Newsletter

Weekly Communique: What Kind of Peace Do We Bring to the World?

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad               

August 16, 2019

MISA at Newman Center THIS SUNDAY!
Fr. Jon will celebrate Sunday mass at the Newman Center August 18 at 9 am, corner of 10th and San Carlos.
NO MISA on August 25 and September 1.

¡SI HAY MISA en Centro Newman este domingo!
Habra la misa de Grupo el 18 de agosto a las 9 am
en la capilla de la Universidad SJSU
en la esquina de Calle 10 y S Carlos.
NO MISA 25 de agosto y 1 de septiembre.

WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE

At the County Building with the Jewish community celebrating Tisha B’Av, a Jewish religious holiday commemorating the destruction of the First and Second Temples and the sufferings inflicted upon God’s people by injustice and social sin. Rabbis and inter-faith clergy shared in the prayer calling attention to the concentration camps, racism and El Paso shootings.

Gospel Reflection:
What Kind of Peace Do We Bring to the World?

Last week we read Lk 12:32-48, in which Jesus-as-the Christ broke through the Gentile mindset fixated on a caste system of levels of privilege. Jesus’ social critique was rooted in Jewish social ethics in which all people are charged with the responsibility to care for one another without regard to one’s socio-economic status. We explored the social difficulty Gentile had in letting go of privilege in order to embrace all persons regardless of race, social status, and gender.

Today’s gospel passage underscores the difficult choices that discipleship demands: you have to make a choice.  Do we baptize the Empire and its culture of privilege or do we renounce the Empire? Luke’s gospel does not provide a mix and match or buffet option of take what you like and leave what you do not like. The foundational condition of being a disciple of Jesus-as-the Christ is to make the hard decision whether your raison d’être is to maintain your status quo with a few minor adjustments in your life or to give your whole self to God.

In Judaism conversion to become a Jew was not a casual thing. One had to discuss the intent to convert with a rabbi. With the rabbi the potential convert would have to undergo rigorous instruction on Jewish life, beliefs, history, liturgy, learn Hebrew (for the prayers) become involved in the community and accept the divinity of the Torah. The convert would have to agree to observe all 613 mitzvot (commandments), life fully a Jewish life, undergo circumcision (if male) be immersed in a mikveh (baptism) and appear before at Bet Din (a religious court) for approval of the conversion. The conversion process was not a matter of taking classes, but of becoming a disciple of a particular rabbi in a particular community.

As we know, members of Luke’s community were not Jews and thus they may not have been made aware of the strenuous process needed to become a Jew.  The controversy of whether Gentiles should become Jews before becoming Christians was resolved in the Christian Council of Jerusalem about 15 years prior to Luke’s narrative, thus Gentiles could convert directly to become disciples in the lineage of Jesus. But this did not mean that conversion to Christianity was easier than converting to Judaism. The literary evidence in Luke’s gospel suggests that the process of becoming a disciple of Jesus-as-the Christ post Resurrection, was similar in rigor as one would undergo in becoming a Jew. Like potential Jewish converts, Christian converts had to be clear about their intent on being baptized and they had to participate in community life as a part of their conversion process. Note that Lk 12:50 references baptism and thus, baptism was not merely signaling a theological conversion or denominational change, but that baptism signaled a commitment to help usher in the kingdom of God. “There is a baptism with which I must be baptized, and how great is my anguish until it is accomplished!”

The Christian testament includes letters to the Christian communities that were directed mostly to Gentile converts to Christianity who were mostly from the slave and servant classes, (but also included freed persons and smaller number of people of means). These letters served as reminders that once baptized, all the baptized were obligated to care for one another, especially the most vulnerable among them.  Since most of those letters predated Luke’s gospel and that the letters began to be circulated throughout the region, it would not be unreasonable to believe that Luke’s community had a minimum understanding of the importance of equality and mutual care that transcended mere blood ties, but was extended to anyone in need.  The Empire did not specifically discourage caring for the poor and vulnerable, but it was clear that caring for the poor was a laudable thing, but not an ethical demand as it was in Judaism and the emerging Christian religion.

The kingdom of God: economic equality, radical inclusion of all people, and special care for the most vulnerable who are not related by blood, does more than disrupt the Empire, it sets it on fire! (c.f., “I have come to set the earth on fire, and how I wish it were already blazing!” Lk 12: 49) In short, today’s passage is a statement of the consequence of choosing God over the Empire: Division! More than merely disrupting the Empire, Jesus-as-the Christ annihilates the Empire by dismantling the Empire’s social system, beginning with paterfamilias, the social pecking order of the Roman family, (c.f., “From now on a household of five will be divided, three against two and two against three…” Lk 12:52, ff).

