Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Blessings and Woes

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

February 15, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD THIS SUNDAY
Next Misa Solidaridad
Sunday, February 17
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

MISA SOLIDARIDA ESTE DOMINGO
La proxima misa solidaridad sera
Domingo 17 de febrero
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Fr Robert Brocato of St. Mary’s Parish in Gilroy offering a prayer and
testimony of a parishioner whose spouse was deported inhumanely at the
Morgan Hill ICE Office.

Reflection on the Gospel: Blessings and Woes
This week’s gospel (Lk 6:17-26) is the famous, “Sermon on the Plain,” a parallel (in some ways) to the “Sermon on the Mount” that is found in the gospel of Matthew. While the two sermons touch on theblessings that come from challenges, Luke’s version includes a section on “woes” directed at those who are in positions of wealth, power and influence. The “Sermon on the Plain” is consistent with the thematic arc of Luke’s gospel: concern for the sufferings endured by those who are poor, hungry, inconsolable, and hated by others (see verses Lk 6:20-22); a warning to those who hold power (Lk 6:24-26) ; and a consolation of solidarity (Lk 6:23). Today’s gospel selection is a part of a longer thematic arc of the call for justice and compassion which we will be addressed in the following weeks. This week’s reflection will focus on the call for justice.

The “Sermon on the Plain” is preceded by a discussion on what is permitted by Jewish Law (Lk 6:1-11). This section should not be interpreted in any way that would invalidate the Law, but rather, as a way to transition the Gentile audience of Luke’s gospel from a Jewish context to their Gentile context. Gentiles did not have the prescriptions of a holiness or cleanliness code because Gentile converts to Christianity by the time of Luke wrote the gospel, were simply unfamiliar with the multiple customs and laws that shaped the world of Jesus-as-the Christ. The evangelist’s audience needed to know Jesus’ story which was a story that could not be recounted without the context of Judaism. The legitimacy of the claim that Jesus was “The Christ/Messiah” depended on the Gentile converts to Christianity embracing key Jewish concepts in ethics and theology. Specifically and in the “Sermon on the Plain,” Gentile Christians had to understand the concept of blessing “‘ashrei,” which was translated to Greek as, “makarioi.”

The Roman belief of blessing is that one is blessed with food, health, strength, income, etc…Such beliefs would lead people to “look for” blessings or “earn” blessings. Blessings in Judaism; however, are not reliant on the “proof” of what one possesses, but rather reliant on God alone. We are always blessed because God made us. We are not blessed because we made something of our selves. Our circumstances, therefore, do not determine our state of “blessedness.”  The ingenuity of this Jewish perspective on blessing is this: if your circumstances are that you are poor (vs. 20) hungry (vs. 21), weeping (vs. 21), being hated and defamed (vs. 21) you not only have a right to resist, but you are obligated resist oppression because God made you a blessing!  (see vs 23).  Blessings are always, therefore, directed to God.

Let us take a moment to go back and revisit the concept, ashrei, as mentioned above.  Ashrei has three concepts: People are restored to a state of “happiness” or “blessedness” when they are in relationship to God; that God cares for those who poor and oppressed; and that God ultimately rewards good behavior (and punishes evil).  The gospel passage reflects ashrei in a way that resonates with Gentile converts.  They had to understand that the ultimate truth of the human condition was not in suffering, but in blessedness! The evangelist Luke integrated these Jewish (and therefore foreign) concepts throughout his narrative as a way to form the minds and imaginations of his community. Gentiles had to come to grips with suffering. They needed to know that suffering was not about blaming God, but about possessing the will to change the circumstance! 

Here is a reworking of the “Sermon the Plain” to serve as an illustration to that point:       
 

If you are poor, you must remember that the kingdom belongs to everyone. No one has a monopoly on the ownership of the kingdom.  Therefore if you ad hungry, you have a right to be satisfied. If you weep now, resist! If you resist, people will hate you, exclude you and insult you denounce you as “evil,” but do not be intimidated by these measures because God’s chosen prophets suffered the same.

The genius of Jewish ethics captured in the “Sermon on the Plain” because it is rooted in the concept of blessing, that is, the condition of God’s inherent goodness rather than in human effort. To understand the perspective on blessing, we must return briefly to the Shema, the foundational prayer of Jewish identity.

The text of the Shema is, ”Hear, Israel: the LORD is our God, the LORD is one.” The Shema expresses these basic teachings: That there is only one God; no other being participated in the work of creation; God is utterly beyond the created order and thus, the truth of God’s unity into God’s own self cannot be captured by diving God into God’s attributes; any attributes assigned to God are by human invention and are therefore incomplete; God alone receives our prayers and therefore we cannot offer praise to any other deity.   The simplicity of the Shema has given rise to an ethics of unity.

The “unity” of God suggests a “unity” of creation which in turn suggests a “unity” of responsibility that creation. This unity precludes human beings from being “mini-gods” that can make up their own rules to manipulate and divide up creation. Because human beings are a part of creation, they as such, human beings are bound to creation and to each other. That means that decisions about land and distribution of resources must reflect a sense of connection to the land and to one’s neighbor. One, therefore, cannot exploit the land for one’s exclusive profit without considering questions of sustainability for future generations and how one’s use of the land would affect one’s neighbor. These basic, foundational precepts give rise to more complex questions in areas of war, the use of money, war between nations, etc…Gentile converts to Christianity in the evangelists’ time were probably unaware of Jewish thought, especially the broad scope of Jewish ethics. The evangelist Luke, therefore, would need to hand down these basic ethical concepts in a way that Gentile converts could not only understand them, but also abide by them.

Although we are far removed from the First Century, studies in Jewish ethics and emerging Christian identity of the first 100 years of Christianity give us a context in which we can return to the text and imagine what questions early Christian communities might have had in relation to the Empire.  We might even see familiar patterns of oppression and exploitation!  As we close today’s reflection, let these verses echo:

“But woe to you who are rich,” for your fortune was made on the broken backs of workers.

“But woe to you who are filled now,” because what you have done to amass your fortune, was done at the expense of the planet and your grandchildren will go hungry.

“Woe to you who laugh now,” for those whom you have mocked and ridiculed, are now mobilizing for change.

“Woe to you when all speak well of you,” for those who you count to be “friends,” will testify against you the court of law. 

Weekly Intercessions

Last Thursday, the Rapid Response Network of Silicon Valley, went to the ICE Office in Morgan Hill to protest the inhumane treatment of detainees who were in their custody.  Community members from throughout Santa Clara County gathered in the freezing rain to raise their voices in challenge to the ICE officials who huddled inside the office building. The alarms from the cars that were parked in front of the ICE office were constantly going off during the rally. Every time a speaker stepped forward, including during the prayers, the car alarms went off. This was not a coincidence because no one was touching the cars and they did not belong to anyone at the rally. It was determined that the cars belonged to those inside the ICE office and that those inside were deliberately activating the alarms as a way to intimidate the activists.  After a short prayer and testimony, a  small delegation from the Rapid Response Network went to the front door asking to speak with the ICE officials because they wanted to ascertain the reason why detainees were forced to sit in the vehicles for hours without having access to a telephone to advise their legal counsel and families where they were. ICE officials refused to open the door to the delegation. On other occasions, community members spoke with officials in the Morgan Hill office and were told that the Morgan Hill ICE office does not hold people in custody and that their office was used to send vehicles to transport detainees to other facilities or to briefly hold detainees so that they could use the restrooms. Given reports from detainees, this was not the case. ICE officials were not accurately reporting what happened. On a national level ICE regularly obfuscate the truth leaving legal and civil rights advocates frustrated and mistrustful of whatever ICE was saying. When the delegation members returned to the crowd, they had the opportunity to speak with the civilian landlord of the ICE office. The landlord confronted the speakers and leaders telling them that they had to leave the premiss and that he supported everything that ICE was doing. When asked about due process questions he replied that due process and Constitutional protections only applied to citizens (wrong!). The action ended peacefully but illustrated the sad reality of our national debate. Let us pray that more civil rights advocates, defenders of the Constitution, community, labor and faith leaders, community organizers, and educators courageously step forward to confront human rights abuses, ignorance of the law, the willful trampling of the Constitution, civil rights violations and the lack of transparency.

Intercesiónes semanales

El juéves pasado, la Red de Respuesta Rápida de Silicon Valley, fue a la oficina de ICE en Morgan Hill para protestar por el trato inhumano de los detenidos que estaban bajo su custodia. Miembros de la comunidad de todo el Condado de Santa Clara se reunieron bajo la lluvia helada para alzar sus voces en un desafío a los funcionarios de ICE que se amontonaron dentro del edificio de oficinas. Las alarmas de los autos que estaban estacionados frente a la oficina de ICE se activaban constantemente durante el mitin. Cada vez que un orador daba un paso adelante, incluso durante las oraciones, las alarmas de los autos se activaban. Esto no fue una coincidencia porque nadie tocaba los autos y no pertenecían a nadie en el rally. Se determinó que los automóviles pertenecían a los que estaban dentro de la oficina de ICE y que los que estaban dentro activaban las alarmas deliberadamente como una forma de intimidar a los activistas. Después de una breve oración y testimonio, una pequeña delegación de la Red de Respuesta Rápida se dirigió a la puerta principal para hablar con los funcionarios de ICE porque querían averiguar la razón por la cual los detenidos se vieron obligados a sentarse en los vehículos durante horas sin tener acceso a un Teléfono para asesorar a sus asesores legales y familiares donde se encontraban. Los funcionarios de ICE se negaron a abrirle la puerta a la delegación. En otras ocasiones, los miembros de la comunidad hablaron con funcionarios en la oficina de Morgan Hill y se les dijo que la oficina de ICE en Morgan Hill no tiene a las personas bajo custodia y que su oficina se usaba para enviar vehículos para transportar a los detenidos a otras instalaciones o para retenerlos brevemente que podrían usar los baños. Dados los informes de los detenidos, este no fue el caso. Los funcionarios de ICE no estaban informando con precisión lo que sucedió. A nivel nacional, ICE confunde regularmente la verdad, dejando a los defensores de los derechos legales y civiles frustrados y desconfiados de lo que ICE estaba diciendo. Cuando los miembros de la delegación regresaron a la multitud, tuvieron la oportunidad de hablar con el propietario civil de la oficina de ICE. El propietario se enfrentó a los oradores y líderes diciéndoles que tenían que abandonar la propiedad y que él apoyaba todo lo que ICE estaba haciendo. Cuando se le preguntó acerca de las preguntas sobre el debido proceso, respondió que el debido proceso y las protecciones constitucionales solo se aplicaban a los ciudadanos (¡mal!). La acción terminó pacíficamente pero ilustró la triste realidad de nuestro debate nacional. Oremos para que más defensores de los derechos civiles, defensores de la Constitución, líderes comunitarios, laborales y religiosos, organizadores comunitarios y educadores avancen con valentía para enfrentar los abusos de los derechos humanos, el desconocimiento de la ley, el pisoteo deliberado de la Constitución y las violaciones de los derechos civiles y la falta de transparencia.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:
Bendiciones y Afliciones

El evangelio de esta semana (Lc 6: 17-26) es el famoso Bienaventuranzas de S. Lucas. Mientras que los dos versiones (de S. Mateo — es direrente) los dos versiones de sermones tocan las bendiciones que vienen de los desafíos, la versión de Lucas incluye una sección sobre “problemas” dirigida a aquellos que están en posiciones de riqueza, poder e influencia. La version de S. Lucas concuerda con el arco temático del evangelio de Lucas: la preocupación por los sufrimientos sufridos por aquellos que son pobres, hambrientos, inconsolables y odiados por otros (ver versos Lc 6: 20-22); una advertencia para los que tienen poder (Lucas 6: 24-26); y un consuelo solidario (Lc 6:23). La selección del Evangelio de hoy forma parte de un arco temático más largo del llamado a la justicia y la compasión, que se tratará en las próximas semanas. La reflexión de esta semana se centrará en el llamado a la justicia.

La Bienaventuranzas de S. Lucas está precedido por un discurso sobre lo que está permitido por la Ley Judía (Lc 6: 1-11). Esta sección no debe interpretarse de ninguna manera que invalide la ley, sino más bien como una manera de hacer que la audiencia gentil del evangelio de Lucas pase de un contexto judío a su contexto gentil. Los gentiles no tenían las prescripciones de un código de santidad o limpieza porque los gentiles convertidos al cristianismo en el momento en que Lucas escribió el evangelio, simplemente no estaban familiarizados con las múltiples costumbres y leyes que dieron forma al mundo de Jesús-comoel Cristo. La audiencia del evangelista necesitaba conocer la historia de Jesús, que era una historia que no podía ser contada sin el contexto del judaísmo. La legitimidad de la afirmación de que Jesús era “El Cristo / Mesías” dependía de que los gentiles se convirtieran al cristianismo, abarcando conceptos judíos fundamentales en la ética y la teología. Específicamente y en la Bienaventuranzas, los cristianos gentiles tenían que entender el concepto de bendición “ashrei“, que se traducía al griego como “makarioi“.

La creencia romana de bendición es que uno está bendecido con comida, salud, fortaleza, ingresos, etc. Tales creencias llevarían a las personas a “buscar” bendiciones o “ganar” bendiciones. Bendiciones en el judaísmo; sin embargo, no dependen de la “prueba” de lo que uno posee, sino que dependen solo de Dios. Siempre somos bendecidos porque Dios nos hizo. No somos bendecidos porque hicimos algo de nosotros mismos. Nuestras circunstancias, por lo tanto, no determinan nuestro estado de “bienaventuranza”. El ingenio de esta perspectiva judía sobre la bendición es esta: si sus circunstancias son que usted es pobre (vs. 20) hambriento (vs. 21), llorando (vs. 21), al ser odiado y difamado (v. 21), no solo tienes el derecho de resistir, sino que estás obligado a resistir la opresión, ¡porque Dios te hizo una bendición! (ver vs 23). Las bendiciones son siempre, por lo tanto, dirigidas a Dios.

Tomemos un momento para regresar y revisar el concepto, ashrei, como se mencionó anteriormente. Ashrei tiene tres conceptos: las personas son restauradas a un estado de “felicidad” o “bienaventuranza” cuando están en relación con Dios; que Dios cuida a los pobres y oprimidos; y que Dios finalmente recompensa el buen comportamiento (y castiga el mal). El pasaje del evangelio refleja ashrei de una manera que resuena con los conversos gentiles. ¡Tenían que entender que la verdad última de la condición humana no estaba en el sufrimiento, sino en la bendición! El evangelista Lucas integró estos conceptos judíos (y, por lo tanto, extraños) a lo largo de su narrativa como una forma de formar las mentes y las imaginaciones de su comunidad. Los gentiles tenían que enfrentarse con el sufrimiento. ¡Necesitaban saber que el sufrimiento no se trataba de culpar a Dios, sino de poseer la voluntad de cambiar las circunstancias!

