Newsletter

Weekly Communique: Beware

Catholic Charities Grupo de Solidaridad November 30, 2018
============================================================ MISA DEL BARRIO THIS SUNDAY REGULAR TIME AND REGULAR PLACE First Sunday of Advent Misa Sunday, December 2 at 9 AM at Newman Chapel Corner of San Carlos and 10th Street. SPECIAL SPEAKER: RABBI DANA MAGAT FROM TEMPLE EMMANUEL

¡MISA DEL BARRIO ESTE DOMINGO! LUGAR Y TIEMPO REGULAR Primer domingo de Aviento
La próxima misa será el 2 de diciembre a las 11 am en la Capilla Newman la esquina de San Carlos y Calle 10 UN INVITADO MUY ESPECIAL: RABI DANA MAGAT DE LA SINOGOGA, “EMMANUEL” WEEKLY COMMUNIQUE
Sunday’s Gospel Reflection: Beware
The gospel text for this Sunday is taken from the Gospel of Luke chapter 21:2528, 34-36, the apocalyptic warning that Jesus issued to his disciples, “There will be signs in the sun, the moon, and the stars, and on earth nations will be in dismay, perplexed by the roaring of the sea and the waves. People will die of fright in anticipation of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken. And then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory. But when these signs begin to happen, stand erect and raise your heads because your redemption is at hand.” The evangelist Luke ties this warning to the destruction of Jerusalem. This vital connection is lost in the liturgical reading of the gospel because verse 20, (“When you see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, know that its desolation is at hand…”) is not included in the reading. The unfortunate omission of verse 20 impoverishes our appreciation of the socio-historical context and limits our understanding of the passage in question.
That we are in Advent, we begin a new cycle of readings: the cycle of Luke. As we read through Luke’s gospel and specifically as we read today’s passage, we might want to consider that by using the same socio-historical lens that we used for John, Matthew and Mark, what would be unique about Luke’s portrayal of Jesus? What events and developments might have informed the shift? Before we return specifically to the text, let us take a peek at the context in which Luke’s gospel was written.
The evangelist Luke wrote the gospel between 80-110 CE, several years after the destruction of Jerusalem (70 CE). From what scholars can tell, the evangelists’s original audience was primarily Hellenist in culture and see Jerusalem surrounded by armies, know that its desolation is at hand…”) is not included in the reading. The unfortunate omission of verse 20 impoverishes our appreciation of the socio-historical context and limits our understanding of the passage in question.
That we are in Advent, we begin a new cycle of readings: the cycle of Luke. As we read through Luke’s gospel and specifically as we read today’s passage, we might want to consider that by using the same socio-historical lens that we used for John, Matthew and Mark, what would be unique about Luke’s portrayal of Jesus? What events and developments might have informed the shift? Before we return specifically to the text, let us take a peek at the context in which Luke’s gospel was written.
The evangelist Luke wrote the gospel between 80-110 CE, several years after the destruction of Jerusalem (70 CE). From what scholars can tell, the evangelists’s original audience was primarily Hellenist in culture and written in a significant Hellenist city, possibly Ephesus or Smyrna. The distance of time and geography certainly had an impact on the literary lens of the gospel which is why the evangelist Luke, unlike the evangelist Mark, did not write from the perspective of Jewish Resistance, but from the perspective of Gentile Resistance that was loosely rooted in Judaism. See verse 24 and the use of the term, “Times of the Gentiles.” (“They will fall by the edge of the sword and be taken as captives to all the Gentiles; and Jerusalem will be trampled underfoot by the Gentiles until the times of the Gentiles^ are fulfilled.”) Theologically, the “Times of the Gentiles” refers to the intermittent time between the destruction of Jerusalem and the coming of the Son of Man. But if we were to consider the historical and social location of the evangelist, we might begin to see the Luke’s account of the life, ministry, death and resurrection of Jesus in a more dynamic and challenging light.
Throughout this liturgical cycle we will see the strong emphasis on economic justice, a sub-theme of parity between women and men, and a concern for physical healing and reconciliation. Unlike Mark’s choppy grammar, Luke’s gospel uses smoother phrasing and a softer cadence that is somewhat typical of Hellenistic accounts of heroes and demigods. Do not; however, mistake Luke’s literary approach as an attempt to soften Jesus’ opposition to Empire. The content of Jesus’ resistance to the Empire, stylized along Hellenistic lines, allows a Gentile audience unfamiliar with the egalitarian and justice dimensions of Jewish theology and culture, might apply these same themes within a Hellenistic culture. Thus, “The age of the Gentiles” is not only a reference to Jesus’ impending judgement against the wicked, but rather, a reference to the on-going Resistance to the Empire in a Hellenistic culture. Keep in mind that at the time that the evangelist Luke was setting the gospel down in writing, the Gentile converts were primarily drawn from the servant and slave classes. These converts from the so-called under-class understood all too well the injustices of living in a caste-conscious society that weighed the value of human life by caste association and social standing. To those who were Christians in this context, the idea of the Empire collapsing was not something to be feared, but to be hoped for. Jesus’ words in Lk 21:18, “People will die of fright in anticipation of what is coming upon the world, for the powers of the heavens will be shaken.^ And then they will see the Son of Man coming in a cloud with power and great glory…” were words of warning to those who benefited from the stratified society of Rome. To those who were the faithful, Jesus said, “…when these signs begin to happen, stand erect and raise your heads because your redemption is at hand.” (Lk 21:28) Jesus admonished his followers not to be passive in the collapse of the Empire: “Beware that your hearts do not become drowsy from carousing and drunkenness and the anxieties of daily life…” (Lk 21:34). The collapse of the Empire will affect everyone and everything, including themselves. (“For that day will assault everyone who lives on the face of the earth.” Lk 21:35). Throughout this liturgical cycle we will explore how the evangelist Luke portrays Jesus-as-the Christ within the context of a Hellenistic landscape and ponder how our Christian ancestors living in the heart of the Empire stood against the cruelty and violence of Caesar.
As we look at American leadership’s public behavior and public policies, we see that the American Empire rewards the already-powerful and is ambivalent (and even hostile!) toward those who are poor or marginalized. The Christian values of equality among all people, dignity for those who are marginalized and comfort for those afflicted by disease and poverty are ridiculed as being unreasonable and unattainable while discrediting those who promote these values as idealists and demagogues. Christianity in the 21st Century faces new challenges such as climate change, massive global inequality, and rising fascism. Christians; however, seem lacking in the urgency of an outward mission and instead preoccupy themselves with concerns of institutional survival and nitpicking on people’s individual choices and lifestyles. Whether it is Galilee in the First Century, Ephesus in the year 100 CE or the United States in 2018, we must stand erect, raise our heads, work with one another in the joyful anticipation of a new tomorrow.
Weekly Intercessions
Last week asylum seekers from Central America were repelled from entering the country with tear gas and rubber bullets. Most of those in affected by this hostility were parents with small children. The images of barefoot children with their faces smeared in tears and dust were shared around the world. As they say, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” The White House has portrayed the asylum seekers as criminals, “bad people,” and “terrorists.” Just prior to the elections, the administration sent over 5,000 troops to the Texas/Mexico border to support the border patrol and gave a “green light” for the US Border Patrol to use of lethal force. The descriptive inflammatory language and bellicose statements did not slow down the asylum seekers who left behind armed gangs who patrol the cities and countryside looking for young boys to recruit and young girls to abuse. They left behind the political chaos and corruption. Brave parents and children ofter travel in large groups as a way to share resources with one another and provide protection for vulnerable co-travelers. When one of the larger traveling groups arrived in Tijuana they were met with protests from many Tijuana residents who did not want them in the city. The asylum seekers had already walked weeks on end and the inhospitality of angry detractors were not going to get them to walk back home. They had come so far and they could see the America. Early arrivals had already been waiting several days at the border to begin the first step in a long, detailed process to win an asylum case. Under American law those seeking asylum have a right to enter into the country and ask for an asylum hearing. The administration; however, is working to change that rule and force people to wait in Tijuana. The decision is yet to be finalized and in spite of the administration’s lawless attempts to prevent people from seeking asylum, the asylum seekers will persevere to have their day in court. Let us pray for those who seek asylum, for the volunteers who are helping them on both sides of the border and for the countries that they left behind
Intercesiónes semanales
La semana pasada, los solicitantes de asilo de Centroamérica fueron rechazados de ingresar al país con gas lacrimógeno y balas de goma. La mayoría de los afectados por esta hostilidad eran padres con niños pequeños. Los fotos de niños descalzos con sus caras manchadas de lágrimas y polvo se compartieron en todo el mundo. Como dicen, “una imagen vale más que mil palabras”. Trump ha presentado a los solicitantes de asilo como criminales, “gente mala” y “terroristas”. Justo antes de las elecciones, el gobierno envió más de 5,000 soldados a la frontera de Texas/México para apoyar a la patrulla fronteriza y dio “luz verde” a la patrulla fronteriza de los EE. UU para utilizar la fuerza letal. El lenguaje inflamatorio descriptivo y las declaraciones bélicas no ralentizaron a los solicitantes de asilo que dejaron atrás a las bandillas armadas que patrullan las ciudades y el campo en busca de muchachos jóvenes para reclutar y niñas jóvenes para abusar. Dejaron atrás el caos político y la corrupción. Los valientes padres e hijos a menudo viajan en grupos grandes como una forma de compartir recursos entre sí y brindar protección a los viajeros vulnerables. Cuando uno de los grupos más grandes llegó a Tijuana, se encontraron con protestas de muchos residentes de Tijuana que no los querían en la ciudad. Los solicitantes de asilo ya habían caminado durante semanas y la inhabilidad de los detractores enojados no iban a hacer que regresaran a casa. Habían llegado tan lejos y podían ver los EEUU. Las llegadas anticipadas ya habían estado esperando varios días en la frontera para comenzar el primer paso en un proceso largo y detallado para ganar en el corte de asilo. Según la ley estadounidense, los solicitantes de asilo tienen derecho a ingresar al país y solicitar una audiencia de asilo. Trump; sin embargo, está trabajando para cambiar esa regla y obligar a la gente a esperar en Tijuana. La decisión aún no se ha finalizado y, a pesar de los intentos ilegales de la administración por evitar que las personas soliciten asilo, los solicitantes de asilo perseverarán para tener su día en la corte. Oremos por los que buscan asilo, por los voluntarios que los están ayudando en ambos lados de la frontera y por los países que dejaron atrás.
Reflexión del evangelio: Estén alerta El texto del evangelio para este domingo está tomado del Evangelio de Lucas capítulo 21: 25-28, 34-36, la advertencia apocalíptica que Jesús envió a sus discípulos: “Habrá señales en el sol, la luna y las estrellas, y en Las naciones de la tierra quedarán consternadas, perplejas por el rugido del mar y las olas. La gente morirá de miedo en anticipación de lo que vendrá sobre el mundo, porque los poderes de los cielos serán sacudidos. Y luego verán al Hijo del Hombre venir en una nube con poder y gran gloria. Pero cuando estas señales comiencen a suceder, manténganse erguidos y levanten la cabeza porque su redención está a la mano ”. El evangelista Lucas conecta esta tema de la destrucción de Jerusalén con la advertencia. Esta conexión vital se pierde en la lectura litúrgica del evangelio porque el versículo 20, (“Cuando ves a Jerusalén rodeada de ejércitos, debes saber que su desolación está a la mano …”) no se incluye en la lectura. La desafortunada omisión del versículo 20 empobrece nuestra apreciación del contexto socio-histórico y limita nuestra comprensión del pasaje en cuestión.
Que estamos en Adviento, comenzamos un nuevo ciclo de lecturas: el ciclo de Lucas. A medida que leemos el evangelio de Lucas y específicamente cuando leemos el pasaje de hoy, podríamos considerar que al usar la misma lente socio-histórica que usamos para Juan, Mateo y Marcos, ¿qué sería único acerca de la descripción de Lucas sobre Jesús? ¿Qué eventos y desarrollos podrían haber informado el cambio? Antes de volver específicamente al texto, vamos a ver al contexto en el que se escribió el evangelio de Lucas.
El evangelista Lucas escribió el evangelio entre 80-110 EC, varios años después de la destrucción de Jerusalén (70 EC). Por lo que los profesores de las escrituras pueden decir, la audiencia original de los evangelistas fue principalmente de cultura helenista y escrita en una importante ciudad helenista, posiblemente en Éfeso o Esmirna. La distancia entre el tiempo y la geografía ciertamente tuvo un impacto en la lente literaria del evangelio, razón por la cual el evangelista Lucas, a diferencia del evangelista Marcos, no escribió desde la perspectiva de la resistencia judía, sino desde la perspectiva de la resistencia gentil, que estaba vagamente enraizada en el judaísmo.
Vea el versículo 24 y el uso del término “Tiempos de los gentiles”. (“Caerán a filo de espada y serán llevados como cautivos a todos los gentiles; y los gentiles pisotearán a Jerusalén hasta los tiempos” de los gentiles se cumplen “.) Teológicamente, los “tiempos de los gentiles” se refieren al tiempo intermitente entre la destrucción de Jerusalén y la venida del Hijo del Hombre. Pero si tuviéramos que considerar la ubicación histórica y social del evangelista, podríamos comenzar a ver el relato de Lucas sobre la vida, el ministerio, la muerte y la resurrección de Jesús de una manera más dinámica y desafiante.
A lo largo de este ciclo litúrgico, veremos el fuerte énfasis en la justicia económica, un sub-tema de paridad entre mujeres y hombres y una preocupación por la curación física y la reconciliación. A diferencia de la gramática entrecortada de Marcos, el evangelio de Lucas usa frases más suaves y una cadencia más suave que es algo típica de los relatos helenísticos de héroes y semidioses. No haga; sin embargo, confunde el enfoque literario de Lucas como un intento de suavizar la oposición de Jesús al Imperio. El contenido de la resistencia de Jesús al Imperio, estilizado según las líneas helenísticas, permite que una audiencia gentil que no esté familiarizada con las dimensiones igualitarias y de justicia de la teología y cultura judías, pueda aplicar estos mismos temas dentro de una cultura helenística. Por lo tanto, “la era de los gentiles” no es solo una referencia al juicio inminente de Jesús contra los malvados, sino más bien, una referencia a la resistencia actual al Imperio en una cultura helenística.
Tenga en cuenta que en el momento en que el evangelista Lucas estaba estableciendo el evangelio por escrito, los conversos gentiles procedían principalmente de las clases de sirvientes y esclavos. Estos conversos de la llamada clase baja entendían muy bien las injusticias de vivir en una sociedad consciente de castas que sopesaba el valor de la vida humana por asociación de casta y posición social. Para aquellos que eran cristianos en este contexto, la idea del colapso del Imperio no era algo que temer, sino esperar. Las palabras de Jesús en Lc 21:18, “La gente morirá de miedo en anticipación de lo que vendrá sobre el mundo, porque los poderes de los cielos serán sacudidos. Y luego verán al Hijo del Hombre venir en una nube con poder y gran gloria …” fueron palabras de advertencia para aquellos que se beneficiaron de la sociedad estratificada de Roma. Jesús dijo a los que eran fieles: “Cuando estas cosas comiencen a suceder, pongan atención y levanten la cabeza, porque se acerca la hora de su liberación”. (Lc 21, 28) Jesús advirtió a sus seguidores que no deben ser pasivos en el colapso del Imperio: “Estén alerta, para que los vicios, con el libertinaje, la embriaguez y las preocupaciones de esta vida no entorpezcan su mente y aquel día los sorprenda desprevenidos …” (Lc 21, 34). El colapso del Imperio afectará a todos y a todo, incluso a ellos mismos. (“…porque caerá de repente como una trampa sobre todos los habitantes de la tierra”. 21:35). A lo largo de este ciclo litúrgico, exploraremos cómo el evangelista Lucas retrata a Jesús como Cristo en el contexto de un paisaje helenístico y reflexionaremos sobre cómo nuestros antepasados ​​cristianos que viven en el corazón del Imperio se enfrentaron a la crueldad y la violencia de César.
Al observar el comportamiento público y las políticas públicas del liderazgo estadounidense, vemos que el Imperio Americano recompensa a los que ya son poderosos y son ambivalentes (¡e incluso hostiles!) Hacia aquellos que son pobres o marginados. Los valores cristianos de igualdad entre todas las personas, dignidad para quienes están marginados y consuelo para quienes padecen enfermedades y pobreza son ridiculizados por ser irrazonables e inalcanzables, a la vez que desacreditan a quienes promueven estos valores como idealistas y demagogos. El cristianismo en el siglo XXI enfrenta nuevos desafíos, como el cambio climático, la desigualdad masiva global y el fascismo en aumento. Cristianos sin embargo, parece carecer de la urgencia de una misión externa y, en cambio, se preocupa por las preocupaciones de supervivencia institucional y por la elección de las opciones y estilos de vida individuales de las personas. Ya sea en Galilea en el primer siglo, en Éfeso en el año 100 DC o en los Estados Unidos en 2018, debemos permanecer erguidos, levantar la cabeza, trabajar juntos en la alegre anticipación de un nuevo mañana. Sunday, December 2 11 AM San Jose City Hall PLEASE PLAN ON PARTICIPATING IN THE SIT-IN AT CITY HALL FOR THE ASYLUM SEEKERS IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING MISA
Domingo 2 de diciembre 11 AM la alcaldía de la ciudad de San José POR FAVOR, PLANEAR PARA PARTICIPAR EN EL “SIT IN” (PROTESTA) EN UN ACTO DE SOLIDARIDAD CON LAS SOLICITANTES DE ASILO INMEDIATAMENTE DESPUÉS DE LA MISA
A federal appeals court just ruled against Trump on DACA! DO NOT WAIT TO RENEW YOUR DACA. DO IT NOW.
Family Separation
Sign the petitions that have been put together by advocacy organizations asking our elected officials and leaders to take action:
Firme las peticiones que han elaborado las organizaciones de defensa para pedirles a nuestros funcionarios y líderes electos que actúen: * ** Families Belong Together (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=4be42c8ffe&e=105d556a20) * ** CAIR (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=4f79231202&e=105d556a20) * ** MoveOn (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=a7f17e1018&e=105d556a20) * ** CredoAction (blog.us1.list-manage.com/track/click?u=03b8119942a871facc95e72c7&id=384ea9d2c7&e=105d556a20)
JEANS FOR THE J

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.