The reflection is based on the socio-historical location of Luke’s narrative, but given that we are living in the midst of an Empire, might we take this time to consider the level of commitment demanded of us in the same way that disciples had to consider in the time of Luke? What was our level of commitment to the well-being of others, particularly the poor, when we were baptized? If that commitment was made for us by parents and godparents, was there any time in our life when we made an adult decision to choose the kingdom of God over the Empire?

Weekly Intercessions
A recent article published in USA Today (USA Today republished the original article, “For Latinos, Fear in America becomes real, powerful,” by Thomas Hawthorne, The Republic, AzCentral.Com)  said that the “fear among Latino people is palpable…” after the El Paso shooting. The article said that the shooting was a turning point that “…peeled back the hate behind words they’ve tried to ignore. It has sliced open the racism many grew up learning to navigate.” A newly issued report on racism from Grupo Solidaridad shows that the weaponization of racism, when left unopposed, will merely increase in intensity and cause greater harm to the Latinx community. History has shown that racism has been used in many different cultures as a way to lift up one group above others or to place a social pecking order which valued the lives of those who found themselves categorized at the top of the order over those who found themselves at the bottom of the list. Preferences based on race physical characteristics were discussed in ancient Greece and Rome. In the late 19th and early 20th century the Eugenics Movement had great sway over England and the US. Supporter included Alexander Graham Bell, Stanford President David Starr Jordan and Luther Burbank!  An English scholar, Sir Francis Galton systematized the ideas of racial and physical preference and, after reading Charles Darwin’s Origin of Species, he proposed that societies should refrain from protecting the vulnerable and the weak so societies can improve. He believed that the less intelligent were more fertile and had more children. He encouraged a change in social mores that would encourage more “acceptable” people to procreate. Eugenics rationalized restrictive immigration policies barring non-white immigration in the 1800’s until the 1960’s and when the Nazis were placed on trial after WWII, many war criminals justified the Nazi racial and purification laws were inspired by policies of the United States! Sadly racism is embedded in science, public policy and politics and when unchecked, racism has and will escalate to genocide. Let us pray for the courageous civil rights activists who work to dismantle the infamous legacy of racism in the US and abroad. Let us also pray for our sisters and brothers who feel the sting of racial animus every day.

Reflexión sobre el Evangelio: 
¿Qué tipo de paz traemos al mundo?

La semana pasada leímos Lc 12, 32-48, en el cual Jesús como el Cristo rompió la mentalidad gentil fijada en un sistema de castas de niveles de privilegio. La crítica social de Jesús se basó en la ética social judía en la que todas las personas tienen la responsabilidad de cuidarse unos a otros sin tener en cuenta el estado socioeconómico de uno. Exploramos la dificultad social que Gentile tuvo al dejar ir el privilegio para abrazar a todas las personas independientemente de su raza, estatus social y género.

El pasaje del Evangelio de hoy subraya las decisiones difíciles que exige el discipulado: tienes que tomar una decisión. ¿Bautizamos el Imperio y su cultura de privilegio o renunciamos al Imperio? El evangelio de Lucas no ofrece una opción de comer como en un buffet de tomar lo que te gusta y dejar lo que no te gusta. La condición fundamental de ser un discípulo de Jesús-como-el Cristo es tomar la difícil decisión de si su razón de ser es mantener su estatus quo con algunos ajustes menores en su vida o entregarse completamente a Dios.

En el judaísmo, la conversión para convertirse en judío no era algo casual. Uno tenía que dialogar la intención de convertirse con un rabino. Con el rabino, el converso potencial tendría que someterse a una instrucción rigurosa sobre la vida judía, las creencias, la historia, la liturgia, aprender hebreo (para las oraciones) involucrarse en la comunidad y aceptar la divinidad de la Torá. El converso tendría que aceptar observar todas las 613 mitzvot (mandamientos), vivir plenamente una vida judía, someterse a la circuncisión (si es hombre), sumergirse en una mikveh (bautismo) y presentarse ante Bet Din (un tribunal religioso) para su aprobación. conversión. El proceso de conversión no se trataba de tomar clases, sino de convertirse en discípulo de un rabino en particular en una comunidad en particular.

Como sabemos, los miembros de la comunidad de Luke no eran judíos y, por lo tanto, es posible que no hayan sido conscientes del arduo proceso necesario para convertirse en judío. La controversia de si los gentiles deberían convertirse en judíos antes de convertirse en cristianos se resolvió en el Concilio Cristiano de Jerusalén unos 15 años antes del evangelio de Lucas, por lo que los gentiles podrían convertirse directamente para convertirse en discípulos en el linaje de Jesús. Pero esto no significaba que la conversión al cristianismo fuera más fácil que la conversión al judaísmo. La evidencia literaria en el evangelio de Lucas sugiere que el proceso de convertirse en discípulo de Jesús-como-el Cristo después de la Resurrección fue similar en rigor al que uno se convertiría en judío. Al igual que los conversos judíos potenciales, los conversos cristianos tenían que ser claros acerca de su intención de ser bautizados y tenían que participar en la vida comunitaria como parte de su proceso de conversión. Tenga en cuenta que Lucas 12:50 hace referencia al bautismo y, por lo tanto, el bautismo no solo indicaba una conversión teológica o un cambio de denominación, sino que el bautismo señalaba un compromiso para ayudar a introducir el reino de Dios. “Hay un bautismo con el que debo ser bautizado, ¡y cuán grande es mi angustia hasta que se cumpla!”

El testamento cristiano incluye cartas a las comunidades cristianas que se dirigieron principalmente a los conversos gentiles al cristianismo que provenían principalmente de las clases de esclavos y sirvientes (pero también incluyeron personas liberadas y un número menor de personas de medios). Estas cartas sirvieron como recordatorios de que una vez bautizados, todos los bautizados estaban obligados a cuidarse unos a otros, especialmente los más vulnerables. Dado que la mayoría de esas cartas fueron anteriores al evangelio de Lucas y que las cartas comenzaron a circular por toda la región, no sería irrazonable creer que la comunidad de Lucas tenía una comprensión mínima de la importancia de la igualdad y el cuidado mutuo que trascendía los lazos de sangre, pero era extendido a cualquiera que lo necesite. El Imperio no desalentó específicamente el cuidado de los pobres y vulnerables, pero estaba claro que cuidar a los pobres era algo loable, pero no una exigencia ética como lo era en el judaísmo y la religión cristiana emergente.

El reino de Dios: la igualdad económica, la inclusión radical de todas las personas y el cuidado especial para los más vulnerables que no están relacionados por la sangre, ¡hace más que perturbar al Imperio, lo incendia! (c.f., “¡He venido a prender fuego a la tierra, y cómo desearía que ya estuviera ardiendo! Lc 12: 49) En resumen, el pasaje de hoy es una declaración de la consecuencia de elegir a Dios sobre el Imperio: ¡División! Más que simplemente interrumpir el Imperio, Jesús como el Cristo aniquila al Imperio desmantelando el sistema social del Imperio, comenzando con paterfamilias, el orden social jerárquico de la familia romana (cf. “De ahora en adelante, una familia de cinco se dividirá , tres contra dos y dos contra tres … “ Lc 12:52, ss.).

La reflexión se basa en la ubicación sociohistórica de la narrativa de Lucas, pero dado que estamos viviendo en medio de un Imperio, ¿podríamos aprovechar este tiempo para considerar el nivel de compromiso que se nos exige de la misma manera que los discípulos tuvieron que considerarlo? en el tiempo de Lucas? ¿Cuál fue nuestro nivel de compromiso con el bienestar de los demás, particularmente de los pobres, cuando fuimos bautizados? Si ese compromiso fue hecho por padres y padrinos, ¿hubo algún momento en nuestra vida cuando tomamos la decisión adulta de elegir el reino de Dios sobre el Imperio?

Intercesiónes semanales
Un artículo reciente publicado en USA Today (USA Today volvió a publicar el artículo original, “Para los latinos, el miedo en Estados Unidos se vuelve real, poderoso”, por Thomas Hawthorne, The Republic, AzCentral.Com) dijo que “el miedo entre los latinos es palpable … ” después del tiroteo en El Paso. El artículo decía que el tiroteo fue un punto de inflexión que “… retiró el odio detrás de las palabras que intentaron ignorar. Se ha abierto el racismo que muchos crecieron aprendiendo a soprtar”. Un reporte recientemente publicado sobre el racismo del Grupo Solidaridad muestra que la armamentización del racismo, cuando se deja sin oposición, simplemente aumentará en intensidad y causará un mayor daño a la comunidad Latinx. La historia ha demostrado que el racismo se ha utilizado en muchas culturas diferentes como una forma de elevar a un grupo por encima de otros o para colocar un orden social jerárquico que valora las vidas de aquellos que se encuentran en la parte superior del orden sobre aquellos que se encuentran al final de la lista. Las preferencias basadas en las características físicas de la raza se discutieron en la antigua Grecia y Roma. A fines del siglo XIX y principios del XX, el Movimiento Eugenésico tuvo un gran dominio sobre Inglaterra y los Estados Unidos. ¡El partidario incluyó a Alexander Graham Bell, el presidente de Stanford, David Starr Jordan y Luther Burbank! Un doctor inglés, Sir Francis Galton sistematizó las ideas de preferencia racial y física y, después de leer El origen de las especies de Charles Darwin, propuso que las sociedades deberían abstenerse de proteger a los vulnerables y los débiles para que las sociedades puedan mejorar. Creía que los menos inteligentes eran más fértiles y tenían más hijos. Alentó un cambio en las costumbres sociales que alentaría a más personas “aceptables” a procrear. La eugenesia racionalizó las políticas restrictivas de inmigración que prohibieron la inmigración no blanca en la década de 1800 hasta la década de 1960 y cuando los nazis fueron enjuiciados después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, ¡muchos criminales de guerra justificaron las leyes raciales y de purificación nazis inspiradas en las políticas de los Estados Unidos! Lamentablemente, el racismo está integrado en la ciencia, las políticas públicas y la política, y cuando no se controla, el racismo se ha intensificado y se convertirá en genocidio. Oremos por los valientes activistas de derechos civiles que trabajan para desmantelar el infame legado del racismo en los Estados Unidos y en el extranjero. Oremos también por nuestras hermanas y hermanos que sienten el aguijón del animus racial todos los días.

<!–


–>

News – Noticias

<!–


–>

NO MISA 25 de agosto y 1 de septiembre.

NO MISA on August 25 and September 1.

<!–


–>

Amenazas de la deportación masiva – ¿Qué hacer?
¿Debemos tomar en serio la amenaza de Trump de deportar a millones de personas? Si y no. Al observar el nivel práctico de esta amenaza, el DHS no cuenta con personal para lograr este objetivo … pero no podemos simplemente ignorar la amenaza de Trump porque su política de inmigración está orientada hacia la deportación. Los activistas de inmigración y el Grupo Solidaridad trabajan junto con equipos de acompañamiento que brindan apoyo emocional y espiritual y ayudan a conectarse a los servicios sociales, se respetan los recursos legales para garantizar que se respeta el debido proceso de la Constitución, y los defensores que trabajan para moldear la política pública y responsabilizan a los funcionarios públicos de garantizar que los inmigrantes sean respetados en el trabajo y la escuela, estén seguros en sus comunidades y puedan participar en sus propios asuntos públicos. Esté atento a las ALERTAS DE TEXTO en los próximos días para recibir alertas sobre eventos y acciones que apoyan a nuestra comunidad de inmigrantes en el Valle.

Threats of Mass Deportation – What to do?
Should we take Trump’s threat to deport millions of people seriously?  Yes and no. Looking at this threat form practical level, DHS is not staffed to accomplish this goal….but we cannot simply ignore Trump’s threat because his immigration policy is geared toward deportation.  Immigration activists and Grupo Solidaridad are working alongside accompaniment teams that provide emotional and spiritual support and help connecting to social services, legal resources to ensure due process under the Constitution is respected, and advocates who work to shape public policy and hold public officials accountable to ensure that immigrants are respected at work and school, secure in their communities, and able to engage in their own public affairs.  Watch for TEXT ALERTS over these next few days for alerts on events and actions that support our immigrant community in the Valley. 

<!–


–>

Read the paper from our last Grupo discussion by clicking the link below:

CONFRONTING RACISM THROUGH CREATIVE CONSTRUCTION ORGANIZING IN GRUPO SOLIDARIDAD

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! 
DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA.
DO IT NOW. 

<!–


–>

Grupo Solidaridad is a part of an on-going community project of Catholic Charities’ division, Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information on how to get involved in Grupo Solidaridad, its activities or other groups associated with Grupo Solidaridad, contact Fr. Jon Pedigo at jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

Grupo Solidaridad es parte de un proyecto comunitario en curso de la división de Caridades Católicas, Advocacy and Community Engagement (Abogar y Compromiso Comunitario). Para obtener más información sobre cómo participar en Grupo Solidaridad, sus actividades u otros grupos asociados con Grupo Solidaridad, comuníquese con el P. Jon Pedigo en jpedigo@CatholicCharitiesSCC.org

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

<!–


–>

Copyright © 2019 Friends of Jon Pedigo, All rights reserved.
You are on this list because you are a friend of Fr. Jon Pedigo, or you have subscribed to this list.

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.