Aquí hay una revisión del “Sermón de la llanura” para servir de ilustración a ese punto:

Si eres pobre, debes recordar que el reino pertenece a todos. Nadie tiene el monopolio de la propiedad del reino. Por lo tanto, si tienes hambre, tienes derecho a estar satisfecho. Si lloras ahora, resiste! Si te resistes, la gente te odiará, te excluirá e insultará y te denunciará como “malvado”, pero no te dejes intimidar por estas medidas porque los profetas escogidos por Dios sufrieron lo mismo.

El genio de la ética judía capturado en el Bienaventuranzas porque está arraigado en el concepto de bendición, es decir, la condición de la bondad inherente de Dios más que en el esfuerzo humano. Para comprender la perspectiva de la bendición, debemos regresar brevemente a Shema, la oración fundamental de la identidad judía.

El texto del Shemá es: “Oye, Israel: el SEÑOR es nuestro Dios, el SEÑOR es uno”. El Shemá expresa estas enseñanzas básicas: que hay un solo Dios; ningún otro ser participó en la obra de la creación; Dios está completamente más allá del orden creado y, por lo tanto, la verdad de la unidad de Dios en el propio yo de Dios no puede ser capturada al sumergir a Dios en los atributos de Dios; cualquier atributo asignado a Dios es por invención humana y, por lo tanto, está incompleto; Solo Dios recibe nuestras oraciones y, por lo tanto, no podemos alabar a ninguna otra deidad. La simplicidad del Shema ha dado lugar a una ética de la unidad.

La “unidad” de Dios sugiere una “unidad” de creación que a su vez sugiere una “unidad” de responsabilidad que la creación. Esta unidad impide a los seres humanos ser “mini-dioses” que pueden inventar sus propias reglas para manipular y dividir la creación. Debido a que los seres humanos son parte de la creación, como tales, los seres humanos están vinculados a la creación y entre sí. Eso significa que las decisiones sobre la tierra y la distribución de los recursos deben reflejar un sentido de conexión con la tierra y con el prójimo. Por lo tanto, uno no puede explotar la tierra para un beneficio exclusivo sin considerar las cuestiones de sostenibilidad para las generaciones futuras y cómo el uso de la tierra afectaría al vecino. Estos preceptos básicos dan lugar a preguntas más complejas en áreas de guerra, el uso del dinero, la guerra entre naciones, etc. Los gentiles conversos al cristianismo en la época de los evangelistas probablemente desconocían el pensamiento judío, especialmente el amplio alcance de la ética judía. Por lo tanto, el evangelista Lucas tendría que transmitir estos conceptos éticos básicos de manera que los conversos gentiles no solo los comprendan, sino que también los respeten.

Aunque estamos muy alejados del primer siglo, los estudios sobre ética judía e identidad cristiana emergente de los primeros 100 años del cristianismo nos brindan un contexto en el que podemos volver al texto e imaginar qué preguntas podrían haber tenido las comunidades cristianas primitivas en relación con el imperio. ¡Incluso podríamos ver patrones familiares de opresión y explotación! Al cerrar la reflexión de hoy, que estos versos hagan eco:

“Pero, ¡ay de ustedes, que son ricos!”, Porque su fortuna se hizo sobre las espaldas de los campesinos.

“Pero, ¡ay de ustedes que están saciados ahora!”, Porque lo que hicieron para amasar su fortuna se hicieron a expensas del planeta y sus nietos pasarán hambre.

“Ay de ustedes que se ríen ahora”, quienes se han burlado y ridiculizado ahora se están movilizando para el cambio.

“Ay de ti cuando todos hablan bien de ti”, ya que los que consideras que son “amigos”, testificarán en tu contra ante el tribunal de justicia.

Become a Housing Ready Communities Neighborhood Ambassador 

WE ARE MAKING PROGRESS
Since Santa Clara County residents voted for the Affordable Housing Bond (Measure A) in November 2016, the County of Santa Clara has funded 19 new housing developments in six cities. Thanks to this funding and more from our cities, the Santa Clara County Housing Authority and the private sector, these developments will bring more than 1,400 new apartment homes for those in our community who need them most.

TIME FOR ACTION
In the coming months, the County Board of Supervisors and many city councils will consider additional housing for approval and funding. At this Ambassador Workshop, we will review proposed housing developments, discuss our collective outreach strategy, and provide an opportunity for you to become a neighborhood ambassador and make certain your own community is “housing ready”.

WORKSHOP AGENDA
• What makes a “housing ready” community?
• Tools and resources 
• Theory of change and actor mapping
• How to be a neighborhood ambassador?
• Next steps: Individual action plans

TWO WORKSHOP DATES
Pick one; same workshop on each date:

Thursday, February 21, 6-8pm
Recovery Cafe, 80 South 5th Street, San Jose
Register today!

Sunday, February 24, 3-5pm
Met North, 2122 Monterey Rd. San Jose, CA 95112
Register today!

PREREQUISITES AND MATERIALS
All are invited! No previous involvement, experience or knowledge is required. The focus will be on countywide development and not limited to specific cities or districts (but with a focus on taking action in your own neighborhood).

While it is not required, please bring a laptop computer if you have one. Food, drink, pens and paper will be provided.

Join PACT on Saturday, February 16, to learn how to use your voice and story to engage more people and organize for change in our communities!
Hear PACT UPDATES and share yours!
To Sign Up: http://bit.ly/LDRtraining02

ENTRENAMIENTO DE LIDERAZGO DE PACT: COMPARTE TU HISTORIA Y VISIONPOR LA JUSTICIA EN TU COMUNIDAD
¡Únase a PACT el sábado 16 de febrero para aprender a usar su voz e historia para involucrar a más personas y organizar el cambio en nuestras comunidades!
¡Escuche de nuestros eventos y entrenamientos! Para saber más sobre nosotros: Visiten nuestra pagina de web! www.pactsj.org
Para regístrese: http://bit.ly/LDRtraining02

San Jose Day of Remembrance 2019
Sunday, February 17, 2019
5:30 PM
Buddhist Church San Jose Betsuin
640 North 5th street, San Jose, California 95112

All are welcome to attend the Historic San Jose Japantown’s 39th Annual Day of Remembrance. With family separation in the news, tents cities being built on the border, and children dying while in the custody of the US Federal Government, the annual Day of Remembrance takes on new urgency. The theme this year is #NeverAgainIsNow.

On February 19th, 1942, Executive Order 9066 was signed. This lead to the incarceration of more than 120,000 people of Japanese decent, two-thirds of whom were American citizens.

Chizu Omori will give her Remembrance. Teresa Castellanos, a Grupo member,  will be the community speaker. Masao Suzuki will give an update of the Nihonmachi Outreach Committee and examine the parallel of the immigration issues of today to the Japanese American experience. Don Tamaki will give the the keynote address and provide insight on the Korematsu case.

There will be a candlelight procession and cultural performances from San Jose Taiko, Asha Sudra, Safiyah Hernandez, and Jake Shimada. There will also be an activity area for children. It is free but donations are welcome.
 

Día de la conmemoración de San José 2019
Domingo 17 de febrero 2019
5:30 PM
 Iglesia Budista San Jose Betsuin
640 North 5th street, San Jose, California 95112

Todos son bienvenidos a asistir al 39 ° Día Anual del Recuerdo del histórico San Jose Japantown. Con la separación de familias en las noticias, los campamentos construidos en la frontera y los niños muriendo mientras están bajo la custodia del Gobierno Federal de los EE. UU., El Día del Recuerdo anual tiene una nueva urgencia. El tema de este año es #Nuncajamáseshoy.

El 19 de febrero de 1942 se firmó la Orden Ejecutiva 9066. Esto condujo al encarcelamiento de más de 120,000 personas de decentes japoneses, dos tercios de los cuales eran ciudadanos estadounidenses.

Chizu Omori le dará su recuerdo. Teresa Castellanos, miembro del Grupo, será la oradora de la comunidad. Masao Suzuki dará una actualización del Comité de Alcance de Nihonmachi y examinará el paralelo de los problemas de inmigración de hoy con la experiencia japonesa estadounidense. Don Tamaki dará el discurso de apertura y proporcionará información sobre el caso Korematsu.

Habrá una procesión de velas y actuaciones culturales de San José Taiko, Asha Sudra, Safiyah Hernández y Jake Shimada. También habrá un área de actividades para los niños. Es gratis pero las donaciones son bienvenidas.
 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Over the past several months we have directed our Sunday collection for the Jeans for the Journey Campaign.  We will begin to direct our collection toward the “Good Samaritan Fund” which helps local individuals and families in need.

 

For those who wish to continue supporting the Jeans for the Journey Campaign, please send your donations directly to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, Texas: 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501.

College Scholarships

Amigos de Guadalupe is offering scholarships for entering and continuing college students. Please click the below links for applications and share with students who might be eligible.

Amigos de Guadalupe está ofreciendo becas para estudiantes quien están empezando o continuando sus estudios universitarios. Haga clic en los enlaces de abajo para las aplicaciones y pasen la voz a estudiantes que podrían ser elegibles.

Graduating High School Students
Current College Students

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  Fishers of the Human Family

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

February 8, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD THIS SUNDAY
Next Misa Solidaridad
Sunday, February 10
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

MISA SOLIDARIDA ESTE DOMINGO
La proxima misa solidaridad sera
Domingo 10 de febrero
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Reflection on the Gospel: Fishers of the Human Family 
This week’s gospel (Lk 5:1-11) serves as an underscore to the previous chapter. Recall that Jesus-as-the Christ read out the Isaiah reading and preached a powerful one-liner, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” (Lk 4:21) and the evangelist Luke recorded that Jesus’ words created a ruckus. He preached that God’s liberation was more comprehensive than merely setting individuals free, but that liberation was setting the world free from an oppressive system of injustice. The evangelist Luke was priming his own Gentile community to consider that their own suffering, as the permanent underclass of the Empire, was not unique to them. Luke presented his community with Jesus-as-the Christ, as a liberator who freed people by reconciliation, healing through the profound spiritual heritage of the Jewish faith.  In this chapter and throughout the rest of his gospel, Luke had to establish the scope of Jesus-as-the Christ’s salvation: that salvation was for everyone.

Today’s gospel selection begins with Jesus preaching to the vast crowds. Luke uses the preaching as an interpretive function for the following verses.  In other words, whatever happens within the passage is related to Jesus’ preaching.  Note that now Luke placed Jesus by the “Lake of Gennesaret.”  Luke uses the name, “Gennesaret” whereas evangelists Matthew, Mark and John use the name “Sea of Galilee” and John uses the additional name, “Sea of Tiberias.”  The locale’s history is interesting because after 135 CE, just a few years after Luke’s gospel was estimated to being written, Jewish resisters were defeated and they settled along the lake alongside Gentile communities.  The Jewish community eventually grew strong enough to build up a strong Jewish culture and a thriving theological center. (The Jerusalem Talmud was compiled in this same region).  Luke’s Gentile audience was most likely aware of the developments in Jewish thought and were no doubt asking how they, as non-Jews, were connected to the promises of liberation.  Luke 5: 1-11 provides some insight into a growing understanding that salvation is extended to the entire human family.

In today’s text Jesus-as-the Christ notices the fishermen were already finished with their work: they were washing their nets (Lk 5:2-3).  Jesus-as-the Christ boards one of the boats and pulled away from the shore as a way to teach the vast crowd that was gathered on the shore. Modern readers would interpret this as a practical move — that due to the crowd, a decision to move the speaker just off shore would be practical solution to handle the transmission of information. Keep in mind; however, that the evangelist was not merely transmitting historical information, but also, amplifying the idea that God’s mercy extends to all humankind. The context is this: a large crowd, hungry for the “good news,” was gathered to hear Jesus speak. Unlike the congregants that wanted to harm Jesus for his preaching, this crowd was eager to hear what he had to say. The evangelist does not record the content of the speech — and there is no way to recover what might have been said; however, the point was not the historicity of Jesus’ specific speech, but rather, the amplification of the idea that salvation is for everyone.

After speaking, Jesus had Simon put further out into deep water and lower his nets. (Lk 5:4). Simon complied reluctantly and offered a key commentary, “…we have worked hard all night and have caught nothing…”  (Lk5:5) This comment betrays a sense of self defeat, but it also acts as a transition in which the narrative switches from a suggestion about fishing to a metaphor for salvation for all humankind. Even though the fishermen had already given up and were ready to return home, they obeyed Jesus’ command to go further into the deep. By complying with Jesus’ request to go to “deeper” waters, they returned with a catch so large that the weight tore the nets and endangered their own stability on the water: “…they caught a great number of fish and their nets were tearing. They signaled to their partners in the other boat to come to help them. They came and filled both boats so that they were in danger of sinking.” (Lk 5:6-7)  Luke’s Gentile audience may have interpreted the narrative as a powerful story of inclusion, meaning, that they would see themselves as Gentiles, included in salvation…but that the challenge in welcoming Gentiles into the fold was not without danger to the existing structure of salvation. As Christianity spread to more cultures, the challenge was that people would have to go into “deeper waters” themselves and take the chance that their “nets” might break and their “vessels” sink. The story of fishing by now had become a metaphor about radical inclusion. The metaphor taught that the fear of having “nets” torn and vessels being sunk should not limit the efforts of going into the “deep waters.” We cannot be afraid of success!

As we journey this liturgical year with gospel of Luke, we will see the theme of radical inclusion weave itself throughout the narrative of Jesus-as-the Christ.  When we read about the life of Jesus-as-the Christ in Luke’s gospel, the consistent message of embracing the stranger, the lost and marginalized,  opens up the question of who we welcome to the table. When national leaders ridicule, debase and vilify a person based on one’s national origin, status of citizenship, race, gender identity, sexual orientation, physical appearance, or any other aspect of humanity, we know that the Empire fears its time is up. The push-back against inclusion tells us that those who presently hold power fear that their nets of power will tear as more people become citizens, that more women become powerful, that more people of color begin to speak out and take their rightful place as co-leaders in the community. Let us recall the first words of God to the shepherds who trembled in fear, “Do not be afraid; for behold, I proclaim to you good news of great joy that will be for all the people,” (Lk 2:10), Indeed, for all the people.  

Weekly Intercessions
Last Friday (February 1), the Trump administration conceded that it would require way too much effort to reunite the children who were separated from their parents at the border. The Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services released a report that disclosed thousands more children were separated from their parents than previously reported. The report stated that the DHHS said that finding the parents would be too burdensome. The cruel policy of separating children from their parents was done as a deterrent for people seeking asylum in the US and as such, was illegal. Representative Pramila Jayapal (D, WA) asked Matt Whitiker, the acting Attorney General, “…these parents (of the children) were in your custody, your attorneys are prosecuting them and your department was not tracking parents who were separated from their children. Do you know what kind of damage has been done to children and families across this country, children who will never get to see their parents again? Do you understand the magnitude of that?” He responded flatly, “Congresswoman, the responsibility for the arrests and the detention and together with the custody of the children was handled by DHS and HHS before those people were ever transferred to DOJ custody through the U.S. Marshals.” He did not acknowledge the magnitude of suffering. The House of Representatives is currently holding hearings on Trump’s “Zero Tolerance” policy that led to thousands of brutal separations. Medical and psychological experts have spoken about the irreparable damage that separation has on a young, developing mind. Dr. Collen Kraft, the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics said the “zero tolerance” policy “…amounts to child abuse.” Frank Sherry of America’s Voice, a pro- immigrant advocacy group likened the policy to “state sanctioned kidnapping.” The tragedy on top of tragedy is that many of the children think that their parents abandoned them. These innocent children are unaware of the politics and policies that have upended their lives. One day they will know. Let us pray for the healing of the children and their parents. Let us also pray that those who designed, carried out and enabled the barbaric and illegal policy of separation be held accountable.

Intercesiónes semanales
El viernes pasado (1 de febrero), la administración de Trump reconoció que requeriría demasiado esfuerzo para reunir a los niños que estaban separados de sus padres en la frontera. El Inspector General del Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos publicó un reporte que reveló que miles de niños más fueron separados de sus padres de lo que se informó anteriormente. El informe indicó que el HHS dijo que encontrar a los padres sería demasiado oneroso. La cruel política de separar a los niños de sus padres se hizo para disuadir a las personas que buscan asilo en los Estados Unidos y, como tal, era ilegal. La Representante Pramila Jayapal (D, WA) le pidió a Matt Whitiker, el Fiscal General en funciones, “… estos padres (de los niños) estaban bajo su custodia, sus abogados los están procesando y su departamento no estaba rastreando a los padres que estaban separados de sus hijos. ¿Sabe qué tipo de daño se ha hecho a los niños y las familias en todo el país, niños que nunca volverán a ver a sus padres? ¿Entiendes la magnitud de eso?” Respondió rotundamente: “Congresista, la responsabilidad de los arrestos y la detención y junto con la custodia de los niños fue manejada por el DHS y el HHS antes de que esas personas fueran transferidas a la custodia del Departamento de Justicia a través de los Alguaciles de los EE. UU. ”. No reconoció la magnitud del sufrimiento. La Cámara de Representantes actualmente está celebrando audiencias sobre la política de “tolerancia cero” de Trump que llevó a miles de separaciones brutales. Los expertos médicos y psicológicos han hablado sobre el daño irreparable que la separación tiene en una mente joven y en desarrollo. El Dra. Collen Kraft, presidente de la Academia Estadounidense de Pediatría, dijo que la política de “tolerancia cero” “… equivale a abuso infantil”. Frank Sherry de America’s Voice, una organización nacional de defensa a favor de los inmigrantes, comparó la política con “el secuestro autorizado por el estado”. La tragedia de la tragedia es que muchos de los niños piensan que sus padres los abandonaron. Estos niños inocentes desconocen la política y las políticas que han cambiado sus vidas. Un dia ellos sabrán. Oremos por la curación de los niños y sus padres. Oremos también para que aquellos que diseñaron, llevaron a cabo y permitieron que la política bárbara e ilegal de separación se hicieran responsables.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: Pescadores de toda la humanidad 
El evangelio de esta semana (Lucas 5: 1-11) sirve de subrayado al capítulo anterior. Recuerde que Jesús-como-el Cristo leyó en voz alta Isaías leyendo y predicó una oración de gran alcance: “Hoy en tu audiencia se cumple este pasaje de las Escrituras” (Lc 4:21) y el evangelista Lucas registró que las palabras de Jesús crearon una lío. Predicó que la liberación de Dios era más amplia que simplemente liberar a los individuos, pero que la liberación estaba liberando al mundo de un sistema opresivo de injusticia. El evangelista Lucas estaba preparando a su propia comunidad gentil para considerar que su propio sufrimiento, como la subclase permanente del Imperio, no era exclusivo de ellos. Lucas presentó a su comunidad con Jesús-como-el Cristo, como un liberador que liberó a las personas mediante la reconciliación, sanando a través de la profunda herencia espiritual de la fe judía. En este capítulo y en todo el resto de su evangelio, Lucas tuvo que establecer el alcance de la salvación de Jesús-como-el Cristo: la salvación era para todos.

La selección del evangelio de hoy comienza con Jesús predicando a las grandes multitudes. Lucas usa la predicación como una función interpretativa para los siguientes versos. En otras palabras, lo que ocurra dentro del pasaje está relacionado con la predicación de Jesús. Tenga en cuenta que ahora Lucas colocó a Jesús en el “Lago de Genesaret”. Lucas usa el nombre “Genesaret”, mientras que los evangelistas Mateo, Marcos y Juan usan el nombre “Mar de Galilea” y Juan usa el nombre adicional, “Mar de Tiberíades”. La historia del lugar es interesante porque después del 135 EC, solo unos pocos años después de que se estimara que estaba escrito el evangelio de Lucas, los resistentes judíos fueron derrotados y se establecieron a lo largo del lago junto a las comunidades gentiles. La comunidad judía finalmente se hizo lo suficientemente fuerte como para construir una cultura judía fuerte y un centro teológico próspero. (El Talmud de Jerusalén fue compilado en esta misma lugar). La audiencia gentil de Lucas era muy consciente de los desarrollos en el pensamiento judío y sin duda se preguntaba cómo, como no judíos, estaban conectados con las promesas de la liberación. Lucas 5: 1-11 proporciona información sobre una comprensión creciente de que la salvación se extiende a toda la familia humana.

En el texto de hoy, Jesús-como-el Cristo nota que los pescadores ya habían terminado con su trabajo: estaban lavando sus redes (Lc 5: 2-3). Jesús-como-el Cristo aborda uno de las barcas y se aleja de la orilla como una manera de enseñar a la gran multitud que se reunió en la orilla. Los lectores modernos interpretarían esto como un movimiento práctico, ya que debido a la multitud, la decisión de mover al hablante fuera de la costa sería una solución práctica para manejar la transmisión de información. Tenga en cuenta; sin embargo, el evangelista no solo transmitía información histórica, sino que también amplía la idea de que la misericordia de Dios se extiende a toda la humanidad. El contexto literal es este: una gran multitud, hambrienta por las “buenas nuevas”, se reunió para escuchar a Jesús hablar. A diferencia de los feligreses que querían hacerle daño a Jesús por su predicación, esta multitud estaba ansiosa por escuchar lo que tenía que decir. El evangelista no registra el contenido del discurso, y no hay forma de recuperar lo que se podría haber dicho; sin embargo, el punto no era la historicidad del discurso específico de Jesús, sino la amplificación de la idea de que la salvación es para todos.

Después de hablar, Jesús hizo que Simón lo echara en aguas profundas y bajara las redes. (Lc 5: 4). Simon obedeció a regañadientes y ofreció un comentario clave: “… hemos trabajado duro toda la noche y no hemos atrapado nada …” (Lk5: 5) Este comentario revela un sentimiento de autodestrucción, pero también actúa como una transición en la que la narración cambia una sugerencia sobre la pesca a una metáfora para la salvación de toda la humanidad. A pesar de que los pescadores ya se habían dado por vencidos y estaban listos para regresar a casa, obedecieron el mandato de Jesús de ir más lejos en las profundidades. 

Al cumplir con la solicitud de Jesús de ir a aguas “más profundas”, regresaron con una captura tan grande que el peso rasgó las redes y puso en peligro su propia estabilidad en el agua: “… capturaron una gran cantidad de peces y sus redes se estaban rompiendo . Hicieron una señal a sus compañeros en el otro barco para que vinieran a ayudarlos. Ellos vinieron y llenaron ambos botes para que estuvieran en peligro de hundirse ”. (Lc 5: 6-7) La audiencia gentil de Lucas pudo haber interpretado la narrativa como una poderosa historia de inclusión, es decir, que se verían a sí mismos como gentiles, incluidos en la salvación … pero que el desafío de acoger a los gentiles en el redil no estaba exento de peligro para la estructura existente de la salvación. A medida que el cristianismo se extendió a más culturas, el desafío era que las personas tuvieran que ir a “aguas más profundas” y tomar la oportunidad de que sus “redes” pudieran romperse y sus “vasos” se hundieran. La historia de la pesca ya se había convertido en una metáfora sobre la inclusión radical. La metáfora enseñó que el temor de que se rompan las “redes” y que se hundan los recipientes no debe limitar los esfuerzos de ir a las “aguas profundas”. ¡No podemos tener miedo del éxito!

A medida que viajamos este año litúrgico con el evangelio de Lucas, veremos cómo el tema de la inclusión radical se entrelaza a lo largo de la narrativa de Jesús-como-el Cristo. Cuando leemos sobre la vida de Jesús-como-el Cristo en el evangelio de Lucas, el mensaje constante de abrazar al extraño, los perdidos y los marginados, abre la pregunta de a quién le damos la bienvenida a la mesa. Cuando los líderes nacionales ridiculizan, degradan y vilipendian a una persona según su origen nacional, estado de ciudadanía, raza, identidad de género, orientación sexual, apariencia física o cualquier otro aspecto de la humanidad, sabemos que el Imperio teme que se acabe el tiempo. El rechazo a la inclusión nos dice que las personas que actualmente tienen el poder temen que sus redes de poder se rompan a medida que más personas se conviertan en ciudadanos, que más mujeres se vuelvan poderosas, que más personas de color comiencen a hablar y tomar el lugar que les corresponde. -Líderes en la comunidad. Recordemos las primeras palabras de Dios a los pastores que temblaron de miedo: “No tengas miedo; porque he aquí, les proclamo buenas nuevas de gran gozo que serán para todas las personas”. (Lc 2, 10), Ciertamente, para todas las personas.
 

Committees are forming to help organize a “kermes” for Carnival!  We need your help!  All proceeds go toward Fr. Jon’s pilot project at Our Lady of Refuge Parish. Contact Judi or Patty for volunteer opportunities.

 

¡Se están formando comités para ayudar a organizar un “kermes” para el carnaval! ¡Necesitamos tu ayuda! Todos los ingresos van hacia el proyecto piloto de P. Jon en la Parroquia de Nuestra Señora del Refugio. Póngase en contacto con Judi o Patty para oportunidades de voluntariado.

Become a Housing Ready Communities Neighborhood Ambassador 

WE ARE MAKING PROGRESS
Since Santa Clara County residents voted for the Affordable Housing Bond (Measure A) in November 2016, the County of Santa Clara has funded 19 new housing developments in six cities. Thanks to this funding and more from our cities, the Santa Clara County Housing Authority and the private sector, these developments will bring more than 1,400 new apartment homes for those in our community who need them most.

TIME FOR ACTION
In the coming months, the County Board of Supervisors and many city councils will consider additional housing for approval and funding. At this Ambassador Workshop, we will review proposed housing developments, discuss our collective outreach strategy, and provide an opportunity for you to become a neighborhood ambassador and make certain your own community is “housing ready”.

WORKSHOP AGENDA
• What makes a “housing ready” community?
• Tools and resources 
• Theory of change and actor mapping
• How to be a neighborhood ambassador?
• Next steps: Individual action plans

TWO WORKSHOP DATES
Pick one; same workshop on each date:

Thursday, February 21, 6-8pm
Recovery Cafe, 80 South 5th Street, San Jose
Register today!

Sunday, February 24, 3-5pm
Met North, 2122 Monterey Rd. San Jose, CA 95112
Register today!

PREREQUISITES AND MATERIALS
All are invited! No previous involvement, experience or knowledge is required. The focus will be on countywide development and not limited to specific cities or districts (but with a focus on taking action in your own neighborhood).

While it is not required, please bring a laptop computer if you have one. Food, drink, pens and paper will be provided.

COMMUNITY ORGANIZING
ORGANIZACIÓN COMUNITARIA 

Valentine’s Day Action: ICE Has No Heart
Thursday, February 14, 2019
1 to 2 PM
Morgan Hill ICE Office

220 Vineyard Court, Suite 100 Morgan Hill 95038

 

Join the community and the Rapid Response Network in Santa Clara County at a rally to expose ICE’s inhumane and unlawful use of its field office in Morgan Hill to tear families apart.
 

Únase a la comunidad y a la Red de Respuesta Rápida en el Condado de San- ta Clara en una manifestación para exponer el uso inhumano e ilegal de ICE de su oficina de campo en Morgan Hill para destrozar a las familias.

 

Join PACT on Saturday, February 16, to learn how to use your voice and story to engage more people and organize for change in our communities!
Hear PACT UPDATES and share yours!
To Sign Up: http://bit.ly/LDRtraining02

ENTRENAMIENTO DE LIDERAZGO DE PACT: COMPARTE TU HISTORIA Y VISIONPOR LA JUSTICIA EN TU COMUNIDAD
¡Únase a PACT el sábado 16 de febrero para aprender a usar su voz e historia para involucrar a más personas y organizar el cambio en nuestras comunidades!
¡Escuche de nuestros eventos y entrenamientos! Para saber más sobre nosotros: Visiten nuestra pagina de web! www.pactsj.org
Para regístrese: http://bit.ly/LDRtraining02

San Jose Day of Remembrance 2019
Sunday, February 17, 2019
5:30 PM
Buddhist Church San Jose Betsuin
640 North 5th street, San Jose, California 95112

All are welcome to attend the Historic San Jose Japantown’s 39th Annual Day of Remembrance. With family separation in the news, tents cities being built on the border, and children dying while in the custody of the US Federal Government, the annual Day of Remembrance takes on new urgency. The theme this year is #NeverAgainIsNow.

On February 19th, 1942, Executive Order 9066 was signed. This lead to the incarceration of more than 120,000 people of Japanese decent, two-thirds of whom were American citizens.

Chizu Omori will give her Remembrance. Teresa Castellanos, a Grupo member,  will be the community speaker. Masao Suzuki will give an update of the Nihonmachi Outreach Committee and examine the parallel of the immigration issues of today to the Japanese American experience. Don Tamaki will give the the keynote address and provide insight on the Korematsu case.

There will be a candlelight procession and cultural performances from San Jose Taiko, Asha Sudra, Safiyah Hernandez, and Jake Shimada. There will also be an activity area for children. It is free but donations are welcome.
 

Día de la conmemoración de San José 2019
Domingo 17 de febrero 2019
5:30 PM
 Iglesia Budista San Jose Betsuin
640 North 5th street, San Jose, California 95112

Todos son bienvenidos a asistir al 39 ° Día Anual del Recuerdo del histórico San Jose Japantown. Con la separación de familias en las noticias, los campamentos construidos en la frontera y los niños muriendo mientras están bajo la custodia del Gobierno Federal de los EE. UU., El Día del Recuerdo anual tiene una nueva urgencia. El tema de este año es #Nuncajamáseshoy.

El 19 de febrero de 1942 se firmó la Orden Ejecutiva 9066. Esto condujo al encarcelamiento de más de 120,000 personas de decentes japoneses, dos tercios de los cuales eran ciudadanos estadounidenses.

Chizu Omori le dará su recuerdo. Teresa Castellanos, miembro del Grupo, será la oradora de la comunidad. Masao Suzuki dará una actualización del Comité de Alcance de Nihonmachi y examinará el paralelo de los problemas de inmigración de hoy con la experiencia japonesa estadounidense. Don Tamaki dará el discurso de apertura y proporcionará información sobre el caso Korematsu.

Habrá una procesión de velas y actuaciones culturales de San José Taiko, Asha Sudra, Safiyah Hernández y Jake Shimada. También habrá un área de actividades para los niños. Es gratis pero las donaciones son bienvenidas.
 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Over the past several months we have directed our Sunday collection for the Jeans for the Journey Campaign.  We will begin to direct our collection toward the “Good Samaritan Fund” which helps local individuals and families in need.

 

For those who wish to continue supporting the Jeans for the Journey Campaign, please send your donations directly to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, Texas: 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501.

College Scholarships

Amigos de Guadalupe is offering scholarships for entering and continuing college students. Please click the below links for applications and share with students who might be eligible.

Amigos de Guadalupe está ofreciendo becas para estudiantes quien están empezando o continuando sus estudios universitarios. Haga clic en los enlaces de abajo para las aplicaciones y pasen la voz a estudiantes que podrían ser elegibles.

Graduating High School Students
Current College Students

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  Prophets in our Midst

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

February 1, 2019

No misa this weekend February 3
Next Misa Solidaridad
Sunday, February 10
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

No hay misa este fin de semana
el 3 de febrero

La proxima misa solidaridad sera
Domingo 10 de febrero
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Discussion about affordable housing for the poorest among us at Stone Church in Willow Glen

Reflection on the Gospel:
Prophets in our Midst

This week’s gospel (Lk 4:21-30) is the conclusion to last week’s selection, Lk 4:14-21.  Last week Jesus concluded the reading from the scroll, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” (Lk 4:21) Traditional Christian scholars interpret this verse as the demarcation of the announcement that Jesus-as-the Christ has fulfilled Messianic expectation of the Jewish people, meaning that Jesus-as-the Christ fulfills Isaiah’s words that God had anointed Jesus-as-the Christ to, “…bring glad tidings to the poor…proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind…let the oppressed go free…and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.” (Lk 4: 18-19 and Isaiah 61:1-2 and 58:6). Isaiah’s prophecy touches the realities of Jews and poor Gentiles living in the First Century.  The Empire disrupted local social, economic and political systems by imposing tributes and taxes, pitting groups against each other, and political manipulation (placing surrogates for the Empire in local positions of power). As a result of the Empire’s interference in the Jewish social order, more people were displaced from their lands and those who could not pay land tax or repay loans, were placed in debtor’s prison and their families were forced into a life of servitude until the debt or taxes were fully paid.   The aim of the Jewish Resistance was to dismantle the Empire’s hold on the Jewish homeland and set people free. It is in this context that Jesus read the passage Isaiah and said, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” This bold conclusion was interpreted by successive generations of Christians conditional by the Empire. Scholars and Church leaders dared not to suggest that Jesus took a side against the Empire, thus they chose to “spiritualize” Jesus’ words by teaching that “freedom” and “liberty” pertained to religious freedom and heaven.  Conditioned by the catechism of power and authority of the Empire, traditional scholars did not think that “liberty” and “freedom” pertained to economic or social freedoms. The concept of “recovery of sight” for traditionalists was not about seeing the Empire for what it was, but rather seeing the doctrinal truth that Jesus was the Savior and they also interpreted the “oppressed” as those burdened by personal sin. They did not consider that freedom was a reference to debtors prisons.

The evangelist Luke, though writing from a Gentile perspective, was not sympathetic to the Empire. Recall from last week’s reflection that Luke’s content is filled with critique of political power, economics and social norms. His antipathy toward the Empire is evident in the Canticles of Zachariah and Mary, the use of parables and in his description of how Jesus treated marginalized persons. It would thus appear then, that the most legitimate way to read verse 21 is that Jesus himself and by extension, those who chose to follow him, were there to bring down the Empire by a radical spiritual movement of liberation.

The reaction of the crowd reflected the questions of doubt within Luke’s Gentile audience. Like Jesus’ own people saying, “Wasn’t he the son of Joseph?!” Poor Gentile audiences of the First Century would also be doubting the possibility that they themselves had the agency to be the architects of their own freedom. Poor Gentile converts to Christianity were seen as traitors to the Empire. By confessing Jesus-as-the Christ, they renounced the legitimacy of Caesar as a god and by accepting the lordship of Jesus over their own lives, they removed themselves from the protection of the Empire.

Early Gentile Christians were taught that their salvation was through Christ, not the Empire. The evangelist Luke took great lengths to underscore that Gentiles, even though they were not Jews, were included in God’s plan of salvation. Verses 25-27 showed that God loved Gentiles that God’s plan of salvation did not exclude them and verses 28-29 show the anger and resentment over the inclusion. We can speculate whether the evangelist’s intent was to include these verses to reflect a historical event that would give some perspective of what might have been going on between Jews and their Gentile neighbors whom they may or may not have blamed to be collaborators or we might consider the question: What would the inclusion of verses 28-29 mean to a Gentile audience facing equal oppression under the Empire?  Using a lens of Resistance allows us to revisit the text from a perspective that asks, “Where is the liberating message?”

The Gentile audience hearing this narrative would certainly be comforted by the inclusion of Elijah and Elisha and the widow of Zarephath. These stories, while they illustrate the inclusion of non-Jews and God’s mercy to Gentiles and Pagans, are also stories of resistance. Naaman the Syrian, was afflicted by leprosy and was ready to give up on his life. A powerful general was reduced to the status of a leper, but by bathing in the Jordan River seven times, in obedience to the prophet Elisha, Naaman received a miraculous cure.  The widow faced the death of her son and looked the entire system that failed her. She recognized that her time and her child’s time was close at hand and said, “….See, I am gathering a couple of sticks that I may go in and prepare it for myself and my son, that we may eat it, and die…”  (1 Kings 17:12) This widow chose to support the prophet Elijah, a foreigner, rather than chose to prolong her life. In both cases, the emphasis is on believing that salvation is not guaranteed by obedience to laws or by birthright, but rather in surrendering all of our power, our dreams, and even our hopes to God. Might it be possible that the evangelist’s use of these stories was to build up his own community’s confidence rather than make a theological point that Jesus is a “neo-Elijah” and “neo-Elisha?”

As we look at asylum seekers at the US-Mexico border hoping to have their day in court, our unhoused families seeking a safe place to park their van for the night, or a trans-youth trying to get through another day in high school, we see many instances of perseverance.  There are no guarantees that one will win asylum, have a safe place to stay for the night or not be beat up at school; however, there is one assurance: that you are not unloved by God. Knowing that we are loved is sometimes the only source of strength that will get us through one more day. Naaman could have stopped washing in the Jordan after the sixth time, but he trusted the word of the prophet to enter seven times.  And he was cured. The widow could have refused to feed the Prophet, yet she trusted the word of the Prophet that she and her son would live.  The Resistance is built on what we believe, not what we think is possible. Let the Resistance be strong and bold.  May it never be limited by what we think is possible, but may it grow by what we believe is right and just.

Weekly Intercessions

This past week, Johnny Hultzapple, a teen in Colorado wrote an article in his local paper standing up to the Archbishop of Denver and the John Paul II Center to protest the appearance of controversial “conversion therapist” proponent, Andrew Comiskey and the appearance of a banner that read, “There is no such thing as a ‘gay’ person…That is a popular myth,” and “Satan delights in homosexual perversion.” In the conference Comiskey said, “The enemy is intent on sowing seeds of deception in really bright and really colorful and really fragile people, and that’s what the whole LGBT juggernaut is.”  Hultzapple strongly criticized the event and Comiskey and the Archdiocese for supporting that hateful message and he encouraged readers to be informed, talk about the issue and to give love to all the LGBTQ friends and family members, especially in unsupportive communities. Around the same time that this article circulated the internet, a popular gay African American actor, Jussie Smollette, was attacked in Chicago by two men who hailed racial and sexual hate speech at him, beat him up, put a noose around his neck and poured bleach over him. And then a Hindu temple in Kentucky was vandalized with sacred images desecrated and spray-painted messages such as, “Jesus is The Only God.” Incidents of intolerance and hate are on the rise throughout the country, especially during the past two years. Many attribute the escalation of hate crimes to remarks by Donald Trump and other members of the administration. The so-called “Red MAGA hat” has become a symbol of hatred like the brown shirts worn by members of the SA, Sturmabteilung the paramilitary group of young men who beat up unionists, Jews, gays, gypsies, members of the communist party, and Jehovah Witnesses in the 1920’s and early 1930’s Germany. These young men were called the “Brownshirts.”  Today’s racial intolerance, religious bigotry, and homophobia do indeed have their antecedents in history. We must ask ourselves what will we do when we see the rise of hatred and intolerance. Will we speak up? Will we be courageous enough to stand up to religious leaders — even within our own Church when speech become incendiary? Let us pray for all those who dare to say, “NO!  I do not give you power to destroy me or those whom I love!”  Let us also pray for more conversations and dialogs around difficult topics and that more faith communities stand up to religious bigotry within their pews.

Intercesiónes semanales

La semana pasada, Johnny Hultzapple, un adolescente de Colorado, escribió un artículo en su periódico local en el enfrentó el Arzobispo de Denver y el Centro Juan Pablo II por la presencia del controvertido promotor del “terapeuta de conversión”, Andrew Comiskey y la aparición de un una pancarta que decía: “No hay tal cosa como una persona ‘gay’ … Eso es un mito popular” y “Satanás se deleita en la perversión homosexual”. En la conferencia Comiskey dijo: “El enemigo tiene la intención de sembrar semillas de engaño en gente realmente brillante y realmente colorida y realmente frágil, y eso es lo que todo el gigante LGBT es ”. Hultzapple criticó al evento a Comiskey y la Arquidiócesis por apoyar ese mensaje de odio y alentó a los lectores a estar informados, hablar sobre el tema y dar amor a todos los amigos y miembros de la familia LGBTQ, especialmente en comunidades sin apoyo. Casi al mismo tiempo que este artículo circulaba por Internet, un popular actor afroamericano y gay, Jussie Smollette, fue atacado en Chicago por dos hombres que lo acusaron de odio racial y sexual, lo golpearon, le pusieron una soga alrededor del cuello y lo vertieron lejía sobre él. Y luego, un templo hindú en Kentucky fue destrozado con imágenes sagradas profanadas y pintadas con rociadores, como “Jesús es el único Dios”. Los incidentes de intolerancia y odio aumentan en todo el país, especialmente durante los últimos dos años. Muchos atribuyen la escalada de los crímenes de odio a los comentarios de Donald Trump y otros miembros de la administración. El llamado “Sombrero rojo de MAGA” se ha convertido en un símbolo del odio como las camisas marrones que usan los miembros de las SA, Sturmabteilung, el grupo paramilitar de jóvenes que golpeaban a sindicalistas, judíos, gays, gitanos, miembros del partido comunista y los Testigos de Jehová en la década de 1920 y principios de la década de 1930 en Alemania. A estos jóvenes se les llamó “Camisetas marrones”. La intolerancia racial de hoy, el fanatismo religioso y la homofobia sí tienen sus antecedentes en la historia. Debemos preguntarnos qué haremos cuando veamos el aumento del odio y la intolerancia. ¿Hablaremos? ¿Seremos lo suficientemente valientes para enfrentarnos a los líderes religiosos, incluso dentro de nuestra propia Iglesia cuando el discurso se convierta en incendiario? Oremos por todos aquellos que se atreven a decir: “¡NO! ¡No te doy poder para destruirme a mí ni a los que amo! . Oremos también por más conversaciones y diálogos sobre temas difíciles y que más comunidades de fe se enfrenten al fanatismo religioso en sus templos.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio:
Profetas en nuestro medio

El evangelio de esta semana (Lc 4: 21-30) es la conclusión de la selección de la semana pasada, Lc 4: 14-21. La semana pasada, Jesús concluyó la lectura del pergamino: “Hoy, este pasaje de las Escrituras se cumple en tu audiencia”. (Lc 4:21) Los académicos cristianos tradicionales interpretan este versículo como la demarcación del anuncio de que Jesús-como-el Cristo ha cumplido lo mesiánico expectativa del pueblo judío, lo que significa que Jesús-como-el Cristo cumple las palabras de Isaías de que Dios había ungido a Jesús-como-el Cristo para “… traer buenas nuevas a los pobres … proclamar la libertad a los cautivos y recuperar la vista de los ciegos … que los oprimidos salgan libres … y para proclamar un año aceptable para el Señor”. (Lc 4: 18-19 e Isaías 61: 1-2 y 58: 6). La profecía de Isaías toca las realidades de los judíos y los pobres gentiles que viven en el Primer Siglo. El Imperio interrumpió los sistemas sociales, económicos y políticos locales al imponer tributos e impuestos, enfrentando a los grupos entre sí, y la manipulación política (colocando muñeco para el Imperio en posiciones de poder locales). Como resultado de la interferencia del Imperio en el orden social judío, más personas fueron desplazadas de sus terrenos y aquellos que no podían pagar el impuesto a su terreno o pagar los préstamos, fueron colocados en la prisión de deudores y sus familias fueron forzadas a una vida de servidumbre hasta la deuda o los impuestos fueron pagados en su totalidad.  El objetivo de la Resistencia judía era desmantelar el dominio del Imperio sobre la patria judía y liberar los encarcelados.  En este contexto, Jesús leyó el pasaje de Isaías y dijo: “Hoy, este pasaje de las Escrituras se cumple en su audiencia”. Esta conclusión audaz fue interpretada por las sucesivas generaciones de cristianos condicionales por el Imperio. Los académicos y los líderes de la Iglesia se atrevieron a no sugerir que Jesús tomara partido contra el Imperio, por lo que optaron por “espiritualizar” las palabras de Jesús al enseñar que “libertad” y “libertad” pertenecían a la libertad religiosa y al cielo. Condicionados por “el catecismo de poder y autoridad del Imperio”, los académicos tradicionales no pensaban que la “libertad” pertenecían a las libertades económicas o sociales. El concepto de “recuperación de la vista” para los tradicionalistas no consistía en ver el Imperio por lo que era, doctrinal de que Jesús era el Salvador y también interpretaban a los “oprimidos” como aquellos agobiados por el pecado personal. No consideraron que la libertad fuera una referencia a la sistema de opresión o de las prisiones de los deudores.

El evangelista Lucas, aunque escribe desde una perspectiva gentil, no simpatizaba con el Imperio. Recordemos de la reflexión de la semana pasada que el contenido de Lucas está lleno de críticas al poder político, la economía y las normas sociales. Su antipatía hacia el Imperio es evidente en los Cánticos de Zacarías y María, el uso de parábolas y en su descripción de cómo Jesús trató a las personas marginadas. Por lo tanto, parecería entonces que la forma más legítima de leer el versículo 21 es que Jesús mismo y por extensión, aquellos que eligieron seguirlo, estaban allí para derribar el Imperio mediante un movimiento espiritual radical de liberación.

La reacción de la multitud reflejó las preguntas de duda dentro de la audiencia gentil de Lucas. Como el propio pueblo de Jesús que decía:¡¿No era él el hijo de José?” Las audiencias de los gentiles del primer siglo también dudarían de la posibilidad de que ellos mismos tuvieran la agencia de ser los arquitectos de su propia libertad. Los pobres gentiles conversos al cristianismo fueron vistos como traidores al Imperio. Al confesar a Jesús-como-el Cristo, renunciaron a la legitimidad de César como dios y al aceptar la autoridad de Jesús sobre sus propias vidas, se retiraron de la protección del Imperio.

A los primeros cristianos gentiles se les enseñó que su salvación era a través de Cristo, no del Imperio. El evangelista Lucas hizo grandes esfuerzos para subrayar que los gentiles, aunque no eran judíos, estaban incluidos en el plan de salvación de Dios. Los versículos 25-27 mostraron que Dios amaba a los gentiles que el plan de salvación de Dios no los excluía y los versículos 28-29 mostraban la ira y el resentimiento por la inclusión. Podemos especular si la intención del evangelista era incluir estos versículos para reflejar un evento histórico que brindaría una perspectiva de lo que podría haber estado sucediendo entre los judíos y sus vecinos gentiles a quienes pueden o no haber culpado de ser colaboradores o si podemos considerar la pregunta: ¿Qué significaría la inclusión de los versículos 28-29 para una audiencia gentil que enfrenta una opresión igual en el Imperio? El uso de un óptico de Resistencia nos permite revisar el texto desde una perspectiva que pregunta: “¿Dónde está el mensaje liberador?”

La audiencia gentil que escucha esta narrativa sin duda se sentiría reconfortada con la inclusión de Elías y Eliseo y la viuda de Zarephath. Estas historias, mientras ilustran la inclusión de los no judíos y la misericordia de Dios a los gentiles y paganos, también son historias de resistencia. Naamán, el sirio, estaba afligido por la lepra y estaba dispuesto a renunciar a su vida. Un general poderoso se redujo al estado de leproso, pero al bañarse en el río Jordán siete veces, en obediencia al profeta Eliseo, Naamán recibió una cura milagrosa. La viuda enfrentó la muerte de su hijo y miró todo el sistema que le falló. Ella reconoció que su tiempo y el tiempo de su hija estaban cerca y dijo: “… Mira, estoy juntando un par de palos para que pueda entrar y prepararlo para mí y para mi hijo, para que podamos comerlo y morir”. … (1 Reyes 17:12) Esta viuda eligió apoyar al profeta Elías, un extranjero, en lugar de elegir prolongar su vida. En ambos casos, el énfasis está en creer que la salvación no está garantizada por la obediencia a las leyes o por derecho de nacimiento, sino más bien en la entrega de todo nuestro poder, nuestros sueños e incluso nuestras esperanzas a Dios. ¿Podría ser posible que el uso de estas historias por parte del evangelista sea para aumentar la confianza de su propia comunidad en lugar de hacer una observación teológica de que Jesús es un “neo-Elías” y un “neo-Elisha”?

Mientras observamos a los solicitantes de asilo en la frontera de EEUU y México con la esperanza de tener su día en la corte, nuestras familias no ocupadas buscan un lugar seguro para estacionar su camioneta por la noche o un transexual que intenta pasar otro día en la escuela secundaria. Vemos muchos casos de perseverancia. No hay garantías de que uno gane asilo, tenga un lugar seguro para quedarse por la noche o no sea golpeado en la escuela; sin embargo, hay una seguridad: que Dios no te ama. Saber que somos amados es a veces la única fuente de fortaleza que nos llevará a través de un día más. Naamán pudo haber dejado de lavarse en el Jordán después de la sexta vez, pero confió en la palabra del profeta para entrar siete veces. Y se curó. La viuda podría haberse negado a alimentar al Profeta, pero ella confiaba en la palabra del Profeta de que ella y su hijo vivirían. La resistencia se basa en lo que creemos, no en lo que creemos que es posible. Que la resistencia sea fuerte y audaz. Que nunca esté limitado por lo que creemos que es posible, sino que crezca por lo que creemos que es correcto y justo.

Committees are forming to help organize a “kermes” for Carnival!  We need your help!  All proceeds go toward Fr. Jon’s pilot project at Our Lady of Refuge Parish. Contact Judi for volunteer opportunities.

 

¡Se están formando comités para ayudar a organizar un “kermes” para el carnaval! ¡Necesitamos tu ayuda! Todos los ingresos van hacia el proyecto piloto de P. Jon en la Parroquia de Nuestra Señora del Refugio. Póngase en contacto con Judi para oportunidades de voluntariado.

San Jose Day of Remembrance 2019
Sunday, February 17, 2019
5:30 PM
Buddhist Church San Jose Betsuin
640 North 5th street, San Jose, California 95112

All are welcome to attend the Historic San Jose Japantown’s 39th Annual Day of Remembrance. With family separation in the news, tents cities being built on the border, and children dying while in the custody of the US Federal Government, the annual Day of Remembrance takes on new urgency. The theme this year is #NeverAgainIsNow.

On February 19th, 1942, Executive Order 9066 was signed. This lead to the incarceration of more than 120,000 people of Japanese decent, two-thirds of whom were American citizens.

Chizu Omori will give her Remembrance. Teresa Castellanos, a Grupo member,  will be the community speaker. Masao Suzuki will give an update of the Nihonmachi Outreach Committee and examine the parallel of the immigration issues of today to the Japanese American experience. Don Tamaki will give the the keynote address and provide insight on the Korematsu case.

There will be a candlelight procession and cultural performances from San Jose Taiko, Asha Sudra, Safiyah Hernandez, and Jake Shimada. There will also be an activity area for children. It is free but donations are welcome.
 

Día de la conmemoración de San José 2019
Domingo 17 de febrero 2019
5:30 PM
 Iglesia Budista San Jose Betsuin
640 North 5th street, San Jose, California 95112

Todos son bienvenidos a asistir al 39 ° Día Anual del Recuerdo del histórico San Jose Japantown. Con la separación de familias en las noticias, los campamentos construidos en la frontera y los niños muriendo mientras están bajo la custodia del Gobierno Federal de los EE. UU., El Día del Recuerdo anual tiene una nueva urgencia. El tema de este año es #Nuncajamáseshoy.

El 19 de febrero de 1942 se firmó la Orden Ejecutiva 9066. Esto condujo al encarcelamiento de más de 120,000 personas de decentes japoneses, dos tercios de los cuales eran ciudadanos estadounidenses.

Chizu Omori le dará su recuerdo. Teresa Castellanos, miembro del Grupo, será la oradora de la comunidad. Masao Suzuki dará una actualización del Comité de Alcance de Nihonmachi y examinará el paralelo de los problemas de inmigración de hoy con la experiencia japonesa estadounidense. Don Tamaki dará el discurso de apertura y proporcionará información sobre el caso Korematsu.

Habrá una procesión de velas y actuaciones culturales de San José Taiko, Asha Sudra, Safiyah Hernández y Jake Shimada. También habrá un área de actividades para los niños. Es gratis pero las donaciones son bienvenidas.
 

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Over the past several months we have directed our Sunday collection for the Jeans for the Journey Campaign.  We will begin to direct our collection toward the “Good Samaritan Fund” which helps local individuals and families in need.

 

For those who wish to continue supporting the Jeans for the Journey Campaign, please send your donations directly to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, Texas: 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501.

JEANS FOR THE JOURNEY
A little background on why we need jeans (and other things for the journey)

Families arrive to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, TX with only the clothes on their backs. Clothes that they’ve worn day after day as they walked, waited, slept, been detained, survived. Some families travel close to a month before we meet them at the Respite Center. When they arrive, we greet them with cheers and clapping, smiles and warm welcomes. Some have said this is the first time in over a month they’ve felt welcomed. A part of that welcome process is receiving a new backpack, a warm meal, and a place to rest. They are also gifted new clothes; clothes that fit and are chosen by them. Nothing tattered or full of holes but clean, well fitted clothing. They take a shower and come out clean. They throw their old clothes away and you can almost see a physical change in their persona. The newness in their journey and a step in this new chapter. We get to help them by physically walking alongside them. It may seem simple and unnecessary, but the sure fact they get a new pair of pants—one that fits them, one that has not been trudged along with them…but one that represents their new direction. It is a small thing that empowers them and restores a piece of dignity.

They are most in need of men’s and boys jeans. Here are the sizes of jeans most commonly needed and quantity per week:

  • Men’s Jeans: 28″-32″ waist (no longer than 32), 250-300 weekly
  • Boys Jeans: ages 7-14 (22″-24″ waist), 150 weekly
  • Women’s Jeans: 24″-29″ waist (or 00-7/8), 300 weekly 
  • Girl’s Jeans: 4-10, 150 weekly 
  • Toddlers pants 3-7T, 150 weekly
  • Men’s shoes sizes 6-9.

Please send your donations directly to 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501.

JEANS PARA EL CAMINO
Un poco de historia sobre por qué necesitamos jeans (y otras cosas para el viaje)

Las familias llegan al Centro de la Restauración Humanitaria en McAllen, TX con solo la ropa en la espalda. La ropa que han usado día tras día mientras caminan, esperan, duermen, han sido detenidas y han sobrevivido. Algunas familias viajan cerca de un mes antes de que nos encontremos con ellas en el Centro. Cuando llegan, los saludamos con aplausos y aplausos, sonrisas y cálidas bienvenidas. Algunos han dicho que esta es la primera vez en más de un mes que se sienten bienvenidos. Una parte de ese proceso de bienvenida es recibir una nueva mochila, una comida caliente y un lugar para descansar. También son nuevas prendas dotadas; ropa que se ajusta y es elegida por ellos. Nada desgarrado o lleno de agujeros, pero la ropa limpia y bien equipada. Se bañan y salen limpios. Se tiran la ropa vieja y casi se puede ver un cambio físico en su persona. La novedad en su viaje y un paso en este nuevo capítulo. Podemos ayudarlos caminando físicamente junto a ellos. Puede parecer simple e innecesario, pero el hecho seguro de que tienen un nuevo par de pantalones, uno que les queda bien, uno que no ha sido caminado con ellos … pero que representa su nueva dirección. Es algo pequeño que los empodera y restaura una pieza de dignidad.

Cada día nos quedamos sin pantalones de hombre. Aquí están el tamaño de los pantalones vaqueros más comúnmente necesarios y la cantidad por semana. Aquí hay necesidades específicas:

  • Jeans para hombres: cintura de 28 “-32” (no más de 32), 250-300 por semana
  • Jeans para niños: edades 7-14 (22 “-24” cintura), 150 semanal
  • Jeans para mujeres: cintura de 24 “-29” (o 00-7 / 8), 300 semanal
  • Jeans de niña: 4-10, 150 semanal
  • Los niños pequeños pantalones 3-7T, 150 semanales
  • Zapatos para hombres, tallas 6-9

Envíe sus donaciones directamente a 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501. \

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  Resistance in a New Context

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

January 25, 2019

MISA SOLIDARIDAD 
THIS SUNDAY

Sunday, January 27
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.
No misa on February 3

MISA SOLIDARIDAD 
ESTE DOMINGO

Domingo 27 de enero 
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10
No hay misa el 3 de febrero

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Spreading the word of accompaniment at Our Lady of Refuge Parish!

Reflection on the Gospel: Resistance in a New Context

This week’s gospel is taken from two passages within the gospel of Luke: Lk 1:1-4 and Lk 4:14-21.  The opening lines of Luke’s gospel, “I too have decided, after investigating everything accurately anew, to write (the account of Jesus’ life and death) down in an orderly sequence for you, most excellent Theophilus, so that you may realize the certainty of the teachings you have received.”  The opening lines tell us that the evangelist was writing the gospel so that “Theophilus” (translated, “Friend of God,” might understand who Jesus was in history and who Jesus is as the Living Christ.  In the opening four lines of his gospel, the evangelist established that his account as a “companion” document to the faith they already received from earlier writings, presumably Mark’s gospel and some of the letters from St. Paul.

The evangelist’s content and frame is drawn from Jewish sources, but the delivery, style, cadence of sentences, and grammatical tenor show a Gentile sensibility. Based on these literary clues, bible scholars place the probable location of Luke’s audience in a non-Jewish, Hellenistic urban setting in Asia Minor or possibly even Greece itself. Some scholars believe that the resistance elements that were evident in Mark’s narration are softened with the intention to make the Christian faith more “palatable” for the non-Jewish audience of Luke.  A Resistance optic does not agree with that mainstream conclusion. The prose and narration of Luke is certainly more florid than that of Mark and the influence of Hellenistic elements portray Jesus as an “exception” to the Jewish culture and in a sense a victim of Jewish collaborators rather than as an active dissenter that emerged from the collective hope of Jewish Resistance as Mark’s gospel might suggest.  Mainstream scholars believe that the stylistic frame of the Luke’s writing shows the author’s intent and purpose to make the Christian faith “palatable” to Gentiles. These scholars have focused too much on the style and have given too short notice of the content.

Luke’s content is filled with critique of political power, economics and social norms. The content of Luke’s narration lays out a scathing critique of the use of power and presumption that those in leadership yield a superior intellect to those who do not yield power (see the Magnificat (Lk 1:46-55). Parables, such as the rich man and the poor man, Lazarus, condemn the economic disparity between the rich and poor and the treatment of people marginalized by gender identity, sexual expression and physical ability  in Luke’s narrative, provide a vision that is the antithesis of Roman social order. The political, social and economic critique are emerged from a Jewish Resistance Movement’s reading of the Torah and Luke captures those critiques in a way that Hellenistic audiences can understand. In short, the evangelist Luke is not trying to make Christianity more “friendly” to Gentiles in order to prove that Christians are good subjects of the Empire, but rather, he is trying to raise up Resistance within a new Gentile context. Mainstream scholars conditioned by the Empire, have failed to see that Luke’s intent is to, “disperse the arrogant of mind and heart,” “throw down the rulers from their thrones,” and “lift up the lowly.” (see Lk 1:51-52).

The evangelist’s social and historical location no doubt colors the narrative and thus we now turn to the socio-historical context of the evangelist Luke in relationship to Jewish history and to the Destruction of Jerusalem.  Resistance is part and parcel of Jewish ethics and history and thus one cannot understand Jesus without also understanding the framework of Resistance. Jewish identity was born from a struggle for freedom from slavery. Religious identity gave birth to an ethical identity of justice once the Davidic line was established. The Prophets pushed back against internal oppression of the poor when the kings took advantage of the labor of people of the land. Jewish political Resistance is rooted in religious identity and ethics. Throughout Jewish history, Judea and Israel were invaded by foreign Empires resulting in religious and cultural colonization and economic monopolies. Invasions and occupations benefited foreign powers at the expense of the welfare of the people. These violent injustices gave birth to Jewish Resistance. Jesus-as-the Christ was born into this legacy of struggle and the evangelist Luke needed a way to express this so that his audience would be able to continue that same spirit of struggle in a Gentile context as members of the servant underclass.

The historical context of Luke also influenced his narrative.  By the writing of Luke’s gospel, the Jewish Diaspora had already displaced the cultural and religious leaders in Jerusalem. The Jewish economy had collapsed (see http://www.adath-shalom.ca/buchler.htm) The Jewish Resistance War and collapse of Jerusalem was a reversal of fortune for those whose livlihood was tied to the Temple like the Levites, Priests and Sadducees. Those families tied to Temple sacrifices were reduced to poverty. Historical accounts indicate that many priestly families tried to retain their purity by restricting marriages and meals. Those families that chose the path of separation and exclusion could not survive in the new social context of post-war Judea. Wealthy rabbis and others who already had property and who cooperated with the Empire were given permission to retain property and some degree of their wealth. Those who resisted the Empire ended up landless and poor. The Empire recognized that Jewish wealth within a few short generations would lead to a new Resistance, thus, the Empire levied a heavy tax on those families so that they would not be able to accumulate much wealth. The context of colonial domination, and economic, political, social, cultural and religious repression, provided the basic elements of Resistance for Luke’s gospel. The Hellenist audience would interpret the Jewish Resistance as an invitation to consider their own oppression under Caesar’s Empire. The evangelist promises his audience the good news in first chapter of Luke which acts as an “overture” that introduces themes of cultural, political, economic and religious resistance. (See Canticle of Zechariah (Lk 1:67-79 and the Magnificat (Lk 1:46-55).  

This year we will read Luke’s gospel through the lens of Resistance so that we, like Luke’s original audience, might contextualize Jesus-as-the Christ, the Liberator of the Oppressed and the Passover for Humanity in our own social location. Just as Luke helped First Century Gentiles familiarize themselves with Jewish ethics and social moral imagination of a just society as a way to resist the Empire, we too must be prepared spiritually and ethically to resist the Empire by making Jesus’ message clear in a world where 1/10th of 1% of the population own as much wealth as the bottom 90%, in a country that scapegoats immigrants and asylum seekers as criminals as a way to justify placing children in cages, and in a time when elected officials at the highest level in office abuse their authority and in order to benefit their own personal gain.  Let us reflect on the closing words of this Sunday’s gospel:

The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, because he has anointed me  to bring glad tidings to the poor.

He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.
Rolling up the scroll, he handed it back to the attendant and sat down, and the eyes of all in the synagogue looked intently at him. He said to them, “Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”

Weekly Intercessions

Last week a boat over-filled with refugees capsized off the Libyan coast. A U.N. migration officer said that up to 117 other migrants were aboard when the rubber boat capsized.  This incident is one of hundreds of tragic incidents where migrants have boarded boats in the hopes of starting a new life as they flee from war torn, impoverished countries.  Wide-spread violence and poverty in the African continent is caused by political instability. Legitimate governments are supplanted by local “militia” and “gangs” that terrorize the population and rape, kidnappings, extortions, and beatings are every day occurrences. These stories from across the Atlantic are not unfamiliar to the plight of Central American asylum seekers. They, like their African counter-parts, are also victims of extreme violence and poverty in which the only viable option for survival is to leave their country. There is no simple or ready-made solution to address the international crisis of refugees. Ultimately must help stabilize countries to protect vulnerable people and establish social order, but in the mean time we must address the immediate reality of refugees and asylum seekers.  Refusing to rescue people from a capsized boat is not an option nor is separating children from parents and placing them in cages in a cold warehouse. As people of faith we must act now.  The Holy Father has long challenged European countries to care for refugees from the Middle East and Africa.  This week in Panama he addressed the situation on our own continent. He said, “We know that the father of lies, the devil, prefers a community divided and bickering…This is the criteria to divide people…The builders of bridges and the builders of walls, those builders of walls sow fear and look to divide people. What do you want to be?” As we let this question echo in our heart and stir our conscience let us remember that this past week four women from the humanitarian organization, “No More Deaths,” were declared guilty for placing water and food for migrants crossing the dangerous Arizona desert where temperatures rise into the 100’s during the summers. They could face up to six months in federal prison. Will we — as people of faith — also be willing to take a stand in favor of those who need our help in the name of God? Let us pray for the women convicted for helping migrants and for all of those throughout the world who tend to the needs of refugees, migrants and asylum seekers.

Intercesiónes semanales

La semana pasada, un barco lleno de refugiados se volcó en la costa de Libia. Un oficial de migración de N.U. dijo que hasta 117 otros migrantes estaban a bordo cuando el bote de goma volcó. Este incidente es uno de los cientos de incidentes trágicos en que los migrantes han abordado embarcaciones con la esperanza de comenzar una nueva vida mientras huyen de países empobrecidos y desgarrados por la guerra. La violencia y la pobreza generalizadas en el continente africano son causadas por la inestabilidad política. Los gobiernos legítimos son suplantados por las “milicias” locales y las “pandillas” que aterrorizan a la población y las violaciones, los secuestros, las extorsiones y las palizas son hechos cotidianos. Estas historias de un lado del Atlántico no son desconocidas para la difícil situación de los solicitantes de asilo de América Central. Ellos, al igual que sus contrapartes africanas, también son víctimas de la violencia extrema y la pobreza en la que la única opción viable para sobrevivir es de salir su país. No existe una solución simple o lista para enfrentar la crisis internacional de refugiados. En última instancia, debe ayudar a estabilizar a los países para proteger a las personas vulnerables y establecer el orden social, pero mientras tanto debemos abordar la realidad inmediata de los refugiados y solicitantes de asilo. Negarse a rescatar a las personas de un barco volcado no es una opción, ni tampoco es separar a los niños de los padres y colocarlos en jaulas en un almacén frigorífico. Como personas de fe debemos actuar ahora. El Santo Padre ha rogado durante mucho tiempo a los países europeos para que cuiden de los refugiados de Oriente Medio y África. Esta semana en Panamá abordó la situación en nuestro propio continente. Dijo: “Sabemos que el padre de las mentiras, el diablo, prefiere una comunidad dividida y discutiendo … Este es el criterio para dividir a la gente … Los constructores de puentes y los constructores de muros, aquellos constructores de muros siembran el miedo y buscan dividir gente. ¿Qué quieres ser? ”. Cuando dejamos que esta pregunta resuene en nuestro corazón y despierte nuestra conciencia, recordemos que la semana pasada, cuatro mujeres de la organización humanitaria,“No más muertes”, fueron declaradas culpables por colocar agua y alimentos para los migrantes cruzan el peligroso desierto de Arizona, donde las temperaturas suben a los 100’s durante los veranos. Podrían enfrentar hasta seis meses en prisión federal. ¿Nosotros, como personas de fe, también estaremos dispuestos a tomar una posición en favor de aquellos que necesitan nuestra ayuda en el nombre de Dios? Oremos por las mujeres condenadas por ayudar a los migrantes y por todas las personas de todo el mundo que atienden las necesidades de los refugiados, migrantes y solicitantes de asilo

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: La resistencia en un nuevo contexto

El evangelio de esta semana está tomado de dos pasajes dentro del evangelio de Lucas: Lc 1: 1-4 y Lk 4: 14-21. Las primeras líneas del evangelio de Lucas: Yo también, ilustre Teófilo, después de haberme informado minuciosamente de todo, desde sus principios, pensé escribírtelo por orden, para que veas la verdad de lo que se te ha enseñado”.  Las líneas iniciales nos dicen que el evangelista estaba escribiendo el evangelio para que” Teófilo “(traducido como” Amigo de Dios”, pudiera entender quién era Jesús en la historia y quién es Jesús-como-el Cristo viviente. En las cuatro líneas iniciales de su evangelio, el evangelista estableció que su relato como documento “suplemento” de la fe que ya habían recibido de escritos anteriores, presumiblemente el evangelio de Marcos y algunas de las cartas de San Pablo.

El contenido y el marco del evangelista Lucas se han extraído de fuentes judías, pero la entrega, el estilo, la cadencia de las oraciones y el tenor gramatical muestran una sensibilidad gentil. Basados ​​en estas pistas literarias, los profesores bíblicos ubican la ubicación probable de la audiencia de Lucas en un entorno urbano no judío, helenístico en Asia Menor o posiblemente incluso en la misma Grecia. Algunos profesores creen que los elementos de resistencia que fueron evidentes en la narración de Marcos se suavizan con la intención de hacer que la fe cristiana sea más “aceptable” para las audiencia no judía en el evangelio según Lucas. Una óptica de resistencia no está de acuerdo con esa conclusión general. La prosa y la narración de Lucas es ciertamente más florida que la de Marcos y la influencia de los elementos helenísticos retrata a Jesús como una “excepción” a la cultura judía y, en cierto sentido, una víctima de colaboradores judíos más que como un disidente activo que surgió de la esperanza colectiva de la resistencia judía, como sugiere el evangelio de Marcos. Los profesores tradicionales creen que el marco estilístico de los escritos de Lucas muestra la intención y el propósito del autor de hacer que la fe cristiana sea “aceptable para los gentiles”. Estos académicos se han enfocado demasiado en el estilo y han dado muy poca atención al contenido.

El contenido de Lucas está lleno de crítica del poder político, la economía y las normas sociales. El contenido de la narración de Lucas presenta una crítica mordaz del uso del poder y la presunción de que aquellos en el liderazgo ceden un intelecto superior a los que no ceden el poder (ver el Magnificat (Lc 1: 46-55). Parábolas, tales como El Hombre Rico y el Lázaro, condenan la disparidad económica entre ricos y pobres y el trato a las personas marginadas por la identidad de género, la expresión sexual y la capacidad física en la narrativa de Lucas, proporcionan una visión que es la antítesis del orden social romano. Las críticas políticas, sociales y económicas surgen de la lectura de la Torá de un Movimiento de Resistencia Judía y Lucas capta esas críticas de una manera que las audiencias helenísticas pueden comprender. En resumen, el evangelista Lucas no está tratando de hacer que el cristianismo sea más “amigable” con los gentiles para probar que los cristianos son buenos súbditos del Imperio, sino que está tratando de elevar la resistencia en un nuevo contexto gentil. Los académicos tradicionales que son condicionados por el Imperio, no han podido ver que la intención de Lucas es “dispersar a los arrogantes de la mente y el corazón”, “derribar a los gobernantes de sus tronos” y “elevar a los humildes” (ver Lc 1: 51-52).

La ubicación social e histórica del evangelista sin duda colorea la narrativa y, por lo tanto, ahora nos dirigimos al contexto socio-histórico del evangelista Lucas en relación con la historia judía y la Destrucción de Jerusalén. La Resistencia es parte integral de la ética y la historia judía y, por lo tanto, no se puede entender a Jesús sin entender también el sistema de la resistencia. La identidad judía nació de una lucha por la libertad de la esclavitud. La identidad religiosa dio origen a una identidad ética de justicia una vez que se estableció la línea davídica. Los profetas rechazaron la opresión interna de los pobres cuando los reyes se aprovecharon del trabajo de los campesinos y pobres. La resistencia política judía está arraigada en la identidad religiosa y la ética. A lo largo de la historia judía, Judea e Israel fueron invadidos por imperios extranjeros que dieron como resultado la colonización religiosa y cultural y los monopolios económicos. Las invasiones y ocupaciones beneficiaron a las potencias extranjeras a expensas del bienestar de la población. Estas violentas injusticias dieron origen a la resistencia judía. Jesús-como-el Cristo nació en este legado de lucha y el evangelista Lucas necesitaba una forma de expresarlo para que su audiencia pudiera continuar ese mismo espíritu de lucha en un contexto gentil como miembros de la clase baja de siervos.
El contexto histórico de Lucas también influyó en su narrativa. Al escribir el evangelio de Lucas, la diáspora judía ya había desplazado a los líderes culturales y religiosos en Jerusalén. La economía judía se había derrumbado (ver http://www.adath-shalom.ca/buchler.htm) La guerra de resistencia judía y el colapso de Jerusalén fueron un derrumbo de fortuna para aquellos cuya vida estaba ligada al Templo como los levitas, sacerdotes y saduceos. Aquellas familias atadas a los sacrificios del Templo fueron reducidas a la pobreza. Los relatos históricos indican que muchas familias sacerdotales intentaron conservar su pureza restringiendo los matrimonios y las comidas puras. Las familias que eligieron el camino de la separación y la exclusión no pudieron sobrevivir en el nuevo contexto social de la Judea de posguerra. A los rabinos ricos y otros que ya tenían propiedades y que cooperaron con el Imperio se les dio permiso para retener propiedades y algún grado de su riqueza. Los que resistieron al Imperio terminaron sin tierra y pobres. El Imperio reconoció que la riqueza judía en unas pocas generaciones conduciría a una nueva Resistencia, por lo tanto, el Imperio impuso un impuesto pesado a esas familias para que no pudieran acumular mucha riqueza. El contexto de la dominación colonial y la represión económica, política, social, cultural y religiosa proporcionaron los elementos básicos de la resistencia para el evangelio de Lucas. La audiencia helenista interpretaría la resistencia judía como una invitación a considerar su propia opresión bajo el Imperio de César. El evangelista promete a su audiencia las buenas nuevas en el primer capítulo de Lucas, que actúa como una “obertura” que introduce temas de resistencia cultural, política, económica y religiosa. (Ver Cántico de Zacarías (Lc 1: 67-79 y el Magnificat (Lc 1: 46-55).

Este año leeremos el evangelio de Lucas a través de la óptica de la Resistencia para que nosotros, como la audiencia original de Lucas, podamos contextualizar a Jesús-como-el Cristo, el Libertador de los oprimidos y la Pascua para la humanidad en nuestra propia ubicación social. Así como Lucas ayudó a los gentiles del primer siglo a familiarizarse con la ética judía y la imaginación moral/social de una sociedad justa como una forma de resistir al Imperio, también debemos estar preparados espiritual y éticamente para resistir al Imperio al dejar claro el mensaje de Jesús en un mundo donde la décima parte del 1% de la población posee tanta riqueza como el 90% inferior, en un país que castigue a los inmigrantes y solicitantes de asilo como delincuentes como una forma de justificar la colocación de niños en jaulas y en un momento en que los funcionarios elegidos son los más altos niveles abusa de su autoridad y para beneficiar su propio beneficio personal. Reflexionemos sobre las palabras finales del evangelio de este domingo:

El espíritu del Señor está sobre mí, porque me ha ungido para llevar a los pobres la buena nueva,
para anunciar la liberación a los cautivos y la curación a los ciegos, para dar libertad a los oprimidos y proclamar el año de gracia del Señor.
Enrolló el volumen, lo devolvió al encargado y se sentó. Los ojos de todos los asistentes a la sinagoga estaban fijos en é
l. Entonces comenzó a hablar, diciendo: Hoy mismo se ha cumplido este pasaje de la Escritura que acaban de oír”.

Save the Date!
Community Meeting: Homelessness and Affordable Housing

Homelessness affects each and every person who lives and works in Santa Clara County. The factors that lead to one experiencing homelessness, and thus the solutions to ending homelessness, are complex and varied. We are seeking to create a space where all members of the community may explore creative solutions to end homelessness.

You are invited to participate in a community conversation about homelessness and the process for building affordable housing in Santa Clara County. The purposes of this gathering are to engage in meaningful dialogue with other members of the community; to learn about homelessness from Robert Stromberg, Project Manager at Destination: Home; and to learn about the model for building, sustaining, and managing affordable housing from Kathy Robinson, Director of Housing Development, Charities Housing.

We hope you will join us for this conversation on January 29, 2019 from 5:00 – 8:00 PM at the Stone Church of Willow Glen located at 1937 Lincoln Ave., San Jose CA. Please register at: http://alfsv.nonprofitsoapbox.com/component/events/event/166

Wage Theft Coalition Needs Your Support

 
Please attend the Wednesday Rules Committee meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 30 at 2 p.m. at CITY HALL to support the attached building permit revocation ordinance. The MEPS (Mechanical, Electrical, Pipe, and Sprinklers) and the Wage Theft Coalition are sponsoring it. We do not expect the meeting to be long.
 
This legislation does two things: 1) It adds public works to the wage theft policy that was passed last year; and 2) It also creates a new ordinance that requires developers who apply for building permits to submit disclosure forms for all contractors and subcontractors for wage theft, human trafficking, retaliation, and discrimination judgments, final administrative decisions, and citations and whether or not the contractor or subcontractor has a license. The  building permit will not issue unless there are satisfied judgments, final administrative decisions, or citations. We need this ordinance to prevent another Silvery Towers.

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Over the past several months we have directed our Sunday collection for the Jeans for the Journey Campaign.  We will begin to direct our collection toward the “Good Samaritan Fund” which helps local individuals and families in need.

 

For those who wish to continue supporting the Jeans for the Journey Campaign, please send your donations directly to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, Texas: 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501.

JEANS FOR THE JOURNEY
A little background on why we need jeans (and other things for the journey)

Families arrive to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, TX with only the clothes on their backs. Clothes that they’ve worn day after day as they walked, waited, slept, been detained, survived. Some families travel close to a month before we meet them at the Respite Center. When they arrive, we greet them with cheers and clapping, smiles and warm welcomes. Some have said this is the first time in over a month they’ve felt welcomed. A part of that welcome process is receiving a new backpack, a warm meal, and a place to rest. They are also gifted new clothes; clothes that fit and are chosen by them. Nothing tattered or full of holes but clean, well fitted clothing. They take a shower and come out clean. They throw their old clothes away and you can almost see a physical change in their persona. The newness in their journey and a step in this new chapter. We get to help them by physically walking alongside them. It may seem simple and unnecessary, but the sure fact they get a new pair of pants—one that fits them, one that has not been trudged along with them…but one that represents their new direction. It is a small thing that empowers them and restores a piece of dignity.

They are most in need of men’s and boys jeans. Here are the sizes of jeans most commonly needed and quantity per week:

  • Men’s Jeans: 28″-32″ waist (no longer than 32), 250-300 weekly
  • Boys Jeans: ages 7-14 (22″-24″ waist), 150 weekly
  • Women’s Jeans: 24″-29″ waist (or 00-7/8), 300 weekly 
  • Girl’s Jeans: 4-10, 150 weekly 
  • Toddlers pants 3-7T, 150 weekly
  • Men’s shoes sizes 6-9.

Please send your donations directly to 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501.

JEANS PARA EL CAMINO
Un poco de historia sobre por qué necesitamos jeans (y otras cosas para el viaje)

Las familias llegan al Centro de la Restauración Humanitaria en McAllen, TX con solo la ropa en la espalda. La ropa que han usado día tras día mientras caminan, esperan, duermen, han sido detenidas y han sobrevivido. Algunas familias viajan cerca de un mes antes de que nos encontremos con ellas en el Centro. Cuando llegan, los saludamos con aplausos y aplausos, sonrisas y cálidas bienvenidas. Algunos han dicho que esta es la primera vez en más de un mes que se sienten bienvenidos. Una parte de ese proceso de bienvenida es recibir una nueva mochila, una comida caliente y un lugar para descansar. También son nuevas prendas dotadas; ropa que se ajusta y es elegida por ellos. Nada desgarrado o lleno de agujeros, pero la ropa limpia y bien equipada. Se bañan y salen limpios. Se tiran la ropa vieja y casi se puede ver un cambio físico en su persona. La novedad en su viaje y un paso en este nuevo capítulo. Podemos ayudarlos caminando físicamente junto a ellos. Puede parecer simple e innecesario, pero el hecho seguro de que tienen un nuevo par de pantalones, uno que les queda bien, uno que no ha sido caminado con ellos … pero que representa su nueva dirección. Es algo pequeño que los empodera y restaura una pieza de dignidad.

Cada día nos quedamos sin pantalones de hombre. Aquí están el tamaño de los pantalones vaqueros más comúnmente necesarios y la cantidad por semana. Aquí hay necesidades específicas:

  • Jeans para hombres: cintura de 28 “-32” (no más de 32), 250-300 por semana
  • Jeans para niños: edades 7-14 (22 “-24” cintura), 150 semanal
  • Jeans para mujeres: cintura de 24 “-29” (o 00-7 / 8), 300 semanal
  • Jeans de niña: 4-10, 150 semanal
  • Los niños pequeños pantalones 3-7T, 150 semanales
  • Zapatos para hombres, tallas 6-9

Envíe sus donaciones directamente a 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501. \

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Newsletter

Weekly Communique:  The Wine of Joy

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

January 18, 2019

FIRST
MISA SOLIDARIDAD OF 2019
THIS SUNDAY

Sunday, January 20
at 9 am
Newman Chapel
Corner of San Carlos and 10th Sts.

 

¡PRIMERA
MISA SOLIDARIDAD DEL AÑO 2019!
ESTE DOMINGO

Domingo 20 de enero 
a las 9 am
Capilla Newman
Esquina de las calles San Carlos y 10

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

Reflection on the Gospel: The Wine of Joy

This week’s gospel is taken from the narrative of the Wedding in Cana, John 2:-11.  The narrative provides an insight into the mind of the evangelist John.  The evangelist used the context of a wedding in Cana as a “Sign” that Jesus was the Messiah. (See John 20:30-31, “Therefore many other signs Jesus also performed in the presence of the disciples, which are not written in this book; but these have been written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing you may have life in His name.”  The Signs in the gospel narrative, in their own way (and within each specific context), somehow signify that Jesus was the Christ.(The Seven Signs are: John 2:1-11: the changing of water into wine at the wedding in Cana; John 4:46-54: the healing of the royal official’s son in Capernaum; John 5:1-13: the healing of the paralytic at Bethesda; John 6:16-23: the feeding of the 5,000; John 6:16-24: Jesus walking on the water; John 9:1-7: the healing of the man born blind; John 11:1-45: the raising of Lazarus.) 

The social context of wedding indicates suggests a festive occasion in which it would be the custom to provide wine to the guests. In verse 3 Jesus’ mother alerted him that the wedding wine ran out. Jesus responded abruptly. “Woman, how does your concern affect me? My hour has not yet come.” (Jn 2:4) The narrative continues with Jesus taking water and making it into fine wine. Simple interpretations and preaching emphasize the miracle of water into wine because those sermons and commentaries appear have allowed the miracle itself to eclipse the other elements of the story. In order to get to the deeper meaning of the passage, we will flesh out the narrative in the socio-historical context of large Jewish weddings in the First Century CE and ask the question, “Apart from the miracle itself, what can we learn about Jesus’ identity as the Messiah, the Christ, in this narrative?”

The narrative begins when Jesus’ mother told him about the problem of the lack of wine. Jesus responded that his “hour” or his time was not yet here. It is not clear from the text if the wine ran out because hosts did not purchase enough wine due to budgetary constraints or if the wine ran out because the guests were still thirsty. What is clear is that Jesus-as-the Christ linked his response to the lack of wine to his “hour,” that is, to the Passion.  This linkage is underscored in John 18:11, Jesus said in response to Peter’s violent response to Jesus’ arrest, “Put your sword back into its sheath; shall I not drink the cup that the Father has given me?”  Christian scholars believe that the cup to which Jesus referred, was the last cup of the Passover meal in which the cup signified that Elijah would return before the coming of the Messiah. If the scholars are correct in that Elijah/Passover/Messianic expectation, then wine is indeed connected to sadness and exception. But since the context of today’s gospel selection is a wedding, wine also connected to life and goodness.

Vineyards were treasured deeply by the people in Jesus’ time and like the French and Northern California wine growers today, there were great wines and there were “box wines,” that is, wine that was cheap and common. For example the “Vine of Sodom” was inferior wine and “Vine of the Fields,” which produced the “sorek,” was the choicest vine. At a wedding feast the choicest of wines that would normally be served first with the intention to impress the guests and then the inferior wines would be served when the guests’ palettes would be compromised by inebriation.  The water that became wine turned out to be good wine.  What would be the revelatory marker for Jesus’ identity as the Messiah?  The miracle or the wine? 

Jesus’ mother told the servants to follow her son’s instructions. Jesus then had the servants bring the six water jugs that were reserved for purification rituals, and have them filled them with water.  (The presence of those purification jars was not unsurprising because Jewish law required pre and post-meal ritual washings. The rigorousness of following ritual practices of purification before and after meals was not uniform. Some Pharisaic schools were more rigid than others and some Talmudic scholars were more lax on ritual cleanings than others). The important nuance to note is that in the narrative is that the purification jars needed to be filled (see Jn 2:7), suggesting that the meal had ended and the jars were empty because they were used in a post-meal purification ritual. The jars were then filled with water that became wine. From a literary perspective, the miraculous action of water changed into wine points to a change not just in the element of water, but in the intent of Jesus’ action. The evangelist John intentionally used purification vessels as a way to link the many symbolic meanings of wine to an even greater thematic point. 

The intent of  purification jugs would be to provide enough water for all the guests to wash their hands in a purification ritual (as prescribed by the law). The ritual reason for hand washing at the time (there were purification rituals prior to eating and after the mean), was to ensure that food that had not been “purified” (that is, food that had not been approved and prepared for use in the Temple) would not ritually contaminate the food (and the person) for ritual sacrifice in the Temple.  All ritual sacrifices in the Temple were done to expiate the effects of sin, therefore, food and animal offerings had to be specially prepared in order to bring about the purpose of the sacrifice: the forgiveness of sin. (Recall the “sacrificial mechanism” in which the harm caused by the unjust spilling of blood (sin) could only be replaced by the blood of the one who caused the harm or the blood of a substitute sacrifice (the sacrificial offerings were placed on the altar at the Temple served as a substitute sacrifice). This “sacrificial mechanism” obligated people to make sacrifices at the Temple. (In previous editions of the Communique we discussed the evangelist John’s portrayal of Jesus and his relationship to the Temple authorities who abused their position of spiritual authority). 

The evangelists’ audience was familiar with Jewish theology, culture and rituals and they understood these connections even though many years had already passed between the destruction of the Temple and the writing of the gospel. The evangelist’s point in this selection was to draw the line between Jesus-as-the Christ as the unblemished and acceptable sacrifice for the sins of all humanity and the Temple sacrifice. This line was drawn in the context of Jesus-as-the Christ acting as the Eternal Passover (Passion and Resurrection) in which liberation for all humanity will unfold in real time.

As we look at our part in the Resistance we might consider that the wine of Resistance isn’t something we have to wait for until the end, but rather we can taste the best wine now. The struggle for liberation is itself the good wine. Rather than dwelling on our mistakes, faults and misgivings, we can instead focus on the joy of being free and forgiven. The wedding in Cana is indeed a Sign and the transformation is not solely in water that became wine, but rather the transformation is within us and between us. WE become the good wine!

Weekly Intercessions

This week we celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Day.  Dr. King, a man of deep faith, understood that his life was in imitation of Christ’s life.  He knew that the time of his age: a time of cruelty and violence against African Americans in Selma and ambivalence toward African American workers in Philadelphia, required a leader who would, like Jesus, take risks and ultimately make the final sacrifice.  Dr. King’s faith was rooted in the belief that the sacrificial death of Jesus meant that his leadership must also be a leadership of prophetic witness in the face of apathy and indifference in liberal suburbs in the West and North and lynchings and segregation in the South.  Dr. King believed in the Resurrection. His faith lead him to believe that being a Christian meant believing in a God that would vindicate his beloved children. It meant believing that the Kingdom of God was about brother and sisterhood between different races. It meant that even though that police used fire hoses against women and children and set police dogs against unarmed young men and teenagers, God will vindicate his faithful. He echoed the words of the Unitarian minister, Theodore Parker, saying that “…the arc of the moral universe is long, but that it bends toward justice”.  Dr. King’s words, printed and spoken, continue to challenge us today. In his famous Riverside Speech, Dr. King said, “This is a calling that takes me beyond national allegiances, but even if it were not present I would yet have to live with the meaning of my commitment to the ministry of Jesus Christ. To me the relationship of this ministry to the making of peace is so obvious that I sometimes marvel at those who ask me why I’m speaking against the war. Could it be that they do not know that the good news was meant for all … Have they forgotten that my ministry is in obedience to the One who loved his enemies so fully that he died for them?” Dr. King’s words stand in deep contrast to the silence of today’s White Evangelicals. In the face of the separation of children from parents at the border, the killing of unarmed black youth and the non-convictions of their killers, in the increase of attacks against Muslims and Trans people, and in the increase of anti-Semitic activity, the silence from the so-called “Pro-Life” religious leaders is indeed shameful. Dr. King preached 50 years ago and what he said still stands as a testimony of true faith. His preaching and ministry was courageous in deed, risk-taking in ministry, prophetic in speaking truth to power, and self-sacrificing in accepting the consequences of living an authentic Christian life.  Let us pray that today’s religious leaders may be as courageous, risk-taking, prophetic and self-sacrificing in the face of increased white nationalism, authoritarianism, and hostility to religious, sexual, racial and gender minorities. 

Intercesiónes semanales

Esta semana celebramos el día del Dr. Martin Luther King. El Dr. King, un hombre de profunda fe, comprendió que su vida era una imitación de la vida de Cristo. Sabía que la época de su edad: una época de crueldad y violencia contra los afroamericanos en Selma y la ambivalencia hacia los trabajadores afroamericanos en Filadelfia, requería un líder que, como Jesús, se arriesgara y finalmente hiciera el sacrificio final. La fe del Dr. King estaba arraigada en la creencia de que la muerte sacrificial de Jesús significaba que su liderazgo también debía ser un liderazgo de testimonio profético frente a la apatía e indiferencia en los suburbios liberales en el oeste y el norte y en los linchamientos y segregación en el sur. El Dr. King creyó en la Resurrección. Su fe lo llevó a creer que ser cristiano significaba creer en un Dios que reivindicaría a sus amados hijos. Significaba creer que el Reino de Dios tenía que ver con el hermano y la hermandad entre diferentes razas. Significó que aunque la policía usó mangueras contra incendios contra mujeres y niños y puso perros policías contra jóvenes y adolescentes desarmados, Dios vindicará a sus fieles. Se hizo eco de las palabras del ministro unitario, Theodore Parker, diciendo que “… el arco del universo moral es largo, pero que se inclina hacia la justicia”. Las palabras del Dr. King, impresas y habladas, continúan desafiándonos hoy. En su famoso Discurso de Riverside, el Dr. King dijo:Este es un llamado que me lleva más allá de las lealtades nacionales, pero incluso si no estuviera presente, tendría que vivir con el significado de mi compromiso con el ministerio de Jesucristo. Para mí, la relación de este ministerio con la construcción de la paz es tan obvia que a veces me maravillo con aquellos que me preguntan por qué estoy hablando en contra de la guerra. ¿Es posible que no sepan que las buenas nuevas fueron para todos … ¿Han olvidado que mi ministerio es en obediencia a Aquel que amó a sus enemigos tanto que murió por ellos”? Las palabras del Dr. King contrastan profundamente Al silencio de los blancos evangélicos de hoy. Ante la separación de los hijos de los padres en la frontera, el asesinato de jóvenes negros desarmados y las no convicciones de sus asesinos, en el aumento de los ataques contra los musulmanes y las personas trans, y en el aumento de la actividad antisemita, el silencio de los llamados líderes religiosos “pro-vida” es ciertamente vergonzoso. El Dr. King predicó hace 50 años y lo que dijo sigue siendo un testimonio de la verdadera fe. Su predicación y ministerio fue valeroso en hechos, asumió riesgos en el ministerio, profetizó hablando la verdad al poder y se sacrificó al aceptar las consecuencias de vivir una vida cristiana auténtica. Oremos para que los líderes religiosos de hoy puedan ser tan valientes, arriesgados, proféticos y abnegados ante el aumento del nacionalismo blanco, el autoritarismo y la hostilidad hacia las minorías religiosas, sexuales, raciales y de género.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: El vino de la alegría

El evangelio de esta semana está tomado de la narrativa de las Bodas de Cana, Juan 2: -11. La narrativa proporciona una visión de la mente del evangelista Juan. El evangelista usó el contexto de una boda en Caná como una “señal” de que Jesús era el Mesías. (Vea Juan 20: 30-31,Por lo tanto, muchas otras señales que Jesús también realizó en presencia de los discípulos, que no están escritas en este libro; pero estas se han escrito para que puedan creer que Jesús es el Cristo, el Hijo de Dios, y para creer que puedes tener vida en su nombre “. Las señales en la narrativa del evangelio, a su manera (y dentro de cada contexto específico), de alguna manera significan que Jesús era el Cristo (las siete señales son: Juan 2 : 1-11: el cambio de agua en vino en la boda en Caná; Juan 4: 46-54: la curación del hijo del funcionario real en Capernaum; Juan 5: 1-13: la curación del paralítico en Bethesda; Juan 6: 16-23: la alimentación de los 5,000; Juan 6: 16-24: Jesús caminando sobre el agua; Juan 9: 1-7: la curación del hombre ciego de nacimiento; Juan 11: 1-45: la crianza de Lázaro.)

El contexto social de la boda indica una ocasión festiva en la que sería costumbre proporcionar vino a los invitados. En el versículo 3, la madre de Jesús le alertó que el vino de bodas se había acabado. Jesús respondió bruscamente. “Mujer, ¿cómo me afecta tu preocupación? Todavía no ha llegado mi hora”.  (Jn 2, 4). La narración continúa con Jesús tomando agua y convirtiéndola en buen vino. Las simples interpretaciones y la predicación enfatizan el milagro del agua en el vino porque esos sermones y comentarios que aparecieron permitieron que el milagro eclipse a los otros elementos de la narrativa. Para llegar al significado más profundo del pasaje, desarrollaremos la narrativa en el contexto socio-histórico de las grandes bodas judías en el primer siglo EC y haremos la pregunta: “Aparte del milagro en sí, ¿qué podemos aprender? ¿La identidad de Jesús como el Mesías, el Cristo, en esta narrativa?”

La narración comienza cuando la madre de Jesús le habló sobre el problema de la falta de vino. Jesús respondió que su “hora” aún no estaba aquí. No queda claro en el texto si el vino se agotó porque los anfitriones no compraron suficiente vino debido a restricciones presupuestarias o si el vino se agotó porque los invitados todavía tenían sed. Lo que está claro es que Jesús-como-Cristo vinculó su respuesta a la falta de vino a su “hora”, es decir, a la Pasión. Este vínculo se subraya en Juan 18:11, Jesús dijo en respuesta a la respuesta violenta de Pedro al arresto de Jesús: “Vuelve a poner tu espada en su vaina; ¿No beberé la copa que el Padre me ha dado? ”  Los escolásticos cristianos creen que la copa a la que Jesús se refirió fue la última copa (cáliz) de la cena de la Pascua en la que la copa significaba que Elías volvería antes de la venida del Mesías. Si los escolasticos tienen razón en esa expectativa de Elías / Pascua / Mesiánica, entonces el vino está conectado a la tristeza y la excepción. Pero como el contexto de la selección del evangelio de hoy es una boda, el vino también está conectado con la vida y la bondad.

Los viñedos fueron atesorados profundamente por la gente en la época de Jesús y, como en el caso de los viticultores franceses y del norte de California, había grandes vinos y había “vinos de caja”, es decir, vinos que eran baratos y corrientes. Por ejemplo, la “Vid de Sodoma” fue un vino inferior y “Vid del Campo”, que produjo el “sorek”, fue la vid más exclusiva. En una fiesta de bodas, los vinos más finos que normalmente se servirían primero con la intención de impresionar a los invitados y luego los vinos inferiores se servirían cuando las paletas de los invitados se vieran comprometidas por la embriaguez. El agua que se convirtió en vino resultó ser buen vino. ¿Cuál sería el marcador revelador de la identidad de Jesús como el Mesías? ¿El milagro o el vino?

La madre de Jesús les dijo a los sirvientes que siguieran las instrucciones de su hijo. Jesús entonces hizo que los sirvientes trajeran las seis jarras de agua que estaban reservadas para los rituales de purificación, y las llenaron con agua. (La presencia de esos jarrones de purificación no fue sorprendente, ya que la ley judía requería lavados rituales antes y después de las comidas. La rigurosidad de las prácticas rituales de purificación antes y después de las comidas no era uniforme. Algunas escuelas farisaicas eran más rígidas que otras y algunos maestros talmúdicos fueron más laxas en limpiezas rituales que otras). El matiz importante a destacar es que en la narrativa es que los jarrones de purificación debían llenarse (ver Jn 2: 7), lo que sugiere que la comida había terminado y los frascos estaban vacíos porque se usaron en un ritual de purificación posterior a la comida. Los jarrones se llenaron con agua que se convirtió en vino. Desde una perspectiva literaria, la acción milagrosa del agua transformada en vino apunta a un cambio no solo en el elemento agua, sino en la intención de la acción de Jesús. El evangelista Juan usó intencionalmente jarrones de purificación como una forma de vincular los muchos significados simbólicos del vino a un punto temático aún mayor.

El propósito de las jarras de purificación sería proporcionar suficiente agua para que todos los invitados se laven las manos en un ritual de purificación (según lo prescrito por la ley). La razón ritual para lavarse las manos en ese momento (hubo rituales de purificación antes de comer y después de la media), fue para asegurar que los alimentos que no se habían “purificado” (es decir, los alimentos que no se habían aprobado y preparado para su uso en el Templo) no contaminaría ritualmente la comida (y la persona) para el sacrificio ritual en el Templo. Todos los sacrificios rituales en el Templo se hicieron para expiar los efectos del pecado, por lo tanto, los alimentos y las ofrendas de los animales tenían que estar especialmente preparados para lograr el propósito del sacrificio: el perdón del pecado. (Recuerde el “mecanismo de sacrificio” en el cual el daño causado por el derramamiento injusto de sangre (pecado) solo se puede reemplazar por la sangre de quien causó el daño o la sangre de un sacrificio sustituto (las ofrendas de sacrificio se colocaron en el El altar en el Templo sirvió como un sacrificio sustituto. Este “mecanismo de sacrificio” obligó a las personas a hacer sacrificios en el Templo. (En ediciones anteriores del Communique discutimos la descripción de Jesús del evangelista Juan y su relación con las autoridades del Templo que abusaron de su posición de autoridad espiritual).

La audiencia del evangelista estaba familiarizada con la teología, la cultura y los rituales judíos, y entendieron estas conexiones a pesar de que ya habían pasado muchos años entre la destrucción del Templo y la escritura del Evangelio. El punto del evangelista en esta selección fue trazar la línea entre Jesús-como-el Cristo como el sacrificio sin tacha y aceptable por los pecados de toda la humanidad y el sacrificio del Templo. Esta línea se dibujó en el contexto de Jesús-como-el Cristo que actúa como la Pascua Eterna (Pasión y Resurrección) en la cual la liberación para toda la humanidad se desarrollará en tiempo real.

Al considerar nuestra parte en la resistencia, podríamos considerar que el vino de la resistencia no es algo que tengamos que esperar hasta el final, sino que podemos degustar el mejor vino ahora. La lucha por la liberación es en sí misma el buen vino. En lugar de insistir en nuestros errores, faltas y dudas, podemos centrarnos en la alegría de ser libres y perdonados. La boda en Caná es sin duda un signo y la transformación no es únicamente en el agua que se convirtió en vino, sino que la transformación está dentro de nosotros y entre nosotros. ¡Nos convertimos en el buen vino!

Save the Date!
Community Meeting: Homelessness and Affordable Housing

Homelessness affects each and every person who lives and works in Santa Clara County. The factors that lead to one experiencing homelessness, and thus the solutions to ending homelessness, are complex and varied. We are seeking to create a space where all members of the community may explore creative solutions to end homelessness.

You are invited to participate in a community conversation about homelessness and the process for building affordable housing in Santa Clara County. The purposes of this gathering are to engage in meaningful dialogue with other members of the community; to learn about homelessness from Robert Stromberg, Project Manager at Destination: Home; and to learn about the model for building, sustaining, and managing affordable housing from Kathy Robinson, Director of Housing Development, Charities Housing.

We hope you will join us for this conversation on January 29, 2019 from 5:00 – 8:00 PM at the Stone Church of Willow Glen located at 1937 Lincoln Ave., San Jose CA. Please register at: http://alfsv.nonprofitsoapbox.com/component/events/event/166

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

Family Separation

Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:

Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen:

JEANS FOR THE JOURNEY
A little background on why we need jeans (and other things for the journey)

Families arrive to the Humanitarian Respite Center in McAllen, TX with only the clothes on their backs. Clothes that they’ve worn day after day as they walked, waited, slept, been detained, survived. Some families travel close to a month before we meet them at the Respite Center. When they arrive, we greet them with cheers and clapping, smiles and warm welcomes. Some have said this is the first time in over a month they’ve felt welcomed. A part of that welcome process is receiving a new backpack, a warm meal, and a place to rest. They are also gifted new clothes; clothes that fit and are chosen by them. Nothing tattered or full of holes but clean, well fitted clothing. They take a shower and come out clean. They throw their old clothes away and you can almost see a physical change in their persona. The newness in their journey and a step in this new chapter. We get to help them by physically walking alongside them. It may seem simple and unnecessary, but the sure fact they get a new pair of pants—one that fits them, one that has not been trudged along with them…but one that represents their new direction. It is a small thing that empowers them and restores a piece of dignity.

They are most in need of men’s and boys jeans. Here are the sizes of jeans most commonly needed and quantity per week:

  • Men’s Jeans: 28″-32″ waist (no longer than 32), 250-300 weekly
  • Boys Jeans: ages 7-14 (22″-24″ waist), 150 weekly
  • Women’s Jeans: 24″-29″ waist (or 00-7/8), 300 weekly 
  • Girl’s Jeans: 4-10, 150 weekly 
  • Toddlers pants 3-7T, 150 weekly
  • Men’s shoes sizes 6-9.

Please send your donations directly to 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501. We will also collect new and gently used and washed jeans at Grupo Solidaridad gatherings, misas, and events.

JEANS PARA EL CAMINO
Un poco de historia sobre por qué necesitamos jeans (y otras cosas para el viaje)

Las familias llegan al Centro de la Restauración Humanitaria en McAllen, TX con solo la ropa en la espalda. La ropa que han usado día tras día mientras caminan, esperan, duermen, han sido detenidas y han sobrevivido. Algunas familias viajan cerca de un mes antes de que nos encontremos con ellas en el Centro. Cuando llegan, los saludamos con aplausos y aplausos, sonrisas y cálidas bienvenidas. Algunos han dicho que esta es la primera vez en más de un mes que se sienten bienvenidos. Una parte de ese proceso de bienvenida es recibir una nueva mochila, una comida caliente y un lugar para descansar. También son nuevas prendas dotadas; ropa que se ajusta y es elegida por ellos. Nada desgarrado o lleno de agujeros, pero la ropa limpia y bien equipada. Se bañan y salen limpios. Se tiran la ropa vieja y casi se puede ver un cambio físico en su persona. La novedad en su viaje y un paso en este nuevo capítulo. Podemos ayudarlos caminando físicamente junto a ellos. Puede parecer simple e innecesario, pero el hecho seguro de que tienen un nuevo par de pantalones, uno que les queda bien, uno que no ha sido caminado con ellos … pero que representa su nueva dirección. Es algo pequeño que los empodera y restaura una pieza de dignidad.

Cada día nos quedamos sin pantalones de hombre. Aquí están el tamaño de los pantalones vaqueros más comúnmente necesarios y la cantidad por semana. Aquí hay necesidades específicas:

  • Jeans para hombres: cintura de 28 “-32” (no más de 32), 250-300 por semana
  • Jeans para niños: edades 7-14 (22 “-24” cintura), 150 semanal
  • Jeans para mujeres: cintura de 24 “-29” (o 00-7 / 8), 300 semanal
  • Jeans de niña: 4-10, 150 semanal
  • Los niños pequeños pantalones 3-7T, 150 semanales
  • Zapatos para hombres, tallas 6-9

Envíe sus donaciones directamente a 1721 B Beaumont Ave., McAllen, TX 78501. También recogeremos jeans nuevos y usados con suavidad y lavados en las reuniones, misas y eventos de Grupo Solidaridad.

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp