Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Understanding Trinity in Context

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

June 13, 2019

No MISA Solidaridad THIS SUNDAY!
Our next mass will be
June 23 at 9 am

Join Fr. Jon at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish this Sunday June 16: English mass at 9:30 am or Spanish mass at 11 am. 

¡NO hay MISA este domingo!
La próxima misa sera
23 de junio a las 9 am

Únase a P. Jon en Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe este domingo 16 de julio. Hay misa en inglés a las 9:30 am o en español a las 11 am. 

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

A new mural painted by high school student Chloe Becker—a junior at Magnificat High School in Rocky River, Ohio.  Ms Becker subjects were St. Augustine, St. Monica, St. Benedict and then Sister Thea Bowman and Father Augustus Tolton.  America Magazine has the full story on Ms. Becker’s work. See: https://www.americamagazine.org/arts-culture/2019/06/07/looking-new-religious-art-check-your-local-high-school?fbclid=IwAR3J2uWaPXilLsi0ydYC-usGsM7UALCUkDKPmQ-bXrZNsjWakoQuCApgIRs

Reflection: Understanding Trinity in Context

This week Catholics and members of the Anglican Communion and a few Protestant denominations celebrate “Trinity Sunday,” a feast that demarcates the dogma that one God exists in three equally divine “persons”, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit and that these three persons are co-equal, co-eternal distinct one from another.  (The hyperlink above is to an external website, New Advent, from a hetero-Euro-cis-male perspective).  The Trinity is not only a fascinating in that it attempts to hold together a non-dual monotheistic concept of God using dualistic categories and language, it is a dogma with a rich and complex history. Today’s reflection is a dive into the history and theological context that give rise to the concept of the Trinity.

The Feast of the Most Holy Trinity was established in reaction to a growing heresy that held Jesus was a creature distinct from the Father. Those who believe in the Trinity believe that Jesus-as-the Christ is “Eternal,”  meaning that “Christ was, is, and ever shall be…”  The category of “eternal” excludes the belief that Jesus-as-the Christ came into existence only when he was born in history.  One of the earliest “heresies” of the Church was Arianism. Arians did not believe in the dogma of the Trinity.  They believed that Jesus was a begotten being — that is “made,” and therefore was not of the same essence or substance as the Creator. This theological distinction divide those who believed in the Trinity from those who did not and, not surprisingly, the theological distinction was a convenient way to divide territories between Orthodox Bishops (from which modern Christians descend) and Arian Bishops. The division territories gave bishops taxation dominion over those said territories and predictably wars were fought over the pretense of orthodoxy.  Conflicts in Germanic kingdoms (and their mission territories in modern France and England) extended well into the  6th Century. Arianism or some form of it has reappeared in and out throughout Christian history until even today in which some Christian churches reject Trinitarian theology. 

The historical context provides a living example that Christians had (and still have) in understanding God in relation to Jesus-as-the Christ. As the early Christian community became more and more separated from its Jewish cultural and religious context, Christian leaders lost contact with the Jewish theological dialog about God. The Jewish religion has been described by some modern thinkers as an ethical enterprise in which people who identify as Jews are compelled to live in an ethical manner (personally and communally) as dictated by the Torah.  Ethical demands are drawn from the Torah by way of asking questions of teachers and studying the writings of well-known rabbis of antiquity commentators (Talmud) with special attention given to teaching parables which opened up the minds of those who studied the Torah. The questioning, studying, and commentaries were known as the Oral Torah, that is, a living and breathing Law that existed in the breath of the people.

The Oral Torah (the Mishhah,(מִשְׁנָה), helped people understand who they were in relation to the God of Israel and what that relationship demanded of them as they, the Chosen People, lived in the world.  Christians (particularly those who were directly converted from Judaism), up until the destruction of the Second Temple (70 CE), were a part of that amazing conversation.  When the Second Temple was destroyed and Jewish leaders were expelled from Jerusalem, the entire region became unsettled. The singular element that would hold the people together was their religious practice.  The Empire presumed that by destroying the focal point of Jewish identity, the Temple, that the people would eventually give up their faith and become loyal subjects of the Empire. The Empire did not understand that more central to Jewish life than ritual sacrifices made at the Temple, was the Torah.  The Empire (and subsequent Emperors, Kings, Queens, Chancellors, and Presidents of the Empire) could not destroy the Jewish people because the Torah — the Written Word and the Oral Torah remained a part of their lives. With the Torah, the people never lost contact with the God who led them from Egypt into the Promised Land.  Christians could no longer theologically identify as a sect of Judaism because they believed that Jesus was the Christ, the Anointed One, the Messiah and LORD.

Because Christians separated from the divine conversation between the people and the Torah and that they too suffered under the oppression of the Empire and like their Jewish neighbors, were expelled from the region, they needed to find a way to hold on to their identity. Using the familiar methodology of asking questions, retelling the parables, and reading the Written Torah, the Christian communities that were covered directly from Judaism like the community of the evangelist John (Johannine community), they seemed to have supplanted the Oral Torah with the Jesus-as-the Christ. Christian theologians like Dutch theologian Jacobus Schoneveld, posits that the prolog of the Gospel of John is not a Hellenist echo of an ode to Zeus, but rather a poem exalting Jesus-as-the Christ as the Living Torah. Schoneveld’s work is not a “supersessionist theology” that believes that Jesus-as-the Christ is a new and improved Torah and that Christianity is the Judaism that God always wanted. (Supersessionist theologies are not merely superficial and misguided by poor scholarship, they are dangerous because they play into the hands of anti-Semitic forces that use supersessionist theologies to legitimize pogroms and genocide.)

Schoneveld’s position, a minority position among Christian theologians, raises an interesting point: some early Christian communities were trying to understand Jesus using Jewish interpretive categories. As years went on and the cultural and political separation between Jews and Christians widened, new converts came from the Hellenistic community outnumbered the converts from Judaism. The gospels and letters of Paul and other Christian writing soon became the only consistent theological tether with Jewish theology.  Christians relied more and more on their own texts for understanding who Jesus was in relationship to God the Creator ( Jesus referred to God as “Father”) and Spirit (Ruah/life force of God, Shekinah) by re-reading and interpreting the texts of the Prophets and the Torah with the lens that Jesus was the Messiah. At this point in time, Christians continued to refer to the Torah, Prophets and Wisdom literature as the sources that legitimized their belief that Jesus was the Christ. It appears that for the years after the fall of Jerusalem and during the writing and compilation of Christian sacred texts that Christian leaders did in fact point to Jewish categories, history and theology as a way for their new converts to understand who Jesus was and what relationship Jesus had with God and Spirit. By “rebranding” Christ and Christianity, Christian leadership suppressed the Jewish resistance elements of Jesus as an itinerant rabbi who stood against the Empire. Christian leaders toned down the Jewishness of Jesus of Nazareth, especially the resistance dimension, and began to rebrand Jesus as a Divine Being made flesh, something quite familiar to Romans and Greeks.  Beginning in the Second Century Christian leaders began an outreach to the Empire’s intellectuals as a way to win over new converts and gain a foothold of power in the Empire. 

Christian theologians in the 3rd and 4th Centuries turned away from the monotheistic theology of the Jews and turned to the polytheistic theologies and materialist categories of the Greco-Roman Empire as a way to “explain” Jesus’ legitimate divinity.  The Christian theologians turned to the Scriptures as “proof texts” to retain a sense of still rooting themselves in their Semitic roots while jumping into the waters of Hellenism. It is in this mix of history, theology, and politics that Western Christian theology was born.
 
By the 6th Century the wandering rabbi who overturned the tables of moneychangers and was crucified in the garbage heaps outside the walls of the city took on the visage of a Byzantine Emperor or the god Zeus. Christ was a king and identified with power. As Pantokrator, Christ legitimized war against the Empire’s enemies and upheld the divine right of kings. This was not a surprising development because the majority of the gods of the Empire were conceptualized as humans: they possessed physical likeness, they took on human attributes (good and bad), and were glorified for their beauty. Christian leaders were interested in growing numbers and protecting their membership.  Appealing to the Hellenistic power structures signaled that Christianity which had been a religion of slaves and servants was, by the 5th Century, the religion of the Empire.  The elite of the Empire did not see a rebel rabbi that consorted with rabble rousers, prostitutes and political agitators, they saw a god of victory, certainty, beauty and strength. They saw themselves. They saw Zeus.

Supplementing the traditional concept of Trinity, today’s pioneering theologians such as the late Professor Schoneveld, liberation theologians from the southern hemisphere, biblical historians, political historians, and sociologists studying comparative theologies in their historical contexts, provide exciting ways to rediscover Jesus-as-the Christ without the baggage of anti-Semitism and supersessionism and the looming shadow of the Empire that seeks to make God into its own image. Emerging Christian theologies and studies can provide avenues for deeper appreciation of Jesus’ Jewish context using text and scholarship without reinterpreting Jewish traditions to fit Christian dogmas. Most importantly, the new theology lets us see Jesus-as-the Christ.

Weekly Intercessions
This past week the administration announced that they will reopen Ft. Sill, a Japanese interment camp, to house migrant children. Ft. Sill once housed 350 Americans of Japanese descent during WWII. Executive Order 9066 was signed on February 19, 1942 authorized the American government to incarcerate Japanese Americans (120,000 Japanese Americans were sent to the camps of which 70,000 were American citizens.  11,000 German Americans, 3,000 Italian Americans were also interned, but not in internment camps like their Japanese American neighbors. ).  American citizens were rousted out of their homes, taking only what they could carry, board buses and be relocated to camps in remote areas of the country under the pretense of protecting America from foreign enemies. Whether one was born and raised in the country, attended public school and worked along side fellow Americans for decades made no difference in the Executive Order. If anyone with Japanese blood was taken to an interment camp where they remained for the duration of the war. Japanese American families lost their homes, their positions at work and university, and all their treasured possessions. The injustice of yesteryear is raised again in the decision to use Fr. Sill for an estimated 1,400 children. Immigration and refugee experts say that these children pose no threat to the American people and that the most appropriate place to house children who are separated from their families because they had to flee political chaos and where they would otherwise be subject to rape, torture, kidnapping, and murder, would be to house them among the general population. There are technologies that can track the children without placing them in an internment camp. In the history of Camp Sill, one man became so distraught about being separated from his family that he climbed the barbed wire and died saying, “I want to go home. I want to go home.” Let us pray for the thousands of refugees in need of support. We also pray for our country, that we may remember the past and not be condemned to repeat it.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Entendiendo la Trinidad en contexto

Esta semana, los católicos y los miembros de la Comunión Anglicana y algunas denominaciones protestantes celebran la Fiesta de la Santísima Trinidad, una fiesta que demarca el dogma de que un solo Dios existe en tres “personas” igualmente divinas, el Padre, el Hijo y el Espíritu Santo y que estas tres personas son co-iguales, co-eternas distintas una de otra. La Trinidad no solo es fascinante, ya que intenta mantener unido un concepto monoteísta no-dual de Dios utilizando categorías y lenguaje dualistas, es un dogma con una historia rica y compleja. La reflexión de hoy es una inmersión en la historia y el contexto teológico que dan origen al concepto de la Trinidad.

La Fiesta de la Santísima Trinidad se estableció como reacción a una creciente herejía que sostenía que Jesús era una criatura distinta del Padre. Los que creen en la Trinidad creen que Jesús-comoel Cristo es “Eterno”, lo que significa que “Cristo fue, es y siempre será …” La categoría de “eterno” excluye la creencia de que Jesús-como-el Cristo vino sólo existe cuando nació en la historia. Una de las primeras “herejías” de la Iglesia fue el arrianismo. Arios no creía en el dogma de la Trinidad. Creían que Jesús era una cosa material, engendrado no hecho y, por lo tanto, no tenía la misma esencia o sustancia que el Creador. Esta distinción teológica divide a quienes creían en la Trinidad de aquellos que no lo hacían y, como es lógico, la distinción teológica era una forma conveniente de dividir los territorios entre los obispos ortodoxos (de los cuales descienden los cristianos modernos) y los obispos arios. Los territorios de la división otorgaron a los obispos el dominio fiscal sobre esos territorios y, como era de esperar, las guerras se libraron por el pretexto de la ortodoxia. Los conflictos en los reinos germánicos (y sus territorios de misión en la moderna Francia e Inglaterra) se extendieron hasta el siglo VI. El arrianismo o alguna forma de él ha reaparecido a lo largo de la historia cristiana hasta el día de hoy, en el que algunas iglesias cristianas rechazan la teología trinitaria.

El contexto histórico proporciona un ejemplo vivo que los cristianos tuvieron (y aún tienen) al entender a Dios en relación con Jesús-como-el Cristo. A medida que la comunidad cristiana primitiva se separaba cada vez más de su contexto cultural y religioso judío, los líderes cristianos perdieron contacto con el diálogo teológico judío acerca de Dios. La religión judía ha sido descrita por algunos pensadores modernos como un proyecto ética en la que las personas que se identifican como judíos se ven obligadas a vivir de una manera ética (personal y comunitaria) según lo dictado por la Torá. Las exigencias éticas se extraen de la Torá haciendo preguntas a los maestros y estudiando los escritos de conocidos rabinos de comentaristas de la antigüedad (Talmud), prestando especial atención a las parábolas que abrieron las mentes de quienes estudiaron la Torá. El cuestionamiento, el estudio y los comentarios se conocían como la Torá Oral, es decir, una ley viva que existía en el aliento de la gente.

La Torá Oral (el Mishhah, (מִשְׁנָה), ayudó a las personas a entender quiénes eran en relación con el Dios de Israel y lo que esa relación les exigía, ya que ellos, el Pueblo Elegido, vivían en el mundo. Cristianos (particularmente aquellos que estaban directamente convertidos del judaísmo), hasta la destrucción del Segundo Templo (70 EC), fueron parte de esa conversación increíble. Cuando el Segundo Templo fue destruido y los líderes judíos fueron expulsados ​​de Jerusalén, toda la región quedó sin resolver. El elemento singular que su práctica religiosa sería mantener a la gente unida. El Imperio supuso que al destruir el punto focal de la identidad judía, el Templo, que la gente finalmente abandonaría su fe y se convertiría en súbditos leales del Imperio. El Imperio no aceptó eso. El centro de la vida judía que los sacrificios rituales realizados en el Templo era la Torá. El Imperio (y los siguientes emperadores, reyes, reinas, cancilleres y presidentes del imperio) no podían destruir al pueblo judío porque la Torá, la Palabra escrita y la Torá oral, siguen siendo parte de sus vidas. Con la Torá, la gente nunca perdió el contacto con el Dios que los llevó de Egipto a la Tierra Prometida. Los cristianos ya no podían identificarse teológicamente como una secta del judaísmo porque creían que Jesús era el Cristo, el Ungido, el Mesías y el SEÑOR.

Debido a que los cristianos se separaron de la conversación divina entre la gente y la Torá y que ellos también sufrieron bajo la opresión del Imperio y al igual que sus vecinos judíos, fueron expulsados ​​de la región, tenían que encontrar una manera de mantener su identidad. Usando la metodología familiar de hacer preguntas, volver a contar las parábolas y leer la Torá Escrita, las comunidades cristianas que estaban cubiertas directamente por el judaísmo como la comunidad del evangelista Juan (comunidad Johannina), parecían haber suplantado la Torá Oral con el Jesús -como-el Cristo. Teólogos cristianos, como el teólogo holandés Jacobus Schoneveld, postulan que el prólogo del Evangelio de Juan no es un eco helenista de una oda a Zeus, sino un poema que exalta a Jesús-como el-Cristo como la Torá Viva. El trabajo de Schoneveld no es una “teología supersesionista” que cree que Jesús-como-el Cristo es “una Torá nueva” y mejorada y que el cristianismo es el judaísmo que Dios siempre quiso. (Las teologías supersesionistas no son meramente superficiales y están equivocadas por una investigación deficiente, son peligrosas porque juegan en las manos de las fuerzas antisemitas que utilizan teologías supersesionistas para legitimar los pogromos y el genocidio).

La posición de Schoneveld, una posición minoritaria entre los teólogos cristianos, plantea un punto interesante: algunas comunidades cristianas primitivas intentaban entender a Jesús utilizando categorías interpretativas judías. A medida que pasaron los años y se amplió la separación cultural y política entre judíos y cristianos, los nuevos conversos provenientes de la comunidad helenística superaron en número a los conversos del judaísmo. Los evangelios y las cartas de Pablo y otros escritos cristianos pronto se convirtieron en el único vínculo teológico consistente con la teología judía. Los cristianos confiaban cada vez más en sus propios textos para comprender quién era Jesús en relación con Dios el Creador (Jesús se refirió a Dios como “Padre”) y Espíritu (Ruah / fuerza vital de Dios, Shekinah) al releer e interpretar los textos de los profetas y la Torá con la lente interpretada de que Jesús era el Mesías. En este momento, los cristianos continuaron refiriéndose a la literatura de la Torá, los Profetas y los libros de Sabiduría como las fuentes que confirmaban su creencia de que Jesús era el Cristo. Parece que durante los años posteriores a la destrucción de Jerusalén y durante la redacción y compilación de textos sagrados cristianos, los líderes cristianos señalaron de hecho las categorías, la historia y la teología judías como una forma para que sus nuevos conversos entiendan quién era Jesús y qué relación Jesús tuvo con Dios y el Espíritu. Al “renombrar” a Cristo y al cristianismo, el liderazgo cristiano suprimió los elementos de resistencia judíos de Jesús como un rabino itinerante que se resistía al Imperio. Los líderes cristianos disminuido el carácter judío de Jesús de Nazaret, especialmente la dimensión de la resistencia, y comenzaron a cambiar el nombre de Jesús como un ser divino incarnado, algo muy familiar para los romanos y los griegos. A partir del siglo II, los líderes cristianos comenzaron a acercarse a los intelectuales del Imperio como una forma de ganarse a los nuevos conversos y ganar poder en el Imperio.

Los teólogos cristianos de los siglos III y IV se apartaron de la teología monoteísta de los judíos y se centraron en las teologías politeístas y las categorías materialistas del Imperio grecorromano como una forma de “explicar” la divinidad legítima de Jesús. Los teólogos cristianos recurrieron a las Escrituras como “textos de prueba” para conservar la sensación de seguir arraigándose en sus raíces semíticas mientras saltaban a las aguas del helenismo. Es en esta mezcla de historia, teología y política que nació la teología cristiana occidental.

 En el siglo VI, el rabino errante que volcó las mesas de los cambistas y fue crucificado en el basurero fuera del muro de la ciudad tomó el rostro de un emperador bizantino o del dios Zeus. Cristo fue un rey y se identificó con el poder del Imperio. Como Pantokrator, Cristo legitimó la guerra contra los enemigos del Imperio y defendió el derecho divino de los reyes. Este no fue un desarrollo sorprendente porque la mayoría de los dioses del Imperio fueron conceptualizados como humanos: poseían semejanza física, tomaron atributos humanos (buenos y malos) y fueron glorificados por su belleza. Los líderes cristianos estaban interesados ​​en un número creciente y en proteger a sus miembros. La apelación a las estructuras de poder helenísticas indicaba que el cristianismo que había sido una religión de esclavos y sirvientes era, en el siglo V, la religión del Imperio. La élite del Imperio no vio a un rabino rebelde que se juntara con los agitadores de la agitación, las prostitutas y los agitadores políticos, vieron a un dios de la victoria, la certeza, la belleza y la fuerza. Se vieron a sí mismos. Vieron a Zeus.

Complementando el concepto tradicional de la Trinidad, los teólogos pioneros de hoy en día, como el difunto Profesor Schoneveld, los teólogos de la liberación del hemisferio sur, los historiadores bíblicos, los historiadores políticos y los sociólogos que estudian teologías comparativas en sus contextos históricos, proporcionan maneras emocionantes de redescubrir a Jesús-como-el Cristo sin el bagaje de antisemitismo y supersessionism y la sombra que se avecina del Imperio que busca hacer de Dios a su propia imagen. Los estudios y las teologías cristianas emergentes pueden proporcionar caminos para una apreciación más profunda del contexto judío de Jesús mediante el uso de textos y estudios sin reinterpretar las tradiciones judías para que se confirman a los dogmas cristianos. Lo más importante es que la nueva teología nos permite ver a Jesús-como-el Cristo.

Intercesiónes semanales

La semana pasada, la administración anunció que reabrirá Ft. Sill, un campamento de entierro japonés, para albergar a niños migrantes. Ft. Sill una vez albergó a 350 estadounidenses de ascendencia japonesa durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial. La Orden Ejecutiva 9066 se firmó el 19 de febrero de 1942 y autorizó al gobierno estadounidense a encarcelar a los estadounidenses de origen japonés (120,000 estadounidenses de origen japonés fueron enviados a los campos de los cuales 70,000 eran ciudadanos estadounidenses. 11,000 estadounidenses de origen alemán, 3,000 estadounidenses estadounidenses también fueron internados, pero no en campos de internamiento como sus vecinos japoneses americanos). Los ciudadanos estadounidenses fueron sacados de sus hogares, tomando solo lo que podían llevar, abordar los autobuses y ser reubicados en campamentos en áreas remotas del país con el pretexto de proteger a Estados Unidos de enemigos extranjeros. Si uno nació y creció en el país, asistió a una escuela pública y trabajó junto a otros estadounidenses durante décadas, no hizo ninguna diferencia en la Orden Ejecutiva. Si alguien con sangre japonesa fue llevado a un campo de enterramiento donde permanecieron durante la guerra. Las familias japonesas estadounidenses perdieron sus hogares, sus puestos en el trabajo y la universidad, y todas sus posesiones preciadas. La injusticia de antaño se vuelve a plantear en la decisión de usar al Padre. Sill para un estimado de 1,400 niños. Los expertos en inmigración y refugiados dicen que estos niños no representan una amenaza para el pueblo estadounidense y que es el lugar más apropiado para albergar a los niños que están separados de sus familias porque tuvieron que huir del caos político y de dónde serían sujetos a violación, tortura y secuestro, y asesinato, sería albergarlos entre la población general. Hay tecnologías que pueden rastrear a los niños sin colocarlos en un campo de internamiento. En la historia de Camp Sill, un señor se sintió tan angustiado por haberse separado de su familia que trepó el alambre de púas y murió diciendo: “Quiero mi familia”. Quiero mi familia ”. Oremos por los miles de refugiados que necesitan apoyo. También oramos por nuestro país, para que podamos recordar el pasado y no ser condenados a repetirlo.

News – Noticias

FR JON WILL BE CELEBRATING MASS AT OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE PARISH 2020 E. S. ANTONIO ST., SJ AT THE 9:30 (ENG) AND 11 AM (SP) MASSES. THERE WILL NOT BE A MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD 9 AM THIS SUNDAY.
 
FR JON CELEBRARÁ LA MISA EN NUESTRA SEÑORA DE LA PARROQUÍA DE GUADALUPE 2020 E. S. ANTONIO ST., SJ A LAS 9:30 (INGLES) Y 11 AM (ESPANOL). NO HABRÁ UNA MISA DE SOLIDARIDAD 9 AM DE ESTE DOMINGO.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Pentecost and Forgiveness

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

June 7, 2019

YES! MISA THIS SUNDAY!
Our next mass is
June 9 at 9 am
at SJSU Newman Chapel,
the corner of San Carlos and 10th.

Join Fr. Jon at the Sun- nyvale Zen Center at 2 pm for a panel discussion on climate change. 750 E. Arques Ave., Sunnyvale.

¡SI hay MISA este domingo!
La próxima misa sera
9 de junio a las 9 am
en la Capilla de SJSU
la esquina de 10 y S. Carlos

Estan invitados a atender una mesa redonda sobre el cambio climático en el Sunnyvale Zen Center a las 2 pm con P. Jon. 750 E. Arques Ave., Sunnyvale.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The annual San Francisco Carnival featured dancers, musicians and performance artists representing the multi-faceted way that various Latinx, Afro-Caribe, and Brazilian cultures celebrate Carnival. The Bay Area is dominated by immigrants; however, immigrant persons are not integrated into the society. A recent study has shown that the Bay Area is as segregated along racial lines now as it was in 1970. Segregation leads to mutual exclusion and cultural ignorance. Carnival is one way that San Francisco helps its residence to see each other.

Reflection: Pentecost and Forgiveness 
The Feast of Pentecost has two options for the gospel reading: John 20:19-23 or John 14:15-16, 23B-26. This week’s Communique will take John 20:19-23 and respond to the question, “Under whose authority can we forgive sins?”

Simon Wiesenthal, Holocaust survivor, Nazi hunter, noted author, activist, and philosopher, wrote a short book, The Sunflower, with the intent that readers must struggle with the question: Will you forgive me? The Sunflower takes place in Germany at the end of WWII concerning an incident that happened to Wiesenthal as a young man. 

In the story a group of concentration camp inmates came across a 21 year old dying Nazi soldier who was dying in a hospital bed. The soldier, Karl, had asked the nurse to find a Jew to whom he could confess and ask forgiveness for his war crimes.  Simon was brought into the room to meet Karl and hear his story. Karl told Simon that he came from a good family, but chose to become a Nazi and because of that decision his own family separated from him. He then talked about a horrific instance of going to a Russian village where he and the other Nazi’s rounded up the village’s Jews, forced all of them to go into a house, doused the house with petrol and threw grenades into the house. Most of those killed were older people, women and children who posed no threat to the Nazi invaders. Karl saw a family escape and he let them go.  Later in Crimea, he saw the family again just before a bomb exploded at his side. The explosion sent him to the hospital where he was. 

After telling this horrific story, Karl said, “So I lie here waiting for death. The pains in my body are terrible, but worse still is my conscience . . . I cannot die . . . without coming clean . . . In the last hours of my life you are with me. I do not know who you are. I only know that you are a Jew and that is enough . . . In the long nights while I have been waiting for death, time and time again I have longed to talk about it to a Jew and beg forgiveness from him. Only I didn’t know whether there were any Jews left . . . I know that what I am asking is almost too much for you, but without your answer I cannot die in peace.”  Simon left the room without forgiving him. The following day Karl the soldier died. Simon often thought of Karl and wondered whether he should have forgiven him.  He wrote, “Ought I to have forgiven him? Was my silence at the bedside of the dying Nazi right or wrong? This is a profound moral question . . . The crux of the matter is, of course, the question of forgiveness. Forgetting is something that time alone takes care of, but forgiveness is an act of volition . . .” 

Wiesenthal’s book, The Sunflower, was published with a number of essays following the story that respond to his question, “Ought I have forgiven him.” The essays provide a wide variety of theological, spiritual and philosophical thinking around this issue.  Given today’s reading, how would we as Christians answer Simon’s question?  What would Jesus-as-the Christ be asking of us were we Simon? Let us return to the gospel to try to get at that question.

The Risen Lord breathed Spirit into the disciples and said, “Receive the holy Spirit. Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained.” At the most superficial level, one might say that Karl —who willfully became a Nazi and who followed the orders to round up and lock the village’s Jews into a house and then set that house on fire — should be forgiven. Karl expressed deep regret for what he did and therefore he “deserves” forgiveness.  A deeper study of the passage might suggest something surprisingly different. 

In Judaism, confession is but a step in the process of atonement in which one stands before the mercy of God alone. When one has sinned against another person — as in the case of Karl — one should confess publicly. Confession; however, does not automatically bring on forgiveness.  Confession is merely a starting point that demarcates the specific date, place and time in which a person wishes to change one’s life.  Forgiveness is given in the test of time in which a person demonstratively shows that there is a true change in one’s life and that finally this person “deserves” forgiveness. Judaism does not have a religious figure to whom one goes to confess, nor does it have “absolution” as part of the process of sin and repentance. Lastly, the Jewish concept of “reconciliation” (the condition where is no inner feeling of hatred toward the offender, but love) is desirable, but not necessarily the best outcome depending on the situation. 

The concept of teshuva, meaning returning, is a fundamental concept of which Jesus-as-the Christ would be familiar. Teshuva is the total reform of one’s inner and outer character through awareness and analysis of the harm one has caused, by a clear sense of remorse, an attempt at restitution, giving to charity as an expression of desiring to heal the world, and a confession. Forgiveness breaks the effect of sin. Turning now to the question of forgiveness, we must consider that for Judaism there are various levels of forgiveness. The first level is mechilá, this means the offended person should forgive the debt of the offender. The second level of forgiveness is selichá. This is an act of the heart in which the one offended is able to see the offender as also frail and deserving of empathy.  The third level of forgiveness is kappará or ahorá.  This level can only be given by God as it is the total wiping away of all sinfulness.  Jewish teaching on forgiveness is at the heart of the gospel text: “Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained.”  

The emphasis in the text is the formation of the disciple’s character: their lives must bring forgiveness to all places. They must carry out the ministry of healing to all places.  Love compels the disciple to encourage forgiveness in all relations. Recall Wiesenthal’s statement, “Forgetting is something that time alone takes care of, but forgiveness is an act of volition . . .”   The act of forgiving is indeed a volition in which a Christian deliberately releases the debt (mechilá,) and over time, be able to even sympathize with the offender (selichá). Reading the gospel in the context of the Jewish paradigm of forgiveness might suggest that disciples and subsequent generations of Christians cannot shrink back from touching wounds (c.f., Jn20:20, “…he showed them his hands and his side…).  

We must be ready to hear, feel, and touch the pain of the offended before we can release debt. As we touch the wounds of a child abused by a priest we too must feel the betrayal, anger and hurt of the victim and the family.  We must breathe the air of refugee children sitting in a crowded, mold-infested jail cell. We must feel the bruises and the tears mixed with blood of a trans youth beaten by transphobic bullies. In short, we cannot be afraid to accompany those who were broken by the sins of others hatred, ignorance, racial, gender, and social supremacy. To ignore the reality of the effect of sin is to bypass the elements of teshuva. We must, therefore, like the Risen Lord, breath hope into others and wake up the power of resistance that lies dormant within each person to break the cycle of sin. The task of the Church is not to sit in a dark confessional waiting for the penitent to enter, but rather, go out, stand with those who are harmed by the hatred and greed of others and stand up to those who do harm. 

And now finally the matter of The Sunflower: Were we in Simon’s shoes, would we offer total restoration or kappará? Would that even be possible? No…but what we can do is offer Simon shalom.

Weekly Intercessions
This past week the Board of Supervisors voted to support the detainer policy for county jails that pro- tects the civil rights afforded to every person living in the United States and its territories. The detainer policy was set in place in response to the unconstitutional practice of detaining persons in jail indefinitely based on their immigration status. Immigrants who had relatively minor violations would stay in custody beyond their non-immigrant counterparts. ICE would come to the jail, interrogate people and, in many cases, use manipulative psychological tactics inducing fear and re-traumatizing vulnerable immigrants with the intent to compel them to speak against their best interests. ICE’s presence in county jails resulted in hundreds of cases of family separation and thousands of lives disrupted. A new detainer policy was put in place to protect the civil rights of all people. Santa Clara County’s new policy proved to be so clear, that many other counties throughout the country implemented the same plan in their counties. A few months ago, changes were proposed to the county’s detainer policy that would reinstitute ICE in the jails. ICE would then take up once again its practice of violating due process by racially profiling Latinx-appearing persons by presuming their immigration status and subjecting Latinx and Latinx- appearing persons to unwarranted searches. Hundreds of immigrant rights advocates and leaders convinced the Board of Supervisors to keep ICE out of county business. Unfortunately, some public officials took it upon themselves not to merely protest the decision, but to go online and announce that they will go to other cities and states to rally support against the Board of Supervisor’s decision. The bombastic public announcements and threats have re-traumatized several immigrant rights leaders and generated new waves of fear in the community. Rather than making people feel safe, people are fearing for their safety and are saying that they will not call on the police for help. Let us pray for our immigrant community and for immigrant advocates, organizers and activists who work to bring about a community in which everyone feels that they belong.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Pentecostés y perdón 
La Fiesta de Pentecostés tiene dos opciones para la lectura del evangelio: Juan 20: 19-23 o Juan 14: 15-16, 23B-26. El Communique de esta semana tomará Juan 20: 19-23 y responderá a la pregunta: “¿Bajo qué autoridad podemos perdonar los pecados?”

Simon Wiesenthal, sobreviviente del Holocausto, cazador nazi, destacado autor, activista y filósofo, escribió un libro corto, The Sunflower, con la intención de que los lectores luchen con la pregunta: ¿Me perdonará? The Sunflower se lleva a cabo en Alemania al final de la Segunda Guerra Mundial en relación con un incidente que le sucedió a Wiesenthal cuando era joven.

En la historia, un grupo de presos en un campo de concentración se encontró con un soldado nazi moribundo de 21 años que se estaba muriendo en una cama de hospital. Karl, el soldado, le había pedido a la enfermera que buscara un judío a quien pudiera confesar y pedirle perdón por sus crímenes de guerra. Simon fue llevado a la habitación para encontrarse con Karl y escuchar su historia. Karl le dijo a Simon que venía de una buena familia, pero decidió convertirse en nazi y, debido a esa decisión, su propia familia se separó de él. Luego habló sobre un caso horrible de ir a un pueblecito rusa donde él y los otros nazis rodearon a los judíos de la comunidad, forzaron a todos a entrar a una casa, rociaron la casa con gasolina y lanzaron granadas a la casa. La mayoría de los muertos eran personas mayores, mujeres y niños que no representaban una amenaza para los invasores nazis. Karl vio una fuga familiar y los dejó ir. Más tarde, en Crimea, volvió a ver a la familia justo antes de que una bomba explotara a su lado. La explosión lo envió al hospital donde se encontraba.

Después de contar esta horrible historia, Karl dijo: “Así que estoy aquí esperando la muerte”. Los dolores en mi cuerpo son terribles, pero peor aún es mi conciencia. . . No puedo morir . . sin venir limpio . . En las últimas horas de mi vida estás conmigo. No sé quién es usted. Sólo sé que eres judío y eso es suficiente. . . En las largas noches en que he estado esperando la muerte, una y otra vez he deseado hablar de ello con un judío y pedirle perdón. Solo que no sabía si quedaban judíos. . . Sé que lo que estoy pidiendo es casi demasiado para ti, pero sin tu respuesta no puedo morir en paz ”. Simon abandonó la habitación sin perdonarlo. Al día siguiente murió Karl el soldado. Simon a menudo pensaba en Karl y se preguntaba si debería haberle perdonado. Él escribió: “¿Debí haberle perdonado? ¿Mi silencio al lado de la cama del moribundo nazi era correcto o incorrecto? Esta es una pregunta moral profunda. . . la clave de la cuestión es, por supuesto, la cuestión del perdón. Olvidar es algo que solo el tiempo cuida, pero el perdón es un acto de voluntad. . .”

El libro de Wiesenthal, The Sunflower, fue publicado con una serie de ensayos que siguen la historia que responde a su pregunta: “Debería haberle perdonado”. Los ensayos ofrecen una amplia variedad de pensamientos teológicos, espirituales y filosóficos sobre este tema. Dada la lectura de hoy, ¿cómo responderíamos nosotros, como cristianos, a la pregunta de Simón? ¿Qué nos pediría Jesús-como-el Cristo si fuéramos Simón? Volvamos al evangelio para tratar de llegar a esa pregunta.

El Señor resucitado sopló el Espíritu en los discípulos y dijo: “Recibe el Espíritu santo. Los pecados que perdonas se les perdonan y los que conservas se conservan “. En el nivel más superficial, se podría decir que Karl, que voluntariamente se convirtió en un nazi y que siguió las órdenes de reunir y encerrar a los judíos de la aldea en una casa y luego prenderle fuego a esa casa – debe ser perdonado. Karl expresó un profundo pesar por lo que hizo y, por lo tanto, “merece” el perdón. Un estudio más profundo del pasaje podría sugerir algo sorprendentemente diferente.

En el judaísmo, la confesión no es más que un paso en el proceso de expiación en el que uno está solo ante la misericordia de Dios. Cuando uno ha pecado contra otra persona, como en el caso de Karl, debe confesar públicamente. Confesión; sin embargo, no trae automáticamente el perdón. La confesión es simplemente un punto de partida que demarca la fecha, el lugar y la hora específicos en que una persona desea cambiar su vida. El perdón se da en la prueba del tiempo en que una persona demuestra de manera demostrativa que hay un verdadero cambio en la vida y que finalmente esta persona “merece” el perdón. El judaísmo no tiene una figura religiosa a la que uno va a confesar, ni tiene la “absolución” como parte del proceso del pecado y el arrepentimiento. Por último, el concepto judío de “reconciliación” (la condición donde no hay un sentimiento interno de odio hacia el agresor, sino el amor) es deseable, pero no necesariamente el mejor resultado dependiendo de la situación.

El concepto de teshuvá, que significa regresar, es un concepto fundamental que Jesús-como-el Cristo sería familiar. Teshuvá es la reforma total de nuestro carácter interno y externo a través de la conciencia y el análisis del daño que uno ha causado, mediante un claro sentimiento de remordimiento, un intento de restitución, dar a la caridad como una expresión de deseo de curar al mundo y una confesión. El perdón rompe el efecto del pecado. Volviendo ahora a la cuestión del perdón, debemos considerar que para el judaísmo hay varios niveles de perdón. El primer nivel es mechilá, esto significa que la persona ofendida debe perdonar la deuda del infractor. El segundo nivel de perdón es selichá. Este es un acto del corazón en el que el ofendido puede ver al delincuente como también frágil y merecedor de empatía. El tercer nivel de perdón es kappará o ahorá. Este nivel solo puede ser dado por Dios, ya que es la eliminación total de todo pecado. La enseñanza judía sobre el perdón está en el corazón del texto del evangelio: “Los pecados que perdonas se les perdonan y los que conservas se conservan”.

El énfasis en el texto es la formación del carácter del discípulo: sus vidas deben llevar el perdón a todos los lugares. Deben llevar a cabo el ministerio de sanación a todos los lugares. El amor obliga al discípulo a alentar el perdón en todas las relaciones. Recuerde la declaración de Wiesenthal: “Olvidar es algo que solo el tiempo se ocupa, pero el perdón es un acto de volición. . . ”  El acto de perdonar es, de hecho, una volición en la que un cristiano libera la deuda deliberadamente (mechilá) y, con el tiempo, puede incluso simpatizar con el delincuente (selichá). Leer el evangelio en el contexto del paradigma judío del perdón podría sugerir que los discípulos y las generaciones posteriores de cristianos no pueden retroceder ante las heridas conmovedoras (c.f., Jn20: 20, “… les mostró las manos y el costado …).

Debemos estar listos para escuchar, sentir y tocar el dolor de los ofendidos antes de que podamos liberar la deuda. Cuando tocamos las heridas de un niño abusado por un sacerdote, también debemos sentir la traición, la ira y el dolor de la víctima y la familia. Debemos respirar el aire de los niños refugiados sentados en una celda llena de gente, infestada de moho. Debemos sentir los moretones y las lágrimas mezcladas con la sangre de un joven trans golpeado por los matones transfóbicos. En resumen, no podemos tener miedo de acompañar a quienes fueron quebrantados por los pecados de otros, odio, ignorancia, raza, género y supremacía social. Ignorar la realidad del efecto del pecado es pasar por alto los elementos de teshuvá. Por lo tanto, como el Señor resucitado, debemos respirar la esperanza en los demás y despertar el poder de la resistencia que yace latente dentro de cada persona para romper el ciclo del pecado. La tarea de la Iglesia no es sentarse en un confesionario oscuro a la espera de que entre el penitente, sino salir, estar con los que son perjudicados por el odio y la codicia de los demás y hacer frente a los que hacen daño.

Y ahora, finalmente, el asunto de The Sunflower: ¿Estábamos en los zapatos de Simon, ofreceríamos restauración total o kappará? ¿Sería eso posible? No … pero lo que podemos hacer es ofrecer a Simon shalom.

Intercesiónes semanales

La semana pasada, la Junta de Supervisores votó a favor de respaldar la política de detención de las cárceles del condado que protege los derechos civiles otorgados a todas las personas que viven en los Estados Unidos y sus territorios. La política de detención se estableció en respuesta a la práctica inconstitucional de detener a personas en la cárcel por tiempo indefinido en función de su estatus migratorio. Los inmigrantes que tuvieron violaciones relativamente menores permanecerían bajo custodia más allá de sus homólogos no inmigrantes. ICE iría a la cárcel, interrogaría a la gente y, en muchos casos, usaría tácticas psicológicas manipuladoras para inducir el miedo y re-traumatizar a los inmigrantes vulnerables con la intención de obligarlos a hablar en contra de sus mejores intereses. La presencia de ICE en las cárceles del condado dio lugar a cientos de casos de separación familiar y miles de vidas interrumpidas. Se implementó una nueva política de detención para proteger los derechos civiles de todas las personas. La nueva política del Condado de Santa Clara demostró ser tan clara, que muchos otros condados en todo el país implementaron el mismo plan en sus condados. Hace unos meses, se propusieron cambios a la política de detención del condado que restablecería el ICE en las cárceles. Luego, ICE retomaría su práctica de violar el debido proceso al perfilar racialmente a las personas que aparecen en Latinx al presumir su estatus migratorio y someter a las personas que aparecen en Latinx y Latinx a búsquedas injustificadas. Cientos de defensores de los derechos de los inmigrantes y líderes convencieron a la Junta de Supervisores de mantener al ICE fuera del negocio del condado. Desafortunadamente, algunos funcionarios públicos se comprometieron a no solo protestar por la decisión, sino a conectarse y anunciar que irán a otras ciudades y estados para reunir apoyo contra la decisión de la Junta de Supervisores. Los grandiosos anuncios y amenazas públicas han re-traumatizado a varios líderes de los derechos de los inmigrantes y han generado nuevas olas de miedo en la comunidad. En lugar de hacer que las personas se sientan seguras, temen por su seguridad y dicen que no pedirán ayuda a la policía. Oremos por nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes y por los defensores, organizadores y activistas de los inmigrantes que trabajan para crear una comunidad en la que todos sientan que pertenecen.

News – Noticias

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español: 
11 de junio 
7 pm – 9 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: The Ascension

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 31, 2019

YES! MISA THIS SUNDAY!
Our next mass is
June 2 at 9 am
at SJSU Newman Chapel,
the corner of San Carlos and 10th.

Immediately after mass we will have a community dialog about the children who died in US custody on the border. Plan to stay for the dialog.

¡SI hay MISA este domingo!
La próxima misa sera
2 de junio a las 9 am
en la Capilla de SJSU
la esquina de 10 y S. Carlos

Inmediatamente después de la misa tendremos un diálogo comunitario sobre los niños que murieron bajo la custodia de los Estados Unidos en la frontera. Planee quedarse para el diálogo.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The Pacifica Institute and Catholic Charities co-sponsored an Iftar celebration at the Cathedral Basilica with Bishop Cantú and members of the Muslim Community. Interfaith participants shared what fasting represented in their religious traditions. After the conclusion of the service the Muslim prayer signaling the end to the day’s fast and the permission to share in the Iftar meal was chanted and participants went to Loyola Hall to share in a delicious meal.

Reflection: The Ascension
Today’s gospel is taken from the evangelist Luke’s account of the Ascension (Lk 24:46-53).  The account follows the familiar narrative of the “Road to Emmaus,” in which two disciples were walking away somewhat disillusioned by the crucifixion of the great Rabbi Jesus. In the narrative the two disciples came to believe after Torah study and discussing the Prophets, that that the stranger they encountered was indeed the Risen Lord. Note that the awareness of Jesus’ truest identity as Risen Lord came upon the disciples in the context of asking questions about the Torah and the prophets. 

The disciples returned to Jerusalem and testified to Simon telling him and the others about how Jesus was made known in the breaking of the bread. Jesus-as-the Risen Lord once again appeared to the disciples. As before the disciples did not know at first that it was Jesus-as-the Christ who appeared before them. Thinking they were seeing a ghost, the Risen Lord bid them to touch his hands and feet and then he ate with them. Since ghostly apparitions do not eat, the narration had the Risen Lord insisting that the disciples eat with him.  The details around eating serve as a literary device showing that the Risen Lord is not an abstract concept, but a concrete encounter of fellowship culminating in a meal and Torah study.

After the meal, as with the disciples on the road to Emmaus, the Risen Lord studied the Torah with them.  (Modern Jews practice studying the Torah in pairs is called havruta. In havruta, the pair of students enter into a lively dialog about the meaning of a Torah passage and discuss how the passage would apply to their lives. The antecedents to havruta is the practice of stying the Tamud in small groups, haburah. The underlying belief is that the meaning of the Torah is arrived at in the context of community and friendship). As the Risen Lord, Jesus closed the haburah with, “Thus it is written that the Messiah would suffer and rise from the dead on the third day and that repentance, for the forgiveness of sins, would be preached in his name to all the nations, beginning from Jerusalem.”  (Lk 24:46-47). Note that the concept of a “suffering Messiah” was not a Jewish concept, but something unique to Luke’s largely Gentile convert community. As argued in previous editions of the communique, the evangelist Luke, seems to borrow concepts from Jewish sources and re-introduce them in a Greco-Roman context with for the purpose of catechizing his audience about the ethical dimensions of the faith.  The use of “suffering Messiah” would not, then, be solely a reference to Jesus’ identity, but a reference to what happens to anyone who chooses the kingdom of God over the Roman Empire.

Following this declaration, the Risen Lord reminded the disciples that the Spirit would come upon the them (See, “I am sending the promise of my Father upon you…” Lk 24: 49). The promise that Spirit would “come upon” believers was an emerging Jewish theme common to both Christian and Jewish writings. The Spirit signified an infusion of the Divine in those who aligned themselves with God rather than the Empire. Thus the closing verses 50-53, close the narrative with a quick departure:  “…As he blessed them he parted from them and was taken up to heaven….” Lk24:51) The verse referencing the Risen Lord’s departure has parallels in Jewish sacred texts as well as in Jewish mystical literature (influenced by Persian and Greek literature). Some scholars therefore believe that Luke’s ending is influenced by those literary forms; however, Luke’s gospel does not reflect the typical hallmarks of apocryphal literature.  It is most likely that verse 51 serves as a catechetical element in the narrative rather than as a data point for a historical report or as a final “proof” for the supernatural identity of Jesus-as-the Christ.

The appearance narratives of the Risen Lord are not mere reports intended to “prove” that Jesus is risen from the dead, but rather, they are carefully crafted narratives that disclose that the Risen Lord has a new relationship between himself and his disciples. Note the centrality of paired Torah study in the context of fellowship.  The conclusion of Luke’s gospel shows that the Risen Lord did not show up to the disciples in the same way as he did prior to the Crucifixion. Disclosure is dependent on fellowship and paired learning.  The Risen Lord led the disciples outside of Jerusalem and he “parted from them and was taken up to heaven.”  In response to the Risen Lord’s departure, the disciples offered homage and then went back to Jerusalem “with great joy.” (Lk 24:51).

If we fixate on the nature of the departure, we risk losing sight of the elements of how the Risen Lord is disclosed to us: through fellowship and a critical dialog of the reading of Scripture. (Note that Acts 1:11 asks the question, “People of Galilee, why are you standing there looking at the sky?”)  As we celebrate the Feast of the Ascension, we must also remember that Spirit is indeed upon those who remain in the community that stands in defiance to the Empire and the Risen Lord will be make himself present where two or more are gathered in friendship to study the Torah and the Prophets. Let us ask whether our faith life reflects the pattern of community, fellowship and paired learning.  Does our parish community reflect a community that stands apart from the Empire or does it reflect the power structure of the Empire? Does our preaching make our congregants hungry enough that they return to the Scriptures to search more deeply for the truth or do our words lull them into passivity or shame them into silence?
 

Weekly Intercessions
The Ascension

This is a poem by Denise Levertov. 
ASCENSION
 
Stretching Himself as if again,
through downpress of dust
upward, soul giving way
to thread of white, that reaches
for daylight, to open as green
leaf that it is…
Can Ascension
not have been
arduous, almost,
as the return
from Sheol, and
back through the tomb
into breath?
Matter reanimate
now must reliquish
itself, its
human cells,
molecules, five
senses, linear
vision endured
as Man –
the sole
all-encompassing gaze
resumed now,
Eye of Eternity.
Reliquished, earth’s
broken Eden.
Expulsion,
liberation,
last
self-enjoined task
of Incarnation.
He again
Fathering Himself.
Seed-case splitting.
He again
Mothering His birth:
torture and bliss.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La Ascensión

El evangelio de hoy está tomado del relato del evangelista Lucas sobre la Ascensión (Lucas 24: 46-53). El relato sigue la narrativa familiar del “Camino a Emaús”, en el que dos discípulos se alejaban algo desilusionados por la crucifixión del gran rabino Jesús. En la narrativa, los dos discípulos llegaron a creer, después de estudiar la Torá y hablar sobre los Profetas, que el extraño que acompañaba ellos en el camino era, en hecho, el Señor resucitado. Tenga en cuenta que la conciencia de la verdadera identidad de Jesús-como-Señor Resucitado vino sobre los discípulos en el contexto de hacer preguntas sobre la Torá y los profetas.

Los discípulos regresaron a Jerusalén y testificaron a Simón diciéndole a él y a los demás cómo se dio a conocer a Jesús al partir el pan. Jesús-como-el Señor Resucitado se apareció una vez más a los discípulos. Como antes, los discípulos no sabían al principio que era Jesús-como-el Cristo quien apareció ante ellos. Pensando que estaban viendo un fantasma, el Señor resucitado les ordenó que se tocaran las manos y los pies y luego comió con ellos. Como las apariciones fantasmales no comen, la narración hizo que el Señor resucitado insistiera en que los discípulos comieran con él. Los detalles en torno a la comida sirven como un dispositivo literario que muestra que el Señor resucitado no es un concepto abstracto, sino un encuentro concreto de compañerismo que culmina en una comida y un estudio de la Torá.

Después de la comida, como con los discípulos en el camino a Emaús, el Señor resucitado estudió la Torá con ellos. (Los judíos modernos practican estudiar la Torá en parejas se llama havruta. En havruta, los dos estudiantes entablan un animado diálogo sobre el significado de un pasaje de la Torá y discuten cómo el pasaje se aplicaría a sus vidas. Los antecedentes de la havruta son la práctica de guardar el Talmud en pequeños grupos, haburah. La creencia subyacente es que el significado de la Torá se encuentra en el contexto de comunidad y amistad). Como el Señor Resucitado, Jesús cerró la habura con: “Así está escrito que el Mesías sufriría y resucitaría de entre los muertos al tercer día y que el arrepentimiento, para el perdón de los pecados, se predicaría en su nombre a todas las naciones. , comenzando desde Jerusalén”. (Lc 24: 46-47). Tenga en cuenta que el concepto de un “Mesías sufriente” no era un concepto judío, sino algo exclusivo de la gran comunidad de conversos gentiles de Lucas. Como se argumentó en ediciones anteriores del comunicado, el evangelista Lucas, parece tomar prestados conceptos de fuentes judías y reintroducirlos en un contexto grecorromano con el propósito de catequizar a su público sobre las dimensiones éticas de la fe. El uso del “Mesías sufriente” no sería, entonces, únicamente una referencia a la identidad de Jesús, sino una referencia a lo que le suceda a cualquiera que elija el reino de Dios sobre el Imperio Romano.

Después de esta declaración, el Señor Resucitado les recordó a los discípulos que el Espíritu vendría sobre ellos (Ver, Te envío la promesa de mi Padre sobre ti … Lc 24, 49). La promesa de que el Espíritu “vendría sobre” los creyentes era un tema judío emergente común a los escritos cristianos y judíos. El Espíritu significó una infusión de lo Divino en aquellos que se alinearon con Dios en lugar del Imperio. Así, los versos finales 50-53, cierran la narración con una rápida partida: “… Al bendecirlos, se separó de ellos y fue llevado al cielo …” Lk24: 51) El verso que hace referencia a la partida del Señor resucitado tiene paralelos en Judíos textos sagrados, así como en la literatura mística judía (influenciada por la literatura persa y griega). Por lo tanto, algunos eruditos creen que el final de Lucas está influenciado por esas formas literarias; sin embargo, el evangelio de Lucas no refleja las características típicas de la literatura apócrifa. Lo más probable es que el versículo 51 sirva como elemento catequético en la narrativa en lugar de como un punto de datos para un informe histórico o como una “prueba” final de la identidad sobrenatural de Jesús-comoel Cristo.

Las aparentes narraciones del Señor resucitado no son meros informes destinados a “probar” que Jesús ha resucitado de los muertos, sino que son narraciones cuidadosamente elaboradas que revelan que el Señor resucitado tiene una nueva relación entre él y sus discípulos. Note la centralidad del estudio pareado de la Torá en el contexto de la comunión. La conclusión del evangelio de Lucas muestra que el Señor Resucitado no se presentó a los discípulos de la misma manera que lo hizo antes de la crucifixión. La divulgación depende de la confraternidad y el aprendizaje pareado. El Señor resucitado condujo a los discípulos fuera de Jerusalén y él “se separó de ellos y fue llevado al cielo”. En respuesta a la partida del Señor resucitado, los discípulos ofrecieron homenaje y luego regresaron a Jerusalén “con gran alegría” (Lc 24). : 51).

Si nos fijamos en la naturaleza de la partida, corremos el riesgo de perder de vista los elementos de cómo el Señor resucitado se nos revela: a través del compañerismo y un diálogo crítico de la lectura de las Escrituras. (Tenga en cuenta que Hechos 1:11 hace la pregunta: “Gente de Galilea, ¿por qué está usted mirando al cielo?). Al celebrar la Fiesta de la Ascensión, también debemos recordar que el Espíritu ciertamente está sobre los que permanecen en la comunidad que desafía al Imperio y al Señor resucitado se hará presente, donde dos o más se reúnen en amistad para estudiar la Torá y los profetas. Preguntémonos si nuestra vida de fe refleja el patrón de comunidad, compañerismo y aprendizaje pareado. ¿Nuestra comunidad parroquial refleja una comunidad que se aleja del Imperio o refleja la estructura de poder del Imperio? ¿Nuestra predicación hace que nuestros feligreses tengan tanta hambre que vuelvan a las Escrituras para buscar más a fondo la verdad o que nuestras palabras los adelgacen en pasividad o los avergüencen en silencio?

Intercesiónes semanales

En La Ascención
Una poema de Fray Luis de León

¿Y dejas, Pastor santo,
tu grey en este valle hondo, escuro,
con soledad y llanto;
y tú, rompiendo el puro
aire, ¿te vas al inmortal Seguro?

Los antes bienhadados,
y los agora tristes y afligidos,
a tus pechos criados,
de ti desposeídos,
¿a dó convertirán ya sus sentidos?

¿Qué mirarán los ojos
que vieron de tu rostro la hermosura,
que no les sea enojos?
Quien oyó tu dulzura,
¿qué no tendrá por sordo y desventura?

Aqueste mar turbado,
¿quién le pondrá ya freno? ¿Quién concierto
al viento fiero, airado?
Estando tú encubierto,
¿qué norte guiará la nave al puerto?

 ¡Ay!, nube, envidiosa
aun deste breve gozo, ¿qué te aquejas?
¿Dó vuelas presurosa?
¡Cuán rica tú te alejas!
¡Cuán pobres y cuán ciegos, ay, nos dejas!

News – Noticias
We will be having a community dialog on Sunday June 2 at 10:30 am after Misa at the Newman Center about the children who died while under US custody.  We will dialog about how we might honor their memory with an all-faiths religious service and/or requiem mass and community rally.  All are welcome! Invite others!  

Marque sus calendarios: tendremos un diálogo con la comunidad el domingo 2 de junio a las 10:30 am después de Misa en el Centro Newman sobre los niños que murieron mientras estaban bajo la custodia de los EE. UU. Vamos a dialogar sobre cómo podríamos honrar su memoria con un servicio religioso de todas las fes y / o una misa y una acción comunitario. ¡Todos son bienvenidos! ¡Corre la voz!

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Session: 
June 4th  7 pm – 9 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español: 
4 y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

We will host a community-wide dialog about the children dying in US custody at the border Sunday, June 2 at 10:30 am.

Ofrecemos un diálogo comunitario sobre los niños que mueren bajo custodia estadounidense en la frontera el domingo 2 de junio a las 10:30 am.

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Peace I Leave with You

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 24, 2019

NO MISA THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon is away this weekend. Our next mass is June 2 at 9 am at SJSU Newman Chapel,
the corner of San Carlos and 10th.

¡NO MISA este domingo!
P. Jon no esta aquí este fin de semana. La próxima misa sera a 2 de junio a las 9 am en la Capilla de SJSU, la esquina de 10 y S. Carlos.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

The Catholic Community of the Diocese of San Jose gathered to celebrate with our Bishop Oscar Cantú on the occasion of his 25th anniversary as priest. Bishop Cantú spoke about the importance of Catholic Charities as helping address poverty, homelessness, hunger, and immigrants rights.

Reflection: Peace I Leave with You

Today’s gospel is taken from one of the series of “Last Supper Discourses” (John 14 – 17). Do not forget that the context of the “Last Supper discourses” is the Passover meal, the Seder.  Commemorating the passage of the Hebrew slaves who, through the urging of Moses and empowerment by God’s Spirit, threw off the yoke of their oppressors and began a new journey of cultural, religious independence and social and economic self-determination.  The prayers and rituals of the Seder demarcate the dimensions of freedom and are intended to help the people remember their true nature as free persons, not slaves. The ritual texts are not history lessons. By reciting prayers and enacting the prescribed rituals, the past is made into the present.  Seder prayers bring the longing for freedom into the present. Participants begin to feel the stirring for justice within themselves and as the Seder continues, the prayer texts urge them to take responsibility for making others free.  What we have in John’s gospel are possibly fragments of Jesus’ own Seder commentary given at a time when the Roman Empire dominated Jewish life. Therefore, we must consider the agitational context of Jesus’ discourse. 

Let us return once again to verse 23 and consider Jesus’ commentary, “Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him.” Recall from previous communiques that the “indwelling of God’s Spirit” was a powerful theme first emerging from Galilean Judaism.  God’s Spirit comes upon prophets and those who live lives of religious and spiritual integrity.  The personal contact of the Spirit is transformative for the individual and for those whom the individual touches because it is God’s work that generates change, not human initiative. In this line of thought, social changes — that is, changes outside of the individual in whom the Spirit indwells, come about because the Spirit within the individual effects key changes in those whom that individual touches.  Now connect this teaching with the context of the Seder.  Do you see the thematic connection of personal awareness and identity and liberation and freedom? Imagine the disciple’s own anxiety levels rise as they are challenged by their rabbi to live free in the context of a regime hell-bent on oppressing them. Jesus-as-the Christ says to them, “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give it to you. Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid.” Jesus-as-the Risen Christ will repeat those words to the disciples when they are huddled in the room with the doors and windows locked after the crucifixion. It would seem that the evangelist was making the point that one must believe that one is free before actually one becomes free.  The role of the Spirit is to agitate the individual into some kind of action. Jesus-as-the Christ states that the indwelling of the Spirit is not without conditions: one must keep the words of Jesus. Disciple must recall what was demanded of them. They must know what Jesus taught them about freedom and apply those words to their present context of oppression. 

Let us take a moment to remember the ethical commitments that Jesus demanded of his disciples (and of us!) as a way to help us understand and ultimately embrace the call for freedom.  (NB, The selected passages are distinguished from dozens of other passages that demand a theological or belief commitment. The passages below pertain to the inner work of being free and corresponding demand to free others).  

Be of service to others  (see Jn 13:1-20, “If I, therefore, the master and teacher, have washed your feet, you ought to wash one another’s feet. I have given you a model to follow, so that as I have done for you, you should also do.”)

Unbind others from the bonds of death  (see Jn 11:1-44 “The dead man came out, tied hand and foot with burial bands, and his face was wrapped in a cloth. So Jesus said to them, “Untie him and let him go.”)
Open your eyes to others and see them for who they are, not for whom we want them to be. (c.f., Jn 9:1-41, “I came into this world for judgment, so that those who do not see might see, and those who do see might become blind.” Some of the Pharisees who were with him heard this and said to him, “Surely we are not also blind, are we?” Jesus said to them, “If you were blind, you would have no sin; but now you are saying, ‘We see,’ so your sin remains.”)

Be merciful rather than judge others. (See Jn 8:1-11, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” She replied, “No one, sir.” Then Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you. Go, [and] from now on do not sin any more.”)

Do not judge others by what they appear to be, but rather judge on the basis of one’s character. (Jn 7:24, “Stop judging by appearances, but judge justly.” )
Consume the words of Jesus (especially in the context of Eucharist) as a hungry person would consume food. (See Jn 6:22-71, “Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him on the last day.”)

Do not be afraid in times of tribulation. (See Jn 6:16-21, “It is I, do not be afraid.”)

Be confident in being made whole and living your life as a free person. (See Jn 5:1-18, “Take up your mat and walk.”)

Live your life in Spirit and truth, not in shame and self-loathing. (See Jn 4:4-42, “God is Spirit, and those who worship him must worship in Spirit and truth.”)

Live your faith as an affirmation of love for others and for creation. (See Jn 3:1-21, “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through him.”)

Serve the best of who you are to others. (See Jn 2:1-12, “Everyone serves good wine first, and then when people have drunk freely, an inferior one; but you have kept the good wine until now.”)

Follow Christ with a sense of wonder and openness. (See Jn 1:35-51, “Nathanael said to him, “How do you know me?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Before Philip called you, I saw you under the fig tree.” Nathanael answered him, “Rabbi, you are the Son of God; you are the King of Israel.” Jesus answered and said to him, “Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than this.”).

Weekly Intercessions
Memorial Day

Memorial Day honors the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades.

Hear Our Prayer This Day
In the quiet sanctuaries of our own hearts,
let each of us name and call on the One whose power over us
is great and gentle, firm and forgiving, holy and healing …
You who created us,
who sustain us,
who call us to live in peace,
hear our prayer this day.
Hear our prayer for all who have died,
whose hearts and hopes are known to you alone … Hear our prayer for those who put the welfare of others
ahead of their own
and give us hearts as generous as theirs …
Hear our prayer for those who gave their lives
in the service of others,
and accept the gift of their sacrifice …
Help us to shape and make a world
where we will lay down the arms of war
and turn our swords into ploughshares
for a harvest of justice and peace …
Comfort those who grieve the loss of their loved ones
and let your healing be the hope in our hearts… Hear our prayer this day
and in your mercy answer us
in the name of all that is holy.
The peace of God be with you.

– Austin Fleming

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La Paz os dejo

El evangelio de hoy está tomado de una de las series de “Discursos de la última cena” (Juan 14 – 17). No olvide que el contexto de los “Discursos de la última cena” es la cena de la Pascua, el Seder. Conmemorando el paso de los esclavos hebreos que, a través de la insistencia de Moisés y el poder del Espíritu de Dios, se despojaron del yugo de sus opresores y comenzaron un nuevo viaje de independencia cultural, religiosa y de autodeterminación social y económica. Las oraciones y los rituales del Seder demarcan las dimensiones de la libertad y están destinadas a ayudar a las personas a recordar su verdadera naturaleza como personas libres, no como esclavos. Los textos rituales no son cuentas de la historia de los Judós. Al recitar las oraciones y realizar los rituales prescritos, el pasado se convierte en el presente: las oraciones del Seder traen el anhelo de libertad al presente. Los participantes comienzan a sentir la agitación de la justicia dentro de sí mismos y, a medida que el Seder continúa, los textos de oración los alientan a asumir la responsabilidad de liberar a otros. Lo que tenemos en el evangelio de Juan son posiblemente fragmentos del comentario del propio Seder de Jesús dado en un momento en que el Imperio Romano dominaba la vida judía. Por lo tanto, debemos considerar el contexto agitativo del discurso de Jesús.

Regresemos una vez más al versículo 23 y consideremos el comentario de Jesús: “Quien me quiera, mantendrá mi palabra, y mi Padre lo amará, y vendremos a él y haremos nuestra morada con él”. Recuerde de comunicados anteriores que La “morada del Espíritu de Dios” fue un tema poderoso que surgió por primera vez del judaísmo galileo. El Espíritu de Dios viene sobre los profetas y aquellos que viven vidas de integridad religiosa y espiritual. El contacto personal del Espíritu es transformador para el individuo y para aquellos a quienes el individuo toca porque es la obra de Dios la que genera el cambio, no la iniciativa humana. En esta línea de pensamiento, los cambios sociales, es decir, los cambios fuera del individuo en el que reside el Espíritu, se producen porque el Espíritu dentro de los efectos individuales cambia de manera clave en aquellos a quienes ese individuo toca.

Ahora conecta esta enseñanza con el contexto del Seder. ¿Ves la conexión temática de la conciencia personal y la identidad y la liberación y la libertad? Fija que los niveles de ansiedad del discípulo aumentan a medida que su rabino los desafía a vivir libres en el contexto de un régimen empeñado en oprimirlos. Jesús-como-el Cristo les dice: “La paz os dejo; te doy mi paz. No como el mundo te lo doy. No dejes que tus corazones se angustien o teman ”. Jesús-como-el Cristo-Resucitado les repetirá esas palabras a los discípulos cuando estén acurrucados en la habitación con las puertas y ventanas cerradas después de la crucifixión. Parecería que el evangelista estaba señalando que uno debe creer que uno es libre antes de que realmente se haga libre. El papel del Espíritu es agitar al individuo en algún tipo de acción. Jesús-como-el Cristo afirma que la morada del Espíritu no está exenta de condiciones: uno debe guardar las palabras de Jesús. El discípulo debe recordar lo que se les exigía. Deben saber lo que Jesús les enseñó acerca de la libertad y aplicar esas palabras a su contexto actual de opresión.

Tomemos un momento para recordar los compromisos éticos que Jesús exigió de sus discípulos (¡y de nosotros!) Como una forma de ayudarnos a comprender y, en última instancia, a aceptar el llamado a la libertad. (NB, los pasajes seleccionados se distinguen de docenas de otros pasajes que exigen un compromiso teológico o de creencias. Los pasajes a continuación se refieren al trabajo interno de ser libres y la demanda correspondiente para liberar a otros).
Preste servicio a los demás (vea Jn 13: 1-20, “Si yo, por lo tanto, el maestro y el maestro, les lavé los pies, deberían lavarse los pies unos a los otros. Les he dado un modelo para que los siga, de modo que He hecho por ti, también deberías hacerlo”.)

Desconecte a los demás de los lazos de la muerte (vea Jn 11: 1-44 “Salió el hombre muerto, atado de pies y manos con cintas de entierro, y su rostro estaba envuelto en una tela. Entonces Jesús les dijo:” Desatenlo y dejen él va”.)

Abre tus ojos a los demás y míralos por quienes son, no por quienes queremos que sean. (cf. Jn 9: 1-41, “Vine a este mundo para juzgarme, para que vean los que no ven, y los que vean, se vuelvan ciegos”. Algunos de los fariseos que estaban con él oyeron esto y Le dijo: “Seguro que no somos también ciegos, ¿verdad?” Jesús les dijo: “Si fueras ciego, no tendrías pecado; pero ahora estás diciendo: ‘Vemos’, entonces tu pecado permanece”. )

Sé misericordioso en lugar de juzgar a los demás. (Vea Jn 8: 1-11, “Mujer, ¿dónde están? ¿Nadie te ha condenado?” Ella respondió: “Nadie, señor”. Entonces Jesús dijo: “Tampoco yo te condeno. Ve, [y] desde ahora en adelante no peques más”.)

No juzgue a los demás por lo que parecen ser, sino juzgue sobre la base de su carácter. (Jn 7:24, “Deja de juzgar por las apariencias, pero juzga con justicia”.)
Consumir las palabras de Jesús (especialmente en el contexto de la Eucaristía) como una persona hambrienta consumiría alimentos. (Vea Jn 6: 22-71, “El que come mi carne y bebe mi sangre tiene vida eterna, y yo lo resucitaré el último día”.)

No temas en tiempos de tribulación. (Vea Jn 6: 16-21, “Soy yo, no tenga miedo”.)

Confíe en sentirse completo y viva su vida como una persona libre. (Vea Jn 5: 1-18, “Toma tu camilla y camina”.)

Vive tu vida en espíritu y en verdad, no en vergüenza y falta de autoestima. (Vea Jn 4: 4-42, “Dios es Espíritu, y los que lo adoran deben adorar en Espíritu y en verdad”.)

Vive tu fe como una afirmación de amor por los demás y por la creación. (Vea Jn 3: 1-21, “Porque tanto amó Dios al mundo que dio a su único Hijo, para que todo el que cree en él no perezca sino que tenga la vida eterna. Porque Dios no envió a su Hijo al mundo para condenen al mundo, pero para que el mundo sea salvo por medio de él “.)

Sirve lo mejor de quien eres a los demás. (Vea Jn 2: 1-12, “Todos sirven el buen vino primero, y luego cuando la gente ha bebido libremente, uno inferior; pero usted ha mantenido el buen vino hasta ahora”.)

Sigue a Cristo con un sentido de maravilla y franqueza. (Vea Jn 1: 35-51, “Natanael le dijo:” ¿Cómo me conoces? “Respondió Jesús y le dijo:” Antes de que Felipe te llamara, te vi debajo de la higuera. “Natanael le respondió: Rabí, tú eres el Hijo de Dios; tú eres el Rey de Israel. “Jesús le respondió y le dijo:” ¿Crees porque te dije que te vi debajo de la higuera? * Verás cosas más grandes que esto. ”)

 

Intercesiónes semanales
El Día de los Caídos en Guerra

El Día de los caídos en guerra o Memorial Day es una fecha conmemorativa de carácter federal que tiene lugar en los Estados Unidos de América el último lunes de mayo de cada año, con el objetivo de recordar a los soldados estadouni- denses que murieron en combate. Inicialmente fue estable- cido para conmemorar a los soldados caídos de la Unión americana que participaron en la Guerra Civil estadouni- dense, aunque tras la primera guerra mundial fue extendido para rendir homenaje a todos los soldados estadounidenses fallecidos en las guerras en las que participó ese país.

Los Héroes En Silencio
(Desde las Hermanas Misioneras Auxiliares del Sagrado Corazón)

Caminando sobre la línea,
fatigados y cansados, en los espesos campos de batalla, van los soldados defendiendo su honor,
y su patria que llevan por dentro,
arriesgando su vida,
en medio del peligro de poder quedar dormidos,
en un desafío entre la victoria y la muerte,
que dejarían su sangre derramada,
que tiñen la tierra y los campos vestidos de verde,
que serian los testigos del sufrimiento de los soldados en guerra,
atravesando ríos y praderas,
y en medio del frio que les llega hasta los huesos,
y el calor que les reseca la boca
Pero, como buenos guerreros siguen adelante,
tratando de pasar la línea imaginaria
entre las oscuras noches,
llevando la esperanza de volver,
y repitiendo las palabras “Dios mío ayúdame ”
y llevando en su mente la palabra “Victoria”
para alzar las manos de alegría
y no volver con la cabeza viendo hacia el suelo,
o en un ataúd, por defender su patria,
y que los reconozcan como unos verdaderos héroes,
por ser quienes sufrieron en los campos,
y que hasta dejaron sus mejores amigos dormidos.

PARA LOS SOLDADOS QUE DAN SU VIDA

POR DEFENDER SU PATRIA QUE LOS VIO NACER.

LOS HÉROES EN SILENCIO.

News – Noticias
NO misa solidaridad this Sunday, but everyone is invited to Fernanda’s Quinceaños Mass on Saturday at 2 pm at the Newman Center.
Also, please mark your calendars: we will be having a community dialog on Sunday June 2 at 10:30 am after Misa at the Newman Center about the children who died while under US custody.  We will dialog about how we might honor their memory with an all-faiths religious service and/or requiem mass and community rally.  All are welcome! Invite others!  

NO misa solidaridad este domingo, pero todos están invitados a la Misa de Quinceaños de Fernanda el sábado a las 2 pm en la Capilla de SJSU.
Además, marque sus calendarios: tendremos un diálogo con la comunidad el domingo 2 de junio a las 10:30 am después de Misa en el Centro Newman sobre los niños que murieron mientras estaban bajo la custodia de los EE. UU. Vamos a dialogar sobre cómo podríamos honrar su memoria con un servicio religioso de todas las fes y / o una misa y una acción comunitario. ¡Todos son bienvenidos! ¡Corre la voz!

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Session: 
June 4th  7 pm – 9 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español:
28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Community dialogue about the children dying in US custody at the border Sunday, June 2 at 10:30 am

Diálogo comunitario sobre los niños que mueren bajo custodia estadounidense en la frontera el domingo 2 de junio a las 10:30 am

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Catholic Charities Appeal Sunday – Setting Love Into Action

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

May 16, 2019

NO MISA THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon is preaching at various parishes
for Catholic Charities Annual Appeal.
Please join him at one of those masses.

¡NO MISA este domingo!
P. Jon esta predicando en varias parroquias
por la Campaña Anual de Caridades Católicas.
Favor acompaña el Padre en unas de estas misas.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Members of Grupo Solidaridad and visitors to Misa del Grupo de Solidaridad share in small groups the way that they will live out loving others at work, in school and in neighborhoods. In a society fraught with division fueled by the language of intolerance and hate, spaces like Grupo Solidaridad provide opportunities to connect with others across the differences of language, age, and economic standing.

Reflection: 

Catholic Charities Appeal Sunday – 
Setting Love Into Action

In the mid-1960’s our country underwent deep soul searching as we debated the issues of poverty, war, and race. At that time social divisions were strong and sometimes these divisions descended into violence. Dr. Martin Luther King recognized that the fight for equality would be met with serious opposition. Grounded in non-violence, Dr. King and his followers made a commitment to find love, even in the face of hate. In his book, “Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?” Dr. King wrote, “Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”  Such a beautiful quote was born from his faith.  Dr. King was a preacher and he believed that love, not hate, will transform the world.

This spirit of transformation is found in today’s gospel. Jesus preached, “I give you a new commandment: love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another.”  Today’s set of readings is about setting love into action.

As Jesus formed and shaped his believers, he wanted them to know that whatever they do, they would have to do it in the spirit of love.  In John’s gospel love is the central theme: God came into the world not to condemn us, but rather, to love the world. God’s love is transformative. Recall our Lenten scrutiny readings: Jesus embraced the Samaritan woman whom everyone else rejected.  This woman was scorned by everyone in the village and so she chose to fetch water when no one else was around.  Rather than agreeing with the majority, Jesus chose to sit with the woman and offer her friendship. In the second scrutiny, the man born blind gained more and more confidence to stand up for himself because he recognized that Jesus’ loving touch healed him. Through the love of God, this young man’s confidence grew. He knew who he was and then he knew who Jesus was. And in the final scrutiny, Lazarus stood at the open door of the tomb and rather than untying the burial clothes himself, Jesus called on the community to come forward and set Lazarus free. The community came to embrace Lazarus whom they thought had succumbed to the dark night of death. They untied him and Lazarus’ life was restored when the people embraced him.

These stories are stories of setting love into action. As Catholics, we too are called to demonstrate love. We are called to be, as our second reading says, “born anew.” Our newness is born when those we have touched in ministry or in practical support feel the loving support of others, especially during the most difficult of times. Our faith calls us to join others on a journey — that is, to walk alongside those who struggle with life because of poverty, poor health or hunger.  We are called to journey with those burdened by violence, the lack of housing, or discrimination. As Paul and Barnabas strengthened the disciples to persevere in faith in difficult times, we too must take on the task of encouraging others to persevere. Our encouragement is not mere words, it is the commitment to journey with those who struggle, even in the hardest of times.

An older woman who had been homeless for 17 years, moving from couch to couch, garage to garage, living under the stars with a blue tarp and in vehicles was asked by a social worker what she really wanted. To protect her privacy, I’ll call her Gloria. Did Gloria want to remain unhoused? Did she mind the cold? Did she mind the uncertainty of where her next meal was coming from?  The social worker realized that Gloria most importantly needed someone to listen to her. Gloria needed someone to understand her multiple personal challenges, not someone to judge her. Gloria’s greatest challenge toward becoming self-sufficient was not the lack of opportunity; it was the lack of real human contact.  This social worker was from Catholic Charities.

Gloria’s social worker knew that Gloria needed a kind of treatment that would encourage personal growth that would eventually transform Gloria from within. This transformation led Gloria to believe enough in herself so that she would follow through on appointments, make the deadlines for applications for housing and maintain an emotionally stable life. Today Gloria is living in a beautiful affordable housing unit built by Charities Housing and supported by Catholic Charities’ Supportive Houses Services.

This week is our annual Catholic Charities appeal. Gloria’s story is not unique; there are thousands of people helped each year by Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County. Catholic Charities programs are innovative and participants are offered opportunities that lead to individual progress. In the spirit of love we are asking that all of us take a minute to consider how we might support the ministry of Catholic Charities this year.  Will we walk alongside those whom we are called to serve? Will we join them on their journey?

Please use this link: https://www.catholiccharitiesscc.org/donate to make a donation to Catholic Charities. Through your generosity, you will help the next Gloria on her journey of hope.

Weekly Intercessions
Over the past few weeks our Advocacy and Community Engagement project at Our Lady of Refuge has engaged approximately 50 people in “accompaniment training.”  These volunteers will be participating in a pilot program for Parish Engagement called: “Accompaniment with Service Navigation.” This program is designed to help regular people develop the skills to help those who come to the parish for services (e.g., food, shelter, social services, etc…). Volunteers are training to become “service navigators”  who will help those in need find their way to get connected to Catholic Charities programs and external agencies that offer social services. While service navigation is a practical resource, it is not the heart of our work.  The real work of the volunteers is to “accompany” people along the process of becoming self-sufficient.  Our accompaniment training teaches people to be active listeners and companions along the journey. They are taught to create the space so that individuals in need are able to reach their goals of self-reliance.  Through the process of “accompaniment” volunteers create space for those being helped to become more self-reliant. Volunteers are taught how to help clients figure out for themselves ways that they can reach their own goals. When people reach their goals, they grow in confidence, connect to social support systems and participate in society and ultimately advocate for themselves by using their own voice, their own story. This entire process of growth is called “self-empowerment” because one is encouraged to discover one’s own power and to take back control over one’s life. When all is said and done, would this program “lift” a person out of poverty? Not directly; however, this program helps individuals and families develop the essential emotional and psychological tools needed to ensure stability and fortitude in the face of dealing with the challenges of poverty and the ability for individuals to do strategic planning for their future goals. Maybe some will decide to finish their schooling and train for a better job, others may decide to take control over their health and diet and work on preventative health measures rather than relying on the emergency room at the hospital. Let us pray for those who are being trained in this new ministry: that they will become powerful neighborhood resources and that through their ministry will become more compassionate. We pray also for those who will be served: that they will find their own voice and advocate for what they need to become self-reliant.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 

Domingo de Caridades Católicas –
Poniendo el Amor en Acción

A mediados de la década de 1960, nuestro país experimentó una profunda búsqueda de conciencia mientras debatíamos los temas de la pobreza, la guerra y la raza. En ese momento las divisiones sociales eran fuertes y, a veces, estas divisiones descendían hacia la violencia. El Dr. Martin Luther King reconoció que la lucha por la igualdad se encontraría con una oposición seria. Con sus pies plantadas en la no-violencia, el Dr. King y sus seguidores se comprometieron a encontrar el amor, incluso frente al odio. En su libro, “¿Adónde vamos desde aquí: el caos o la comunidad?”, El Dr. King escribió: “Devolver la violencia por la violencia multiplica la violencia, agregando una oscuridad más profunda a una noche ya sin estrellas. La oscuridad no puede expulsar a la oscuridad; Sólo la luz puede hacer eso. El odio no puede expulsar al odio; solo el amor puede hacer eso”. Una cita tan hermosa nació de su fe, el Dr. King era un predicador y creía que el amor, no el odio, transformará el mundo.

Este espíritu de transformación se encuentra en el evangelio de hoy. Jesús predicó: Te doy un nuevo mandamiento: amaos unos a otros. Como te he amado, también deberías amarte el uno al otro”.  Las lecturas de hoy trata de poner en práctica el amor.

Cuando Jesús formó a sus creyentes, quiso que supieran que hicieran lo que hicieran, tendrían que hacerlo con el espíritu de amor. En el evangelio de Juan, el amor es el tema central: Dios vino al mundo no para condenarnos, sino para amar al mundo. El amor de Dios es transformador. Recordemos las lecturas de los escrutinios de Cuaresma: Jesús abrazó a la mujer samaritana a quien todos los demás rechazaron. Esta mujer fue despreciada por todos en el pueblo y por eso eligió ir a buscar agua cuando no había nadie más alrededor. En lugar de estar de acuerdo con la mayoría, Jesús eligió sentarse con la mujer y ofrecerle su amistad. En el segundo escrutinio, el hombre que nació ciego ganó más y más confianza para defenderse porque reconoció que el toque amoroso de Jesús lo había curado. A través del amor de Dios, la confianza de este joven creció. Sabía quién era y luego sabía quién era Jesús. Y en el escrutinio final, Lázaro se paró en la puerta abierta de la tumba y, en lugar de desatarse la ropa del entierro, Jesús llamó a la comunidad a presentarse y liberar a Lázaro. La comunidad vino a abrazar a Lázaro, a quien creían que había sucumbido a la noche oscura de la muerte. Lo desataron y la vida de Lázaro se restauró cuando la gente lo abrazó.

Estas historias son historias de poner el amor en acción. Como católicos, nosotros también estamos llamados a demostrar amor. Estamos llamados a ser, como dice nuestra segunda lectura, “nacer de nuevo”. Nuestra novedad nace cuando los que hemos tocado en el ministerio o en el apoyo práctico sienten el apoyo amoroso de los demás, especialmente durante los momentos más difíciles. Nuestra fe nos llama a unirnos a otros en un viaje, es decir, a caminar junto a aquellos que luchan con la vida por la pobreza, la mala salud o el hambre. Estamos llamados a viajar con los agobiados por la violencia, la falta de vivienda o la discriminación. Cuando Pablo y Bernabé fortalecieron a los discípulos para que perseveraran en la fe en tiempos difíciles, nosotros también debemos asumir la tarea de alentar a otros a perseverar. Nuestro aliento no son meras palabras, es el compromiso de acompañar con aquellos que luchan, incluso en los momentos más difíciles.

Una señora mayor que había estado sin hogar durante 17 años, mudándose de un sofá a otro, de un garaje a otro, viviendo bajo las estrellas con una lona azul y en vehículos le preguntó qué quería realmente. Para proteger su privacidad, la llamaré “Gloria.” ¿Gloria quería quedarse sin vivienda? ¿Le importaba el frío? ¿Le importaba la incertidumbre de dónde venía su próxima comida? El trabajador social se dio cuenta de que Gloria lo más importante era que alguien la escuchara. Gloria necesitaba que alguien entendiera sus múltiples desafíos personales, no alguien que la juzgara. El mayor desafío de Gloria para ser autosuficiente no fue la falta de oportunidades; fue la falta de contacto humano real. Esta trabajadora social era de Caridades Católicas.

La trabajadora social de Gloria sabía que Gloria necesitaba un tipo de tratamiento que alentara el crecimiento personal que eventualmente transformaría a Gloria desde adentro. Esta transformación llevó a Gloria a creer lo suficiente en sí misma para poder cumplir con las citas, establecer los plazos para las solicitudes (aplicaciones) de vivienda y mantener una vida emocionalmente estable. Hoy Gloria vive en una hermosa apartamento de vivienda asequible construida por “Charities Housing” y apoyada por los servicios de Caridades Católicas.

Esta semana es nuestro atractivo anual de Caridades Católicas. La historia de Gloria no es única; Hay miles de personas ayudadas cada año por Caridades Católicas del Condado de Santa Clara. Los programas de Caridades Católicas son innovadores y a los participantes se les ofrecen oportunidades que conducen al progreso individual. En el espíritu de amor, pedimos que todos nos tomemos un minuto para considerar cómo podríamos apoyar el ministerio de Caridades Católicas este año. ¿Caminaremos junto a aquellos a quienes estamos llamados a servir? ¿Nos uniremos a ellos en su viaje?

Por favor use este enlace: https://www.catholiccharitiesscc.org/donate para hacer una donación a Caridades Católicas. A través de su generosidad, ayudará a la próxima Gloria en su viaje de esperanza.

Intercesiónes semanales
Durante las últimas semanas, nuestro proyecto de Promoción y Participación Comunitaria en Ntra. Sra de Refugio ha involucrado a aproximadamente 50 personas en la “capacitación de acompañamiento”. Estos voluntarios participarán en un programa piloto para Participación Parroquial llamado: “Acompañamiento con Servicio de Navegación”. Este programa está diseñado para ayudar la gente del pueblo a desarrollar las habilidades para ayudar a quienes acuden a la parroquia para obtener servicios (por ejemplo, comida, vivienda, servicios sociales, etc.). Los voluntarios se están capacitando para convertirse en “navegadores de servicios” que ayudarán a los necesitados a encontrar la manera de conectarse con los programas de Caridades Católicas y las agencias externas que ofrecen servicios sociales. Si bien la navegación de servicio es un recurso práctico, no es el núcleo de nuestro trabajo. La clave del trabajo es acompañamiento: que es de “acompañar” a las personas a lo largo del proceso de volverse autosuficientes. Nuestro entrenamiento de acompañamiento enseña a las personas a ser acompañantes activos a lo largo del camino. Se les enseña a crear el espacio para que las personas necesitadas puedan alcanzar sus metas de autosuficiencia. A través del proceso de “acompañamiento”, los voluntarios crean un espacio para que aquellos que reciben ayuda se vuelvan más autosuficientes. A los voluntarios se les enseña cómo ayudar a los clientes a descubrir por sí mismos formas en que pueden alcanzar sus propios objetivos. Cuando las personas alcanzan sus metas, crecen en confianza, se conectan a los sistemas de apoyo social y participan en la sociedad y, en última instancia, se defienden utilizando su propia voz, su propia historia. Todo este proceso de crecimiento se denomina “autoempoderamiento” porque uno se alienta a descubrir su propio poder y a recuperar el control sobre su vida. Cuando todo esté dicho y hecho, ¿este programa “sacaría” a una persona de la pobreza? No directamente; sin embargo, este programa ayuda a los individuos y las familias a desarrollar las “herramientas” emocionales y psicológicas esenciales necesarias para garantizar la estabilidad y la fortaleza frente a los desafíos de la pobreza y la capacidad de los individuos para realizar una planificación estratégica para sus objetivos futuros. Tal vez algunos decidan seguir adelante en su educación y entrenarse para un mejor trabajo, otros pueden decidir tomar control de su salud y su dieta y trabajar en medidas preventivas de salud en lugar de depender de la sala de emergencias del hospital. Oremos por aquellos que están siendo capacitados en este nuevo ministerio: que se conviertan en poderosos recursos del vecindario y que a través de su ministerio sean más compasivos. También oramos por aquellos a quienes servirán: que encuentren su propia voz y aboguen por lo que necesitan para ser autosuficientes.

Fr. Jon’s Sunday Outreach Schedule
Horario del domingo de
Caridades Católicas por el P. Jon
 

8:15 a.m. – Christ the King – español
*Presiding* 10:00 a.m. – St. Joseph Mountain View – English
1:00 p.m. – St. Lucy – español
5:00 p.m. – Our Lady of Guadalupe – español
:30 p.m. – Our Lady of Guadalupe – English
 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

TRAINING FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES’ PARISH ENGAGEMENT PROJECT: SERVICE NAVIGATION WITH ACCOMPANIMENT 

Training Sessions-Capacitaciones 

Catholic Charities Parish Engagement program is looking for a group of dedicated volunteers to embark on a transformational journey of accompanying our brothers and sisters who are most in need. Over the span of a 4 month program, you will be paired with a fellow parishioner who is deeply in need of your compassion, your ability to listen, and your help in finding the right resources. 

English Training Sessions: May 21st and June 4th.
7 pm – 9:00 pm
 
 

El programa de Participación Parroquial de Caridades Católicas está
buscando un grupo de voluntarios dedicados para embarcarse en un viaje de transformación para acompañar a nuestros hermanos y hermanas más necesitados. En el transcurso de un programa de 4 meses, se le emparejará con un feligrés compañero que está profundamente necesitado de su compasión, su capacidad de escuchar y su ayuda para encontrar los recursos adecuados.

Capacitación en Español : 14 y 28 de mayo y 11 de junio 
7 pm – 9:00 pm

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp