and spiritual order not born from a system of cooperation with Roman overlords, but from a spirit of Resistance and deep desire for national autonomy that is owned by all. The narrative of the Multiplication of the Loaves concludes with Jesus withdrawing from the large crowd because the people were going to carry him off to make him a king.  They wanted to lift up Jesus not so much out of adoration and recognition of his moral and spiritual authority, but out of a lack of belief that God would provide them with the Spirit that would enable them to carry out the responsibility of the Resistance.

Like our ancestors in the faith, we must not be caught off guard by evoking a false memory of “the good old days” saying, “We remember the fish we used to eat without cost in Egypt, and the cucumbers, the melons, the leeks, the onions, and the garlic….” we cannot be fooled when leaders lift up a selective recall of a 1950’s America where families were traditional, housing was affordable, and jobs plentiful. These political opportunists deliberately forget McCarthyism; segregation and lynchings in the South; widespread misogyny in the workplace and rampant sexual harassment; and state censorship of television programming and movies.  We must live in the here and now. We must remember that when our ancestors struggled through the hard times in the wilderness, they had to rely on God alone for sustenance. Recalling their struggle will remind us that when we walk through the desert of tyranny and repression, God will indeed provide us with whatever is necessary to overcome evil. We must believe that the struggle only makes us stronger and that we shall indeed overcome this moment.

Weekly Intercessions
The arctic circle was literally on fire this past week. Over 80 people were killed in fires in Greece and over 22,ooo people were hospitalized and over 65 people died in Japan due to record breaking heat wave. Locally, fires raged across California with record-breaking heat damaging property and claiming lives.  These events are not disconnected events, they are all tied to a change in the jet stream. The jet stream is subject to the substantial changes in the sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic. What would cause such temperature changes? Rising carbon emissions! Rising carbon emissions intensified the effects of a weakened jet stream and increased temperatures on land and sea. The alarm about the rising carbon emissions sounded decades ago, but the energy industry (petroleum and coal companies) dominated by American investors and supported by American politicians (mostly Republican, but including a handful of Democrats) worked to trivialize climate change research.  Over time as more research was done, in the 1990’s the Democrats embraced protection of the environment whereas the GOP became more entrenched in denying the research and worked to block legislation that would lower emission standards.  By the early to mid 2000’s the evidence of climate change was universally accepted; however, many Republicans and their energy industry backers refused to accept the research that showed the correlation between human activity and the changing climate patterns. The Trump administration, ever-consistent with the GOP platform on the environment is currently working to remove the last of environmental protection laws. Let us pray for our planet and a return to responsible environmental policies.

Intercesiónes semanales
El círculo polar ártico estuvo literalmente quemando la semana pasada. Más de 80 personas murieron en incendios en Grecia y más de 22,000 personas fueron hospitalizadas y más de 65 personas murieron en Japón debido a una ola de calor sin precedentes. Localmente, los incendios se extendieron por todo California con propiedades que dañan el calor y rompen récords y cobran vidas. Estos eventos no son eventos desconectados, todos están vinculados a un cambio en la corriente en chorro. La corriente en chorro está sujeta a cambios sustanciales en las temperaturas de la superficie del mar en el Atlántico Norte. ¿Qué causaría tales cambios de temperatura? ¡Aumento de las emisiones de carbono! El aumento de las emisiones de carbono intensificó los efectos de una corriente de chorro debilitada y el aumento de las temperaturas en la tierra y el mar. La alarma sobre el aumento de las emisiones de carbono sonó hace décadas, pero la industria de petróleo y carbón dominada por inversores estadounidenses y apoyada por políticos estadounidenses (en su mayoría republicanos, pero entre ellos un puñado de demócratas) trabajó para trivializar la investigación sobre el cambio climático. Con el tiempo, a medida que se realizaban más investigaciones, en la década de 1990 los demócratas adoptaron la protección del medio ambiente mientras que el GOP se volvió más atrincherado al negar la investigación y trabajó para bloquear la legislación que reduciría los estándares de emisión. Para principios y mediados del 2000, la evidencia del cambio climático fue universalmente aceptada; sin embargo, muchos republicanos y sus patrocinadores de la industria de la energía se negaron a aceptar la investigación que mostraba la correlación entre la actividad humana y los patrones cambiantes del clima. La administración de Trump, siempre coherente con la plataforma GOP sobre el medio ambiente, está trabajando actualmente para eliminar la última de las leyes de protección ambiental. Oremos por nuestro planeta y un retorno a las políticas ambientales responsables.

Reflexión del domingo: El Pan Profetica

Los textos del evangelio para las próximas semanas se tomarán del sexto capítulo del evangelio de Juan. Esta primera semana de la serie de cinco semanas establece el marco y el contexto para las siguientes semanas. El contexto para el discurso sobre la multiplicación de los panes y el discurso del pan de vida; sin embargo, comienza con este intercambio al final del capítulo anterior:

“No acepto los elogios humanos; Además, sé que no tienes el amor de Dios en ti. Vine en el nombre de mi Padre, pero tú no me aceptas; sin embargo, si otro viene en su propio nombre, lo aceptarás. ¿Cómo pueden creer, cuando aceptan la alabanza el uno del otro y no buscan la alabanza que proviene del único Dios? No pienses que te acusaré ante el Padre: el que te acusará es Moisés, en quien has puesto tu esperanza. Porque si hubieras creído a Moisés, me hubieras creído, porque él escribió sobre mí. Pero si no crees en sus escritos, ¿cómo vas a creer en mis palabras? “(Jn 5: 45-47)

El evangelio de hoy, La Multiplicación de los Panes, es un comentario sobre la creencia arraigada en la narración de la lucha de los israelitas con Moisés mientras luchaban por sobrevivir en el desierto y la lucha de Jesús por alimentar a la multitud en un área remota : ¿Creemos que Dios proporcionará lo que se necesita o necesitamos hacer otros arreglos? Los israelitas en el desierto estaban al principio “a bordo” con Dios, quien los guió en la noche como una columna de fuego y una columna de humo en el día, pero una vez que sintieron hambre, se volvieron combativos. De manera similar, las personas se sintieron atraídas por las poderosas hazañas milagrosas, los exorcismos y la predicación profética (“adoradores”) de Jesús, pero una vez que tuvieron hambre y se les pidió que “tomaran su cruz”, su entusiasmo disminuyó rápidamente. Por lo tanto, en Juan 5:45 Jesús no quiere adoradores que amontonen alabanza sobre Jesús; más bien, quiere discípulos que estén listos para abrazar la cruz y participar en la Resistencia.

Pasando ahora al sexto capítulo, Jesús, los discípulos y los “adoradores” se fueron al otro lado del Mar de Galilea, es decir, a un nuevo territorio donde presumiblemente se unieron los residentes locales. El evangelista subraya la escritura contextual, “La fiesta judía de la Pascua estaba cerca.” La Pascua se refiere a Moisés que sacó al pueblo de Israel de la esclavitud y lo llevó al desierto hacia la Tierra Prometida y a la lucha del pueblo por la libertad después de haber abandonado las cadenas de la esclavitud. Esta lucha por la libertad se expresa en el texto por el deseo de las personas de volver a comer la sabrosa comida de Egipto en lugar de comer la comida relativamente suave del maná. Para entender la referencia del Éxodo, uno debe leer Juan 6 en paralelo con Números 11 y Deuteronomio 9. Número 11: 5 la gente dijo: “Recordamos el pescado que solíamos comer sin costo en Egipto, y los pepinos, los melones, los puerros, las cebollas y el ajo. Pero ahora estamos hambrientos, no tenemos nada que mirar reenviar a pero este maná”. En Deuteronómio, la gente acababa de hacer un ídolo de un becerro de oro en un acto desafiante contra Dios, que sentían que los había abandonado para morir en el desierto. La gente no tenía fe en que el Dios de Abraham, Issac y Jacob proporcionaría comida y guía. En lugar de comer el maná, la gente tenía hambre de las comidas que disfrutaban como esclavos en Egipto y formaban un ídolo de una de las deidades de sus dueños egipcios. Moisés a su vez dejó en claro a Dios que ya no podía llevar la carga del liderazgo y la dirección solo. En respuesta a la creciente presión de Moisés, Dios le ordenó a Moisés que reuniera a 70 ancianos del pueblo para que Dios le diera su espíritu a los ancianos para que Moisés ya no tuviera que soportar la carga de escuchar estas quejas por su cuenta. (La asamblea de 70 ancianos se había convertido en la fuente para establecer el Sanedrín, el tribunal obligatorio de los líderes judíos en Jerusalén). Dios multiplicó los esfuerzos de Moisés al dar el Espíritu a los ancianos … pero, estaba la cuestión práctica de cómo los que estaban reunidos en un lugar serían realmente alimentados.

Moisés fue práctico en lo que Dios le estaba pidiendo, le señaló a Dios que, aparte de los ancianos, habría cientos de miles de soldados reunidos en un solo lugar. Entonces Moisés preguntó: “¿Pueden matarse suficientes ovejas y ganado para ellos? Si todos los peces del mar fueran atrapados por ellos, ¿tendrían suficiente?” (Num 11:22). De nuevo, vemos la pregunta de si alguien tiene fe en que Dios proporcionará “lo suficiente” para lo que se necesita. Esta misma pregunta se refleja en Juan 6: 5-7. “¿Dónde podemos comprar suficiente comida para que coman? Él dijo esto para ponerlo a prueba, porque él mismo sabía lo que iba a hacer. Felipe le respondió: ‘Doscientos días de salario en alimentos no serían suficientes para que cada uno tenga un poco [poco]’”. La forma en que Jesús trata la cuestión de “suficiente” es haciendo que la gente se reúna y luego llama a un niño que tiene cinco panes de cebada y dos pescados.

Mientras que muchos lectores cristianos en este punto de la narrativa saltan directamentea la multiplicación de los panes y sus implicaciones sacramentales, una lectura más profunda de la referencia de la cebada proporcionaría una comprensión más profunda y completa de todo el pasaje. Hay varias referencias a la cebada en el Primer Testamento. Específicamente, en 2 Reyes 4:42, el profeta Eliseo dijo: “Dale (los 20 panes de cebada) al pueblo para que coma”. En esa cuenta, Eliseo también multiplicó panes y proporcionó alimentos para más de 100 hombres con suficiente sobrante. Antiguas fuentes rabínicas asocian la cebada con el profeta Ezequiel, quien alimentó con tortas de cebada a la gente. La cebada horneada bajo condiciones repulsivas (Ver Ezequiel 4:12) normalmente se reservaba para el consumo animal o para personas muy pobres.

En Ezequiel 4 Dios ordenó a la gente no solo observar cómo se horneaba la cebada usando excrementos humanos como combustible, sino que la gente tendría que comer los mismos pasteles de cebada. Los rabinos también asociaron la cebada con el significado simbólico de “dureza”, moderación y límites / identidades. Estos significados simbólicos se tomaron de las características físicas de la cebada: la cebada está encerrada en un casco fuerte que corresponde a fuertes “límites” que permanecen intactos incluso durante el proceso de trilla. La cebada también se usó como medida (un omer) que se usó para calcular los días previos a la cosecha de trigo en Shavuo’t. En los días entre el segundo día de la Pascua hasta Shavuo’t, la cosecha de cebada también se entendió simbólicamente como un proceso de 49 días de “aventar la paja” de nuestras almas y refinar nuestras intenciones y carácter.

Estas referencias simbólicas sobre la cebada serían familiares para Jesús y sus discípulos judíos. Verían las implicaciones simbólicas entre la cebada y la multiplicación de los panes como una referencia a la creciente resistencia entre el pueblo judío: que a pesar de las duras condiciones impuestas al pueblo por el Imperio Romano, el poder de la Resistencia se multiplicará hasta que el Imperio sea finalmente derrotado. El segundo detalle que los lectores cristianos más a menudo pierden es la posición de comer. Jesús ordenó a la gente que se reclinara. Este mandamiento es una referencia intencional a la Pascua en la cual aquellos que comen la Pascua deben comer como personas libres (¡incluso uno diría que comen como nobles!) No como esclavos. ¡Aquellos que se unirían a la Resistencia tendrían que verse a sí mismos como personas libres, no como víctimas!

Aquellos que luchan por la libertad tendrían que forjar su futuro basado en un nuevo orden social y espiritual no nacido de un sistema de cooperación con los conquistadores y colonizadores romanos, sino desde un espíritu de resistencia y profundo deseo de autonomía nacional que es propiedad de todos. La narración de la multiplicación de los panes concluye con Jesús retirarse de la gran multitud porque la gente iba a llevarlo a cabo para hacerlo rey. Querían levantar a Jesús no tanto por la adoración y el reconocimiento de su autoridad moral y espiritual, sino por la falta de creencia de que Dios les proporcionaría el Espíritu que les permitiría llevar a cabo la responsabilidad de la Resistencia. Nuestros antepasados en la fe, no debemos ser tomados por sorpresa evocando un recuerdo falso de “los buenos tiempos” diciendo: “Recordamos el pescado que solíamos comer sin costo en Egipto, y los pepinos, los melones, los puerros , las cebollas y el ajo …” no podemos dejarnos engañar cuando los líderes hacen un retiro selectivo de los Estados Unidos de los 1950’s donde las familias eran tradicionales, las viviendas eran asequibles y los empleos abundaban. Estos oportunistas políticos olvidan deliberadamente el Macartismo (McCarthyism); segregación y linchamientos de los negros en el sur; misoginia generalizada en el lugar de trabajo y acoso sexual desenfrenado; y censura estatal de programas de televisión y películas. Debemos vivir en el aquí y ahora. Debemos recordar que cuando nuestros antepasados lucharon a través de los tiempos difíciles en el desierto, tuvieron que depender solo de Dios para sustento. Recordar su lucha nos recordará que cuando caminamos por el desierto de la tiranía y la represión, Dios nos proporcionará todo lo que sea necesario para vencer el mal. Debemos creer que la lucha solo nos fortalece y que de hecho superaremos este momento.

No Misa de Solidaridad August 12
No hay misa de solidaridad 12 de agosto

A painting by 20th century surreal artist Rene Magritte. This painting of people eating the faces off of each, was done in the post WWII years when millions of homeless and hungry refugees lived in the streets. Government response from Communist Russian countries was slow. Magritte wrote, “Class consciousness is as necessary as bread; but that does not mean that workers must be condemned to bread and water and that wanting chicken and champagne would be harmful.” There are millions of refugees each day throughout the world in search of food and shelter. Thousands of refugees from Central America come to the US not only for food, but for a better future for themselves and their children. Sadly US response is slow and as we know quite cruel. 

IMPORTANT FAQ LINK FROM ILRC REGARDING DACA

https://www.ilrc.org/sites/default/files/resources/daca_faq-20180430.pdf

Catholic Charities Zanker Road office offers Free DACA Clinics every Monday and Wednesday, from 9 am – 12:00 pm until further notice.  Space is limited. For more information call (408) 944-0691.  2625 Zanker Road, San Jose, CA 95134

Free DACA renewals at Most Holy Trinity Parish
every Friday
9:30am to 12:30 pm       
              
Renovación de DACA en la Parroquia de Santisima Trinidad
cada viernes  
9:30am hasta 12:30 pm

2040 Nassau Drive, San José
Simple immigration consults are also free.

Family Separation

Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:

Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen:

Several weeks ago Grupo Solidaridad participated in demonstrations in support of keeping families together. Many people brought their young children with them.  Parents asked if their children wanted to come out and demonstrate and show support the children who were living in cages in detention facilities.  Young people are becoming more politically active and aware than previous generations.

Copyright © 2018 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Our mailing address is:
2625 Zanker Rd, San Jose, CA 95134

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by MailChimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: True Shepherds

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad July 21 2018 MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD THIS SUNDAY
This week’s misa will be July 22 at 9 AM Newman Chapel Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.
MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD La próxima misa sera el 22 de julio a las 9AM Capilla Newman Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10
============================================================ WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Sunday Reflection: True Shepherds The gospel text from this Sunday comes from Mark 6:30-34. The first reading and psalm amplify Mark 6:34, “When he disembarked and saw the vast crowd, his heart was moved with pity for them, for they were like sheep without a shepherd; and he began to teach them many things.” Today’s gospel passage takes on the theme of “shepherd” because of the liturgical context of pairing the Jeremiah 23:1-6 “Woe to the shepherds who mislead and scatter the flock of my pasture…” and Psalm 23, “The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want…” Today we will look at the Jewish understanding of “shepherd” as a way to unpack the on-going theme of spiritual and ministerial Resistance to the Roman Empire.
In Judaism (and by extension, Christianity) there are seven Shepherds (not counting Jesus as the Christ). They are: Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, Aaron, and David. According to an ancient Jewish spiritual belief, these seven shepherds take turn visiting the sukkah (an outdoor shelter built to commemorate the Festival of Tabernacles, or Sukkot. The temporary nature of the booth stands as a ritual reminder that the Jewish people once had to dwell in the “wilderness” for 40 years and essentially live under the stars). What then would be the significance for these seven shepherds to visit people in their sukkahs? With the visit of each shepherd, the people would be reminded that these Shepherds will help lead God’s people to freedom. The prophet Micah prophesied that God will raise up seven shepherds to help lead God’s people to freedom when the powerful Assyrian Empire invades the land. Spiritually and mystically it becomes evident that those who erect these fragile shelters are in fact the shepherds themselves. Those who erect the sukkahs are the agents of their own liberation. The faithful are not the sheep, but the shepherds!
As a rabbi, Jesus would understand the reference to “shepherd” in a specific context. Shepherds, as understood in the First Century CE were strong and fierce protectors of the flock. The Jewish people have from their call of Abraham through the time of Jesus (and up through today), are a people who hold onto the identity as a pilgrim people, that is, a people on the move, who have been displaced from their place of origin and are in a constant state of asserting and reasserting their right to exist. In the context of the First Century, the image of a shepherd as a fierce protector becomes a figure of resistance. We see this in Mark 6:34, “When he disembarked and saw the vast crowd, his heart was moved with pity for them, for they were like sheep without a shepherd; and he began to teach them many things.” The resistance is in capacity building of the vast crowd who were vulnerable to attack. They were waiting for the Messiah, the ultimate shepherd who would lead them into a fierce battle to reclaim their own land from the Empire. Jesus, who seems to have been a part of the spiritual and mystical school that taught the ancient lesson that the seven shepherds of Judaism were actually the people themselves. Teaching the people “many things” would result in self-empowerment. The people would see themselves not as victims, but as shepherds would would fiercely defend the flock and establish security for the people.
The Jewish people are also a people of the land: that is, a people who are connected to a specific place on earth in which they worship God and prepare themselves to be a “Light to the Gentiles.” Ancient Jewish mystics named eight “princes,” that is, the mystical “eight rulers” who would be tied to the fixed geography of the Jewish people who would save the Jewish people. These eight rulers along with the seven shepherds would appear together in the sukkah…and similarly, these rulers would not be “magical” figures, but rather, the people themselves. These rulers protect the people not only from external enemies, but also internal enemies, that is, those who would pose as leaders, but in fact be imposters to the throne. Jewish mystical and spiritual thought would teach that rulers like Jesse, and Saul would be there to defend the land from external forces, but also Samuel, Amos, Zephaniah, Zedekiah, Messiah, and Elijah would be there to defend the land against internal threats.
Internal threats are false shepherds who appear to be fierce and strong in defense of the flock, but are either self-serving leaders who are interested in amassing their own fortune at the expense of the flock or are authoritarian rulers who abuse their own flock and ignore the real threats from outside. In the First Century many itinerate rabbis like Jesus agitated the people to defend themselves against false shepherds like King Herod and the Jerusalem elite. At the time of writing the Gospel of Mark, the power structure that held the Jews together had disintegrated. The puppet ruler, the Hasmonean dynasty had proven to their Roman puppet masters to be ineffective in maintaining control over the Jews. Rather than allow the riots, street violence, and the assassinations of collaborators escalate into a full rebellion, the Empire clamped down very hard on the Jewish people by disbanding the Sanhedrin, dismantling the Temple and expelling the educated class from Jerusalem. The Jewish people responded with full on resistance that climaxed in a bloody rebellion and the eventual military loss.
Given the Scriptural context for “shepherd,” our sanitized Christian notions of the bucolic life of a shepherd are challenged, especially as we re-read Psalm 23 with the notion of a strong, fierce protector leading us through a dark valley. It also challenges our notions of Jesus “mobilizing” the crowds. If Jesus assumes the role of the shepherd in the terms that he would have access to understanding, we would have to re-imagine his style of preaching and teaching as being more fierce than what we may have been led to believe. As we look at religious leadership today, might we ask ourselves, if our “shepherds” took on a more Scriptural posture of shepherding, what would congregations look like? And lastly, if we were to imagine our Sunday assemblies as a sukkah where we anticipate the “arrival” of the seven shepherds and the eight rulers of God’s people, would we ourselves be ready to take on the role of fierce leadership and prophetic challenge not only to take on external threats to our nation, but the internal threats from false shepherds? What would that mean in the context of today’s political ecosystem?
Weekly Intercessions According to Human Rights Watch populist/nativist politicians have gained quick appeal due to “mounting public discontent over the status quo.” Many people are fearful of all the changes brought on by globalism, technology and the changing demographic landscape. The unease has increased the sense that governing officials do not care about the lives of the common man and woman. Populists capitalize on this feeling and they pounce on the idea that the political class is an elite class of people out of touch with the concerns of ordinary people. Rather than take a careful look at social and political tensions, the populist politicians look for groups to blame for social problems. Popular targets are Jews, Muslims, LGBTQ folk and immigrants. Right wing populists portray themselves as the only ones that will protect “our way of life.” They will use code words that harken back to a non-existent time when all people were treated well, everyone was prosperous and that no one had any real worries. They call this non-existent utopia, the “good old days.” Using racist and hateful language, refugees, immigrant communities, and minorities “become” enemies. Taking lessons from history, we see how fascist governments have in the past presented themselves as speaking on behalf of the interests of the people by using intense propaganda. Through propaganda and the suppression of truth, right wing populists gained the veneer of acceptability by attacking critics and calling them “enemies of the state.” Then they went after the judicial branch that upheld the rule of law and then finally attacking the system of checks and balances that constrained the executive branch. Today (in Turkey, Israel, United States, Hungary, Austria and Sweden) we see history play itself out in the present. Let us pray for our country in the midst of a political crisis and we pray for civil rights activists that they not be constrained from fighting for truth and freedom.
Intercesiónes semanales Según Human Rights Watch, los políticos populistas / nativistas han obtenido un rápido atractivo debido al “creciente descontento público por el status quo”. Muchas personas temen todos los cambios provocados por el globalismo, la tecnología y el cambiante panorama demográfico. La inquietud ha aumentado la sensación de que los funcionarios gubernamentales no se preocupan por las vidas del hombre y la mujer común. Los populistas aprovechan este sentimiento y se abalanzan sobre la idea de que la clase política es una clase de élite que no está en contacto con las preocupaciones de la gente común. En lugar de echar un vistazo cuidadoso a las tensiones sociales y políticas, los políticos populistas buscan grupos a los que culpar por los problemas sociales. Los objetivos populares son judíos, musulmanes, personas LGBTQ e inmigrantes. Los populistas de derecha se describen a sí mismos como los únicos que protegerán “nuestra forma de vida”. Usarán palabras en clave que se remontan a un tiempo inexistente cuando todas las personas fueron bien tratadas, todos eran prósperos y nadie tenía un verdadero preocupaciones. Ellos llaman a esta utopía inexistente, los “buenos viejos tiempos”. Usando lenguaje racista y odioso, los refugiados, las comunidades de inmigrantes y las minorías “se vuelven” enemigos. Tomando de la historia en mano, vemos cómo los gobiernos fascistas en el pasado se han presentado a sí mismos hablando en nombre de los intereses de las personas mediante el uso de una intensa propaganda. A través de la propaganda y la supresión de la verdad, los populistas de derecha ganaron la apariencia de aceptabilidad atacando a los críticos y llamándolos “enemigos del estado”. Luego fueron tras la rama judicial que mantuvo el estado de derecho y finalmente atacaron el sistema de controles y equilibrios que restringieron la rama ejecutiva. Hoy (en Turquía, Israel, Estados Unidos, Hungría, Austria y Suecia) vemos que la historia se desarrolla en el presente. Oremos por nuestro país en medio de una crisis política y oremos por los activistas de los derechos civiles para que no se vean obligados a luchar por la verdad y la libertad.
Reflexión del domingo: Verdaderos Pastores El texto del evangelio de este domingo proviene de Marcos 6: 30-34. La primera lectura y el salmo amplifican Marcos 6:34, “Cuando desembarcó y vio la gran multitud, su corazón se conmovió de ellos, porque eran como ovejas sin pastor; y comenzó a enseñarles muchas cosas “. El pasaje del evangelio de hoy toma el tema de “pastor” debido al contexto litúrgico de emparejamiento de Jeremías 23: 1-6″ ¡Ay de los pastores que engañan y dispersan el rebaño de mi pasto … “ Y el Salmo 23,” El Señor es mi pastor…” Hoy veremos la comprensión judía de “pastor” como una forma de desentrañar el tema en curso de la Resistencia espiritual y ministerial al Imperio Romano.
En el judaísmo (y por extensión, el cristianismo) hay siete pastores (sin contar a Jesús como el Cristo). Ellos son: Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, José, Moisés, Aarón y David. Según una antigua creencia espiritual judía, estos siete pastores se turnan para visitar la sucá (un refugio al aire libre construido para conmemorar el Festival de los Tabernáculos o Sucot. La naturaleza temporal del sucá es un recordatorio ritual de que el pueblo judío una vez tuvo que habitar en el “desierto” durante 40 años y esencialmente vivir bajo las estrellas). ¿Cuál sería entonces la importancia de que estos siete pastores visiten a las personas en sus sucá? Con la visita de cada “pastor,” la gente recordará que estos “pastores” ayudarán a guiar a la gente de Dios a la libertad. El profeta Miquéas profetizó que Dios levantará siete pastores para ayudar a llevar al pueblo de Dios a la libertad cuando el poderoso Imperio Asirio invada sus terrenos. Espiritual y místicamente se hace evidente que quienes levantan estos frágiles sucás son, de hecho, los mismos pastores. Aquellos que construyen las sucá son los agentes de su propia liberación. ¡Los fieles no son las ovejas, sino los pastores!
Como rabino, Jesús entendería la referencia al “pastor” en un contexto específico. Los pastores, tal como se los entendió en el Siglo I EC, eran fuertes y feroces protectores del rebaño. El pueblo judío, desde su llamado de Abraham a través del tiempo de Jesús (y hasta el día de hoy), es un pueblo que se aferra a la identidad de un pueblo peregrino, es decir, un pueblo en movimiento, que ha sido desplazado de su lugar de origen y están en un estado constante de afirmar y reafirmar su derecho a existir. En el contexto del Primer Siglo, la imagen de un pastor como un protector feroz se convierte en una figura de resistencia. Vemos esto en Marcos 6:34, “Cuando desembarcó y vio la gran multitud, su corazón se conmovió de ellos, porque eran como ovejas sin pastor; y comenzó a enseñarles muchas cosas “. La resistencia está en la construcción de capacidades de la gran multitud que era vulnerable al ataque. Estaban esperando al Mesías, el último pastor que los conduciría a una feroz batalla para reclamar su propia tierra del Imperio. Jesús, quien parece haber sido parte de la escuela espiritual y mística que enseñó la antigua lección de que los siete pastores del judaísmo eran realmente las personas mismas. Enseñarle a la gente “muchas cosas” daría como resultado el empoderamiento de uno mismo. Las personas se verían a sí mismas no como víctimas, sino como pastores que defenderían ferozmente al rebaño y establecerían seguridad para el pueblo.
El pueblo judío también es un pueblo de la tierra, es decir, un pueblo que está conectado a un lugar específico en la tierra en el que adoran a Dios y se preparan para ser una “Luz para los gentiles”. Antiguos místicos judíos nombraron ocho “príncipes” , es decir, los “ocho gobernantes.” Los místicos que estarían vinculados a la geografía fija del pueblo judío que salvaría al pueblo judío. Estos ocho gobernantes junto con los siete pastores aparecerían juntos en la sucá … y del mismo modo, estos gobernantes no serían figuras “mágicas”, sino las mismas personas. Estos gobernantes protegen a la gente no solo de los enemigos externos, sino también de los enemigos internos, es decir, de aquellos que se hacen pasar por líderes, pero que de hecho son impostores al trono. El pensamiento místico y espiritual judío enseñaría que los gobernantes como Jesé y Saúl estarían allí para defender la tierra de las fuerzas externas, pero también Samuel, Amós, Sofonías, Sedequías, el Mesías y Elías estarían allí para defender la tierra de las amenazas internas.
Las amenazas internas son falsos pastores que parecen ser fieros y fuertes en defensa del rebaño, pero son líderes egoístas que están interesados en amasar su propia fortuna a expensas del rebaño o son gobernantes autoritarios que abusan de su propio rebaño e ignoran las amenazas reales desde el exterior. En el Primer Siglo, muchos rabinos itinerantes como Jesús agitaban al pueblo para defenderse de los falsos pastores como el Rey Herodes y la élite de Jerusalén. En el momento de escribir el Evangelio de Marcos, la estructura de poder que mantenía unidos a los judíos se había desintegrado. El gobernante títere, la dinastía Hasmonea, había demostrado a sus “puppet masters” romanos que era ineficaz para mantener el control sobre los judíos. En lugar de permitir que los disturbios, la violencia callejera y los asesinatos de colaboradores se conviertan en una rebelión total, el Imperio presionó duramente al pueblo judío al disolver el Sanedrín, desmantelar el Templo y expulsar a la clase educada de Jerusalén. El pueblo judío respondió con plena resistencia que culminó en una sangrienta rebelión y la eventual pérdida militar.
Dado el contexto de las Escrituras para “pastor”, nuestras nociones cristianas desinfectadas de la vida bucólica de un pastor son desafiadas, especialmente cuando releemos el Salmo 23 con la noción de un protector fuerte y feroz que nos conduce a través de un valle oscuro. También desafía nuestras nociones de que Jesús “moviliza” a la multitud. Si Jesús asume el papel del pastor en los términos en que tendría acceso a la comprensión, tendríamos que volver a imaginar su estilo de predicación y enseñanza como más feroz de lo que nos han hecho creer. Al mirar hoy el liderazgo religioso, ¿podríamos preguntarnos, si nuestros “pastores” asumieran una postura más bíblica de pastoreo, cómo serían las congregaciones? Y, por último, si imagináramos nuestras asambleas dominicales como una sucá en donde anticipamos la “llegada” de los siete pastores y los ocho gobernantes del pueblo de Dios, ¿estaríamos nosotros mismos listos para asumir el papel de liderazgo feroz y desafío profético no solo para enfrentar amenazas externas a nuestra nación, ¿pero las amenazas internas de falsos pastores? ¿Qué significa eso en el contexto del ecosistema político actual?
Profiles in Courage: Resistance
Hans Scholl and his sister Sophie, along with their best friend, Christoph Probst were in their early and mid-20’s when they were caught distributing essays condemning the Nazi government. After their execution, other students were caught and executed. Learn about their brave story of the White Rose in The White Rose (1970) by Inge Scholl, A Noble Treason (1979) by Richard Hanser, and An Honourable Defeat (1994) by Anton Gill.
The Nazis did not begin as a powerful political party. In the 1928 elections they were a far-right party of the margins with only 2.6% of the national vote. During the world wide Depression, the mood in Germany grew quite grim and millions of people were unemployed. Using propaganda that twisted historical facts, the Nazis created a message of hope by casting blame on Jews, Gypsies (both groups were seen as permanent immigrants, that is, people without proper “German” citizenship) and trade unions (who were labeled as socialists/liberals). The message was clear, “Make Germany great.” By the 1932 elections, Nazi’s gained 37.3% of the vote making them the largest political party. Hitler became chancellor via a questionable deal among a small group of conservative politicians who had aspirations that Hitler would bring about a return to conservative, authoritarian rule. Hitler outmaneuvered these politicians, consolidated power, changed the judiciary and wrote new laws that severely limited free speech, punished Jews, unionists, gypsies and LGBTQ persons. After WWII broke out, dissent was impossible. All dissenters were immediately imprisoned and executed. Only a few people chose to stand against the Nazi’s. The White Rose story stands as a living monument to the Resistance. History tells us that resistance must happen now. IMPORTANT FAQ LINK FROM ILRC REGARDING DACA ** AlmadenResearch.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=a2e683a125&e=105d556a20 (AlmadenResearch.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=99ea87e463&e=105d556a20)
Catholic Charities Zanker Road office offers Free DACA Clinics every Monday and Wednesday, from 9 am – 12:00 pm until further notice. Space is limited. For more information call (408) 944-0691. 2625 Zanker Road, San Jose, CA 95134 Free DACA renewals at Most Holy Trinity Parish every Friday 9:30am to 12:30 pm
Renovación de DACA en la Parroquia de Santisima Trinidad cada viernes 9:30am hasta 12:30 pm
2040 Nassau Drive, San José Simple immigration consults are also free.
Family Separation The issue of family separation continues to intensify with a number of congressional leaders condemning the increasing use of the tactic. The policy, originally announced on May 7th by the Trump Administration, calls for all families crossing the border to be prosecuted. The result of this policy means parents are incarcerated while their children are taken away and sent to family members or foster care centers for long periods of time.
In response to this practice, Catholic Charities USA President and CEO Sister Donna Markham OP, PhD, wrote to the Secretary of Homeland Security expressing CCUSA’s opposition to the policy of separating children from parents.
“As a clinical psychologist, I have also seen the consequences that not having a parent can have on a child, and it is deeply troubling that the administration has chosen to create a generation of traumatized children in the name of border security. Surely as a nation we can debate the best way to secure our border without resorting to creating life-long trauma for children, some of whom are mere toddlers.” You can read the full letter ** here (AlmadenResearch.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=61621aa66c&e=105d556a20) .
Join USCCB/Migration and Refugee Services and Catholic Charities USA today to help make a difference. Please email us at ** familyseparation@usccb.org (mailto:familyseparation@usccb.org) or ** socialpolicy@catholiccharitiesusa.org (mailto:socialpolicy@catholiccharitiesusa.org) with information and questions.
Five Ways To Help Stop Family Separation: 1. Pray: You can find a prayer for migrant children ** here (AlmadenResearch.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=f708b8fd64&e=105d556a20) . 2. Speak Up: Sign our ** Action Alert (AlmadenResearch.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=ce827a46a2&e=105d556a20) and share with your networks. Also consider contacting your senators and representative directly by phone to voice your concern. You can find the number for your representative ** here (AlmadenResearch.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=e05b4ffb61&e=105d556a20) and your senators** here (AlmadenResearch.us1.list-mana